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Isabel de Clare

Female - 1220


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  • Name Isabel de Clare 
    Gender Female 
    Died 7 Mar 1220 
    Buried Tintern Abbey, Tintern, Monmouthshire, Wales Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID I6694  Petersen-de Lanskoy
    Last Modified 27 May 2021 

    Father Richard "Strongbow" Fitz Gilbert (de Clare),   b. Abt 1130,   d. Abt 20 Apr 1176  (Age ~ 46 years) 
    Mother Eve of Leinster,   d. Aft 1194 
    Married 26 Aug 1170  County Waterford, Ireland Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Family ID F2878  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family William Marshal,   b. 1146,   d. 14 May 1219, Caversham, Berkshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 73 years) 
    Married Aug 1189  London, England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
     1. William Marshal,   b. Abt 1190, , Normandy, France Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 6 Apr 1231  (Age ~ 41 years)
     2. Richard Marshal,   b. Aft 1190, of Hampstead Marshall, Berkshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 16 Apr 1234, Kilkenny Castle, County Kilkenny, Ireland Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age < 42 years)
     3. Gilbert Marshal,   b. of Hampstead Marshall, Berkshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 27 Jun 1241, Hertford Priory, Hertford, Hertfordshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location
     4. Walter Marshal,   b. Aft 1198, of Hampstead Marshall, Berkshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 24 Nov 1245, Goodrich Castle, Goodrich, Herefordshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age < 45 years)
     5. Anselm Marshal,   b. of Hampstead Marshall, Berkshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. From 22 Dec 1245 to 24 Dec 1245, Chepstow, Monmouthshire, Wales Find all individuals with events at this location
     6. Maud Marshal,   d. From 27 Mar 1248 to 29 Mar 1248
     7. Isabel Marshal,   b. 9 Oct 1200, Pembroke Castle, Pembrokeshire, Wales Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 17/17 Jan 1239/40, Berkharnpstead, Hertfordshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 39 years)
     8. Sibyl Marshal,   d. Bef 1238
     9. Eve Marshal,   d. Bef 1246
     10. Joan Marshal,   d. Bef 1234
    Last Modified 28 May 2021 
    Family ID F2946  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Notes 
    • RESEARCH_NOTES:
      1. “Royal Ancestry: A Study in Colonial & Medieval Families,” Douglas Richardson (2013):
      “WILLIAM MARSHAL, Knt., hereditary Marshal of England, Sheriff of Gloucestershire, 1189-94, 1198-1207, Sheriff of Sussex, 1193-1208, Warden of the Forest of Dean and Constable of St. Briavels Castle, 1194-1206, Constable of Lillebonne, 1202, Protector, Regent of the Kingdom, 1216-19, and, in right of his wife, Earl of Pembroke and Striguil, Lord of Leinster, probably born in 1146. In 1152 his father gave him as a hostage to King Stephen at the Siege of Newbury. At a later date, his father sent him to his cousin, William de Tancarville, Chamberlain of Normandy, with whom he remained for eight years as a squire. In 1167, while riding near the castle of Lusigan in Poitou with his uncle, Patrick, Earl of Salisbury, and Queen Eleanor, two of the Lusignan brothers attacked and killed Earl Patrick who was unarmed; William was wounded and taken prisoner while defending the Queen's retreat into the castle. Eventually he was ransomed by Queen Eleanor and returned to England. During the period, 1170-83, he was a member of the household of Henry "the Young King." In 1173 he supported Henry the Young King in his rebellion against King Henry II. Young Henry chose to knight him, and on his death bed in 1183, Henry charged him to carry his cross to the Holy Sepulchre. When William returned to England c.1187, King Henry II made him a member of his household. He was granted the manor of Cartmel, Lancashire by the king in 1187, where the following year he founded a priory for Regular canons of the order of St. Augustine. He was with King Henry II in France in 1188 and 1189. He was present at King Henry II's deathbed at Chinon in July 1189, and escorted the body to Fontevrault. He married in London in August 1189 ISABEL DE CLARE, daughter of Richard Fitz Gilbert [de Clare], 2nd Earl of Pembroke, by Eve, daughter of Dairmait Macmurchada, King of Leinster [see PEMBROKE 4 for her ancestry]. They had five sons, William, Knt. [Earl of Pembroke], Richard, Knt. [Earl of Pembroke], Gilbert, Knt. [Earl of Pembroke], Walter, Knt. [Earl of Pembroke and Lincoln], and Anselm [Earl of Pembroke], and five daughters, Maud, Isabel, Sibyl, Eve, and Joan. She was heiress in 1185-89 of her brother, Gilbert Fitz Richard (otherwise known as Gilbert de Strigoil). He was present at the Coronation of King Richard I in 1189, where he bore the gold scepter with the cross. Shortly afterwards he was appointed one of the subordinate Justiciars of England, first under Hugh, Bishop of Durham, and then under William de Longchamp. In 1190 he fined for 2,000 marks for a moiety of the lands of Walter Giffard, sometime Earl of Buckingham, including the manors of Chilton, Dorton, Long Crendon, and Loughton, Buckinghamshire, Caversham and Long Wittenham, Berkshire, and Wootton Rivers, Wiltshire, together with the fief of Longueville in Normandy. In 1191, when the Archbishop of Rouen superceded Longchamp, William became his chief assistant. When John, Count of Mortain (later King John) revolted in 1193, William besieged and took Windsor Castle. He was heir in 1194 to his elder brother, John Marshal, whereby he succeeded his brother as hereditary Master Marshal. He took part in the Siege of Nottingham Castle in 1194. From 1194 to 1199, he was almost continually in Normandy with King Richard I. One of Richard's last acts was to appoint him custodian of Rouen and the royal treasure there. He was present at the Coronation of King John in 1199. In 1200 the king confirmed the marshalship to him. He served John actively in Gascony, England, and Normandy. William may have paid a brief visit to Ireland in the winter of 1200-1. In 1201 he was granted a yearly fair to be held at the borough of Pembroke in Wales. In 1202 he loaned money to his kinsman, Geoffrey II, Count of Perche, who was preparing to go on crusade. In 1204 he was sent with Robert, Earl of Leicester as ambassadors to negotiate a truce with King Philippe Auguste of France. In 1204 he was granted a weekly market to be held in the vill of Castle Goodrich, Herefordshire. The same year he invaded Wales and captured Kilgerran. In 1206 he gave the Templars the advowson of the church of Speen, Berkshire. He spent most of his time in Ireland from 1207 to 1213. In 1213 he witnessed King John's charter of resignation to the Pope. He was given charge of the Castles of Haverfordwest, Carmarthen, Cardigan, and Gower, and Dunamase in Ireland. He was one of the few English earls to remain loyal to the king through the First Barons' War. He was one of the king's representatives at Runnymede in 1215. Following the death of King John in 1216, he was named by the king's council to serve as Regent of the Kingdom. In 1217 he routed the French and the rebel Barons at Lincoln. In Sept. 1217 he concluded the treaty of Lambeth with Prince Louis. In 1218 he was granted weekly markets to be held at his manors of Toddington, Bedfordshire, Speen, Berkshire, Long Crendon, Buckinghamshire, and Bosham, Sussex, and yearly fairs at Toddington, Bedfordshire and Sturminster Marshall, Dorset. During his lifetime, he founded and endowed monasteries at Voto (or Tintern Minor), Duiske (or Graig-na-Managh), and Kilkenny, in Ireland. He was also a benefactor to the chapter of Lisieux, the abbeys of Foucarmont, Gloucester, Tintern, Nutley, and St. Thomas, Dublin, the priories of Longueville, Bradenstoke, Pembroke, Pill, and Stanley, Holy Trinity and St. Kevin, Dublin, the Templars, and other religious bodies. SIR WILLIAM MARSHAL, Earl of Pembroke, died at Caversham, Berkshire 14 May 1219, and was buried in the Temple Church, London. His widow, Isabel, Countess of Pembroke, died 7 March 1220, and was buried at Tintern Abbey.
