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7101 RESEARCH_NOTES;
1. Ted Brown < ted.brown982 @ gmail.com

Jesse had property outside of Elberton, GA, according to the county records. I have plat maps of this. Lucy Staples born 1791, death 1864; Jesse born 1788, death 1844. They were married 17th Jan 1811. Their son David Staples Brown and his wife Frances Ann Manley, were my great-grandparents. 
Staples, Lucy (I1937)
 
7102 RESEARCH_NOTES;
1. The book "Descendants of Joseph Loomis in America," by Elias Loomis; update of 1875 edition published by Elisha S. Loomis, Berea, Ohio,1908. Note - Dr. Elias Loomis died before the Supplement was published. But this third (1908) edition contains all new materials which he had collected, along with all new data collected and obtainable since his death. From Preface: 'While we have retained unbroken Dr. Elias Loomis's historical account of Joseph Loomis, his origin and his name, as set forth under the heading, Historical Data, p. 21, yet we deem it best to add such supplementary facts as have come to light since 1875, especially as touching the name Loomis. Indeed it is very doubtful if our ancestral name originated in the way Dr. Loomis surmised, as the investigations of Prof. C. A. Hoppin, Jr., hereinafter given, seem to show. That Joseph's great-grandfather died at Thaxted, Eng., in the year 1551, is now proved as evidenced by Thaxted church records. But whence came his ancestors, what was the origin of the name, and what is our right to a coat-of-arms? These queries are raised and discussed in Prof. Hoppin's scholarly report to which the reader is referred. Evidently our antecedents are not Royal, but something far better, viz., clean, God-fearing, industrious men of respect and influence - men of character and back-bone.'" The book notes:
Unknown, two sons:
Thos. Lummyus, d. 1551.
John Lummys, will 1567, m. to Kyrsten Pasfield (or Jackson). Two sons:
John Lummys, bap. 1562, d. 1619, m. to Agnes. Six children:
Joseph Lummys the emigrant, m. Mary White, dau. of Robert White.
Ann (Warr).
Sara (Burton)
Elizabeth (Preston)
Jane (Pengally)
Geoffrey, d. 1625, m. Priscilla (Whitehead?), d. 1631. One daughter Priscilla.
Edward Lomys of Bocking, m. 2 Aug 1593 to Alicia Perie. Four Children:
Jane, d. 1595.
Frances, d. 1595.
Thos., c. 1596-7.
William, bap. 9 Jan 1596-7.
William Lommance, d. 1540, five children:
John Lommance, m. Alice Pasfield (or Jackson) will 1580, four children [see book for detail].
William Lummys, d. Lavenham 1573.
Margaret (Llower) Brigham.
James Lummys, living 1573.
Richard Lummys, d. Lavenham 1588, m. Anne or Agnes Gylbarte, four children [see book for detail]. 
Loomis, Edward (I2386)
 
7103 RESEARCH_NOTES;
1. The book "The Phelps Family of America and their English Ancestors," comp. by Oliver Seymour Phelps of Portland, Oregon and Andrew T. Servin of Lenox, Massachusetts, 1899, pp. 109-110:
"Cornelius Phelps, b. Windsor, Ct., 16 Apr 1671, m. Sarah Mansfield, 2 Nov 1704, dau. of John and Sarah (Phelps) Mansfield, she b. Windsor 5 Jan 1685, d. there 1774. Mr. Phelps settled in Windsor. He died there in 1741. His will in Hartford Probate Records, 8 Mar 1741-2, mentions his wife Sarah, and sons Cornelius, John, Timothy, Isaac, and daughter Sarah Hutchinson. Children b. Windsor, Ct.:
I. Sarah, b. 7 Dec., bp. 19 Dec 1705, m. ___ Hutchinson. [There is a handwritten note in the copy of the book I copied at the Windsor Historical Society that says "see book of corrections."]
II. Cornelius, b. 2 Jun 1707, m. Hannah Phelps.
III. John, b. 6 Jul 1710, m. twice.
IV. Timothy, b. 3 Feb 1713, m. Margaret Gillett.
V. Isaac, b. 22 Jul 1722, m. Margaret Mills.
VI. Lot (or Lanslot), b. 1724.

