Charles Henry Hales

Male 1817 - 1889  (72 years)


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  • Name Charles Henry Hales 
    Born 17 Jun 1817  Rainham, Kent, England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Christened 17 Aug 1817  Rainham, Kent, England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    Died 1 Jul 1889  Spanish Fork, Utah, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Buried 3 Jul 1889  Spanish Fork City Cemetery, Spanish Fork, Utah, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID I155  Petersen-de Lanskoy
    Last Modified 21 Aug 2015 

    Father Stephen Hales, III,   b. 10 Sep 1791, Stockbury, Kent, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 5 Oct 1846, Fort Madison, Lee, Iowa, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 55 years) 
    Mother Mary Ann Hales,   b. 11 Oct 1799, Minster-in-Sheppy, Kent, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 9 Aug 1851, Cobble Hills, Reins, Nebraska, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 51 years) 
    Married 31 Aug 1816  Rodmersham, Kent, England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Family ID F136  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 1 Julia Ann Lockwood,   b. 10 Aug 1824, Canandaigua, Ontario, New York, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 18 Feb 1903, Spanish Fork, Utah, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 78 years) 
    Married 31 Oct 1839  Quincy, Adams, Illinois, United States Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
     1. Eliza Ann Hales,   b. 27 Nov 1840, Quincy, Adams, Illinois, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 5 Jan 1899, Richfield, Sevier, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 58 years)
    +2. Julia Ardena or Ardence Hales,   b. 17 Jul 1842, Nauvoo, Hancock, Illinois, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 25 Nov 1919, Cedar City, Iron, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 77 years)
     3. George Gillette Hales,   b. 19 Mar 1844, Nauvoo, Hancock, Illinois, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 31 Jan 1907, Provo, Utah, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 62 years)
     4. Mary Isabell Hales,   b. 4 Jun 1846, Garden Grove, Decatur, Iowa, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 2 Apr 1866, near Grafton, Washington, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 19 years)
    +5. Charles Henry Hales,   b. 17 Sep 1848, Garden Grove, Decatur, Iowa, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 2 Apr 1907, Junction, Piute, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 58 years)
     6. Joseph Lockwood Hales,   b. 16 Jan 1851, Garden Grove, Decatur, Iowa, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 30 Apr 1923, Spanish Fork, Utah, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 72 years)
     7. John Taylor Hales,   b. 13 Feb 1853, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 27 Jun 1926, Spanish Fork, Utah, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 73 years)
     8. Stephen Frederick Hales,   b. 19 Sep 1855, Big Cottonwood, Salt Lake, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 14 Jan 1900, Spanish Fork, Utah, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 44 years)
     9. William Parley Hales,   b. 25 Aug 1857, South Cottonwood, Salt Lake, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 4 Feb 1928, Mapleton, Utah, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 70 years)
     10. Maria Josephine Hales,   b. 3 Oct 1859, Spanish Fork, Utah, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 15 Feb 1940, Kilgore, Clark, Idaho, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 80 years)
     11. Jonathan Hyrum Hales,   b. 25 May 1861, Spanish Fork, Utah, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 21 Jan 1922, Provo, Utah, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 60 years)
     12. Harriet Elizabeth Hales,   b. 20 Jun 1863, Spanish Fork, Utah, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 25 Jun 1945, Payson, Utah, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 82 years)
    Last Modified 22 Oct 2015 
    Family ID F118  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 2 Frances Elisabeth Almira Brunyer,   b. 4 Feb 1839, Liverpool, Lancashire, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 5 Dec 1915, Spanish Fork, Utah, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 76 years) 
    Married 18 Apr 1857  Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
     1. Lucy Elmina Hales,   b. 23 Apr 1858, Big Cottonwood, Salt Lake, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 10 Oct 1933, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 75 years)
     2. Mary Ann Hales,   b. 13 Nov 1859, Spanish Fork, Utah, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 21 Jun 1928, Draper, Salt Lake, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 68 years)
     3. James Lawrence Hales,   b. 31 Aug 1861, Spanish Fork, Utah, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 17 May 1921, Spanish Fork, Utah, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 59 years)
     4. Alma Charles Hales,   b. 19 Apr 1863, Spanish Fork, Utah, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 22 Nov 1932, Spanish Fork, Utah, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 69 years)
     5. Caroline Elmira Hales,   b. 7 May 1865, Spanish Fork, Utah, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 7 Mar 1946, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 80 years)
     6. Franklin Henry Hales,   b. 30 Jul 1867, Spanish Fork, Utah, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 25 Feb 1939, Dubois, Clark, Idaho, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 71 years)
     7. Harmon Brunyer Hales,   b. 13 Aug 1869, Spanish Fork, Utah, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 31 Jan 1934, Spanish Fork, Utah, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 64 years)
     8. Edward Moroni Hales,   b. 22 Sep 1871, Spanish Fork, Utah, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 30 Jul 1940, Spanish Fork, Utah, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 68 years)
     9. Joseph Mathew Hales,   b. 21 Jul 1873, Spanish Fork, Utah, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 23 Nov 1903, Spanish Fork, Utah, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 30 years)
     10. Richard Smith Hales,   b. 23 Apr 1875, Spanish Fork, Utah, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 14 Jul 1930, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 55 years)
     11. Sarah Jane Hales,   b. 22 Sep 1877, Spanish Fork, Utah, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 26 Oct 1952, Small, Clark, Idaho, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 75 years)
     12. Hannah Permelia or Minnie Hales,   b. 19 Jun 1879, Spanish Fork, Utah, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 27 Mar 1965, Spanish Fork, Utah, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 85 years)
     13. Daniel Wells Hales,   b. 26 Oct 1880, Spanish Fork, Utah, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 13 Mar 1946, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 65 years)
    Last Modified 22 Oct 2015 
    Family ID F135  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Notes 
    • RESEARCH_NOTES:
      1. Censuses:
      1840 US: Quincy First Ward, Adams, Illinois, related families:
      P. 6a:
      Stephen Hales, males 10-15:1; 15-20:1; 30-40:1; 40-50:1//females 15-20:1; 40-50:1. [Stephen, his wife Mary Ann, Henry W.(12), George (18), {not sure who the 30-40 male and the 15-20 female would be unless it was Charles, age 23 and not over 30, and his new bride Julia Ann, under age 20 - either way it would live Stephen, age 20, unaccounted for}. I do not find Charles or Stephen separately in same census.]
      P. 7a:
      John Ellis, males 20-30:1//females 15-20:2. [Not sure who the second female would be.]
      P. 15a [2nd Ward]:
      Joseph Horne, males 0-5:1; 20-30:1//females 20-30:1.

      1850 US: Dist. 14, Decatur, Iowa, p. 326b, dwellings 39-42, 30 Oct 1850; note there are only about 16 pages of census for this area versus 188 for Pottawattamie County; also note that the families of George, Charles, Henry, Stephen Hales and their mother Mary Ann Thompson were all neighbors - Mary Ann's husband had died in 1846 and she remarried to William Thompson; she dies herself in about 6 months:
      Dwelling 39:
      William Thompson, 46, farmer, Scotland.
      Mary A., 51, Eng.
      Daniel 17, farmer, Canada.
      David 19, farmer, Scotland.
      William, 15, Canada.
      Maria, 12, MO.
      Orville, 9, Ill.
      Dwelling 40:
      George Hales, 28, printer, Eng.
      Sarah A., 27, NY.
      Mary A., 6.
      Harriett, 4, Iowa.
      Dwelling 41:
      Charles Hales, 33, bricklayer, Eng.
      Julia A., 26, NY.
      Eliza A., 9, IL.
      Julia A., 8, IL.
      George G., 6, IL.
      Mary J. 4, IL.
      Charles H., 2, IL.
      Henry H. Hales, 21, farmer, Eng.
      Eliza A., 20, PA.
      Dwelling 42:
      Stephen Hales, 30, stonecutter, Eng.
      Eveline, 20, VT.
      Stephen, 1, IA.

      1856 State: Utah Statehood Census Index per Ancestry.com: Charles H. Hales, South Cottonwood Ward, Salt Lake County, p. 579.

      1860 US: Spanish Fork City, Utah, Utah, p. 229, 23 Aug 1860, family 1629:
      Charles H. Hale, 48 farmer, $300, $800, Eng.
      Julia A., 35, NY.
      Frances, 23, Eng.
      George G., 17, laborer, IL.
      Mary J., 13, IA.
      Charles H., 11, IA.
      Joseph L., 9, IA.
      John T., 7, UT.
      Stephen F., 5, UT.
      William, 2, UT.
      Maria J., 7/12, UT.
      Lucy E., 3, UT.
      Mary, 4/12, UT.

      1870 US: Spanish Fork, Utah, Utah, 3 Aug 1870, p. 24:
      Family #172:
      Charles H. Hales, 51, farmer, $750, $600, England.
      Julia A., 45, keeping house, NY.
      Joseph L., 19, at home, IA.
      John T., 17, at home, UT.
      Stephen F., 14, at home, UT.
      William P., 12, at home, UT.
      Josephine, 10, no occupation, UT.
      Jonathan, 9, at home, UT.
      Harriet E. 6, at home, UT.
      Family #173:
      Frances E. Hales, 31, keeping house, England.
      Lucy E., 12, no occupation, UT.
      Mary A., 10, no occupation, UT.
      James L., 8, at home, UT.
      Charles A., 7, at home, UT.
      Caroline E, 5, at home, UT.
      Franklin H., 2, at home, UT.
      Harmon, 9/12, UT.

      1880 US: Spanish Fork, Utah, Utah, NA film T9-1338, p. 193D:
      Charles H. Hales, mason/farmer, self, M, 62, Eng., Eng., Eng.
      Julia Ann, wife, M, 55, NY, RI, MA.
      Jonathan H., son, S, 19, UT, Eng., NY.
      Harriet E., dau., S, 17, UT, Eng., UT.
      Frances, wife, M, 41, Eng., Germ., Germ.
      James L., son, S, 18, UT, Eng., Eng.
      Charles A., son, S, 17, UT, Eng., Eng.
      Caroline E., dau., S, 15, UT, Eng., Eng.
      Franklin H., son, S, 12, UT, Eng., Eng.
      Harmon B., son, S, 10, UT, Eng., Eng.
      Edward M., son, S, 8, UT, Eng., Eng.
      Mathew J., son, S, 6, UT, Eng., Eng.
      Richard S., son, S, 5, UT, Eng., Eng.
      Sarah J., dau, S, 2, UT, Eng., Eng.
      Hannah P., dau, S, 1M, UT, Eng., Eng.

      2. Parish map of Kent with origin dates on file.

      PHOTOS:
      1. Pictures in possession of Kerry Petersen in file folder with father's family group.

      2. Photos on file from Marian Moody of 68-682 Crozier Dr., Waialua, HI, 96791 Marian is a descendant thru Caroline Elmira Hales and her husband Benjamin Franklin Woodard. Photos include large portraits of Charles Henry Hales and each of his two wives. There is also a collage of photos including Charles Henry Hales, his wife Frances, their daughters Caroline and Mary Ann, an unnamed daughter, and combined shot of Frances with an unnamed daughter. There is also another photo of the Spanish Fork Choir with Charles Henry Hales and his wife Julia Lockwod Hales. This is the same choir that was invited to sing at the dedication of the Salt Lake Tabernacle as quoted in an accompanying article about the history of Spanish Fork (source not cited). Lastly, a photo from the Spanish Fork Press showing a two story home Charles Henry Hales that was built in 1860.

      BIOGRAPHY:
      1. The book "Mormon Redress Petitions, Documents of the 1833-1838 Missouri Conflict," edited by Clark V. Johnson, contains a copy of the "Scroll Petition" dated 28 Nov 1843 at Nauvoo, IL addressed to the U.S. Congress by members of the LDS Church who had property destroyed by Missouri mobs in the 1830's. Included with over a couple thousand signatures are Charles and Julia Ann Hales.

      2. Autobiography of Charles Henry Hales (The oldest child of Stephen and Mary Ann Hales, Charles wrote his biography which is recorded on page 208 of the record of the 2nd Quorum of Seventies) and as quoted from the book "Windows: A Mormon Family" by Kenneth Glyn Hales, 520-888-9199 [Tucson]. His version does vary slightly with the version I printed 13 Sep 2006 at the LDS Visitor's Center at Kirtland, Ohio. Both versions are from the same source and the latter notes grammar has been standardized. For excerpts only found in the first quotation, I mark with {} and the same for the second quotation with []:
      "I, Charles H. Hales, [was the eldest son of Stephen and Mary Ann Hales, who was the eldest son of Stephen and Margaret Hales. Mary Ann Hales was the daughter of Henry and Hannah Hales. I Charles H Hales,] was born in the parish of Rainham [Reinham], county of Kent, England on the seventeenth of June 1817. I was educated and raised under the doctrines of the Church of England. I was baptized in infancy and had godfathers and godmothers to stand responsible for my conduct until I arrived at the age of fourteen. At ths age they were no longer held responisible since those being confirmed took the responsibility upon themselves. I did not receive this ordinance myself, since I was not quite old enough to when the bishop visited our parish for confirmation; it was established by law that the bishop should visit each parish twice in seven years. At this time all those who had arrived at the age of fourteen were confirmed while the remainder waited for the next term. I was one that had to wait on account of my age, but before the next term my father with his family emigrated to upper Canada in North America. This was the year 1832. My father was a boot and shoe maker by trade and he taught me the same business until I was fifteen years of age. I was somewhat adverse to this trade, and when we came to Canada I was permitted to follow any occupation I chose. Accordingly I chose to follow farming which I did until after the time I embraced the everlasting gospel. My father was a professor of religion. He was called a Wesleyan Methodist when we came to Canada, and continued the same faith until Elder Parley P. Pratt came into the providence of Upper Canada and proclaimed the everlasting gospel. I had never embraced any of the systems of the present age, but had been greatly addicted to the reading of the old and new testament. I was subject to many serious reflections and wonderings as to why we had not apostles and prophets on the earth at the present age as was true in former ages. Since I was destitute of the priesthood I could not understand the scriptures. I always endeavored to be honest in my dealings with my fellow men. I had been trained to observe the sabbath very strictly and to be upright and honest in all things; principles which I always endeavored to inculcate and practice according to the knowledge we had of right and wrong. I embraced the everlasting gospel in the month of June 1836. I was baptized by Parley P. Pratt and confirmed by Elders Orson Hyde and Parley P. Pratt in the fall of the same year. After embracing the truth I went on a visit to Kirtland, Ohio where the main body was located. Here I first became acquainted with Joseph Smith the Prophet and Seer of this last dispensation. I also became acquainted with his father, Joseph Smith, Sr., the Patriarch of the Church for I received my patriarchal blessing. I stayed in Kirtland till spring, and then returned to Canada. I was well pleased with my visit, and had heard many good instructions in the house of the Lord. The same year I left Kirtland, I was ordained a priest in the Aaronic Priesthood at conference held in Scarborough Township in December 1837. I was then sent out to preach with Brother Eli Maginn who had been ordained a priest at the same conference. We continued to preach until spring at which time the word of the Lord through his servant Joseph was for the saints to sell their farms and move to the state of Missouri. Accordingly, we gathered a small company together, and after selling our farms started our journey on the twentieth of March in 1838. We had a very tiresome journey since we started just as the roads were breakng up in the spring. We arrved in the state of Missouri in the early part of June, coming to a place called Huntsville. We stayed a short time, since we found quite a big branch of the church there. Some of our company concluded to buy and settle there which they did. I stayed with my father, and went to work for a few months here. I first became acquainted with Julia Ann Lockwood at this place. She was the daughter of Joseph and Annis Lockwood, and was a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Sometime in the month of September, I started for Far West, but on coming to DeWitt I was requested to stay by George M. Hinkle, who was president of the Branch. I was asked to assist them in defending the place as they were threatened with the mob. I did so, although the first time the mob came to make an attack on us we were but 23 in number while they numbered from 150 to 175. I stayed in DeWitt until the brethren were counseled to leave. Joseph Smith, Hyrum - his brother, and many other brethren came to assist us from Far West. I did not leave DeWitt quite as soon as the rest of the brethren as I stayed behind to assist one of my Canadian brethren, who was not quite ready when the rest were. We, however, calculated to overtake them soon, but one of his horses gave out, and he was compelled to stay. I was then under the necessity of going to Far West on foot, and alone, since he, himself, gave up the idea of going. The first day I lost my way as I crossed the prairie of the Big Mound. I continued traveling till night, not knowing but that I was on the right road. On coming to a cultivated field I found a man putting up corn. I inquired if I could stay with him for the night. He made no reply, but asked me if I was a Mormon. I replied in the afiirmative. He then told me that I could not stay with him, and further told me that I was greatly out of my way for Far West. I then told him that I was a perfect stranger in the county, that I had lost my way, that my feet were much torn by my boots, and that it was now sunset, and I could not go any further. He then said, as a reason for not keeping me, that during our difficulties in DeWitt, he had himself entertained seventeen of the mob, and that he had sworn never to keep a Mormon. He did, however, tell me where I could stay for the night. In the morning I started again for far West, and arrived there in October. I arrived just a few hours before the Crooked River Battle. I was one of the company engaged in that affair, although I was lame and tired. I borrowed a horse and a gun, (for I had neither) and went to defend my brethren. I saw Brother (Patrick) O'Banion when he fell. Soon after the battle the governor's troops came to Far West, and demanded every man that was engaged in the Crooked River Battle. At this time, we were under the necessity of having our houses and grain burnt and our cattle driven off, or else if we stood up for our rights and defended ourselves like men and saints of the Most High we must be hunted by an authorized mob and be driven from our homes and families, or be killed, just as they pleased. As soon as we learned their intentions were to take every man that was in the Crooked River Battle we all started for Illinois, going by the way of Diahman, [Adam-ondi-Ahman] since we were surrounded on every other side. Before we arrived at Diahman my horse gave out, so the brethren counseled me to stay in Diahman as I was not known by any of the mob in that county. Accordingly I stayed till the arms were given up and the brethren returned again to Far West. I then went to Fort Leavenworth and worked until spring.. Then I left the fort and came to Quincy, Illinois. Here I married Julia Ann Lockwood on the last day of October 1839. On the following year on the 27th of November, my eldest daughter was born which we called Eliza Ann. The next April I left Quincy and went on a mission in company with Elder Andrew Hamilton to the southern part of the state of Illinois. We baptized some and left quite a number believing. After I came back I continued to live in Quincy till next spring when I moved with my family to the city of Nauvoo. As soon as I arrived in Nauvoo I joined the brass band and continued to play with them at every public festival. We played for the Nauvoo Legion, for the dedication of the Seventies Hall, and for the laying of the capstone of the Lord's House. The first summer after I arrived at Nauvoo, in the month of June, my second daughter was born which we named Julia Ardena. This was June 1842 and in the month of March 1844 my wife delivered of a son which we called George. In the fall following, at the October conference, I was ordained one of the Seventies and was organized in the Second Quorum. On the 23rd of December 1845 we were called to go into the temple to receive our endowments. We were fully satisfied that the present organization of the church is as it should be, and that the priesthood is again restored to man on the earth with all its attendant gifts and blessings as in ancient days, that all men must sooner or later bow to the priesthood, held by the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. We knew that Joseph Smith was the instrument in the hands of God in bringing forth the fullness of the gospel and that he lived and died a prophet of the Most High God, sealing his testimony with his blood as did the ancient prophets and apostles. (After crossing the plains with the saints, Charles Henry Hales made his home in Spanish Fork, Utah where he became a prominent builder and farmer. He married a second wife, Frances E. Brunyer, on Oct. 31, 1856 at Salt Lake City. He was the father of 25 children by his two wives and is the ancestor of the Spanish Fork branch of the Utah Hales family. Charles Henry Hales and his two wives are buried in the Spanish Fork, Utah Cemetery.)"

      3. "Charles Henry Hales" by W.B. Hales: "At the age of 22 Charles Henry Hales met in Quincy, Illinois, Julia Ann Lockwood, age 15, and married her on October 30, 1839. She was the daughter of Joseph Lockwood and Ann Gillett.
      Their subsequent residence and family growth are listed as follows:
      Residence: Years: Family Growth:
      Quincy, Illinois 1839-1842 Elizabeth Ann
      Nauvoo, Illinois 1842-1845 Julia Ardena, George Gillett
      Garden Grove, Iowa 1846-1852 Mary Isabella, Charles Henry
      Salt Lake City,Utah 1852-1853 John Taylor
      Big Cottonwood,Utah 1854-1858 Stephen Frederick, William Parley
      Spanish Fork, Utah 1858-1889 Maria Josephine, Jonathan Hyrum, Harriet, Elizabeth
      He later met and married Francis Brunyer, age 19, on April 18, 1857. She made her home in Spanish Fork, Utah and to them were born 13 children. All 25 of his children grew to adulthood and each had large families of their own. Charles Henry Hales was a mason and builder by trade and practiced this vocation wherever he resided. Many of the public building of Spanish Fork area were constructed by him. These included such buildings as the City hall, Ideal School Building and the Spanish Fork Coop building, still standing. Many of the homes in this city were built by him. He had a small farm in this area which occupied his time when building contracts were low. He was a public spirited community builder and served in many responsible positions in city, school, and church life - a few of his positions of responsibility are listed below:
      Span. Fork Dist. School Trustee-10 years.
      " " City Counilman-Several years.
      " " Coop-Board Member, V.P. and President, and Superintendent - many years in all.
      " " Choir-35 years-and band-many years.
      He was a member of the armed forces that kept the Indians under control during the early days of the pioneer settlements. He was a faithful member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints throughout his life. His family grew up and became respected and honored citizens in the communities where they chose to build their homes. He died in Spanish fork, Utah on July 1, 1889 at the age of 72 and was buried in the local cemetery.

      4. According to autobiography of son Stephen as recorded by 6 Sep 1845 at Nauvoo: "My father was a professor of religion." According to biography of son Henry Williams: "His father was a shoemaker by trade and he saw a better chance for raising his boys in Canada than in England."

      5. According to biography of son George: "In the spring of 1838 George left Canada with his parents to join the saints in Far West, Missouri."

      6. Owned lot 32, N/2 1/4 acre, Kimball 1st Subd. between Gordon and James Streets on the south side of Kimball Street in Nauvoo. See file for map provided from Nauvoo Visitors Center. Location is southeast of temple about the same distance as the temple is from the Mississippi River.

      7. "Army of Israel, Mormon Battalion Narratives," David Bigler and Will Bagley, editors, pg. 49 (The Arthur H. Clark Co., Spokane, WA, 2000) quotes from a letter of Brigham Young from Mt. Pisgah, 7 Jul 1846, to the Saints at Garden Grove: "We must take these 500 men from among the teamsters, and sent them without delay. If there is any one among your over eighteen and under forty five that wants to and can go, let him be at Council Bluffs forthwith. Drummers and fifers are wanted. Where is bro. Hales and the rest of the band? (Footnote: Brothers Charles and Stephen Hales were members of Captain Pitt's Brass Band, but neither joined the battalion.)

      8. Per Kate B. Carter, "Our Pioneer Heritage" (Dau. of Utah Pioneers, SLC, UT, 1977) vol.20, pp.74, 75: Speaking of Nauvoo: "Nauvoo Legion Band. The maneuvers of a large body such as the Nauvoo Legion grew to be could not properly be conducted ... and the thought of a brass band therefore suggested itself to the general (Joseph Smith). Thus, at the call of the Prophet, a meeting was held...sometime during the year 1842...some of the persons present...Charles H. Hales, trombones; Stephen Hales...clarinets; Geo. Hales...french horns...numbering 18 in all." Later, in Utah: "At a meeting of the Nauvoo Legion Band held... 9 Apr 1850, Bro. William Clayton made the following remarks: 'I have a conscientious notion of organizing this band...I have as firm a notion in the organizing this band as I would have in being baptized...'(list includes 25 including the 3 Hales.) It was also moved...the band adopt a straw hat for the covering of the head, a white dress coat and white pantaloons, a sky blue sash and a white muslim cravat at their uniform...a committee was appointed relative to procuring a band carriage, and by unanimous vote Brig. Young was appointed to the office of standard bearer..."

      9. Per Kate B. Carter, "Our Pioneer Heritage" (Dau. of Utah Pioneers, SLC, UT, 1977) vol.15, pp.517/518: The Spanish Fork Choir had some notoriety in rendering both sacred and secular music, having some of the best soprano voices in the Territory, and affording amusement and refined enjoyment to the citizens of Spanish Fork and the neighboring settlements by giving concerts and social parties. They attracted the attention of Pres. Brigham Young and on two occasions they visited SLC by his invitation, the first to sing at a conference held in the Bowery and afterwards at the opening of the new Tabernacle. At another time, while on his way to attend the dedicatory sevices at the opening of the Nephi meetinghouse, Pres. Young and party stayed at Spanish Fork and held service in the afternoon. Afterward the Pres.. asked the choir to accompany him to Nephi to assist at services there. The choir spent two days at Nephi having a most enjoyable time. See hard file for choir picture which includes both Charles Henry Hales and his wife Julia Lockwood Hales. The choir was organized 4 Jul 1856 and still functioning by 1889.

      10. The book, "On the Mormon Frontier, The Diary of Hosea Stout, 1844-1861," edited by Juanita Brooks, Univ. of Utah Press, p. 155: "Friday April the 24th 1846. Today was clear warm & dry. I sent Allen & the two gun waggons on today & Hunter & I tarried This was done because there was not team enough to go all together. They were to go to the next timber or good camping place & send the teams back for us. Col Scott with the Artillery also moved on. The ox which we left in the prairie give out was brought on today by Charles Hales. This added strength to our teams which were now too weak for our loading."

      11. The following is a review of the Deseret Evening News for articles about Charles H. Hales:
      Feb. 23, 1852: Salt Lake City, Utah-Charles Henry Hales is living in Garden Grove, Iowa. Second Quorum of Seventies: A general appointment is given out for the brethren of the Quorum to meet every Sabbath evening, at 6:00 pm at the house of bro. William Taylor, in the 14th ward. A punctual attendance is requested. Bradford W. Elliott, clerk.
      Sep. 18, 1852, p. 90: Reports recent pioneer companies arriving into the Salt Lake Valley. Shows: "2nd Ten. Charles H. Hales, Capt., wife and 6 kids." They were part of the James C. Snow Co.
      Feb. 14 1853: Editor of the Deseret News: We beg leave to make our annual report through your valuable paper of the names and residents of the Presidents and members of members [sic] of the Second Quorum of Seventies, as follows: Charles H. Hales-Great Salt Lake County. Those of the quorum who live in this city are diligent in meeting regular every Sunday night, and have felt the benefits of the same; their minds have been instructed and enlightened in doctrine and the principals of the gospel, preparing themselves for the great work ahead of them. Unity exists among the brethren and they feel happy in the enjoyment of each others society, and the spirit of God is with us all the time. Walter Thompson, Clerk.
      Feb. 6, 1856: He was a member of the second Quorum of Seventies Great Salt Lake County. We hold monthly meetings on the first Sabbath of every month at 6:00 pm in the City Hall by the order of the council.
      July 24, 1856: p 3-Spanish Fork-parade, brassband [sic], Capt. Charles H. Hales; 24 young men in uniform bearing stars and stripes.
      March 4, 1857: Annual report of quorum-Charles H. Hales-Great Salt Lake County. The quorum meets in the city hall on the 1st and 3rd Sat. of every month at 6:00pm. The members living in the city and precinct thereof are requested to attend and all those living at a distance are requested to report themselves at least once in 3 months. Those failing to comply with the above may expect to be dropped and their places filled with those that will. William Livingston, Clerk.
      Jan. 20 1858: Charles H. Hales-Great Salt Lake County. The Quorum meetings are held in the police station on the 1st and 3rd Sat. of each month at 6:00 pm. All the members are requested to attend. J. V. Long, Clerk.
      July 24, 1865: p. 3 - Spanish Fork - parage, brassband, Capt. Chalres H. Hales; 24 young men in uniform bearing stars and stripes.
      Dec. 30, 1861: Charles Henry Hales was elected to a committee of six men to help get the territory of Spanish Fork admission into the Union and adopt the State Government.
      Jan. 22, 1870: Des Even News; Results of the 11th annual election of directors for Utah County, which took place on the 17th. The following are the names of the newly elected Board of Directors: Spanish Fork-Charles H. Hales. At the next meeting to be held at Provo, Feb. 15th, the following matters will be considered; First premium list for the ensuing season; a seed committee for each settlement, and traveling committees on field crops and early fruits, vegetable, etc.
      Jan. 20, 1888, p. 5, Salt Lake Herald-Charles H. Hales, of Spanish Fork was brought before commissioner Hills today on the usual charge, but the commissioner was kindly disposed on account of the age of the defendant, and discharged him. He was 71.
      Jul 6, 1889 He died at age 72.
      Jul 8, 1889 His obituary. [See quotation below.]

      12. Per "Pioneers and Prominent Men of Utah": Came to Utah in Sep., 1852. Seventy, home missionary, member Spanish Fork choir, school trustee, member city council, farmer, and brickmason.

      13. Per obituary of son Joseph Lockwood Hales, family emigrated to Utah in 1852. They settled in West Jordan living there until 1855 when they came to Spanish Fork. Obituary of son John T. Hales says 1857.

      14. From a biography of his sister Harriet Louise Hales in the book "Pioneer Women of Faith and Fortitude" by the daughters of Utah Pioneers: "She was a pioneer of 4 Sep 1851 with the Garden Grove Wagon Train. They stayed 3 years in Garden Grove where Harriet's brothers were working to make preparations for the move across the Plains. 'This company of Saints consisting of 21 families left Garden Grove on May 17, 1851 and upon arriving at Kanesville, they engaged the services of Harry Walton to lead their company.' Her mother died soon after they had reached the Platte and was buried at Ancient Bluff, Nebraska in a coffin made from a wagon box. They experienced hardships along the way, but the worst was a buffalo stampede which took the lives of some of their company. They arrived in Salt Lake Valley on Sep. 24, 1851 with what they called the Garden Grove Independent Wagon Company.'"

      15. Several Daughters of the Utah Pioneers biographies exist all based upon the same information I already have cited herein. To cite them here would be redundant; however, their authors and variant information, if any, is as follows:
      a. Vinita Holoyck, granddaughter: "They left Garden Grove, Iowa, in the Spring of 1852, and landed in Salt Lake Sep. 1852... Farming was the principal occupation and he was also a mason by trade... He [Charles Henry Hales] contracted and built the City Hall in the fall of 1876..."
      b. Ora May Sorensen Wilson, 3rd great-grandchild of Stephen: "Stephen Hales was religious man by nature, and belonged to the Methodist faith; however, his wife Mary Ann, attended the Church of England. The children, according to his daughter, attended the Methodist Church with their father who was faithful in the performance of his religious duties, although he never became a very enthusiastic Methodist. In the year 1832, there was great excitement in the town where this family lived. There were favorable reports being sent from Van Dieman's Land (Tasmania), and great inducements were held out to those interested in going to this country. Stephen and Mary Ann caught the spirit of going, and began to make preparations for leaving England. Before arrangements had been completed for them to go, however, letters were received from Upper Canada, picturing, in glowing terms, the advantages of that country. Stephen Hales changed his mind immediately and made arrangements to emigrate to the town of York, afterwards called Toronto, Canada. Accordingly, on the 16th day of April, 1832, this family, consisting of parents, five sons and two daughters, bade adieu to England. They had a tedious voyage of six seeks across the ocean, and the mother, Mary Ann, was sick during the entire voyage. During the passage across, there were three deaths on board, one of the three being a son, Elias, whom they consigned to a watery grave. The ship anchored at Quebec in May, and after a tedious passage up the St. Lawrence River by steamer, they landed safely at the town of York, 16 June, 1832, thankful that they were at the journey's end. They were in a strange land and to their dismay found that the cholera was raging fearfully in that region; but through all of those trying scenes the Lord preserved this family in good health..."
      c. Crista Ell Hales Simons, granddaughter: "In the Spring of 1854, Charles Henry and his family moved to Big Cottonwood... For five years they lived there and farmed. Grandfather helped to build the old paper mill which still stands as relic of the past. In 1856, grandfather had rented a farm and put in crops. Just as plants began to make the fields green, the terrible grasshoppers came, destroying the crops as they did all over Utah. But through faith and prayers, their crops were saved by the sea gulls, which God sent to their rescue. In 1858 they moved to Spanish Fork... He was a member of the Spanish Fork Choir. At the age of eight years, in the absence of the leader, he led the choir in the Church of England... During the trouble with the Indians, grandfather and his two sons served as home guards... Charles Henry injured his foot while driving a team and wagon. Although his foot was hurt, he walked to Provo to a meeting. I remember my grandmother, Francis Brunyer, telling my father she had a dream about the three of them (meaning Chalres Henry, his first wife, and herself) and that something was going to happen to one of them. It happened to grandfather, and he did not live so very long after this. Grandfather was also a firm believer in the paying of tithes. He related to us one time that while making campfire in the canyon one night, he saw three personages in white, and each time he turned his head to look at them, one disappeared until all three had gone. He always regretted that he did not have the strength to sepak to them. Grandmother cooked for her family of 13 in a large kettle over a fireplace until the oldest child, Lucy Elmina, taught school, and bought her first cook stove. They baked in a brick oven outside and had to clean the snow off the oven before baking the bread, but made delicious bread in this oven with an even brown..."

      16. Per records of the Nauvoo Visitors Center as quoted form Seventies Records, Bk B Sel, pg. 17: Member of Quorum 2 and ordained 1844.

      17. For an interesting account of life in Spanish Fork from about 1861 to 1900, read biography of Eliza Brockbank, his daughter-in-law, within this database.

      18. The book "An Intimate Chronicle, the Journals of William Clayton," ed. by George Smith, Signature Books, 1995, Salt Lake City, Utah:
      P. 549, May 24, 1845, Saturday, in the process of dedicating the capstone of the stonework of the original Nauvoo Temple: "On Friday, the 23rd, all the stone on the outside of the wall was laid, except the south-east corner stone. This progress was a great rejoicing to the Saints. The Rigdonites have prophecied that the walls would never be built; but through the blessing of God we have lived to see the prediction come to naught. On Saturday the 24th, at a quarter before six o'clock a.m., was the time appointed for the laying of the capstone of the temple. Quite a number of the Saints had assembled to witness the interesting ceremony. There were present, of the quorum of the Twelve: Pres. Brigham Young, Heber C. Kimball, John Taylor, Willard Richards, Amasa Lyman, George A. Smith, John E. Page, Orson Hyde, and Orson Pratt; also Newel K. Whitney, and George Miller, Trustees-in-Trust; Alpheus Cutler and Raymond Cahoon, building committee; William Clayton, temple recorder; John Smith, Patriarch and president of the Stake, and Chrales C. Rich his counselor. Of the High Council William Huntington, Sr., Aaron Johnson, George W. Harris, James Allred, David Fullmer, William Weeks, architect, and William W. Phelps. A few minutes before six, the band came up and arranged themselves on the platform in a circle a little back from the corner. The names of the band who were present are as follows: William Pitt, leader, Stephen Hales, William F. Cahoon, Robert T. Burton, John Kay, James Smithies, Daniel F. Cahoon, Andrew Cahoon, Charles H. Hales, Martin H. Peck, J.T. Hutchinson, James Standing, William D. Huntington. Charles Smith and Charles C. Robbins, also William H. Kimball, Color bearer. At six o'clock the band played 'The Nightingale;' and afterwards while the people were collecting, they played another tune. At eight minutes after six Brother William W. Player commenced spreading his mortar, perfect silence prevailing. President Young stood on the wall immediately north of the corner stone, with Elder Heber C. Kimball at his right hand. When the mortar was spread, the stone was lifted to its place by President Brigham Young... President Young then stepped on the stone, and taking a large pestle began beating it to its place. He finished laying the stone with the assistance and direction of Brother Player precisely at 22 minutes after six o'clock. The band then struck up the 'Capstone March,' composed and arranged by William Pitt, the leader, for the occassion. President Young then spoke to the congregation, instructing them with regard to shouting the 'Hossannah.' He then said, 'The last stone is laid upon the temple, and I pray the Almighty in the name of Jesus to defend us in this place, and sustain us until the temple is finished and have all got our endowments.' The whole congregation then, following the motion of President Young, shouted as loud as possible; 'Hossannah, hosannah, hossannah, to God and the Lamb! Amen, amen, and amen!' This was repeadted a second and third time. The President concluded by saying; "So let it be, thou Lord Almighty!'... He then dismissed the congregation... The people began to move away, but the band continued playing. John Kay also went on the corner stone and sang a song composed by Elder William W. Phelps, called the 'Capstone Song.' The morning was very cold and chilly... The Saints seemed highly interested and pleased with the morning's performance..."
      P. 267, April 2, 1846, Thursday, in the process of crossing Iowa at the time of the forced Mormon departure from Nauvoo, IL: "One of the Brother Hales arrived to say to his brother who drives team for (William) Pitt that his family is very sick and wants him to go back but we cannot spare the team and he says it is no use for him to go back without it. At night I wrote again to Diantha [William Clayton's wife] and sent it by Brother Hales who returns tonight." [Kerry's note: I am unsure which of the three brothers this refers to - Charles, Stephen, or George. Also there are several entries refering to William Pitt's band performing concerts and collecting fees in various Iowa cities as the Mormons make their pioneer trek. This band seemed to have been travelling together as a company on the trek. Both Stephen and Charles Hales were part of this band in Nauvoo and the above quote would indicate that at least one of the brothers may have been involved in these impromptu performances even though Clayton does not necessarily name him. I have these entries on file.]

      19. From the Kirtland, Ohio, LDS Visitors' Center, 13 Sep 2006: "Hist. Record, June 1889, JENSON - THE Nauvoo Temple, pg. 870: 'A few minutes before 6 o'clock the band came up and arranged themselves on the platform in a circle a little back from the corner. The names of the members of the band who were present were: Wm. Pitt, leader; Stephen Hales, Wm. F. Cahoon, Robert T. Burton, John Kay, James Smithies, Daniel F. Cahoon, Andre Cahoon, Charels H. Hales, Martin H. Peck, J.T. Hutchinson, James Standing, Wm. D. Huntington, Charles Smith and Charles C. Robbins; also William H. Kimball, color bearer.' "

      20. "Old Hales home has fascinating history." [Article accompanies a photo of a two story home with 5 windows on the top story and one door centered within four windows on the first floor with the caption "House built in 1860."
      ~Spanish Fork Press, Jmart reporter
      Charles Henry Hales was born June 17, 1817 in Kent, England. He migrated to upper Canada with his father, Stephen Hales and his mother, Mary Ann Hales and five brother and sisters in 1832. They all joined the Mormon Church and were baptized by Parley P. Pratt in 1836. After his baptism by Parley Pratt and confirmation by Elders Orson F. Hyde and Parley Pratt in the fall of 1836 he then visited Kirtland, Ohio where the Church as a body was located. Here he first became acquainted with Joseph Smith the Prophet and Seer of this Last Dispensation. He also met Joseph Smith, Sr., the Patriarch of the Church, and received his Patriarchal Blessing.
      He was ordained a Priest in the Aaronic Priesthood in December 1837 at the age of 20. On March 20, 1838 the Hales family sold all their property and moved to Huntsville, Missouri, arriving in early June. He stayed there until September and started out for Far West. On arriving in Dewitt he was asked by George M. Hinkel, President of the Branch, in company with Elder John Murdock, to assist in defending the place as they were threatened with the mob. He stayed to help a friend and intended to catch up with them but got lost and didn't get to Far West until October, just a few hours before the Crooked River Battle. From here he went to Quincy, Illinois. He married Julia Lockwood October 31, 1839. From this union 12 children were born. All lived to manhood and womanhood. He and his wife and family moved to the city of Nauvoo in 1842. He joined the Brass Band in Nauvoo and played with them for all public festivals. He left Nauvoo in 1845 with his wife, three children and his father, Stephen Hales and his mother, Mary Ann, and arrived in Garden Grove, Iowa, June 1846. Left Garden Grove in 1851, crossed the plains and arrived in Salt Lake City, Utah in September 1852. His mother and father both died and were buried on the plains. In 1854 the family settled in Big Cottonwood. He lived there for five years, farming and building. He helped build the old paper mill which was converted into an open air dance hall in 1936-37.
      He married Francis Elizabeth Brunyer April 18, 1857. Moved to Spanish Fork, Utah in 1859. Built a home at 236 West Eighth North, Spanish Fork. From this marriage 13 children were born, all who lived to man and womanhood. His second wife lived in a house on the corner of the same lot. He was a farmer and builder. He built the old city hall in Spanish Fork, the Big Co-op Store, the Central School, recently torn down, the Cannery and many homes. He organized the first Brass Band in Spanish Fork and he and his first wife, Julia Ann Hales sang in the Spanish Fork choir. He was also in the Spanish Fork City Council. He died July 1, 1889 at Spanish Fork, Utah and was buried in Spanish Fork Cemetery."