      Dugdale Monasticon Anglicanum 5 (1825): 266 (Obit. of Tintern Abbey: "Isabella Comitissa Pembroc obiit die nono Martin; 6(2) (1830): 843 (charter of William Marshal, Earl of Pembroke dated 1206; charter names his wife, Isabel). Hardy Rotuli Chartarum in Turri Londinensi Asservati 1(1) (1837): 46-47. Addison Temple Church (1843): 103-119. Lipscomb Hist. & Antiqs. of Buckingham 1(1847): 200-201 (Clare ped.). East Anglian 3 (1869): 30-32. Demay Inventaire des Sceaux de la Flandre 1 (1873): 44 (seal of William Marshal). Stevenson Radulphi de Coggeshall Chronicon Anglicanum (Rolls Ser.) (1875): 187 (sub A.D. 1219: "Obiit Willelmus Marescallus senior, comes de Penbrock, qui maximum habuit dominium tam in Anglia quam in Hibernia; et in crastino Ascencionis [17 May] sepultus est apud Novum Templum de Londoniis."). Gilbert Chartularies of St. Mary’s Abbey, Dublin 2 (Rolls Ser. 80) (1884): 307-308 Annals of Ireland sub A.D. 1200: "Eodem anno, fundatur monasterium de Voto, id est, Tynteme, per Willelmum Mareschallum, Comitem Mareschallum et Pembrochie, qui fuit Dominus Lagenie, scilicet, quatuor comitatuum, Weysford, Ossorie, Cartelrlachie, et Kyldare, ratione et jure uxoris sue, quia desponsavit filiam Comitis Ricardi Strogulensis et Eve, filie Dermicii Murcardi."), 315 (Annals of Ireland sub A.D. 1219: "Anno eodem, obiit Willelmus Mareshallus senior, Comes Mareshallus et Pembrochie. Generavit ex filia Ricardi Strangbowe, Comitis Strogulensis, quinque filios et quinque filias."). Gilbert Reg. of the Abbey of St. Thomas, Dublin ((Rolls Ser.) (1889): 337-338 (agreement of William Marshal, Earl of Pembroke and Abbey of St. Thomas, Dublin dated 1205, witnessed by John Marshal), 137 & 356-357 (charter of William Marshal, Earl of Pembroke dated pre-1219, witnessed by Anselm nephew of the earl [Ancelmo, nepote comitis], Ralph Bloet, and Ralph son of Walter Bloet). Meyer Histoire de Guillaume le Marechal (1891-1901), 3 vols. Birch Catalogue of Seals in the British Museum 2 (1892): 392 (seal of Isabel [de Clare], Countess of Pembroke, wife of William Marshal dated before 1219 - Pointed oval. Full-face. In tightly-fitting dress, pointed head-dress, long mantle, the right hand laid on the breast, in the left hand a falcon held on the wrist by the jesses. Standing. Legend: ... SIGILL' • ISABEL • COMITISSE • PEMBROC • VXORIS • WILLI MARESCA[L]..). Owen Desc. of Penbrokshire (Cymmrodorion Rec. Ser. 1) (1892): 16-25. List of Sheriffs for England & Wales (PRO Lists and Indexes 9) (1898): 49, 141. Round Commune of London (1899): 305-306. Cal. MSS. Dean & Chapter of Wells 1 (Hist. MSS. Comm., vol. 12B(1) (1907): 6, 13-14, 16, 51, 309-311. Orpen Ireland under the Normans 2 (1911): 199-234. VCH Hampshire 4 (1911): 51-56. Norgate Minority of Henry the Third (1912): 150-151. VCH Hertford 3 (1912): 232-240. C.P. 4 (1916): 197; 5 (1926): 695, 10 (1945): 358-364 (sub Pembroke); 12(1) (1953): 502-503. Procs. Royal Irish Academy 35 (1918-20): 17-22 (undated charters of William Marshal, Earl of Pembroke to Duiske Abbey). Jarman William Marshal, First Earl of Pembroke & Regent of England (1920). VCH Berkshire 4 (1924): 178-183, 384-390. VCH Buckingham 4 (1927): 22-27, 45-48, 395-401. Painter William Marshal Knight-Errant, Baron & Regent of England (1933). Leys Sandford Cartulary 1 (Oxfordshire Rec. Soc. 19) (1938): 99-100 (charter of John Fitz Hugh to John Marshal dated c.1217; charter witnessed by William Marshal, Earl of Pembroke, Sir William the earl's son, and Sir Alan Basset); 2 (Oxfordshire Rec. Soc. 22) (1941): 188-189 (charter of William Marshal, Earl of Pembroke dated 1206; charter names his wife, Isabel), 192 (charter of William Marshal, Earl of Pembroke dated 1206), 229 (charter of William Marshal dated c.1180). Sanders English Baronies (1960): 63 (there is no evidence of the exact fractions into which the Giffard estates were divided between the Marshal co-heirs), 110-111 (Chepstow) (the barony of Chepstow, co. Monmouth, formed part of the inheritance of Maud, eldest daughter). Powicke Loss of Normandy (1961): 96, 102, 119, 130-131, 152, 199, 214, 246, 260, 262, 266, 285, 294-296, 302-303, 319-320, 344 (Longueville [Seine-Inferieure, arr. Dieppe] was the caput in Normandy of the honour of Earl Giffard. The division of the lands of Earl Walter in 1191 has already been mentioned. William the Marshal retained possession of Longueville after 1204, and the place was in the hands of his widow and sons in 1219. The honour of Earl Giffard had comprised nearly 100 knights in 1172.), 350. Jenkins Cartulary of Missenden 3 (Bucks Rec. Soc. 12) (1962): 105-106. Sheehy Pontificia Hibernica 2 (1965): 173, footnote 1. Warren King John (1978): 106-107. Painter William Marsha/Knight-Errant, Baron and Regent of England. (1982). VCH Wiltshire 12 (1983): 125-138; 16 (1999): 8-49, 229-236. Duby William Marshal The Flower of Chivalry (1985). Kemp Reading Abbey Cartularies 2 (Camden 4th Ser. 33) (1987): 225-226 (charter of Isabel, Countess of Pembroke dated 1219), 227 (charter of William Marshal dated ?1189-99). Crouch William Marshal (1990). Carpenter Minority of Henry III (1990). Fryde & Greenway Handbook of British Chronology (1996): 477. VCH Gloucester 5 (1996): 413-415. Holden & Gregory Hist. of William Marshal (2002).
      Children of William Marshal, Knt., by Isabel de Clare:
      i. WILLIAM MARSHAL, Knt., 5th Earl of Pembroke, hereditary Master Marshal, hereditary Steward of Leinster, of Hampstead Marshall, Berkshire, Silchester, Hampshire, Hinxworth, Hertfordshire, Great Bedwyn, Wexcombe (in Great Bedwyn), and Wootton Rivers, Wiltshire, etc., joint Warden of Bamborough Castle, 1212, Constable (or Keeper) of Caerleon, Carmarthen, Cardigan, Ludgarshall, and Marlborough Castles, Receiver of the Exchange of all of England, 1217-21, Justiciar of Ireland, 1224-6, son and heir, born about 1190, in Normandy. In 1205 his father gave him to King John as a hostage for his loyalty; he was released in 1212. He married (1st) in 1214 ALICE DE BETHUNE, daughter of Baldwin de Bethune, Count of Aumale, by Hawise, daughter of William, Count of Aumale. They had no issue. Her dowry included the manor of Wantage, Berkshire. He joined the baronial opposition, and in Feb. 1214/5 he was present at the meeting of the barons at Stamford. In June he was elected one of the 25 Barons to ensure the execution of the provisions of Magna Carta. He was subsequently excommunicated by the Pope 11 Dec. 1215. His wife, Alice, was living Sept. 1215. She died probably about 1216, and was buried in St. Paul's Cathedral, London. In the period, 1215-19, he confirmed the legacy left by his former wife, Alice de Bethun, of 100s. from her manor of Luton, Bedfordshire to the dean and chapter of St. Paul's, London for the foundation of a chantry in the church of St. Paul's. In the same period, he also gave a rent of 20s. from his mill at Brache (in Luton), Bedfordshire to the church of St. Paul, London for the celebration of the obit of his wife, and for a light for her tomb. In April 1216 he had letters of safe conduct to go to his father. In May 1216 he was one of the Barons who joined Louis of France and did homage to him. In July 1216 he seized Worcester for Louis, but retreated when the Earl of Chester approached. In the autumn he deserted Louis and retired to Wales. In March 1216/7 he joined William Longespée, Earl of Salisbury in a revolt at Rye against Louis, who was only saved by the arrival of a French fleet. With Salisbury he besieged and took the Castles of Winchester and Southampton, after which he besieged and captured Marlborough Castle. He fought at the Battle of Lincoln 20 May 1217. In May 1219 he succeeded his father in the Earldom and estates, but he ceded the Norman lands to his brother Richard 20 May 1220. In 1223 he sailed from Ireland with a large force to fight the Welsh, recaputured his castles, defeated Llywelyn and compelled him to come to terms. He married (2nd) by betrothal dated 23 April 1224 ELEANOR OF ENGLAND, daughter of John, King of England, by his 2nd wife, Isabel, daughter and heiress of Ademar (or Aimar) III Taillefer, Count of Angoulême [see ENGLAND 5 for her ancestry]. She was born at Gloucester in 1215. Her maritagium included the manors of Brabourne and Sutton, Kent. They had no issue. In 1224 he wrote Hubert de Burgh the justiciar requesting justice for John Marshal his kinsman. Sometime before 1224 he enfeoffed Fulk Fitz Warin with the manor of Wantage, Berkshire. He was appointed one of the executors in the 1225 will of William Longespée, Earl of Salisbury. He was appointed joint Ambassador to France in 1225 and joint Ambassador to the German Congress at Antwerp in 1227. In 1229 Roger de Dauntsey, Knt., and his wife, Maud de Mandeville, Countess of Essex and Hereford, sold him one moiety of the manor of Long Compton, Warwickshire, except the capital messuage. In 1230 he accompanied the king on his fruitless march to Bordeaux. He founded the house of Friars Preachers at Kilkenny, and was a benefactor to the abbeys of Tintern and Mottisfont, the priory of Inistioge, St. Paul's Cathedral, and the hospital of St. Mary Rounceval. SIR WILLIAM MARSHALL, 5th Earl of Pembroke, died 6 April 1231, and was buried 15 April 1231 in the Temple Church, London. His widow, Eleanor, married (2nd) in the King's chapel at Westminster 7 Jan. 1237/8 SIMON DE MONTFORT, Knt., Earl of Leicester, High Steward of England, Governor of Gascony [see LEICESTER 10], 3rd son of Simon de Montfort, Earl of Leicester, seigneur of Montfort, by Alice, daughter of Bouchard de Montmorency, seigneur of Montmorency, Conflans-Sainte-Honorine, Heronville, and Ecouen. He was born about 1208. They had five sons, Henry, Knt., Simon, Knt., Amaury (clerk), Guy [Count of Nola], and Richard, and two daughters, including Eleanor (wife of Llywelyn ap Gruffudd, Prince of Wales, lord of Snowdon). In 1229 his older brother, Amaury de Montfort, surrendered to him all their father's inheritance in England. In August 1231 King Henry III restored him in his father's lands in England. In 1236 he served as High Steward at Queen Eleanor's coronation. In 1240 he embarked on a Crusade to the Holy Land and returned to Europe in Spring 1242. He took part in King Henry III's unsuccessful expedition to Poitou in 1242. In 1253 he and his wife, Eleanor, were granted Kenilworth castle, Warwickshire, and the manor of Odiham, Hampshire for life. In 1254 he was sent to Scotland on a secret mission for the king. In 1263 Parliament denounced the king as "false to his oath" and declared war on all violators of the "Provisions." In July 1263 Earl Simon and the barons entered London, where he made the king ratify his concessions. In 1264 a decisive battle was fought at Lewes, where the King and his son Edward were captured. Simon subsequently carried on the government under the King's name and seal, including the summoning of a Parliament in London in Jan. 1265. SIR SIMON DE MONTFORT, Earl of Leicester, was slain at the Battle of Evesham 4 August 1265, and was buried at Evesham Abbey. His tomb at Evesham at once became a shrine at which miracles were wrought. He left a will dated 1 Jan. 1259. His widow, Eleanor, went into exile about Nov. 1265. She retired to the convent of the sisters of Saint-Dominique near Montargis in France, where she died testate 13 April 1275. Dugdale Monasticon Anglicanum 5 (1825): 267-269 (charter of William Marshal, Marshal of England, Earl of Pembroke); 6(2) (1830): 843 (charter of William Marshal, Earl of Pembroke, dated 1206; charter names his wife, Eleanor). Bentley Excetpta Historica (1833): 341-343 (will of William Longespée). Addison Temple Church (1843): 103-119. Lipscomb Hist. & Antiqs. of Buckingham 1 (1847): 200-201 (Clare ped.). Arch. Cambrensis 3rd Ser. 8 (1862): 278 (Chronicle of the 13th Cent.: "mccxxiiijo. [A.D. 1224] - Sororem Henrici Regis nupsit Willielmus Marescallus."), 278 (Chron. of the 13th Cent.: "mccxxxo. [A.D. 1230] - Obierunt Willielmus junior Comes de Pembroc."). Shirley Royal & Other Historical Letters illustrative of the Reign of King Henry III 1 (1862) (Rolls Ser. 27): 47-48, 70-71, 143-145, 150, 170-171, 175-176, 178-179, 222, 369, 500-503 (letters of William le Marshal, Earl of Pembroke). Gilbert Chartularies of St. Mary’s Abbey, Dublin 2 (Rolls Ser. 80) (1884): 315 (Annals of Ireland sub A.D. 1231: "Obiit Willelmus Mareshallus, junior, Comes Mareschallus et Pembrochie, qui sepelitur in choro Fratrum Predicatorum Kylkennie."). Gilbert Reg. of the Abbey of St. Thomas, Dublin ((Rolls Ser.) (1889): 118-119 (confirmation charter charter of William Marshal, Earl of Pembroke dated c.1219-31, names Basilia, daughter of Earl Gilbert; charter witnessed by John Marshal), 137 & 357 (confirmation charter of William Marshal, Earl of Pembroke). Owen Desc. of Penbrokshire (Cymmrodorion Rec. Ser. 1) (1892): 16-25. Wrottesley Peds. from the Plea Rolls (1905): 100. C.P.R. 1232-1247 (1906): 125-126. VCH Hampshire 4 (1911): 51-56, 608-609. Phillimore Rotuli Hugonis de Welles, Episcopi Lincolniensis 1209-1235 3 (Lincoln Rec. Soc. 9) (1914): 6-7. Fowler Cal. of Feet of Fines for Bedfordshire (Pubs Bedfordshire Hist. Soc. 6 (1919): 66. Fowler & Hughes Cal. of the Pipe Rolls of the Reign of Richard I for Buckinghamshire and Bedfordshire, 1189-1199 (Pubs. Bedfordshire Hist. Rec. Soc. 7) (1923): 210 (chart). VCH Berkshire 4 (1924): 178-183,321 (Marshal arms: Party or and vett a lion gules). G.H. Fowler 'The Disseisins by Falk de Breaute at Luton' in Pubs. Bedfordshire Hist. Rec. Soc. 9 (1925): 51-60, 183. C.P. 7 (1929): 543-547 (sub Leicester); 10 (1945): 365-368 (sub Pembroke). VCH Hertford 3 (1912): 232-240. Leys Sandford Cartulary 1 (Oxfordshire Rec. Soc. 19) (1938): 99-100 (charter of John Fitz Hugh to John Marshal dated c.1217; charter witnessed by William Marshal, Earl of Pembroke, Sir William the earl's son, and Sir Alan Basset); 9 (Oxfordshire Rec. Soc. 22) (1941): 189-490 (charter of William Marshal, Earl of Pembroke dated 1224-31; charter names his wife, Eleanor, and his father, William Marshal, Earl of Pembroke). Gibbs Early Charters of the Cathedral Church of St. Paul (Camden Soc. 3rd Ser. 58) (1939): 34-39, 92-93, 175-177 (charters of William Marshal, son of William Marshal Earl of Pembroke Willelmus Marescallus filius Willelmi Marescalli comitis Penbroch"). Leys Sandford Cartulary 2 (Oxfordshire Rec. Soc. 22) (1941): 189-190 (charter of William Marshal, Earl of Pembroke dated c.1224-31). Tremlett Rolls of Arms Henry Ill (H.S.P., vols. 113-114) (1967): 64 (arms of William Marshal: Party per pale or and vert, a lion rampant gules). Fryde & Greenway Handbook of British Chronology (1996): 477. Curia Regis Rolls 18 (1999): 152, 161. VCH Wiltshire 16 (1999): 3-7, 8-49, 229-236. National Archives, SC 1/1/147 (available at www.catalogue.nationalarchives.gov.uk/search.asp).
      ii. RICHARD MARSHAL, Knt., 6th Earl of Pembroke, hereditary Master Marshal, of Hampstead Marshall, Berkshire, Silchester, Hampshire, Hinxworth, Hertfordshire, etc., seigneur of Longueville and Orbec in Normandy, and, in right of his wife, seigneur of Dinan in Brittany, 2nd son, born after 1090 [sic 1190?]. In 1220 his older brother, William ceded all his Norman lands to him. He married in 1222 GERVAISE DE DINAN, widow of Juhel II de Mayenne, seigneur of Mayenne and Dinan (died 2 or 4 May 1220) [see BOHUN 4.iii], and Geoffroi I, Vicomte of Rohan (died 25 Sept. 1221), and daughter of Alain de Dinan (or Vitré). They had no issue. In 1225 he was present at a meeting of Breton nobles in Nantes. In 1226 he and his wife, Gervaise, were granted a weekly market at Ringwood, Hampshire, to be held at the manor until the king came of age. In 1232 the Pope ordered the Bishop of Lisieux to ascertain what degree of affinity existed between Richard and his wife, Gervaise, and to report to the Pope. In 1233 he led the Barons in appealing to the king to dismiss his foreign advisors. In 1233 he was proclaimed a traitor and the office of Marshal was declared to be forfeited. He made an alliance with Llywelyn, and for some months successfully carried on warfare against the royal forces. In 1234 he proceeded to Ireland, where he took Limerick and recovered some of his castles. An abortive conference with the rebels at the Carragh of Kildare on 1 April was followed by a battle, in which he was wounded and captured. While recovering from his wounds, he was practically murdered by a treacherous surgeon. SIR RICHARD MARSHAL, Earl of Pembroke, died at Kilkenny Castle, co. Kilkenny, Ireland 16 April 1234, and was buried in the Church of the Franciscans at Kilkenny 17 April 1234. He was a benefactor to the abbeys of Dunbrothy, St. Aubin des Bois, and Savigny, and he confirmed the possessions of Beaulieu Abbey. His widow, Gervaise, founded a chantry in Saint-Aubin-des-Bois Abbey 22 December 1236. She was also a benefactor of Lehon Priory. Gervaise, Countess of Pembroke, died testate sometime before June 1248. Dugdale Monasticon Anglicanum 5 (1825): 266 (Obit. of Tintern Abbey: "Richardus comes marescallus obiit die xv. Aprilis [15 April]."). Lipscomb Hist. Antiqs. of Buckingham 1 (1847): 200-201 (Clare ped.). Arch. Cambrensis 3rd Ser. 8 (1862): 278-279 (Chronicle of the 13th Cent.: "mccxxxiijo. [A.D. 1233] - Ricardus Marescallus Comes de Pembroc obiit in Ybernia apud Kildar in praelio."). Shirley Royal & Other Historical Letters illus. of the Reign of King Henry III 1 (1862) (Rolls Ser. 27): 421-425 (letters dated 1233 from King Henry III of England to Richard Marshal). Owen Desc. of Penbrokshire (Cymmrodorion Rec. Ser. 1) (1892): 16-25. Papal Regs.: Letters 1 (1893): 129-132. Recueil des Historiens des Gaules et de la France 23 (1894): 398 (E Chronico Sanctae Catharinae de Monte Rotomagi: "Anno M.CC.XXXIII [A.D. 1233]. Richardus Marescallus, dominus Longuæ Villaæ et Dinanti, in Hyberniæ insula interfectus est."). Grosse-Duperon & Gouvrion Cartulaire de l'Abbaye cisterdenne de Fontaine-Daniel (1896): 26-35 (charter of Juhel de Mayenne, seigneur of Mayenne and Dinan dated 1205; charter granted with consent of his wife, Gervaise, daughter of Alain de Dinan), 205-206 (charter of Dreux de Mello, seigneur of Loches and Mayenne, and Isabelle his wife dated June 1248; charter mentions Isabelle's deceased mother, Gervaise, late lady of Dinan rbonae memoriae Gervasia, quondam domina Dinanni"]). Wrottesley Peds. from the Plea Rolls (1905): 100. C.P.R. 1232-1247 (1906): 125-126. Farcy Cartulaire Obituaire du Prieuré des Bonshommes de Craon (1907): 13-14 (charter of Juhel de Mayenne dated 1210; charter granted with consent of his wife, Gervaise), 107 ("XII April - Obiit dominus Juhellus de Meduana, dominus Meduane et Dinani, fundator prioratus de Monteguidonis, nostri ordinis Grandismontis."). VCH Hampshire 4 (1911): 51-56, 608-609. VCH Hertford 3 (1912): 232-240. Fairer Feudal Cambridgeshire (1920): 42. Orpen Ireland under the Normans 3 (1920): 49-78. VCH Berkshire 4 (1924): 178-183. Angot Généalogies Féodales Mayennaises du XIe an XIIIe Siècle (1942): 611. C.P. 10(1945): 368-371 (sub Pembroke). Tremlett Rolls of Arms Henry III (H.S.P. 113-114) (1967): 65 (arms of Richard Marshal: Per pale or and vert, a lion rampant queue fourchee gules). Rogers Lacock Abbey Charters (Wiltshire Rec. Soc. 34) (1979): 15. Fryde & Greenway Handbook of British Chronology (1996): 477.