2. Henry R. Stiles, "The History and Genealogies of Ancient Windsor, Connecticut," 1892, v. 2, p. 465: "John Mansfield, m. Sarah (dau. Sam'l and Sarah Griswold) Phelps, and wid. Andrew Moore of Sims., 13 Dec 1683 (Col. Rec.), who d. 26 Oct 1732; he d. 15 Mar 1726/7. Children:
A. John, b. 13 Sep 1684.
B. Sarah, b. 5 Jan 1685/6.
C. Sam'l, b. 16 Sep 1687.
D. Mary, b. 16 Aug 1689."

3. Henry R. Stiles, "The History and Genealogies of Ancient Windsor, Connecticut," 1892, v. 2, p. 568: "Cornelius Phelps (son of Lt. Timothy, g.son of William), m. Sarah (dau. John and Sarah Phelps) Mansfield of Windsor 2 Nov 1704; she b. Windsor 5 Jan 1685. Will in Hartford Probate Records, 8 Mar 1741/2, mentions wife Sarah; sons Cornelius, John, Timothy, Isaac; dau. Sarah Hutchinson. - R.T.S. Children (b. Windsor):
A. Sarah, b. 19 Dec 1705; m. Mr. Hutchinson.
B. Cornelius, b. 2 Jun 1707.
C. John, b. 6 Jul 1710; prob. m. 15 Jun 1741, Thanks Willcocks; sett. Windsor; d. 9 Sep 1776. Servin says it was John, son of Amos, who m. Thanks W.
D. Timothy, b. 3 Feb 1713/14.
E. Isaac, b. 22 Jul 1722; poss. m. Martha Mills, 5 Sep 1745.
F. Lot (Launcelot), b. abt. 1724."

4. FHL book 929.273 L995m "Ancestors and Descendants of Thomas Rice Lyon and his Wife Harriet Wade Rice...," by Patty Barthell Myers (2003), pp. 357-60:
"EDWARD1 GRISWOLD, son of George Griswold and his first wife Dousubel (___) and half-brother of Matthew Griswold...
[Children...]
viii MARY GRISWOLD, bpt. Windsor 13 Oct 1644; d. 1690; m. 19 May 1661/2 TIMOTHY PHELPS, b. Windsor 1 Sept 1639; d. 1719, s/o William Phelps and his second wife, Mary Dover. Children (PHELPS): Timothy m. Martha Crow, d/o Christopher Crow and Mary Burr; Joseph m. Sarah Hosford; William m/1 Abigail Mudge, m/2 Ruth Barber, d/o Samuel Barber & Mary Coggens; Cornelius m. Sarah Mansfield; Mary d. in her teens; Samuel m. Abigail Eno, d/o James Eno and Abigail Bissell; Nathaniel m/1 Hannah Bissell, d/o Samuel Bissell & Abigail Holcomb, m/2 Abigail Pinney; Sarah m. David Marshall; Abigail m. Samuel Filer; Hannah m/1 Thomas Phelps, m/2 James3 Eno (James2,1); Ann m. David Porter, s/o John Porter & Joanna Gaylord; Martha m. Samuel Holcomb...
(Edward Elbridge Salisbury & Evelyn McCurdy Salisbury, Gen. & Biog. Monographs on the Fam. of Griswold, Wolcott, Pitkin, Ogden, et.al.; pp: 10-13; Nash, Fifty Puritan Ancestors, pp. 102-5; Ruth Lee Griswold, Griswold Family, pp. 188-9; Richard A. Wheeler, History of Stonington, Conn., p. 537; Alvan Talcott, