Sylvanus Cyrus Hulet

Male 1826 - 1901  (75 years)


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  • Name Sylvanus Cyrus Hulet 
    Born 14 Mar 1826  Nelson, Portage, Ohio, United States Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    Died 22 Oct 1901  Summit, Iron, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Buried 25 Oct 1901  Summit City Cemetery, Summit, Iron, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID I2528  Petersen-de Lanskoy
    Last Modified 1 Sep 2015 

    Family Catherine Stoker,   b. 24 Jul 1829, Madison Township, Jackson, Ohio, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 8 Nov 1882, Summit, Iron, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 53 years) 
    Married 19 May 1850  Mount Pisgah, Union, Iowa, United States Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Last Modified 22 Oct 2015 
    Family ID F1267  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Notes 
    • RESEARCH_NOTES:
      1. Censuses:
      1870 US: 7-Dist. Summit, Iron, Utah, p. 295a, entry 6 [neighbors to Edward and Sarah Davis; Barbara Graybill Stoker; Michael and Polly Stoker]:
      Cyrus S. Hewlett, 44, frmer, real estate $200, personal property $600, OH.
      Catherine, 41, OH.
      John K.[or R.], 19, UT.
      Sylvester, 13, UT.
      Malissa, 10, UT.
      Charles, 5, UT.
      Luvella, 3, UT.

      1880 US: Summit Creek, Iron, Utah; Source: FHL film 1255336, National Archives Film T9-1336, p. 366A. Note: Lived in same town at brother Michael Stoker.
      C. Sylvanus Hulet, occupation: farmer, age 54, married, birthplace: OH, father's and mother's birthplace: MA and OH.
      Catherine Hulet, occ.: keeping house, age 50, birthplace: OH [father's and mother's birthplace: NC]. Four children ages 9 through 23 listed all born in Utah.

      1900 US: Summit Creek, Iron, Utah, p. 288a, ED 99, 18 Jun 1900 US:
      Sylvanous Hewlett, head, b. Mar 1826, 74, married 17 years, b. OH, fa. b. MA, mo. b. OH, farmer, owns home.
      Elzina Hulett, wife, b. Feb 1861, 39, married 17 years, 4 total children, 4 living, b. UT, fa. b. Scotland, mo. b. USA, housekeeper.
      Nora D., dau., Feb 1877, 23, single, b. UT, fa. b. OH, mo. b. UT.
      Eliza E., dau., Jul 1884, 15, single, b. UT, fa. b. OH, mo. b. UT.
      Minnie, dau., Apr 1887, 13, single, b. UT, fa. b. OH, mo. b. UT.
      Theresa, dau., Jul 1889, 10, single, b. UT, fa. b. OH, mo. b. UT.
      Cora, dau., Sep 1891, single, b. UT, fa. b. OH, mo. b. UT.
      Note: there are several other "Hewlett" families in Summit.

      2. Ancestry.com World Tree Project 20 Apr 2002: Hulet Family; Contact: Ted Cox :
      Name: Sylvanus Cyrus Hulet Sr.
      Birth: 14 Mar 1826 in Nelson, Portage, Ohio
      Death: 22 Oct 1901 in Summit, Iron, Utah
      Burial: 25 Oct 1901 Summit, Iron, Utah
      Ordained Bishop 27 Jul 1877 Summit, Iron, Utah
      Biographical notes:
      a. Farmer and stock raiser.
      b. "An Enduring Legacy": Volume Four. Notable Pioneers: Sylvanus Cyrus Hulet. Sylvanus was the only son of Charles Hulet and Margaret Ann Noah. He was born March 14, 1826, at Nelson, Portage County, Ohio. Catherine Stoker was a daughter of David Stoker and Barbara Graybill. She was born July 29, 1829, at Bloomfield, Jackson County, Ohio. The Hulets and Stokers were early converts to The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. It was in the winter of 1831 that the missionaries visited the town of Nelson, Portage County, Ohio, and held meetings in the home of Charles and Margaret Hulet. The family soon became interested in the gospel, and in February 1831, the parents and their three eldest children Anna Maria, Catherine and Electa Fidelia were baptized by Elder Parley P. Pratt. Sylvanus, who was baptized in 1838, was ten years of age when his father took him to see the Prophet Joseph Smith. This was a memory he always held dear. In Illinois the family found more tolerant treatment, and as long as they were permitted to remain in the beautiful city that had been called Nauvoo, they displayed industry and loyalty to the Church. Charles Hulet and his sons aided in the building of the temple and many of the homes in the city.
      Up to this time there had been no ward organization in Summit, but a presiding elder, Edward Davis, a brother-in-law of Sylvanus, looked after the affairs of the Church there. The year after the Hulet family's arrival, Elder Davis died and Sylvanus was chosen to fill the vacancy. A ward organization was effected July 27, 1877, and Sylvanus was ordained the first bishop of the Summit Ward.
      Father: Charles Hulet b: 3 Mar 1790 in Lee, Berkshire, Massachusetts
      Mother: Margaret Ann or Haynes NOAH b: 19 Apr 1794 in Kennet, Chester, Pennsylvania
      Marriage 1 Catherine Stoker b: 24 Jul 1829 in Bloomfield, Jackson, Ohio
      Married: 19 May 1850 in Mt. Pisgah, Harrison, Iowa
      Sealing Spouse: 30 May 1856 in EHOUS
      Children
      John Riley Hulet b: 27 Feb 1851 in Springville, Utah, Utah
      Sarah Ann Hulet b: 30 Sep 1852 in Springville, Utah, Utah
      Barbara Adlinda Hulet b: 18 Nov 1854 in Springville, Utah, Utah
      Sylvanus Cyrus Hulet Jr. (Twin) b: 17 Apr 1857 in Springville, Utah, Utah
      Sylvester Silas Hulet (Twin) b: 17 Apr 1857 in Springville, Utah, Utah
      Catherine Melissa Hulet b: 18 May 1860 in Springville, Utah, Utah
      Emma Tryphena Hulet b: 19 Jul 1862 in Saint George, Washington, Utah
      Charles Franklin Hulet Sr. b: 11 Nov 1864 in Saint George, Washington, Utah
      Luella Hulet b: 1 Jan 1867 in Saint George, Washington, Utah
      Oscar Willard Hulet b: 9 Mar 1871 in Saint George, Washington, Utah
      Marriage 2 Elzina Roberta Miller b: 9 Feb 1861 in Parowan, Iron, Utah
      Married: 21 Mar 1883 in Saint George, Washington, Utah
      Sealing Spouse: 21 Mar 1883 in SGEOR
      Children
      Nora Dean Hulet adopted b: 11 Feb 1877 in Parowan, Iron, Utah
      Eliza Ellen Hulet b: 28 Jul 1884 in Summit, Iron, Utah
      Minnie Elzina Hulet b: 5 Apr 1887 in Summit, Iron, Utah
      Theressa Hulet b: 5 Jul 1889 in Summit, Iron, Utah
      Cora Hulet b: 5 Sep 1891 in Summit, Iron, Utah
      Marriage 3 Alice Elizabeth DALLEY b: 1 Nov 1860 in Summit, Iron, Utah
      Married: 7 Oct 1884 in Saint George, Washington, Utah
      Sealing Spouse: 7 Oct 1884 in SGEOR [Ordinance Index 1.02 states SLAKE not SGEOR.]
      Children
      Emma Wright Hulet b: 10 Mar 1890 in Santa Clara, Washington, Utah
      Sources:
      1. Title: Salvanus Cyrus Hulet and His Descendants. Author: Hanks, J Phillip 1980. Publication: Community Press, Provo, Utah. Repository: LDS Family History Department, Salt Lake City, Utah 84150-3400.
      2. Title: Before & After Mt. Pisgah. Author: Clare B Christensen. Publication: Salt Lake City, Copyright 1979.
      3. Title: Cemeteries, Iron County Utah. Author: Ut Gen Web. Page: Summit, Iron, Utah. Note: Tombstones transcribed by Cheryl Whitelaw, July 1999, Whitelawcs@suu.edu. Text: "In Loving Remembrance of SYLVANUS C.Hulet, Born in Ohio, Mar. 14, 1826. Died Oct. 22, 1901. [Faith in every Footstep 1817 - 1997 Pioneers Sticker]. East side: "His words were kindness, his deeds were love, this spirit humble, he rests above."
      4. US Census 1850 page: 252. Text: 1850, Utah County, Utah Territory, Family: 108-108,, Sylvanus Hulet, Age: 25, Birthplace: Ohio.
      5. Census 1860. Hulet SYLVANAS C. Utah, UT 275 Springville, Utah, Utah.
      6. US Census 1880 page 366, Summit Creek, Iron, Utah.
      Notes:
      7 Misc.: (1) Records of John Silas Hulet, (2)Temple Index Bureau, (3) Summit Utah Ward Records, (4) Temple and Endowment House Records.

      3. Sylvanus' uncle Sylvester Hulet was part of the Mormon Battalion. Sylvester Hulet's obituary in the Deseret News, 23 Nov. 1885: "Hulet. - At Fairview, of old age, Nov. 7, 1885, Sylvester Hulet; born in Massachusetts March 1, 1800; was associated with the Latter-day Saints in Kirtland and Missouri, and also lived in Nauvoo, Ill., and was one of the old settlers of Manti, Sanpete Co."

      4. The book "Mormon Redress Petitions, Documents of the 1833-1838 Missouri Conflict," edited by Clark V. Johnson, contains a copy of the "Scroll Petition" dated 28 Nov 1843 at Nauvoo, IL addressed to the U.S. Congress by members of the LDS Church who had property destroyed by Missouri mobs in the 1830's. Included with over a couple thousand signatures are those of his parents and sister: Charles Huelet, Margaret Huelt, and Anna M. Hulet. Can't find Sylvanus or his brother on the list.

      BIOGRAPHY:
      1. From the book "History of Iron County Mission - Parowan, Utah," compiled by Mrs. Luella Adams Dalton, pp. 194-95. In commenting on the early days of Summit, Utah, she mentions several early pioneers to the area such as Michael Stoker and his brother-in-laws Edward Davis and Sylvanus C. Hulet. Also mentioned is the Dalley family into which a Davis daughter marries and has a daughter in 1880, Sarah Mandana Dalley, who marries in 1902 William Heber Hales, a son of Charles and Jemima Adair Hales. Various citations:
      "In the spring of 1859 James Dalley, William Dalley and Labon Morrell moved their families from Johnson Fort to Summit and took up squatters claims. On the 15 April, 1859 a son, Joseph B. Dalley, was born to James and Lettie Wright Dalley in their dugout home, the first child born in Summit. Others came to join them, Edward Davis, John Allen, Thomas R. Smith, John White, William White, Mike Stoker, John Winn, Oliver Pierson and William O. Orton. (Source: Lillian D. White from the 'Life of James Dalley.')"
      "Sylvanus C. Hulet moved his family from St. George to Summit, where he had owned a farm and lot for a number of years. Sylvanus was chosen presiding Elder of Summit, to fill the vacancy caused by the death of Brother William Dalley. Summit Ward was organized 27 July 1877 with Sylvanus C. Hulet as Bishop. His wife Catherine Stoker Hulet helped a great deal with the sick and on the 10 March 1878 she was chosen as the first Relief Society president, a position she held until her death in 1882. 27 July 1877 Bishop Sylvanus C. Hulet, next in their order. Bishop Joseph B. Dalley, 1st C. William Smith, 2nd C. Sylvanus C. Hulet, Ward Clerk Barbara Tweedie... (Source: Ward Records - Lillian D. White)"
      "Summit Ward Relief Society was organized 10 March, 1879, President Catherine Stoker, 1st C. Lette B. Dalley, 2nd C. Mandana H. Dalley, Secretary Mary E. Hulet... (Source: Ordena Dalley)"