      iii. GILBERT MARSHAL, Knt., 7th Earl of Pembroke, hereditary Master Marshal, of Hampstead Marshall, Berkshire, Silchester, Hampshire, Hinxworth, Hertfordshire, etc., 3rd son. He was originally intended for the Church. He took minor orders and from 1225 held benefices. In 1229 he went to the Holy Land. He supported his older brother, Richard Marshal, and acted for him in Ireland. He was heir in 1234 to his brother, Richard Marshal, Knt., Earl of Pembroke. The king knighted him at Winchester 11 June 1234, and invested him with the Earldom of Pembroke and the office of Marshal. In Dec. 1234 he was granted the honor of Laigle, Sussex, together with Pevensey Castle. He married at Berwick 1 August 1235 MARGERY (or MARGARET) OF SCOTLAND, daughter of William the Lion, King of Scots, Earl of Northumberland, by Ermengarde, daughter of Richard de Beaumont, Vicomte of Beaumont-en-Maine [see SCOTLAND 4 for her ancestry]. He received with her a large dowry in Scotland, with 10,000 marks and more. They had no issue. By an unknown mistress, he had one illegitimate daughter, Isabel (contracted to marry Rhys ap Maelgwn Vychan [died 1255]). In 1235 he was granted the honors of Glamorgan and Carmarthen. He officiated as Marshal at the Coronation of Queen Eleanor in 1236. In 1238 he supported his brother-in-law, Richard, Earl of Cornwall, against the king's foreign favorites. Sometime after 1234 he enfeoffed Godfrey de Crowcombe and Ralph Fitz Nicholas in his manor of Compton Bassett, Wiltshire, in return for nominal services of spurs and gloves. SIR GILBERT MARSHAL, Earl of Pembroke, died at Hertford Priory 27 June 1241 of injuries received at a tournament, and was buried in the new Temple Church, London beside his father and brother. He was a benefactor to the monastery of St. Mary de Gloria in the diocese of Anagni, to the abbeys of Nutley and Tintern, and to the lepers' hospital of St. Mary Magdalene of Little Haverford. His widow, Margery, Countess of Pembroke, died 17 Nov. 1244, and was buried in the church of the Black Friars, London. Placitorum in Dome Capitulari Westmonasteriensi Asservatorum Abbrevatio (1811): 108. Dugdale Monasticon Anglicanum 5 (1825): 266 (Obit. of Tintern Abbey: "Galfredus [sic] marescallus comes de Penbroke obiit die xxvij. Junii [27 June]."). Stevenson Chronica de Mailros (1835): 147 (sub A.D. 1235: "Item, desponsata est domina Marion, soror domini Alexandri regis Scottorum, apud Beruuich, in die sancti Petri ad vincula [August 1], cujus desponsationi interfuit ipse rex et magnates ejus regni, sicut ex altera parte dominus G. Anglie marschallus et comes de Penbruch, qui eam duxit in uxorem, cum multis nobilibus viris Anglie."). Shirley Royal & Other Hist. Letters illus. of the Reign of King Henry III 1 (1862) (Rolls Ser. 27): 438-439. Addison Temple Church (1843): 103-119. Halliwell Chronicle of the Monastery of Abingdon (1844): 5 (sub A.D. 1242: "Gilbertus Marescallus obiit apud Ware quint() kalendis Julii [27 June], cui successit in hereditatem frater ejus Walterus."). Lipscomb Hist. & Antiqs. of Buckingham 1 (1847): 200-201 (Clare ped.). Owen Desc. of Penbrokshire (Cymmrodorion Rec. Ser. 1) (1892): 16-25. Scots Peerage 1 (1904): 5 (sub Kings of Scotland). WrottesIey Peck from the Plea Rolls, (1905): 100. C.P.R. 1232-1247 (1906): 125-126. Dunbar Scottish Kings (1906): 76-86. Auvray Registres de Grégoire IX 2 (1907): 89, 93 (dispensation dated 1235 for Richard [le Bigod], clerk, "nepoti nobilium virorum [filiorum] marescalli Anglie, comitis Pambroch, et ... comins Norfulcie germano"), 414. C.P.R. 1429-1436 (1907): 33-34 (undated charter of Gilbert Marshal, Earl of Pembroke). C.Ch.R 3 (1908): 97-98 (undated charter of Gilbert, Marshal of England, Earl of Pembroke, to Tintern Abbey; charter granted for his soul and the soul of Margaret his wife, and William Marshal his father and Isabel his mother and William and Richard his brothers), 98 (charter of Gilbert Marshal, Earl of Pembroke dated 1240), 99 (undated charter of Gilbert Marshal, earl of Pembroke). Orpen Ireland under the Normans 3 (1920): 49-78. VCH Hampshire 4 (1911): 51-56, 608-609. VCH Hertford 3 (1912): 232-240. VCH Berkshire 4 (1924): 178-183. Leys Sandford Cartulary 2 (Oxfordshire Rec. Soc. 22) (1941): 184-185 (charter of John Marshal dated 1215-20; charter witnessed by Gilbert Marshal and Hamon le Gras). C.P. 10 (1945): 371-374 (sub Pembroke). Hockey Beaulieu Cartulary (Southampton Recs. Ser. 17) (1974): 11-12, 44-45. Bartnam Welsh Cens. 300-1400 (1980) [Rhys ap Tewdwr 41. Fryde Handbook of British Gras. (1986): 58. Kemp Reading Abbey Cartularies 2 (Camden 4th Ser. 33) (1987): 229 (charter of Margery, Countess of Pembroke dated 1244). Garnett & Hudson Land & Government in Medieval England & Normandy (1994): 316-317. Fryde & Greenway Handbook of British Chronology (1996): 477. Burke's Landed Gentry of Great Britain (2001): lxiii-lxv (sub Scottish Royal Lineage).
