Chris & Julie Petersen's Genealogy

Tarbert Family History - Tarbert Family News  Vol. 1, No. 1,

Tarbert Family History - Tarbert Family News Vol. 1, No. 1, "A Tarbert Family Newsletter" July 1997



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Tarbert Family History - Tarbert Family News  Vol. 1, No. 1, page 1, 'A Tarbert Family Newsletter' July 1997
Tarbert Family History - Tarbert Family News Vol. 1, No. 1, page 1, "A Tarbert Family Newsletter" July 1997
Joseph and Nancy's story begins in Harrison County, Ohio, where Joseph and Nancy were born, grew to adulthood, married and started raising a family. Joseph Tarbert was born there on Christmas eve in 1838, the first child of John Sarah Tarbert. He was raised on the family farm with four brothers and three sisters. Nancy Knox was born the following year on Oct. 11, 1839, to Thomas and Eleanor Knox. She was the fifth of their nine children. Little is known of Nancy's youth except that both of her parents died on the same day when she was ten years old. No record is available to show who raised her. Joseph and Nancy were married Sep, 12, 1860. Their first child, Laura, was born July 12, 1863. A second daughter, Jennie, was born Jan. 13, 1866 and third daughter, Aletia, was born just a year later on Jan. 15. Joseph was a farmer, but it is apparent from subsequent events that he was also learning the carpentry trade during the next few years. By the end of the decade, Joseph had mastered his craft and the family's prospects were brighter elsewhere. It was time to leave Harrison County. Cont. - page2 
 
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Tarbert Family History - Tarbert Family News  Vol. 1, No. 1, page 2, 'A Tarbert Family Newsletter' July 1997
Tarbert Family History - Tarbert Family News Vol. 1, No. 1, page 2, "A Tarbert Family Newsletter" July 1997
Page 2 continued from page 1 Joseph moved the family to Cincinnati, Ohio, where they lived until 1875 while he worked in the building trades. Two sons were born during the families stay in Cincinnati. Frank was born Aug. 10, 1870, and Elmore on May 6, 1872. Joseph and Nancy next moved, with five children, to Worthington, Minnesota, where Joseph engaged in farming activities while working in the area as a carpenter. Three more children joined the family during the eleven-year stay in Worthington. Floyd was born Feb. 24, 1877, Nellie was born May 24, 1879, and the couple last-child, Clyde, was born June 7, 1881. Laura, the oldest daughter was nearly eighteen years old when Clyde was born, Two years later, on May 14, 1882, she became the bride of Marcus Cox. Exciting events were occurring to the west at this time. A settler had homesteaded in a beautiful little valley called Wild Rose Prairie in Washington Territory in 1882. The population of Spokane Falls - later shortened to Spokane - had grown to fifteen hundred. It was time for the Tarbert family to move. Records show the family arrived at Spokane Falls on May 6, 1884. It was Elmores twelfth birthday, Joseph was forty-six. The children ranged in age from eighteen years old Jennie to three years year old Clyde. Laura and Marcus Cox remained in Mimn., but would soon follow. Details of the move are not in public records. The Northern Pacific Railroad had reached Washington Territory in 1881, but some grandchildren were told the move was by covered wagons crossed the Spokane River on the Plantes Ferry just east of today's Felts Field. The family stayed in Spokane Fall for a short time while Joseph searched for a home site. He soon claimed land at Wild Rose Prairie (see Wild Rose Prairie - page 3) and began the construction of a fortified home (see Fort Tarbert-Page 4) l It was to serve as the family home and as an area fort against Indian attack. Joseph cleared and cultivated the quarter section and started farming as he continued practicing his carpentry trade. The Tarbert children grew to adulthood on the homestead, with the exception of Aletia. Aletia Tarbert died Jan. 15 1887 at nineteen years, two months and five days of age. Death was attributed to consumption (tuberculosis) aggravated by days and nights of concealment in the root cellar during Indian scares (see Fort Tarbert - Page 4). Aletia was buried at Wild Rose Cemetery see Wild Rosa Cemetery-Page 5) Spokane Fall suffered a devastating fire in 1889, creating an emergency need for Joseph's building construction skills. The family temporarily 
 
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Tarbert Family History - Tarbert Family News  Vol. 1, No. 1, page 3, 'A Tarbert Family Newsletter' July 1997
Tarbert Family History - Tarbert Family News Vol. 1, No. 1, page 3, "A Tarbert Family Newsletter" July 1997
(Continued from page 2)
moved to a site close to today's Noth Central High School, where the family ran a dairy operation as Joseph helped rebuild the town. The boys drove the cows to the Spokane River to water them near the wood frame Monroe Street bridge. Joseph and Nancy spent the rest of their lives at Wild Rose Prairie. They witnessed the marriage of daughter Jennie to George Emerson and sons, Floyd to Grace Hall and Elmore to Della Pennington and celebrated the births of numerous grandchildren. Nancy Tarbert passed away June 1900. Burial was alongside Aletia at the Wild Rose Cemetery. Joseph soon moved to a smaller 'retirement' home (see page 10). He lived another fourteen years to see Frank marry Clara Pennington, Clyde marry Ina Tucker and Nellie marry Alfred Beyersdorf and to celebrate the births of several more of the couples 45 grandchildren. Joseph continued his service to the community during his final years as a builder and Sunday School volunteer. Joseph passed away Dec. 6,1914. Service were at the Wild Rose Church he had recently built (see Recollections of a grandchild - page 5) and burial was at the Wild Rose Cemetery next to Nancy.


Wild Rose Prairie
Wild Rose Prairie is just north of Spokane. Follow highway 395 toward Deer Park and turn left on Monroe Road, It is a short drive over low hills under mature pine and fir trees until you reach the valley known as Wild Rose Prairie. The first thing you see is the Wild Rose Cemetery on a slight knoll to your right. Stop and walk to the highest point and two things are immediately obvious. You have found the Tarbert family burial sites and you have the best possible view of Joseph Tarbert's homestead. It is the quarter section of land just across the road to the west. Wild Rose Prairie is two to three miles wide and several miles long. It is surrounded by hills and uncultivated spots are still covered with trees showed the route from cabin to cabin - the vestiges of civilization were evident from the beginning. The first school was taaught in a log building even before the Tarbert family arrived.

 
 
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Living
At least one living or private individual is linked to this item - Details withheld. 
 
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Tarbert Family History - Tarbert Family News  Vol. 1, No. 1, page 5, 'A Tarbert Family Newsletter' July 1997
Tarbert Family History - Tarbert Family News Vol. 1, No. 1, page 5, "A Tarbert Family Newsletter" July 1997
 
 
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Tarbert Family History - Tarbert Family News  Vol. 1, No. 1, page 6, 'A Tarbert Family Newsletter' July 1997
Tarbert Family History - Tarbert Family News Vol. 1, No. 1, page 6, "A Tarbert Family Newsletter" July 1997
 
 
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Tarbert Family History - Tarbert Family News  Vol. 1, No. 1, page 7, 'A Tarbert Family Newsletter' July 1997
Tarbert Family History - Tarbert Family News Vol. 1, No. 1, page 7, "A Tarbert Family Newsletter" July 1997
 
 
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Tarbert Family History - Tarbert Family News  Vol. 1, No. 1, page 8, 'A Tarbert Family Newsletter' July 1997
Tarbert Family History - Tarbert Family News Vol. 1, No. 1, page 8, "A Tarbert Family Newsletter" July 1997
 
 
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Tarbert Family History - Tarbert Family News  Vol. 1, No. 1, page 9, 'A Tarbert Family Newsletter' July 1997
Tarbert Family History - Tarbert Family News Vol. 1, No. 1, page 9, "A Tarbert Family Newsletter" July 1997
 
 
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Living
At least one living or private individual is linked to this item - Details withheld.