      2. Harold B. Lee Library, L. Tom Perry Special Collections, Brigham Young University, microfilm MSS Film 920 no. 1: "A Short Sketch of the Life of Sylvanus Cyrus and Catherine Stoker Hulet. Sylvanus Cyrus Hulet was born March 14, 1826 at Portage, Ohio. Catherine Stoker Hulet was born July 24, 1829 at Jackson, Ohio. The parents of both Sylvanus and Catherine were early members of the Church. When but a young boy and girl, they too were baptized members of the L.D.S. Church. With their parents they suffered the persecutions of the early saints. When Sylvanus was yet but a young boy his father took him to see the Prophet Joseph Smith. The memory of this occasion was always held dear. He was also at the meeting when Brigham Young was chosen to take the place of the Prophet Joseph and witnessed the manifestation when the mantle of Joseph fell on Brigham Young. On April 19, 1850, Sylvanus and Catherine were married at Mt. Pisgah, Iowa, by Reverend Marsh. Shortly after, the young coouple left with a company of saints to make the long journey across the plains to the Rocky Mountains. Many hardships were endured on this long hard trip to the west. During the course of the journey, cholera broke out in the company. Suffering and death occurred along the trail and the mourning of some of the saints could be heard over the departure of a loved one[. M]any new graves marked the trail of those west bound emigrants. On one occasion Sylvanus had the good furtune to kill a buffalo. The meat being distributed among the needy of the company. Upon their arrival in Utah, they made their home at Springville. Sylvanus took up farming and chairmaking to provide a livelihood. It was at this place their first child was born Feb. 27, 1851. The Indians were bad and could not be trusted. One day while Catherine's husband was away from home, an Indian came into the house and asked for bread. Flour at that time was very scarce among the saints, so she told him she had no bread. At that he stepped up to the cradle, drew his bow and pointed the arrow at the baby. Through the mother's fear and anxiety for her child she gave him the bread they so sorely needed for themselves. After securing the food he desired, the Indian left satisfied. A while after their third child was born Sylvanus and Catherine were sealed in the Endowment House in Salt Lake City. In the spring of 1856 Sylvanus was called with others to go back across the plains to assist in bringing another company of saints to Utah. They made their home at Springville until 1861 when he was called to go south to help settle the Dixie country. They were one of the 300 familes sent by Brigham Young under the leadership of Erastus Snow and Orson Pratt to settle the region. During the years they lived in Springville they had built them a good home. In leaving they were forced to part with it at a great sacrifice. For the journey south, they purchased a big government wagon and also used the wagon they already owned. Three yoke of oxen were worked on one wagon and a mule team and a horse team pulled the other. The family then numbered eight including the parents. They took with them some cows and what household goods they could, then started on their way. One month was required to make the journey to their destination. Upon arriving in Dixie they found a very desolate country. However, the company of new settlers were thrifty and went earnestly to work. They laid out a townsite and called the new settlement St. George. They soon moved onto city lots and began once more to build homes. In the short space of two or three years, the place began to flourish. Cotton was grown, vineyards and orchards were planted. Farming was done. Besides work on the temple, tabernacle and courthouse had already begun. The cotton was carded and spun by the women. They trained their hands to do many things that only pioneers could accomplish. This couple, Sylvanus and Catherine put fourth their best efforts for the growth and development of that region. The Indians were still troublesome. On several occasions they drove off animals belonging to the settlers. Two men who were looking after horses and cattle, were killed by the Indans. Sylvanus and some other men were called to go and bring back the horses and cattle which had been driven off. Those were anxious hours, for the wives who were watching and praying for the safe return of their husbands. After the temple was completed and dedicated, Sylvanus and wife did temple work there and had their three olderst children sealed to them. They made their home at St. George until 1872 but prior to this date they had purchased some farming land at Summit, Iron Co., Utah. Some 80 miles north of St George. For a few years they attempted to care for both places with the help of their older children. Which caused many journeys to be made between St. George and Summit with teams and wagon. Finally the St. George home was sold and the family settled permanently at Summit. Before leaving St. George, however, he was released from the Dixie mission by Apostle Erastus Snow. As yet there had been no Ward organiaation at Summit. A presiding elder looked after the church affairs at that place but the years following the arrival of the Hulet family, Sylvanus was chosen to fill the vacancy caused by the death of the presiding elder who had previously officiated in that capacity. He continued to fill that position until a Ward organization could be effected, which was July 27, 1877. He was then ordained Bishop of the Summit Ward. After locating at Summit his wife Catherine labored a great deal among the sick. Whenever there was sickness in that community, she was always called upon to help care for them. When the first Relief Society was organized at Summit March 10, 1878 she was chosen president, which position she faithfully filled until her death, November 8, 1882. She was the mother of ten children, nine of whom she raised to maturity. Their names are as follows:
      John Riley, born 29 February 1851, Springville, Utah.
      Sarah Ann, born 20 September 1852, Springville, Utah.
      Barbara Addilenda, born 18 November 1854, Springville, Utah.
      Sylvanus Cyrus and Sylvester Silas - twins 17 Apr 1857, Springville, Utah.
      Melissa Catherine, born 18 Nov 1860
      Emma Tryphena, born 19 July 1862, St. George, Utah.
      Charles Franklin, born 11 November 1864, St. George, Utah.
      Luella, born 1 January 1867, St. George, Utah.
      Oscar Willard, born 9 March 1870, St. George, Utah.
      After the death of his wife Catherine, Sylvanus married Zina Miller, March 21, 1883. From this union there were four daughters. On October 7, 1884 he was married to Betsy Dalley. From this marriage there was one daughter. He continued to fill the position as bishop until sometime in 1888 when he was released[. He] remained a faithful member of the Church until his death which occurred October 22, 1901."

      3. Visited Summit 25 Dec 2002. Town is just off Interstate 15 and only a few blocks long with one main street with little if any commerce. The original Hulet house is on the northwest corner of Center and Main streets. Many photos of house on file. It is a two story brick structure with three dormers, two chimneys on either end, and in poor repair being used for what appears as a low priced rental. There is a large memorial plaque and rock cairn placed on the property which reads: "Sylvanus Cyrus Hulet, 1826 - 1901, a convert of 1831, Utah Pioneer 1850, Settled in Springville, Called to the Dixie Mission 1861, Moved to Summit 1872,
      Children by Catherine Stoker:
      John Riley, Sarah Ann, Barbara Adlinda, Sylvanus Cyrus, Sylvester Silas, Cathryn Melissa, Emma Tryphena, Charles Franklin, Luella, Oscar Willard,
      Children by Elzina R. Miller:
      Nora Dean, Eliza Ellen, Minnie Elzina, Theresa, Cora,
      Daughter by Elizabeth Dalley:
      Emma Wright."

      4. LDS Church Archives, Salt Lake City, Utah:
      A. MS9124: Mormon Battalion, W.W. Willis Detached Co. "Descriptive List of the Detachment of Mormon Volunteers Sent Back to Santa Fe Under the Command of Lieut. W.W. Willis, Nov. 10, 1846": David Frederick, mustered in service 16 Jul 1846 at Council Bluff, Co. A.
      B. MS9126-2: Mormon Battalion, James Brown Detached Company - Soldier's Pay Records, 1847 [Note that since Captain Brown's company ended up in Utah from Colorado, Cpt. Brown traveled from Salt Lake City to California to collect his company's pay, he deducted 10% - this was not popular with his men to say the least):
      David Frederick, soldier due: $17.50, Brown's percentage: $1.75.
      Sylvester Hewlett, soldier due: $17.50, Brown's percentage: $1.75.
      E. Hanks, soldier due: $32.50, Brown's percentage: $3.25.

      5. From the book "Our Stoker Family Histories 1731-1881," Vol. II, comp. and ed. by Elayne Stoker, 2004, printed by Stevenson's Genealogy Center, Provo, UT [Note: spelling corrected by myself.]:
      "A BRIEF History of SYLVANUS CYRUS & Catherine Stoker Hulet. (Picture of Sylvanus and Catherine on cover.)
      Sylvanus Cyrus Hulet was the only son of Charles Hulet and Margaret Ann Noah Hulet. He was born March 4, 1826 at Nelson, Portage County, Ohio.
      For several generations, in the early 1700's, the Hulets (Huletts), Powells, Newtons, and Lewises lived in the Massachusetts and Connecticut areas. With the opening of new frontiers in the Ohio, Sylvanus and Mary Hulet, with their young family moved westward and settled in Portage County, Ohio. Charles, the oldest child of Sylvanus and Mary, was born in Massachusetts and made the move to Ohio at a very early age.
      Catherine Stoker was a daughter of David Stoker and Barbara Graybill (Graybull). She was born July 29, 1829, at Bloomfield, Jackson County, Ohio. The Stoker's (Stocker's) originated from Switzerland and lived for one generation in Maryland and the next generation in North Carolina before moving to Missouri. Barbara Graybill may have been a full blood Cherokee Indian or may have had a white mother and a Cherokee father.
      The Stoker's May have heard the gospel preached by a brother Luke Johnson on January 19, 1833. Having become "Mormons" during that early period of the Church they were subjected to the same persecution that other members of the Church are known to have had and were forced to move through the Missouri period and into Illinois.
      Sylvanus was only five years old when the Hulet's heard the Gospel first preached by Parley P. Pratt in their home in Nelson, Portage County, Ohio. One history says that Sylvanus was ten years old when his father took him to see the Prophet Joseph for the first time. This was always a choice memory related by Sylvanus on many occasions.
      Soon after the older members of the Charles Hulet family joined the Church the revelations designating Jackson County Missouri as the center stake of Zion (D&C 52 and 57) that the Hulet's moved to that area. Little did they know what persecution and hardship was in store for them.
      Not only was there great difficulty with the mobs and persecutors of the "Mormons" but the internal trouble within the church was difficult for the Saints to cope with. Joseph Smith and Sidney Rigdon were in Kirtland trying to hold the Church together and teach the baptized members how to be "Mormons." Bishop Partridge, Newel Knight, Sidney Gilbert and others were trying to interpret the Gospel as best knew how in the frontier of Jackson County, Missouri. Oliver Cowdery, the Second Elder of the Church was trying to keep unity between the two areas and keep the mobsters at bay. It must have been a difficult time to maintain a testimony, but, the Hulets were a strong and vigorous people not easily dissuaded.
      It was about this time that Sylvanus' Uncle Sylvester was called to be a branch president in the Missouri area. Difficulty arose when he and the members of the branch felt that they were doing the Lord's will by speaking in tongues and interpreting the will of the Lord for the membership of the Church. When Oliver Cowdery pointed out that there was error in their ways, they repented and stayed faithful to the teachings. (See the History of the Church, Vol. 1, Ch. 26, pg. 366 & Vol. 2, Ch. 9, pg. 137-146.)
      It was not long until the Hulets, with the other Saints, were driven from Jackson County, and fled into Clay County. They must have remained in Clay county four or five years and had time to make some progress with their homes and farms before they were forced to leave them. When this company of Church members could no longer cope with the violence and persecution that had followed them from the time they had joined the Church, they had to leave their hard earned property and flee before their tormentors and go to Caldwell County.
      From Caldwell County the Saints moved to Nauvoo, Illinois. The Hulets accompanied them. Here Charles Hulet and his son Sylvanus, and some of Charles' brothers helped in the building of the Nauvoo Temple and some of the homes in Nauvoo. It is reported that Sylvanus was in attendance at the conference in Nauvoo when those present witnessed the mantle of Joseph Smith fall upon Brigham Young, showing that the Lord had chosen Brigham Young to lead His Church.
      David Stoker, also, helped with the building of the Nauvoo Temple and some of the homes in the City of Nauvoo. The Hulets and the Stokers left Nauvoo with other Saints during the cold winter of 1846 and crossed Iowa. It was at Mt. Pisgah that Sylvanus met and fell in love with Catherine Stoker. They were married May 19, 1850, by a Reverend March. Evidently, the Hulets and the Stokers had been in some of the groups who had stayed to protect some of the villages as they were not in the first companies to go to Utah. However, it was soon after Sylvanus and Catherine were married that they started on their journey westward from Mt. Pisgah, with a company of Saints led by Aaron Johnson, who was appointed by President Young. At Winter Quarters Catherine's father, David Stoker, was laid to rest.
      Catherine's mother, her brothers John, William, and MIchael, and her sisters Christina and Sarah, and Sarah's husband, Edward David, were in the company of the Hulet's. It was the latter part of September when they arrived in Salt Lake City. They thought they had reached their journey's end, but President Young asked the Hulets to go on with some other families to Hobble Creek and help settle that area. It was the first week in October 1850 when they arrived at this place, later named Springville.
      Sylvanus and his father took up farming and chair making in Springville as a means of providing for their families. Five children were born to Sylvanus and Catherine: John Kiley, February 27, 1851; Sarah Ann, September 30, 1852; Barbara Adlinda, November 18, 1854; the twins, Sylvanus Cyrus, Jr., and Sylvester Silas, April 17, 1857; and Catherine Melissa, May 18, 1860, during the time they lived in Springville. Shortly after their third child was born Sylvanus and Catherine were sealed in the Endowment House in Salt Lake City. The Endowment House was completed and dedicated in 1855 so the Hulets must have been among the early Saints to use that facility.
      Sylvanus' mother, Margaret Noah Hulet, died soon after Sylvanus and Catherine's first child was born. She died April 15, 1851 in Springville and was buried there. It would be 12 years before her husband, Charles, would be buried by her side. He died May 9, 1863.
      In the spring of 1856 Sylvanus was called to go back across the plains to assist in bringing another company of Saints to Utah. This left Catherine and her father-in-law to take care of the home, the farm, and the chair business.
      The Indians here were unfriendly and could not be trusted. One day while Sylvanus was away from home, an Indian came and asked Catherine for bread and flour. At that time flour was very scarce among the Saints so she told him she had no bread. At that, he stepped over to the cradle, drew his bow and pointed the arrow at the baby. Fearing that he would harm the Child, she gave the Indian the bread they so sorely needed for themselves. After securing the food, the Indian seemed satisfied and left.
      The Hulets lived in Springville until 1861, when they were called to go south to help settle the Dixie Country. During the years they had lived in Springville they had built a home, started a beautiful family, developed a farm that produced well, established a small herd of cattle, and had a small chair building business. By the standards of the early Utah Pioneers they were considered quite successful.
      The Hulets were one of 300 families sent by Brigham Young under the leadership of Erastus Snow and Orson Pratt to colonize that region. For the journey, Sylvanus made a trip to Cedar Valley, where Johnson's Army was selling some of their surplus goods, and purchased a large government wagon. The government wagon plus the wagon they had would still not give them space for all their belongings, however they took the essentials. They traveled with three yoke of oxen and a mule and horse team. With their small herd of cattle they must have presented a formidable sight. One month was required to make the journey to Dixie. This was a test of faith and endurance for Sylvanus and Catherine and their six young children.
      They found Dixie a very desolate country. However, the company of new settlers were thrifty and industrious and immediately went to work in earnest. They laid out a town site and called the new settlement St. George. (Named in honor of Elder George A. Smith.) They soon moved on to city lots and began once more to build homes. In two or three years the settlement began to flourish. Cotton was grown and vineyards were planted. Work on the temple, tabernacle, and courthouse had already begun.
      The cotton was corded and spun by the women. They trained their hands to do many things that only pioneers could accomplish. Sylvanus and Catherine, with others, put forth their best efforts for the growth and development of that new country.
      Indians were troublesome. Several times they drove off animals belonging to the settlers. On one occasion two men who were looking after the horses and cattle were killed by the Indians. Sylvanus and some of the other men were sent to bring back the horses and cattle which had been driven off. Those were anxious hours for the wives who were watching and praying for the safe return of their husbands.
      After arriving in St. George, four more children were born to Sylvanus and Catherine: Emma Tryphena, July 19, 1862 (died October 10, 1864); Charles Franklin, November 11, 1864; Luella, January 1, 1867; and Oscar Willard, March 9, 1870.
      As the cattle business expanded, Sylvanus found it necessary to expand the area in which they would graze. During the summer month the cattle would spend time in the Pine Valley area and then push out through Mountain Meadow in the fall of the year. The cattle would then push on to the desert area for the winter month ending up near Enoch. Sylvanus could see an advantage of living in the Iron County area. Prior to 1872, Sylvanus had purchased some farming land at Summit, about 60 miles north of St. George. For a few years he attempted to care for both places with the help of the other children. This required many trips between St. George and Summit with a team and wagon.
      After being released from the Dixie Mission by Erastus Snow he sold his St. George home in 1872 and the family made a permanent home in Summit.
      Even though Sylvester moved from St. George before the temple was finished he still felt a close tie to seeing that it was completed. Aunt Zinie tells of the occasion when members of the Temple Committee visited them in Summit and Sylvester went upstairs and returned with $500 in gold pieces to help complete the temple. After the temple was finished and dedicated, Sylvanus and Catherine did temple work there and had their three oldest children sealed to them on February 20, 1878.
      The year after the Hulet family moved to Summit, Sylvanus was chosen to be the Presiding Elder. Five years later on July 27, 1877, the Summit Ward was organized and Sylvanus was ordained the Bishop of the Ward.
      Catherine labored a great deal among the sick. Whenever there was sickness in the community she was called upon to help care for them. When the first Relief Society was organized in Summit on March 10, 1878, she was chosen president, which position she faithfully fulfilled until her death on November 8, 1882. Catherine was buried in the Summit Cemetery.
      After the death of Catherine, Sylvanus married Elzina Robena Miller on March 21, 1883. They had five daughters: Nora Dean (adopted) born February 11, 1877; Eliza Ellen, July 28, 1884; Minnie Elzina, April 5, 1887; Theresa, July 5, 189; and Cora, September 5, 1891.
      On October 7, 1884, Sylvanus married Elizabeth (Betsy) Dalley. Of this union there was one daughter, Emma Wright, born March 10, 1890.
      Both Sylvanus and Catherine were systematic and orderly about their work. Everything was kept in order. They did not waste their means, or time. The home, farm buildings, farm machinery, the farm and farm crops and the animals were all well cared for, but nothing was wasted. Yet there was always something to share with others who were in need of assistance. Catherine was a wonderful wife and mother, as well as a willing helper to those in need of assistance in times of sickness or sorrow.
      Catherine and Sylvanus had President Brigham Young and other Church authorities stay in their home when they were traveling through that section of the state visiting the Saints on many occasions.
      Sylvanus filled the position of Bishop until 1888, when he was released. He remained faithful to the Church until his death on October 22, 1901. He is buried in the Summit Cemetery.
      The integrity of these ancestors, their habits of thrift and industry, their patience and kindness toward others had made their lives exemplary to their descendants as well as to others, and worthy of our gratitude and pride for the heritage they have left us.
      (Some of the information for this comes from the "Hulet Quarterly," August 1968, and "Sylvanus Cyrus Hulet and His Descendants," by J. Phillip Hanks 1980, and other items from the genealogy of Kent Hulet.)
      PICTURES:
      pg. 2: 'This is the first home that Sylvanus Cyrus Hulet built in Utah. It was located in Springville.'
      pg. 4: 'This home was built in St. George when the Hulet's were called to the Cotton Mission.'
      pg. 5: 'This is the last home built by Sylvanus Cyrus Hulet. Built in Summit. Aunt Zinie (Elzina) is holding a baby in front.'
      pg. 7: 'Early Mormon Settlements in Missouri.'"

      6. FHL book 929.273 St67d "Descendants of William Stoker (1819-1892): with a View of his Ancestors," by Jay and Rachel Phillips Deeben, Feb. 2014, pp. 46-50; there are some variances in birth and death dates:
      "Catherine Stoker (1829-1882), by Ora H. Barlow and submitted by Mitzie Rogers. Edited and footnoted by Jay Deeben.
      Catherine Stoker, daughter of David Stoker and Barbara Graybill, was born 29 Jul 1829, in Bloomfield, Jackson County, Ohio.[1]
      The Stokers were early converts to the Church. They suffered through the persecutions so common at that time. They were among the Saints who moved to Jackson County, Missouri, later to be driven out to other places in Missouri, and finally to Nauvoo, Illinois.
      David Stoker helped with the building of the Nauvoo temple and some of the homes in the city of Nauvoo. He and his family left Nauvoo with other Saints and crossed Iowa. It was at Mt. Pisgah[2] that Sylvanus Hulet, son of Charles Hulet and Margaret Ann Noah,[3] met and fell in love with Catherine Stoker. They were married 19 May 1850,[4] by a Reverend March. Sylvanus was born 14 Mar 1826, in Nelson, Portage, Ohio.[5] Evidently, the Hulet's and Stoker's had been in some of the groups who had stayed to protect some of the villages as they were not in the first companies to go to Utah.
      Sylvanus and Catherine started their journey westward from Kanesville, Iowa, presently Council Bluffs on 11 Jun 1850, with a company of Saints led by James Pace.[6] This company arrived in Salt Lake City sometime between 20-23 Sept 1850. Shortly after their arrival in the Salt Lake Valley President Young asked the Hulet's to go on with some other families to Hobble Creek (Springville, Utah) to help settle that area.
      Sylvanus and his father took up farming here as well as chair making as a means of providing for their families.
      The Indians here were unfriendly and could not be trusted. One day while Sylvanus was away from home, an Indian came and asked Catherine for bread and flour. At that time flour was very scarce among the Saints so she told him she had no bread. At that, he stepped over to the cradle, drew his bow and pointed the arrow at the baby. Fearing that he would harm the child, she gave the Indian the bread they so sorely needed for themselves. After securing the food, the Indian seemed satisfied and left. In 1861 Sylvanus and Catherine were called with others to help settle the Dixie Country. They accepted the call and left the home they had built in Springville to go south.
      Dixie was a desolate country. However, Catherine and Sylvanus were among the 300 families[7] who were called to settle that area. They worked diligently to build the area up by planting vineyards, orchards, and farms. They grew cotton for a time which was made into clothing. They trained their hands to do many things that only pioneers could accomplish. In time the Cotton Mission ceased to exist and families began looking elsewhere to live and work.
      Sylvanus had purchased some farming land at Summit, Iron County, about 60 miles north of St. George. The family moved there in 1872 to settle permanently. Sylvanus was ordained bishop of the Summit Ward in 1877, becoming the first bishop of that ward.
      "Catherine labored a great deal among the sick. Whenever there was sickness in the community she was called on to help care for them. When the first Relief Society was organized in Summit, March 10, 1878, she was chosen as president, which position she faithfully fulfilled until her death on November 8, 1882.''[8]
      Catherine and Sylvanus proved themselves to be true to the Church and obedient to authority when called upon to perform any duty. They built a good home in Springville, another home in St. George, and a third one in Summit. These homes are still standing and have been lived in continuously since they were built.
      Both Sylvanus and Catherine were systematic and orderly about their work. Everything was kept in order. They did not waste their means, or time. The home, farm buildings, farm machinery, the farm and farm crops and the animals were all well cared for, but nothing was wasted. Yet there was always something to share with others who were in need of assistance. Catherine was a wonderful wife and mother, as well as a willing helper to those in need of assistance in times of sickness or sorrow. She and Sylvanus had President Brigham Young in their home as a guest several times, also others of the Church authorities when they were traveling through that section of the state visiting the Saints.
      Catherine did not live long enough to enjoy much of the fruits of her labors. She had worked by the side of her husband through all their married life, but she passed away on 8 Nov 1882 in Summit, Iron, Utah about the time they were able to live more comfortably than in former years. Sylvanus Hulet lived nineteen more years after Catherine passes away. He died on 25 Oct 1901 in Summit, Iron, Utah.
      The integrity of these ancestors, their habits of thrift and industry, their patience and kindness toward others has made their lives exemplary to their descendants as well as to others, and worthy of our gratitude and pride for the heritage they have left us.
      Children of Sylvanus Hulet and Catherine Stoker Hulet[9] (Name, Birth date, Birth Place, Death date, Death place):
      John Riley Hulet[10], 27 Feb 1851, Springville, Utah, Utah, 11 Jan 1925, Snowflake, Navajo, Arizona. John married Mary Josephine Smith, daughter of Jesse Nathaniel Smith and Emma Seraphine West, born 23 Jan 1855 in Parowan, Iron, Utah. The couple was married on 12 Oct 1875 in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah.
      Sarah Ann Hulet[11], 30 Sep 1852, Springville, Utah, Utah, 11 Mar 1944, Parowan, Iron, Utah. Sarah married Peter Wimmer, son of John Wimmer and Elizabeth Hendricks, born 23 Mar 1842, in Columbus, Adams, Illinois. The couple was married on 31 May 1875, in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah.
      Barbara Adlinda Hulet[12] ,10 Nov 1854 Springville, Utah, Utah, 6 Jun 1930, Summit, Iron, Utah, Barbara married William Hoy Smith born 16 Mar 1854, Noridge, Norwich, Norfolk, England. They were married on 22 Oct 1879, in St. George, Washington, Utah.
      Sylvanus Cyrus Hulet, Jr.[13], 17 Apr 1857, Springville, Utah, Utah, (twin), 13 Dec 1942, Enterprise, Morgan, Utah. Sylvanus married Mary Ida Dalley, daughter of James Dalley and Petrine Nielsen Bertelsen, born 15 Nov 1864, in Summit, Iron, Utah. They were married 25 Apr 1883, in St. George, Washington, Utah.
      Sylvester Silas Hulet[14] 17 Apr 1857 Springville, Utah, Utah (twin) 6 Feb 1950 Wendell, Gooding, Idaho. Sylvester married Mary Elizabeth Dalley, daughter of James Dalley and Emma Wright, born 8 Sep 1856, in Fort Johnson, Iron, Utah. They were married 22 Oct 1879, in St. George, Washington, Utah.
      Catherine Melissa Hulet[15], 18 May 1860, Springville, Utah, Utah, 28 Nov 1956, Joseph, Sevier, Utah. Catherine married James Hillman Dalley, son of William Dalley and Mandana Hillman, born 11 Dec 1855, in Fort Johnson, Iron, Utah. They were married on 8 Nov 1877, in St. George, Washington, Utah.
      Emma Tryphena Hulet[16], 19 Jul 1862, St. George, Washington, Utah, 10 Oct 1864, St. George, Washington, Utah. Emma never married.
      Charles Franklin Hulet[17], 11 Nov 1864 St. George, Washington, Utah, 29 Nov 1915, Newcastle, Iron, Utah. Charles married Harriet Maria Dalley, daughter of James Dalley and Emma Wright, born 29 May 1865, in Summit, Iron, Utah. They were married on 14 Oct 1885, in St. George, Washington, Utah.
      Luella Hulet[18], 1 Jan 1867, St. George, Washington, Utah, 15 Jun 1961, Driggs, Teton, Idaho. Luella married Robert Bertelsen Dalley, son of James Dalley and Petrine Nielsen Bertelsen, born 24 Sep 1862, in Summit, Iron, Utah. They were married 21 Apr 1889, in St. George, Washington, Utah.
      Oscar Willard Hulet[19], 9 Mar 1870, St. George, Washington, Utah, 8 Oct 1940, Cedar City, Iron, Utah. Oscar married Susannah Melling Jones, daughter of Sylvester Frazer Jones and Susannah Melling, born 16 Apr 1879, in Enoch, Iron, Utah. They were married on 15 Jun 1898, in St. George, Washington, Utah.
      Chapter Notes for Catherine Stoker:
      1. Thompson, Maurine W. F., GG Granddaugher of Catherine Stoker Hulet; "Pioneer History of Catherine Stoker Hulet," as found in "Women of Faith & Fortitude, Daughters of the Utah Pioneers," Salt Lake City, Utah; Section 1, p. 1.
      2. In 1846 Mormons established a Waystation named Mt. Pisgah on the western side of Clarke
      County in an area that eventually became the eastern side of Union County. This was the temporary home of thousands of Mormons as they traveled west. The last Mormon left in 1852. Website: (http://iagenweb.org/union/history/history.html)
      3. Charles Hulet and Margaret AI1nNoah Hulet are listed among the names arriving in Salt Lake City with Unidentified Companies of pioneers in1850. This list can be accessed at website: (<http://iagenweb.org/union/history/history.html>), and search for Charles Hulet.
      4. Thompson, Maurine W. F., Section 1, p. 1.
      5. The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Familysearch.org, Family History Department, PIN: KWZV-PHX.
      6. Church History Dept., The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, James Pace Company
      (1850), website: <http://classic.lds.org/churchhistory/library/pioneercompanysearch/1,15773,,00.html>. Search for Catherine Hulet. Company departed Kanesville, Iowa 11 Jun 1850 and arrived 20-23 Sept 1850.
      7. Sons of the Utah Pioneer - Cotton Mission Chapter, "Utah's Dixie Historical Sites," "Called to Dixie" Dixie Pioneers, p. 2, accessed 5 Mar 2013, <http://www.sonsofutahpioneers.info/hs/a17-dixiepioneers.html>.
      8. Thompson, Maurine W. F., Section 1, p. 2.
      9. Information about the children of Sylvanus Cyrus Hulet and Catherine Stoker came from: The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, "FamilySearch," database, FamilySearch. (<http://familysearch.org/>: accessed 4 Jun 2011)
      10. farnilysearch.org <http://farnilysearch.org/>: PIN: KWCZ-KBQ
      11. familysearch.org <http://familysearch.org/>: PIN: KWCN-ZXW
      12. familysearch.org <http://familysearch.org/>: PIN: K2MQ-VDR
      13. familysearch.org <http://familysearch.org/>: PIN: KWCC-K3X
      14. familysearch.org <http://familysearch.org/>: PIN: KWZ9-HTL
      15. familysearch.org <http://familysearch.org/>: PIN: KWZZ-JJQ
      16. familysearch.org <http://fan1i1ysearch.org/>: PIN: KWV7-T4B
      17. familysearch.org <http://fa1ni1ysearch.org/>: PIN: KWZ9-ZL2
      18. farnilysearch.org <http://farnilysearch.org/>: PIN: KWZQ-FJT
      19. familysearch.org <http://familysearch.org/>: PIN: KWCR-9R8"

      BIRTH:
      1. Date per website for Utah State Historical Society Cemeteries Database; 8 Jan 2002.

      2. Online Ordinance Index information given by themselves: "#1 John Riley Hulet, b. 27 Feb 1851 at Springville, UT; #2 Sarah Anne Hulet Wimmer, b. 30 Sep 1852 at Springville, UT; #3 Barbara Adalinda Hulet, b. 18 Nov 1854 at Springville, UT. Sealed to parents Sylvanus Cyrus Hulet, b. 14 Mar 1826 at Portage Co., OH and Catherine Stoker Hulet, b. 24 Jul 1829 at Jackson, OH. M.F. Farnsworth, Recorder." (Per FHL film 170583, St. George Temple Adoption Records, book A, p. 71, 20 Feb 1878.)

      MARRIAGE:
      1. Per DUP biography of Catherine Stoker cited in her notes. Variant date of 19 Apr 1850 in biography cited above.

      DEATH:
      1. Date per website for Utah State Historical Society Cemeteries Database; 8 Jan 2002.

      BURIAL:
      1. Place per website for Utah State Historical Society Cemeteries Database; 8 Jan 2002. Notes: M-4 c.