      iv. WALTER MARSHAL, Knt., 8th Earl of Pembroke, hereditary Master Marshal, hereditary Steward of Leinster, of Hampstead Marshall, Berkshire, Bere and Sturminster, Dorset, Silchester, Hampshire, Himtworth, Hertfordshire, Goodrich Castle, Herefordshire, Box, Great Bedwyn, Wexcombe (in Great Bedwyn), and Wootton Rivers, Wiltshire, etc., seigneur of Orbec and Longueville in Normandy, and, in right of his wife, Earl of Lincoln, 4th son. His father in his lifetime gave him Sturminster, Dorset. His father or his brother gave him Goodrich Castle, Herefordshire and Bere, Dorset. In 1233 he supported his brother, Richard, against the king's foreign favorites and his lands were forfeited. In 1234 he was in Ireland with his brother Richard, who sent him away before the fatal Battle of Kildare, lest his family should be extirpated. He passed over to Wales with his brothers and was pardoned with them. In 1239 he was alienated from King Henry III, by the king's hostility to his brother, Gilbert Marshal. In 1240 he was sent into Wales with a large army to strengthen Cardigan Castle, and he took for his brother Gilbert lands appurtenant to the honour of Carmarthen. In June 1241 he took part in the tournament at which Gilbert Marshal was mortally wounded. The king at first refused to invest Walter in the Earldom of Pembroke as Gilbert's heir, because he had forbidden the tournament, but on 27 October the king relented and invested Walter with both the earldom and office of Marshal. He married 6 Jan. 1241/2 MARGARET (or MARGERY) DE QUINCY, widow of John de Lacy (or Lascy) (also known as John of Chester), Knt., Earl of Lincoln, hereditary Constable of Chester (died 22 July 1240) [see LACY 3], and daughter and heiress of Robert de Quincy, by Hawise, sue jure Countess of Lincoln, daughter of Hugh, Earl of Chester [see QUINCY 6.i for her ancestry]. She was born before 1217. They had no issue. He served as a captain in the king's army in Gascony and Poitou in 1242. In 1243 he surrendered his wife's castle of Bolingbroke, Lincolnshire and her mother's lands in Lincolnshire, which estates were subsequently restored to him and his wife, Margaret. In 1244 he was one of the laymen who was elected to consider the king's demand for a subsidy. He presented to the church of West Halton, Lincolnshire in 1242, and to a mediety of the church of Toynton St. Peter, Lincolnshire in 1245. SIR WALTER MARSHAL, Earl of Pembroke, died at Goodrich Castle, Herefordshire 24 Nov. 1245, and was buried at Tintern Abbey, Monmouthshire. By judgments of the King's court, his widow, Margaret, recovered dower out of lands in Ireland held by Walter Marshal, and she received seisin of one-third of all of the Earl's lands and tenements in Ireland. In 1252 his widow, Margaret, and Richard de Wiltshire were granted a yearly fair at the manor of Chelbury, Lincolnshire. In 1262 an action of recaption was brought against Margaret, Countess of Lincoln, Joce de Stepping [her steward], and John de Lusby. In 1263 the king promised that her executors should have free administration of her goods. In the period, 1263-6, Master Walter of Stainsby filed a writ of attachment against Joce de Stepping, Steward of Margaret, Countess of Lincoln, which required Joce to answer for having distrained Master Walter to perform suit at the court of Lusby contrary to law. Margaret, Countess of Lincoln and Pembroke, died at Hampstead, Middlesex shortly before 30 March 1266, and was buried near her father in the Church of the Hospitallers, Clerkenwell, Middlesex, Baker Hist. & Antiqs. of Northampton 1 (1822-30): 563 (Beaumont-Quincy ped.). Halliwell Chronicle of the Monastery of Abingdon (1844): 6 (sub A.D. 1248: "Walterus Marescallus, comes de Penbrocke, obiit."). Lipscomb Hist. & Antiqs. of Buckingham 1 (1847): 200-201 (Clare ped.). Giles Matthew Paris's English Hist. 2 (1853): 122 (sub 1245: "The last of the brothers but one, Earl Walter Marshal, followed in his steps; for although he had most faithfully promised a revenue of sixty shillings to the house of St. Mary, belonging to the monks of Hertford, and had given a written promise thereof, because his brother Earl Gilbert died there, and his bowels still remained buried there, he forgot the pledge and promise which he had made for the redemption of his brother, and, after causing much useless vexation to the prior of the said house, he proved himself a manifest deceiver and transgressor."). Shirley Royal & Other Historical Letters illustrative of the Reign of King Henry III 1 (1862) (Rolls ser. 27): 438. Hulton Coucher Book or Chartulary of Whalley Abbey 1 (Chetham Soc. 10) (1867): 131 (charter of Margaret de Lascy, Countess of Lincoln and Pembroke). Luard Annales Monastici 4 (Rolls Ser. 36) (1869): 456 (Annals of Worcester sub A.D. 1266- "Obiit Margareta comitissa Lincolniæ."). Matthew of Paris Chronica Majora 4 (Rolls Ser. 57) (1877): 406 (sub A.D. 1245: "Eodemque anno, comes Marescallus Walterus viam universae camis ingressus, octavo kalendas Decembris, Londoniis, spud Tinternam, non procul a Strigoil, ubi plures magnifici antecessores sui sunt sepulti, tumulatur."). Doyle Official Baronage of England 2 (1886): 373 (sub Lincoln); 3 (1886): 7 (sub Pembroke). Christie Annales Cestrienses (Lanc. & Cheshire Rec. Soc. 14) (1887): 50-51 (Chron. of St. Werburg sub 1221: "Johannes constabularius Cestrie duxit in uxorem filiam Roberti de Quenci neptam domini Rannulphi comitis Cestrie."). Birch Cat. Seals in the British Museum 2 1892): 318-319 (seal of Walter Marshal, Earl of Pembroke dated 1241-45 - To the right. In armour: hauberk, surcoat, flat-topped helmet with vizor down, sword, shield with indistinct device or ornament, slung round the neck by a strap. Legend: ... LTERI MARESCALLI COM…), 391 (seal of Margaret de Lacy, Countess of Lincoln and Pembroke dated post-1245 Pointed oval. In long dress, fur cloak, flat head-dress, the left hand on the breast, in the right hand a shield of arms. Standing. Above her head a carved canopy, consisting of a round-headed arch, enriched with battlements. In the field on the right a shield of arms: a lion rampant [LACY]; on the left, held by the countess, another, indistinct.) Legend: ... [MA]RGARETE: …) Owen Desc. of Penbrokshire (Cymmrodorion Rec. Ser. 1) (1892): 16-25. Wrottesley Peds. from the Plea Rolls (1905): 100, 470-471, 531-532. C.Ch.R 2 (1906): 361 (two undated confirmation charters of Walter Marshal, Earl of Pembroke; 3 (1908): 99 (undated charter of Walter Marshal, Earl of Pembroke to Tintern Abbey), 104-105 (undated charter of Walter Marshal, Earl of Pembroke to Tintern Abbey). C.P.R. 1232-1247 (1906): 125-126. Auvray Registres de Grégoire IX 2 (1907): 89. C.P.R. 1429-1436 (1907): 33-34. D.N.B. 11 (1909): 380 (biog. of John de Lacy). VCH Hampshire 4 (1911): 51-56. VCH Hertford 3 (1912): 232-240. G.H. Fowler 'Calendar of Inquisitions Post Mortem. No. I' in Pubs. Bedfordshire Hist. Rec. Soc. 5 (1920): 235-238. Orpen Ireland under the Normans 3 (1920): 49-78. Orpen Ireland under the Normans 3 (1920): 49-78. VCH Berkshire 4 (1924): 178-183. C. P. 10 (1945): 374-376 (sub Pembroke). Ellis Cat. Seals in the PRO. 1 (1978): 63-64 (seal of Margaret de Lacy, Countess of Lincoln and Pembroke dated c.1242-66 - Under a small round-arched canopy, the countess standing on a corbel. She wears a long gown, mantle and head-dress, holds her left hand before her, and with her right hand supports a small shield of arms, indistinct. To right is a second shield of arms, indistinct. Background diapered with roses. Legend lost). Kemp Reading Abbey Cartulcaies 2 (Camden 4th Ser. 33) (1987): 230 (ratification of Margaret de Lacy, Countess of Lincoln and Pembroke dated 1247). Schwennicke Europäische Stammtafeln n.s. 3(4) (1989): 708 (sub Quency). VCH Wiltshire 15 (1995): 55-61. Fryde & Greenway Handbook of British Chronology (1996): 477. Mitchell Portraits of Medieval Women (2003): 148, footnote 19 (rejects Margaret de Quincy's alleged third marriage to Richard de Wiltshire).
      v. ANSELM MARSHAL, 9th Earl of Pembroke, hereditary Master Marshal, hereditary Steward of Leinster, of Hampstead Marshall, Berkshire, Chilton, Dorton, and Loughton, Buckinghamshire, Silchester, Hampshire, Hinxworth, Hertfordshire, Hinton St. George, Somerset, etc., 5th son. He married MAUD DE BOHUN, daughter of Humphrey de Bohun, Knt., Earl of Hereford and Essex, hereditary Constable of England, by Maud, daughter of Raoul (or Ralph) d'Exoudun, 7th Count of Eu [see BOHUN 6 for her ancestry]. They had no issue. He was heir in 1245 to his older brother, Walter Marshal, 8th Earl of Pembroke. ANSELM MARSHAL, Earl of Pembroke, died at Chepstow 22, 23, or 24 Dec. 1245, before he was invested in the earldom. He was buried at Tintern Abbey, Monmouthshire. His widow, Maud, married (2nd) before 12 June 1250 (as his 2nd wife) ROGER DE QUINCY, Knt., 2nd Earl of Winchester, hereditary Constable of Scotland [see QUINCY 7], 2nd but eldest surviving son of Saher de Quincy, Knt., 1st Earl of Winchester, by Margaret (or Margery), daughter of Robert de Bréteuil, Knt., 2nd Earl of Leicester [see QUINCY 6 for his ancestry]. They had no issue. His wife, Maud, died at Groby (in Ratby), Leicestershire 20 October 1252, and was buried at Brackley, Northamptonshire. Dugdale Monasticon Anglicanum 5 (1825): 266 (Obit. of Tintern Abbey: "Anselmus marescallus obiit xxxiv. die Decembris [24 December]."). Lipscomb Hist. & Antiqs. of Buckingham 1 (1847): 200-201 (Clare ped.). Shirley Royal & Other Historical Letters illustrative of the Reign of King Henry III 1 (1862) (Rolls ser. 27): 438. Matthew of Paris Chronica Majora 4 (Rolls Ser. 57) (1877): 406 (sub A.D. 1245: "Et cito post, videlicet tertia die ante Natale, obiit Anselmus frater ejusdem comitis [i.e., Walter Marshal], natu proximo junior consequenter. Quibus sine liberis de medio raptis, illa praeclara haereditas jam multipliciter dissipata ad multos, ratione sororum, est devoluta."). Owen Desc. of Penbrokshire (Cymmrodorion Rec. Ser. 1) (1892): 16-25. Wrottesley Peds. from the Plea Rolls (1905): 100. Auvray Registres de Grégoire IX 2 (1907): 89. C.P.R. 1429-1436 (1907): 33-34. VCH Hertford 3 (1912): 232-240. Orpen Ireland under the Normans 3 (1920): 49-78. VCH Buckingham 4 (1927): 22-27, 45-48, 395-401. C.P. 10 (1945): 376-377 (sub Pembroke); 12(2) (1959): 751-754 (sub Winchester). VCH Somerset 4 (1978): 38-52. Fryde & Greenway Handbook of British Chronology (1996): 477.
      vi. MAUD MARSHAL, married (1st) HUGH LE BIGOD, 3rd Earl of Norfolk [see BIGOD 7]; (2nd) WILLIAM DE WARENNE, 6th Earl of Surrey [see WARENNE 8].
      vii. ISABEL MARSHAL, married (1st) GILBERT DE CLARE, Knt., Earl of Gloucester and Hertford [see CLARE 6]; (2nd) RICHARD OF ENGLAND, King of the Romans, Earl of Cornwall, Count of Poitou [see CORNWALL 6].
      viii. SIBYL MARSHAL, married WILLIAM DE FERRERS, Knt., 5th Earl of Derby [see FERRERS 7].
      ix. EVE MARSHAL, married WILLIAM DE BREWES, of Kington, Herefordshire [see BRIWERRE 5].
      x. JOAN MARSHAL [see next].”

      2. “Royal Ancestry: A Study in Colonial & Medieval Families,” Douglas Richardson (2013):
      “RICHARD FITZ GILBERT (nicknamed Strongbow), 2nd Earl of Pembroke, Earl of Striguil, of Chepstow, Monmouthshire, Hinxworth, Hertfordshire, etc., seigneur of Bienfaite and Orbec (both in Normandy), Justiciar of Ireland, son and heir, born about 1130. On the accession of King Henry II in 1154, he refused to acknowledged Richard as earl and took the lordship of Pembroke into his own hands. In Autumn 1167 he came to an agreement with Dermot MacMurrough, King of Leinster; for the earl's assistance with an army, he could have Eve, Dermot's eldest daughter in marriage and the succession to Leinster. An army was assembled led by Raymond Fitz Gerald (also known as Raymond le Gros) that included Welsh archers; it captured the towns of Wexford, Waterford, and Dublin in 1169-70. Richard married at Waterford, Ireland about 26 August 1170 EVE OF LEINSTER daughter of Dermot MacMurrough (also called Diarmait MacMurchada), King of Leinster, by Mor, daughter of Muirchertach Ua Tuathail From 1172 onwards, he was styled Earl of Striguil. They had one son, Gilbert [Earl of Pembroke], and one daughter, Isabel. In 1173 he played a critical role in Normandy in defending the castle of Gisors and recapturing Verneuil for the king. RICHARD FITZ GILBERT, 2nd Earl of Pembroke died about 20 April 1176, and was buried in the Church of the Holy Trinity [Christ Church], Dublin. His widow, Eve, was living in 1187. Sometime in the period, 1185-94, his widow, Eve, as "heres Regis Deremicii,"confirmed to John Comyn, Archbishop of Dublin, and his successors all of her earlier gifts. At her death, she was buried in Tintern Abbey, Monmouthshire.
      Lipscomb Hist. & Antiqs. of Buckingham 1 (1847): 200-201 (Clare ped.). Jour. British Arch. Assoc. 10 (1855): 261-263 (undated charter of Earl Richard son of Earl Gilbert to the monks of Usk; charter witnessed by Countess Isabel and Isabel her daughter, Ralph Bloet, and Walter Bloet). Eyton Court, Household, & Itinerary of King Henry 11 (1878): 16, 109, 118, 165-166, 172, 176, 196, 202. Gilbert Acct. of Facsimiles of National MSS of Ireland (1879): 72 (charter of Richard Fitz Gislebert dated c.1172). Gilbert Chartularies of St. Mary’s Abbey, Dublin 1 (Rolls Ser. 80) (1884): 78-79 (undated charter of Earl Richard son of Earl Gilbert to St. Mary's Abbey; charter witnessed by Hervé de Montmorency and Walter Bluet), 79-81, 83-84 (undated charter of Earl Richard son of Earl Gilbert to St. Mary's Abbey; charter witnessed by Walter Bluet and Richard Bluet); 2 (Rolls Ser. 80) (1884): 12, 274 (Annals sub A.D. 1177: "Comes Ricardus circa kal. julii apud Dubliniam obiit, et in ecclesia Sancte Trinitatis."), 304 (Annals of Ireland sub A.D. 1177: "Comes Ricardus, circa kalendas Maii, apud Dubliniam obiit; in ecclesia Sancte Trinitatis Dublinie sepelitur."). Owen Desc. of Penbrokshire (Cymmrodorion Rec. Ser. 1) (1892): 16-25. Arch. Jour. 2nd Ser. 6 (1899): 221-231. C.Ch.R. 2 (1906): 361 (undated charter of Earl Richard son of Gilbert to Goldcliff Priory; charter witnessed by Isabel the earl's mother and Isabel his sister); 3 (1908): 96-97 (undated charter of Richard, Earl of Pembroke to Tintern Abbey, charter granted with the consent of his mother, Countess Isabel, and names his father, Earl Gilbert). VCH Hertford 3 (1912): 232-240. C.P. 10 (1945): Appendix H, 100-104 (sub Families of the First and Second Earls of Pembroke). Sanders English Baronies (1960): 110-111. TG 1 (1980): 4-27. Coat of Arms n.s. 10(1994): 322-328. Fryde & Greenway Handbook of British Chronology (1996): 161, 477. Tyerman Who's Who in Early Medieval England 1066-1272 (2001): 206-208 (biog. of Richard of Clare). Duffy Medieval Ireland: An Encyclopedia (2005): 733-737 (biog. of Richard Fitz Gilbert).
      Children of Richard Fitz Gilbert, by unknown wife or mistress,
      i. ___ DE CLARE, married ROBERT DE QUINCY, Constable of Leinster [see PRENDERGAST 5],
      ii. ALINE DE CLARE, married in 1174 WILLIAM FITZ MAURICE, Baron of Naas, co. Kildare. They had one son, William Fitz Maurice [Baron of Naas]. WILLIAM FITZ MAURICE died before c.September 1199. Jour. Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland 5th Ser. 2 (1892): 194 ("William, the son of Maurice, is stated in the table to have married `Ala, daughter of Strongbow'; but the 'Conquest of Ireland' (Cal. Car. MSS., 296) has it - 'Also the Erie yawe Ellyn his sustir to Wyllam Moryces yldist sone."), chart facing pg. 358. Wright Hist. Works of Giraldus Cambrensis (1905): 183 (ped.), 259 (sub Conquest of Ireland: "Raymond also, to consolidate the union among the English, induced the earl to give his daughter Alina in marriage to William, the eldest son of Maurice Fitzgerald."). English Hist. Rev. 31 (1916): 489 ("William, son of Maurice, who according to Giraldus, married in 1174 Alina, daughter of Strongbow, seems to have died before 1199, when 'William de Naas' fined for an inquisition of mort d'ancestor against the abbot of Baltinglass. This was his son and successor, the third baron, who married Mahaut de Pont de l'Arche and died in 1227, when he was succeeded by his son David, the fourth baron."). Orpen Ireland under the Normans 4 (1920): 307-308 ("Addenda et Corrigenda to Volume I and II - Vol. p. 18; vol. ii, pp. 165, 246. William, son of William, Baron of Naas': - It was William, third Baron of Naas, son of William, the second baron, who married Matilda of Pont de l'Arche. She was widow of Philip de Braose. Close Roll, 11 Hen. III, pg. 199. This William Fitz William has been hitherto omitted in the received pedigrees, but in a review of the Gormanston Register (English Hist. Review, vol. xxxi (1916), pp. 488-9) I have established his position. His father, William, son of Maurice, who married Alma, daughter of Strongbow, was dead before c. September 1199 (Rot. de Obtalis, 1 John, m. 15, p. 26). The third baron is often called simply 'William, Baron of Nass', hence the confusion, but his patronymic appears in several documents, e.g. Cal. Germanston Register, pp. 154, 200, 204; and Cal. Docs. Ireland, vol. i, p. 448. David Fitz William, fourth Baron of Naas, was his son and heir by `Mahaut de Pontearch' (Matilda de Pont de l'Arche): Cal. Gormanston Register, p. 163."). C.P. 10 (1945): Appendix H, 100-104 (sub Families of the First and Second Earls of Pembroke). Duffy Medieval Ireland: An Encyclopedia (2005): 733-735 (biog. of Richard Fitz Gilbert).
      Child of Aline de Clare, by William Fitz Maurice:
      a. WILLIAM FITZ WILLIAM, Baron of Naas, married MAUD PONTE DE L'ARCHE [see MARSHAL 2.v.c].