      21. Handwritten letter of Charles Henry Hales to his daughter Caroline transcribed by Kerry Petersen. The letter was found June 2005 in Waialua, Oahu, Hawaii at the home of Marian Moody who is a descendant of Caroline and with whom Kerry was visiting:
      "Spanish Fork Aug'st 6th: 1882
      Dear Daughter,
      I have got in the writing mood I guess. For I have just concluded a letter to Mary Ann in Salt Lake City and two weeks ago to day I wrote 3 letters.
      The greatest difficulty about my writing these days are that if I undertake to write after my days work is done I am tired and as if to sleep with my pen in my hand and I have not time to write in the daytime so I have to use Sunday afternoon instead of going to Sunday School. The folks are all well we got about 13 loads of hay from the north field this year and last week I cut 5 acres for Fred and Willie that they bought of Joseph and they had a splendid crop - 13 loads off from 5 acres. Caroline we received your note and I intended to have answered it before but for the reason already stated. We sent up two pairs of shoes that had been repaired to you and I sent up to Hyrum a Book that came from the states that he had sent for. And would really like to know if you got these things allright. I have just cut my Lucerne the second time and did not get it raked and cocked up untill it was dark last night for I was working with the bees nearly all the afternoon and I found that Phan lost a swarm. I ought to have devided them a week ago and I knew it but have been so busy that it seemed almost impossible for me to attend to them sooner this was the reason I was so late raking up and Fred had Fred had the boys Frank Harnson and Ed and one team and both of my waggons helping to get up his hay and they only suceeded in getting up the last load late last night. They were till dark getting up for Harmos upset his load thus delaying them and in consequence of his haveing all my help I was under the necessity of doing as I did. I have not cut any grain of my own yet but I have helped John and Gillet cut theirs. John and Gillet have been cutting for several other parties yesterday. They broke down and I had to send a card to Warnock to send us the piece that will replace the broken one it will cost about $2.50. I have had a letter from Lucy and one from Mary Ann in the city since we received yours. All are well. I received a letter from Joseph L. Hales a week or ten days ago and he gave us a brief account of the difficulty they had in St. Johns between some roughs and the Mexicans. The Mexicans were celebrating some festival that is customary among them when these fellows some named Greer came into town with guns and pistols on them a Brother of these Greers being a Mormon begged of his Brothers not to go up among the Mexicans with their arms but they would not listen to him but go they would and go they did and the Mexicans ordered them off and they refused to go and the Mexicans opened fire upon them each party then commenced a general fusilade and sought shelter as best they could and kept it up for about an hour. Joseph says the way the bullets whistled around there was a caution he says that it was only 30 rods from where they lived the fight resulted in the death of two men killed and 3 or 4 wounded and the others was taken prisoners and put in jail for one week when they were let out on bail a Mormon by the name of Nathan Tinney was killed while trying to make peace among them. Since reading Joseph's letter I have seen an account of the affair in the Deseret News written by Tinney's Son and does not differ materially from Joseph's version of the affair.
      From your Father,
      Charles N Hales"

      22. Entry for Charles in the Ancestry.com's "Pioneer Immigrants to Utah Territory": Page: 001026 Name: Charles Henry Hales Gender: male Birth Date: 17 Jun 1817 Birth Place: Rainham, Kent County, England Parent1: Stephan Parent2: Mary Ann Spouse: Julia Ann Lockwood;Francis Brunyer Marriage Date: 31 Oct 1839;18 Apr 1857 Marriage Place: Quiney, Ill. Departure Place: Garden Grove, Iowa Travel Company: Stephan (Father) & Mary Ann (Mother) both died on Trail West Eliza Ann, Julia Ardena, George Gillett, Mary Isabella, Charles Henry,Jr, Joseph Lockwood. All children; Julia Ann Lockwood - Wife; All Were pioneers Coming before 1869; Died on the plains en route to Salt Lake Valley before 1869 Arrival Date: Sep 1852 Arrival Place: Salt Lake Valley Religion: L. D. S. Place Settled: Big Cottonwood & Spanish Fork, Utah Occupation: Mason & builder Death Date: 01 Jul 1888 Death Place: Spanish Fork, Utah Burial Place: Spanish Fork, Utah Sources: Abiography recorded on p. 208 of the record of 2nd Quorum of Seventies. Family hisfories in possession of family Comments: This family joined the Church in Toronto, Canada in 1836. Then mores to Kirtland, Ohio. Far West, Mo. He was in the Crooked River War. Ft. Leavenworth 1839, Then Quincy, Ill. Then, Sub Name: Glovia Bauer Neilson Great granddaughter. Sub Date: 18 Jan - 94 Pioneer Immigrants to Utah Territory.

      23. Charles mentioned as an employer per the following quote from the book:"Our Pioneer Heritage," Volume 13, p. 442, Nine Autobiographies, John Henry Hayes, Company E: "In 1870, Father and I put in a crop, but grasshoppers ate it up. I labored around home until about the 1st of September, then began laboring on the construction of the Provo Woolen Mill, until the walls were completed. I then went to work for Charles H. Hales, who had the contract for the west adobe building of the mills. In November I attended a yearly training of the Utah Militia, held for three days on the Provo Bench, the first I had ever attended. The Governor of the Territory, J. Wilson Shaffer, by name, had arrived in the Territory in the spring, and had proved to be the most bitter and bigoted governor Utah ever had. He came to Utah with a hatred against the Latter-day Saints which lasted until his death. He had issued a proclamation that the Militia should not meet, but on Monday morning we started for the training grounds. Near the south boundaries of Springville, General A.K. Thurber, of the Utah Militia, rode up on his horse, and read a telegram he had just received, stating that Governor Shaffer had just died. After reading it, Thurber said, "Now for three rousing cheers!" which were heartily given."

      24. From the online book "An Enduring Legacy" <http://www.ancestry.com>:
      "Charles Henry Hales, born in Rainham Parish, Kent County, England, on June 17, 1817, was a son of Stephen and Mary Ann Hales. At the age of fifteen, he accompanied his family to America, landing in New York and finally settling in Toronto, Canada. It was while they were living in Toronto that the message of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints was introduced to them by Orson Pratt. When Orson Pratt had finished his proselyting efforts in that locality, his brother, Parley P. Pratt, took over his labors. Stephen and Mary Ann were impressed with the teachings and in 1836 the entire family was baptized and became members of this controversial religious group. In the spring of 1838, the family moved to Jackson County, Missouri, and joined with the Saints there.
      In Quincy, Illinois, Charles Henry met a young convert, Julia Ann Lockwood, and they were married October 31, 1839. After the Hales family was forced to leave their holdings, they settled in Nauvoo, Illinois, where they assisted in converting an unwholesome swampland into a beautiful city. They also cooperated in the building of the temple.
      While living in Nauvoo, Charles Henry played in the Nauvoo Band and was a member of the Nauvoo Legion. His people were neighbors and close associates with the Saints and suffered the sorrows and troubles incident to the martyrdom of the Prophet Joseph and his brother Hyrum. The exodus from Nauvoo found the Hales ready and willing to face the deserts, Indians, privations and hardships of the unknown West rather than forsake the religion they knew to be true.
      Charles and Julia Ann were the parents of six children: Eliza Ann, born to them at Quincy; Julia A., George Gillet and Isabess, born at Nauvoo and Charles Henry and Joseph L., born at Garden Grove, Iowa. Leaving a farm and home behind, Charles and Julia Ann, the children and their grandmother began their journey to the West in the early fifties. Grandmother Hales died and was buried on the Plains. After suffering all the trials and hardships common to the pioneers, they reached Salt Lake City in September 1852. The following February when John T. Hales was born, he became the first Hales born in Utah.
      In the spring of 1854, Charles Henry and family moved to Big Cottonwood. Here Frederic and William were born. For five years the family lived and farmed in this area.
      The family moved to Spanish Fork in 1858, where three more children came to bless their home. They were Josephine, Hyrum and Harriet. It was here also that Charles Henry took a second wife, Francis Brunyer. Thirteen children were born to this union.
      Charles Henry was a brick mason by trade, but did farming as an avocation. He was a leader and promoter of education, serving as a school trustee for ten years. He was also a city councilman and was a member of the Spanish Fork Co-op board for many years as vice-president and president of the board, and at one time as superintendent of the store. He contracted and built the city hall, the co-op store and many other public buildings, among them the ideal schoolhouse. Many of the homes in Spanish Fork were built by him, some of which still stand as a monument to his memory [1926]. Always an earnest and willing church worker, he helped whenever he was called. He was a member of the Spanish Fork choir for a period of thirty-five years, was a strict observer of the Word of Wisdom and enjoyed good health and strength until his death July 1, 1889. All twenty-five of his children grew to adulthood. [By Harriet Hales Nelson, daughter. ]
      Stephen Hales, Jr.
      The early history of Stephen Hales, Jr., parallels that of his brother, Charles Henry Hales. He was three years younger than Charles Henry and until his marriage shared in all the vicissitudes of the family group as they journeyed from place to place. A son of Stephen and Mary Ann Hales, he was born in Rainham Parish, County of Kent, England, in 1820.
      His marriage took place while the family was living in Quincy, Illinois. His wife, Eveline Lydia Carter, daughter of Simon Doget Carter and Lydia Kenyon, was bern September 24, 1821, at Benson, Rutland County, Vermont. Their first Child, Mary Isabella, was born October 29, 1843, but died February 14, 1844, at Nauvoo, Illinois."

      25. The book "On the Mormon Frontier- The Diary of Hosea Stout" -Vol. one 1844-1848, edited by Juanita Brooks" 1964 - page 155 (they are on their way to Winter Quarters): "Friday April the 24th 1846. Today was clear warm & dry. I sent Allen & the two gun wagons on today & Hunter & I tarried This was done because there was not team enough to go all together. They were to go to the next timber or good camping place & send the teams back for us. Col Scott with the Artillery also moved on. The ox which we left in the prairie give out was brought on today by Charles Hales. This added strength to our teams which were now too weak for our loading... there was many passed by today I was in camp all day. After dark a short time the boys came back with the teams for us..."

      26. 3 Jun 2007 Http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~rhutch/famhistory/jfhutchinson/jfh_nauvoo_band.html:"Nauvoo Legion Band. The maneuvers of a large body such as the Nauvoo Legion grew to be could not properly be conducted with one small band of music, and the thought of a brass band therefore suggested itself to the general. Upon inquiry, it was found that there were several men in the ranks who either were or had been at some time performers on brass and reed instruments. Thus, at the call of the Prophet, a meeting was held in the house of John W. Coolidge sometime during the year 1842, where the organization of the Nauvoo Brass Band was formally effected. Some of the persons present on this occasion were William Pitt, trumpet; James Smithers and Charles H. Hales, trombones; Stephen Hales, James Standing, Martin H. Peck and George McKenzie, clarinets; Geo. Hales and John Kay, French horns; Wm. Cahoon, bass drum; Andrew Cahoon and David Cahoon, piccolos; and Edmund Ellsworth, cavalry cornet. Some time later the following were also enrolled as members: Robt. T. Burton, trumpet; John Blazard and David Smith, key bugles; Jacob Hutchinson, E-flat clarinet; and Gustavus Hill, arranger and copyist of music; numbering eighteen in all.
      To E. P. Duzette, a man who, it was said, made the drum almost a solo instrument, had been given the rank of chief of music in the Legion. A martial band had been formed, with Levi W. Hancock as fife major, and the frequent drills and parades had been executed to the time of some dozen fifes and drums. - D.U.P. Files
      At a meeting of the Nauvoo Legion Band held at the house of Robert Burton on the evening of April 9, 1850, Brother William Clayton made the following remarks: "I have a conscientious notion in organizing this band, which was organized by Joseph Smith under the name of the Nauvoo Band. I have as firm a notion in the organizing of this band as I would have in being baptized. The minute I see any division of this band, that moment I retire, but still do not consider that I leave the Nauvoo Band. My feelings are that we organize as members that stood on the old list." After all the brethren had expressed their feelings regarding the band, E. P. Duzette was named chief musician of the Legion; William Pitt, captain; and the following as members of the old band: James Smithers, John Kay, David Smith, James Standing, William Clayton, J. F. Hutchingson [sic], Stephen Hales, Ed E. Ellsworth, Charles Hales, George Hales, Robert Burton, William Cahoon, J. Cahoon, M. H. Peck, Jacob Peart, Charles Smith, Ed Martin and H. K. Whitney. The following new members were voted on: E. Averett, J. Armstrong, J. Anderson, William Glover, George Wardle. It was moved and carried that J. Anderson be sustained as temporary leader of the band until William Pitt arrived.
      It was also moved and carried that the band adopt a straw hat for the covering of the head, a white dress coat and white pantaloons, a sky blue sash and a white muslin cravat as their uniform, and a committee was appointed to commence negotiations for such a uniform.
      At another meeting held April 12, 1850, a committee was appointed to make some arrangements relative to procuring a band carriage, and by unanimous vote Brigham H. Young was appointed to the office of standard bearer in the place of William H. Kimball, resigned. - D.U.P. Files
      Source: Our Pioneer Heritage, Vol. 20, p.74-5."

      26. From the Kirtland, Ohio, LDS Visitors' Center 13 Sep 2006 quoted from "An Enduring Legacy," vol. 4, pp. 85-87:
      "The Brass Band of the city of Joseph was first orgainized in January, 1842, under the guidance and teachings of Capt. William Pitt, an ingenious musician, a good timeist, and an excellent performer upon various instruments that came to hand; the few that commenced to learn under him were ignorant of the principles of music, and new beginners upon their instruments; it therefore required great patience and exertion in our captain to fit us and birng us forth as a band of music for the Nauvoo Legion."
      "At a later day, those present at the orgianization of the band were said to have been: William Pitt, trumpet; James Smithies, trombone; Charles Hales, trombone; Stephen Hales, clarinet; James Standing, clarinet; Martin H. Peck, clarinet; George McKenzie, clarinet; George Hales, French horn; John Kay, French horn; William Cahoon, bass drum; Andrew Cahoon, piccolo; David Cahoon, piccolo; Edmund Ellsworth, cornet. To these ranks the following were later adde3d as members: Robert T. Burton, trumpet; John Blazzard, key bugle; David Smith, key bugle; Jacob Hutchinson, clarinet; Gustavus Hill, arranger and copyist." Kate B. Carter, "Heart Throbs of the West," v. 4, p. 118.
      "From the beginning, Joseph Smith showed a great deal of interest in the band, even helping to raise funds with which to improve its condition. The drum William Cahoon played was one he himself had made and many of the instruments used by the members were old and unsuited for advanced playing. Therefor, excursions, picnics and concerts were inaugurated to raise funds, and a round trip was made from Nauvoo to Quincy, Illinois, on the Prophet's steamer 'Maid of Iowa,' the full proceeds of which went to the band. With such aid and encouragement, the group was able to erect the Nauvoo Concert Hall in 1843. Frequent entertainments were held there, the band being assisted by William Clayton as violinist and John Kay, a French horn player who possessed a magnificent baritone voice and who was an entertainer of unusual accomplishment." Whitney, "The Nauvoo Brass Band, " pp. 134-137.
      Photo of a flag with description as follows: "Nauvoo Brass Band Flag. This flag made in early 1840s in Nauvoo, Ill. Blue and White stripes. Pink square with scroll and all-seeing eye. Carried across the Plains by Captain Pitt's Band. Donor: Ida Pitt Lee.
      "Although a formal uniform for the group was not adopted at that time; all band members agreed to wear white trousers.
      "At the placing of the cornerstone of the Nauvoo Temple, the band carried a beautiful new silk banner that had been made by the women of Nauvoo. Parading of the Nauvoo Legion, band music, choral singing and prayer were part of the program witnessed by ten thousand people. The flag has blue and white silk stripes, a pink scroll square and an 'all-seeing Eye' painted directly above the scroll square.
      "The Quadrille Band, composed of stringed and reed instruemts, was next orgainized to play for the dancing parties of the Saints. One of its first assignments was to funish the music for a ball given in the Mansion House, Joseph Smith's residence. It was said to have been the first dance party ever approved by the Prophet." Horace G. Whitney, "The Nauvoo Brass Band," Contributor I, March 1880, pp. 134-137.