      Children of Richard Fitz Gilbert, by Eve of Leinster:
      i. GILBERT FITZ RICHARD, son and heir, born about 1173, died 1185-9 s.p., probably a minor. C.P. 10 (1945): Appendix H, 100-104 (sub Families of the First and Second Earls of Pembroke).
      ii. ISABEL DE CLARE, married WILLIAM MARSHAL, Knt., 3rd Earl of Pembroke [see MARSHAL 3]”

      3. “Royal Ancestry: A Study in Colonial & Medieval Families,” Douglas Richardson (2013):
      “Children of King William “the Lion,” by Ermengarde de Beaumont…
      v. MARGERY (or MARGARET) OF SCOTLAND, married at Berwick 1 August 1235 GILBERT MARSHAL, Knt., 7th Earl of Pembroke, hereditary Master Marshal [see MARSHAL 3.iii], of Hampstead Marshall, Berkshire, Silchester, Hampshire, Hinxworth, Hertfordshire, etc., 3rd son of William Marshal, Knt., 4th Earl of Pembroke (or Strigoil), hereditary Master Marshal, by Isabel, daughter of Richard Fitz Gilbert (nicknamed Strongbow), 2nd Earl of Pembroke (or Strigoil) [see MARSHAL 3 for his ancestry]. He received with her a large dowry in Scotland, with 10,000 marks and more. They had no issue. By an unknown mistress, he had one illegitimate daughter, Isabel (contracted to marry Rhys ap Maelgwn Vychan [died 1255]). He was originally intended for the Church. He took minor orders and from 1225 held benefices. In 1229 he went to the Holy Land. He supported his older brother, Richard Marshal, and acted for him in Ireland. He was heir in 1234 to his brother, Richard Marshal, Knt., 6th Earl of Pembroke. The king knighted him at Winchester 11 June 1234, and invested him with the Earldom of Pembroke and the office of Marshal. In Dec. 1234 he was granted the honor of Laigle, Sussex, together with Pevensey Castle. In 1235 he was granted the honors of Glamorgan and Carmarthen. He officiated as Marshal at the Coronation of Queen Eleanor in 1236. In 1238 he supported his brother-in-law, Richard, Earl of Cornwall, against the king's foreign favorites. Sometime after 1234 he enfeoffed Godfrey de Crowcombe and Ralph Fitz Nicholas in his manor of Compton Bassett, Wiltshire, in return for nominal services of spurs and gloves. SIR GILBERT MARSHAL, Earl of Pembroke, died at Hertford Priory 27 June 1241 of injuries received at a tournament, and was buried in the new Temple Church, London beside his father and brother. He was a benefactor to the monastery of St. Mary de Gloria in the diocese of Anagni, to the abbeys of Nutley and Tintern, and to the lepers' hospital of St. Mary Magdalene of Little Haverford. His widow, Margery, Countess of Pembroke, died 17 Nov. 1244, and was buried in the church of the Black Friars, London. Placitorum in Domo Capitulari Westmonasteriensi Asservatorum Abbrevatio (1811): 108. Dugdale Monasticon Anglicanum 5 (1825): 266 (Obit. of Tintern Abbey: "Galfredus [sic] marescallus comes de Penbroke obiit die xxvij. Junii [27 June]."). Stevenson Chronica de Mailros (1835): 147 (sub A.D. 1235: "Item, desponsata est domino. Marion, soror domini Alexandri regis Scottorum, apud Beruuich, in die sancti Petri ad vincula [August 1], cujus desponsationi interfuit ipse rex et magnates ejus regni, sicut ex altera parte dominus G. Anglie marschallus et comes de Penbruch, qui eam duxit in uxorem, cum multis nobilibus viris Anglie."). Lipscomb Hist. & Antiqs. of Buckingham 1 (1847): 200-201 (Clare ped.). Shirley Royal & Other Hist. Letters illus. of the Reign of King Henry III 1 (1862) (Rolls Ser. 27): 438-439. Addison Temple Church (1843): 103-119. Halliwell Chronicle of the Monastery of Abingdon (1844): 5 (sub A.D. 1242: "Gilbertus Marescallus obiit apud Ware quinto kalendis Julii [27 June], cui successit in hereditatem frater ejus Walterus."). Owen Desc. of Penbrokshire (Cymmrodorion Rec. Ser. 1) (1892): 16-25. Scots Peerage 1 (1904): 5 (sub Kings of Scotland). Wrottesly Peds. from the Plea Rolls (1905): 100. C.P.R. 1232-1247 (1906): 125-126. Dunbar Scottish Kings (1906): 76-86. Auvray Registres de Gregoire IX 2 (1907): 89,93 (dispensation dated 1235 for Richard [le Bigod], clerk, "nepoti nobilium virorum [filiorum] marescalli Anglie, comitis Pambroch, et ... comitis Norfulcie germane”), 414. C.P.R. 1429-1436 (1907): 33-34 (undated charter of Gilbert Marshal, Earl of Pembroke). C.Ch.R. 3 (1908): 97-98 (undated charter of Gilbert, Marshal of England, Earl of Pembroke, to Tintern Abbey; charter granted for his soul and the soul of Margaret his wife, and William Marshal his father and Isabel his mother and William and Richard his brothers), 98 (charter of Gilbert Marshal, Earl of Pembroke dated 1240), 99 (undated charter of Gilbert Marshal, earl of Pembroke). Orpen Ireland under the Normans 3 (1920): 49-78. VCH Hampshire 4 (1911): 51-56, 608-609. VCH Hertford 3 (1912): 232-240. VCH Berkshire 4 (1924): 178-183. Leys Sandford Cartulary 2 (Oxfordshire Rec. Soc. 22) (1941): 184-185 (charter of John Marshal dated 1215-20; charter witnessed by Gilbert Marshal and Hamon le Gras). C.P. 10 (1945): 371-374 (sub Pembroke). Hockey Beaulieu Cartulary (Southampton Recs. Ser. 17) (1974): 11-12, 44-45. Bartrum Welsh Gens. 300-1400 (1980) [Rhys ap Tewdwr 4]. Fryde Handbook of British Chron. (1986): 58. Kemp Reading Abbey Cartularies 2 (Camden 4th Ser. 33) (1987): 229 (charter of Margery, Countess of Pembroke dated 1244). Garnett & Hudson Law & Government in Medieval England & Normandy (1994): 316-317. Fryde & Greenway Handbook of British Chronology (1996): 477. Burke's Landed Gentry of Great Britain (2001): lxdii-lxv (sub Scottish Royal Lineage).”

      4. “Royal Ancestry: A Study in Colonial & Medieval Families,” Douglas Richardson (2013):
      “WILLIAM DE FERRERS, Knt., 5th Earl of Derby, Constable of Bolsover Castle, 1235-6, son and heir, born about 1193. He married (1st) before 14 May 1219 SIBYL MARSHAL, died before 1238, 3rd daughter of William Marshal, Knt., 4th Earl of Pembroke (or Strigoil), hereditary Master Marshal, by Isabel, daughter of Richard Fitz Gilbert (nicknamed "Strongbow”), 2nd Earl of Pembroke (or Strigoil) [see MARSHAL 3 for her ancestry]. They had seven daughters, Agnes, Isabel, Maud, Sibyl, Joan, Agatha (wife of Hugh de Mortimer), and Eleanor. He was afflicted from youth with gout, and habitually travelled in a chariot or litter. He accompanied the king to France in 1230. He married (2nd) in or before 1238 MARGARET (or MARGERY) DE QUINCY, daughter and co-heiress of Roger de Quincy, 2nd Earl of Winchester, by his 1st wife, Ellen, daughter and co-heiress of Alan Fitz Roland, lord of Galloway, hereditary Constable of Scotland [see QUINCY 7 for her ancestry]. They had two sons, Robert, Knt. [6th Earl of Derby], and William, Knt., and three daughters, Elizabeth, Joan, and Agnes. He had livery of Chardey Castle and the rest of his mother's lands 10 Nov. 1247. He was invested with the Earldom of Derby 2 Feb. 1247/8. In 1245 he was granted respite of forest offences because he "laboured under infirmity." He presented to the church of Brington, Northamptonshire in 1250. While passing over a bridge at St. Neots, Huntingdonshire, he was accidentally thrown from his chariot sustaining broken limb bones from which he never recovered. SIR WILLIAM DE FERRERS, 5th Earl of Derby, died at Evington, Leicestershire 24 (or 28) March 1254, and was buried at Merevale Abbey, Warwickshire. His widow, Margaret, presented to the churches of Keyston, Huntingdonshire, 1255, Irchester, Northamptonshire, 1267, and Higham Ferrers, Northamptonshire, 1268, 1275. She was co-heiress in 1264 to her father, Roger de Quincy, Knt., Earl of Winchester, by which she inherited the hereditary office of Constable of Scotland, together with the manors of Groby (in Ratby) and Thurnby, Leicestershire, Ware, Hertfordshire, Keyston and Southoe, Huntingdonshire, Chinnor, Oxfordshire, etc. In 1268-9 the Prior and convent of Lenton released the church of Irchester, Northamptonshire to Margaret de Ferrers, Countess of Derby, who in turn levied a fine of it to the use of herself and her heirs. In 1270 she resigned the office of Constable of Scotland to her brother-in-law, Alexander Comyn, Knt., Earl of Buchan. In 1270 Margaret and her sisters, Ellen and Elizabeth, gave license for the election of William de Shaldeston as Prior of the Hospital of St. James and St. John at Brackley, Northamptonshire. In 1272-3 Margaret arraigned an assize of novel disseisin against John le Fauconer, of Thurcaston, and others, touching a tenement in Groby, Leicestershire. In 1273 Philip de Fifife sued her for the next presentation to the church of Fyfield, Berkshire. In 1274-5 Ellen de Quincy and Alexander Comyn and his wife, Elizabeth, sued their sister, Margaret de Ferrers, Countess of Derby, regarding possessions in Eynesbury, Huntingdonshire. On the assignment of Quincy dower lands in 1275, Margaret was assigned a third part of the manor of Southoe Ferrers, Huntingdonshire, together with a third part of the chief messuage. In 1275-6 William de Karuill' arraigned an assize of mort d'ancestor against her touching a messuage and land in Brampton, Northamptonshire. Sometime in the period, 1275-9, she acquired the one-third share of the same manor assigned to her sister, Elizabeth Comyn, thus increasing Margaret's share to two-thirds. In 1276 Margaret had letters of protection, she then going to Scotland. In 1277-8 Alice widow of John de Kent arraigned an assize of novel disseisin against her and others touching a tenement in Chardey, Staffordshire. About 1281 Margaret de Ferrers, Countess of Derby, Ellen la Zouche, and Alexander Comyn, Earl of Buchan, and his wife, Elizabeth, sued Ranulph son of Robert de Neville and his wife, Euphame, regarding 11-1/2 virgates in Syston, Leicestershire. Margaret, Countess of Derby, died shortly before 12 March 1280/1, on which date custody of all lands late of the said Countess Margaret were granted by the king to Richard Fukeram to hold during pleasure, so that he cultivate and sow them and answer for the issues at the Exchequer. In 1282 custody of the manor of Southoe, Huntingdonshire late of Margaret, Countess of Derby, deceased was granted by the king to John de Aese, Vicomte of Tartas to hold during the minority of the heirs. The same month custody of the manor of Keyston, Huntingdonshire late of Margaret, Countess of Derby, deceased was likewise granted by the king to John de Byu.elard to hold during the minority of the heirs. In 1281 the king ratified the demise of John de Aysse, Vicomte of Tartas, to Baldwin Wake and Hawise his wife of custody of the manor of Southoe, Huntingdonshire which he had of the gift of the king by the extent of £40 2s. 8d. yearly to hold during the minority of the heirs of Margery, Countess of Derby.