      27. Nauvoo LDS Land and Records Office research file (copy in my possession as of 2 Jun 2007) provides the following information (also partially viewable at www.earlylds.com):
      A. Seventies Records: Quorum Q2, was a seventy when endowed 23 Dec 1845, source: 70s Bk B Sel, pg. 17.
      B. Nauvoo property: Kim: Block 32 N/2 1/4 acre.

      28. Mentioned in "Sketch of the life of Henry William Hales, son of Stephen and Mary Ann Hales. I was born August 7, 1829, at Rainham, Kent, England. In the year 1832, my father and family immigrated to Canada. We settled in Toronto where my father, mother and my oldest brother, Charles, and sister, Mary Isabella embraced the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints, in the year 1837. The spring following we started by team to gather with the saints at Far West. We stayed at Kirtland for about three weeks to let the teams recruit, and then headed for Far West. It was there that I first saw the Prophet Joseph Smith when he was betrayed into the hands of the mob by Colonel George Hinckle, when with the other prisoners he was sentenced to be shot without being given a hearing. We were expelled form the state with the rest of the Saints and went to Quincy, Illinois, and remained there until 1841 when we moved to Nauvoo where I heard the Prophet Joseph preach and prophesy and say, "Thus, sayeth the Lord, God," and hear him say he had finished his work and had turned the burden of the Church over to the Twelve Apostles, and they had to round up their shoulders and bear off the Kingdom or they would be damned for he gave them all the keys, powers, and authority he held to build up the Kingdom and htey had to do it. He had laid the foundation and they had to build it up.I saw him when he was going ot carthage and heard him say he "was going like a lamb ot the slaughter, but he was as calm as summer's morniing. He had a conscence void of offense towards God and all men and it would be said of him, "he was murdered in cold blood." I saw him and Hyrum lying in their coffins - I know they were men of God.
      I received my endowments at the Temple in Nauvoo, and was ordained a Seventy June 29, 1845 in Nauvoo. I was a member of the 29th Quorum. I was with the first that crossed the Mississippi to leave Nauvoo and come west, and joined the camp at Sugar Creek in Iowa and continued with the camp to Garden Grove and helped to build the houses and fields for those that were not able to go on that season, then went back to Nauvvo to help my father to start west. We went up to Fort Madison where father and I were taken sick. My father died there. I was just getting around when the mob came and made war on the Saints that were left. We could hear the cannons distinctly. We went that fall to Garden Grove where we lived the following winter. We then returned to Fort Madison and got work. I returned to Garden Grove the next year to take care of our stock. My mother got married to Brother William Thompson. I took the teams and moved them to Garden Grove where we remained until 1850 when I married Eliza Ann Ewing, May 19. In the spring of 1851 we started for Salt Lake. My mother died on the plains and was buried at the Ancient Bluff ruins. We arrived in Salt Lake City about September 21. I first built a house at Little Cottonwood and lived there until the spirng of 1853 when I went to Cedar Valley and made my home. During the Indian trouble, I helped to build two forts and participated in all the Indian troubles and through the grasshopper war when flour could not be bought for money at any price. January 11, 1857, I married Sarah Jane McKinney. I was then called to the city to be in readyness to go to Echo Canyon if wanted. I was there when the U.S. Commissioners came to investigate the trouble between the people of Utah and the U.S. Government, and stayed there until the trouble was settled. I remained in Cedar Fort until the fall of 1859 when I went to Big Cottonwod Canyon and stayed until 1861, when I moved to Weber Valley and made a farm at Enterprisse, Morgan County. Here I was chosen to be counselor to Bishop Charles Peterson and also chosen a county commisioner and laid out most of the roads. During high water the Weber River cut my farm in two and carried about ten acres of the best land away.
      Soon after,the railroad took a strip, so my farm was ruined. The grasshoppers took six crops and the railroad cut off the water ditch so we could not get water for irrigating purposes until 1873. I then sold and moved back to Cedar Valley and rented a farm and ran a stock ranch until the fall of 1877, when we moved to Laketown, Millard County, and entered and fenced a quarter section of land and farmed and raised stock and sheep until we moved to Deseret and made my present home. May 22, 1889 (or '87) I was ordained a High Priest at Fillmore, and was a presiding Elder of Laketown when we moved to Deseret. I was appointed one of the committee of three to complete the Deseret meetinghouse and continued until it was completed. I was set apart as counselor to Bishop Milton Moody, and continued in that calling until the reorganization of the ward November 22, 1898, and was counselor to Frank Hinckley until I resigned on account of ill health and could not see to be out after night. I was ordained patriarch by J.W. Taylor, Reed Smoot and Ira N. Hinckley, J.W. Taylor being mouth.
      I had the privilege of entertaining President Wilford Woodruff and wives two different times, also Owen Woodruff and wife at the same time. Also President Lorenzo Snow and wife Jennie and son LeRoy, also President Joseph F. Smith a number of times, two of his wives and two of his sons, Hyrum M. and Joseph F., Jr. Of the Apostles, George Q. Cannon, Francis M. Lyman and wife, Anthon Lund, Heber J. Grant, John M. Taylor, Reed Smoot and wife, George Teasdale, Orson F. Whitney, Charles W. Penrose of the First Seven Presidents of the Seventies, B.H. Robert, Rulon S.Wells, Joseph McMurin.
      My wife Eliza had 9 children, 40 grandchildren.
      My wife Sarah Jane had 15 children and 15 grandchildren."

      29. The following is detail of the 1851 Mormon Pioneer Overland Travel of the Harry Walton/Garden Grove Company (1851); departure: 17 May 1851, arrival in Salt Lake Valley: 24-25 September 1851; company Information: about 21 families from Garden Grove plus other individuals and 60 wagons were in the company when it began its journey from the outfitting post at Kanesville, Iowa (present day Council Bluffs). They left Garden Grove, Iowa on 17 May 1851 and regrouped at Kanesville (modern day Council Bluffs, Iowa). See more detail including a day-by-day colorful journal account by Ossian F. Taylor, a 19 year old non-Mormon who traveled with the company at (http://www.lds.org/churchhistory/library/pioneercompany/0,15797,4017-1-313,00.html). A total of 206 known people traveled with this company including the following Hales family members. Mary Ann Hales Thompson was the matriarch of the family and had remarried to William G. Thompson after her husband Henry Hales died in Iowa in 1846. Five of her six living children and their families accompanied her on the trek of which there were fourteen grandchildren and four step-Children. Her daughter Mary Isabella Hales and son-in-law Joseph Horne had crossed the plains to Salt Lake City, Utah, a few years earlier. "Mrs Thompson" dies and is buried on the trail a few miles before the Company reaches Chimney Rock. Her death is reported by four separate journal accounts as noted below - even though her death was a tragedy, it was also a blessing to have had most of her family around her at the time.
      Thompson, William G. (56)
      Thompson, Mary Ann Hales (51)
      Thompson, David (19)