      Bridges Hist. & Antiqs. of Northamptonshire 2 (1791): 174, 180. Shaw Hist. & Antiqs. of Steffordshire 1 (1798): 39 (Ferrers ped). Baker Hist. & Antiqs. of Northampton 1 (1822-30): 123-124 (Ferrers ped.), 563 (Beaumont-Quincy ped). Clutterbuck Hist. & Antiqs. of Hertford 3 (1827): 287-288 (Beaumont-Quincy ped.). Burke Dict. of the Peerages ... Extinct, Dormant & in Abeyance (1831): 442-443 (sub Quincy). Hunter Eccl. Docs. (Camden Soc. 8) (1840): 68. Lipscomb Hist. & Antiqs. of Buckingham 1 (1847): 200-201 (Clare ped.). Baines Hist. of the Commerce & Town of Liverpool 1 (1852): 97-133. Giles Matthew Paris's English Hist. 2 (1853): 251 (sub 1247: "In this year certain nobles died in England, amongst whom was William Fad Ferrers, a peaceable and good man, who died at a great age, about St. Catherine's day [25 Novemberl, after having suffered for a long time from gout ... The said earl therefore was succeeded in the earldom by his eldest son and heir William, a good and discrete man, but who was miserably afflicted with the same disease as his father."). Luard Annales Monastici 1 (Rolls Ser. 36) (1864): 317 (Annals of Burton sub 1254: "Willelmus de Ferrariis comes Derbeiæ obiit v. kal. Aptilis, apud Eventonam juxta Leycestriam, et sepultus est in capitulo de Mirevalle ii kal. Aprilis."). Skene Liber Pluscardensis 1 (Historians of Scotland 7) (1877): 136-137; 2 (Historians of Scotland 10) (1880): 102-103. Year Books of Edward Years XXXIII-XXV 5 (Rolls Ser. 31a) (1879): 100-107. Clark Earls, Earldom, & Castle of Pembroke (1880): 69-75. Annual Rpt. of the Deputy Keeper 42 (1881): 568; 44 (1883): 100; 45 (1885): 107, 152; 47 (1886): 186; 50(1889): 45, 92, 442, 460. Wrottesley Feet of Fines: Henry III (Colls. Hist. Staffs. 4) (1883): 238-259. Godfrey Hist. of the Parish & Priory of Lenton (1884): 82. Doyle Official Baronage of England 1 (1886): 548 (sub Derby). Miktag Service Performed Staffordshire Tenants (Colls. Hist. Staffs. 8(1)) (1887): 1-122. Birch Cat. Seals in the British Museum 2 (1892): 281 (seal of William de Ferrers, Earl of Derby dated 1254 - Obverse. To the right. In armour: hauberk, surcoat, shield, sword. Horse galloping. Fine style of workmanship. Reverse. Small round counterseal. A shield of arms: wire, on a bordure eight horse-shoes [FERRERS]. Legend: * S WILL’I : COMITIS : DERB'.). Norris Baddesley Clinton, its Manor, Church & Hall (1897): 63-64 ("The windows at Baddesley are a treasure in themselves ... Therein may be read, as in open volumes, the descent and the alliances of the house of Ferrers ... Most of the shields were set up in the early part of the seventeenth century, though a few bear date in the sixteenth ... In two large windows of the hall opening on the courtyard are twelve shields of arms surmounted by earls' and barons' coronets, and having inscriptions beneath indicating the alliances commemorated [including] 6. Ferrers impaling Quinci. Gules, seven mascles, conjoined, or, 3, 3 and 1; [inscription:] “William Ferrers, earle of Derby, married Margaret, Lady of Groby, daughter of Roger Quincy, earle of Winchester."), 101-110. C.C.R. 1272-1279 (1900): 225-226. C.P.R. 1272-1281 (1901): 93, 140, 427, 442, 459-460. Wrottesley Peds. from the Plea Rolls (1905): 104, 276, 501, 531-532, 548. Scots Peerage 3 (1906): 142. Cal. IPM 2 (1906): 237, 323. C.P. 4 (1916): 196-198 (arms of William de Ferrers: Sable (or Azure), an escutcheon vairy or and gules, and an orle of 8 horse-shoes argent), 199 (chart) (sub Derby); 5 (1926): foll. 320 (chart), 340; 12(2) (1959): 276-278 (sub Vescy). VCH Hertford 3 (1912): 380-397. Turner Cal. Feet of Fines Rel. Huntingdon (Cambridge Antiq. Soc. 8o Ser. 37) (1913): 35. Grosseteste Rank Roberti Grosseteste Episcopi I incolniensis (Lincoln Rec. Soc. 11) (1914): 246, 248, 511. Year Books of Edward 13 (Selden Soc. 34) (1918): 59-67; 14(2) (Selden Soc. 43) (1927): 75-77. Foster Final Concords of Lincoln from the Feet of Fines A.D. 1244-1272 2 (Lincoln Rec. Soc. 17) (1920): 142 (fine dated 1256 between Ralph, Abbot of Croyland, and Margery countess of Ferrars). Davis Rotuli Ricardi Gravesend Episcopi Lincolniensis (Lincoln Rec. Soc. 20) (1925): 99, 109, 118, 129, 168. Rpt. on the MSS of Reginald Razvdon Hastings, Esq. 1 (Hist. MSS Comm. 78) (1928): 323-342 (partition of estates of Roger de Quincy, Earl of Winchester). Cam Hundred & Hundred Rolls (1930): 276. VCH Huntingdon 2 (1932): 346-354. Paget Baronage of England (1957) 205: 4-6; 464: 1-8 (sub Quincy) (Margaret de Quincy and her step-mother, Eleanor, were each the step-mother and step-daughter of the other, the Earls of Derby, their husbands, having each married the other's daughter). Reid Wigtownshire Charters (Scottish Hist. Soc. 51) (1960): xxxix-xlv. Sanders English Baronies (1960): 61, 63, 149. Painter Feudalism & Liberty (1961): 230-239. Beardwood Trial of Walter Langton, Bishop of Lichfield 1307-1312 (Trans. American Philosophical Soc. n.s. 54 (3)) (1964): 14-17. VCH Leicester 5 (1964): 321-330. Saltman Cartulary of Dale Abbey (Derbyshire Arch. Soc. Recs. 2) (1967): 341 (charter of William de Ferrers). VCH Cambridge 5 (1973): 200-201. DeWindt Royal Justice & Medieval English Countryside 2 (1981): 590. Ellis Cat. Seals in the P.R.O. 2 (1981): 41 (seal of William de Ferrers, Earl of Derby dated 1249 - On horseback, galloping to right. He wears mail, long surcoat and flat-topped helmet, and holds a drawn sword and a shield of arms: vair, and a bordure [FERRERS1. Legend: +SIGILLVM:W/ILLELMEDE/FERRARIIS). VCH Wiltshire 12 (1983): 125-138. Simpson & Galbraith Cal. Docs. Rel. Scotland 5 (1986): 142. Schwennicke Europäische Stammtafeln n.s. 3(4) (1989): 708 (sub Quency). Nottingham Medieval Studies 44 (2000): 69-81. Mitchell Portraits of Medieval Women (2003): 11-28. Derbyshire Rec. Office: Gell Fam. of Hopton, D258/7/1/1 (charter of William de Ferrers, Earl of Derby); D258/7/1/8i (charter of William de Ferrers, Earl of Derby) (available at (available at http://www.a2a.org.uk/search/index.asp). Derbyshire Rec. Office: Okeover of Okeover, D231M/T375 (charter of William de Ferrers, Earl of Derby) (available at (available at http://www.a2a.org.uk/search/index.asp). Shakespeare Centre Library & Archive: Gregory of Stivichall, DR10/723 (quitclaim of Margaret de Ferrers, Countess of Derby, to her son, Sir William de Ferrers).
      Children of William de Ferrers, Knt., by Sibyl Marshal:
      i. AGNES DEFERRERS, married WILLIAM DE VESCY, Knt., of Alnwick, Northumberland [See LONGESPEE 5.vii].
      ii. ISABEL DEFERRERS, married (1st) GILBERT BASSET, of Wycombe, Buckinghamshire [see MOHUN 8]; (2nd) REYNOLD DE MOHUN, Knt., of Dunster, Somerset [see MOHUN 8].
      iii. MAUD DE FERRERS, married (1st) SIMON DE KYME, of Sotby and Croft, Lincolnshire [see MALET 3]; (2nd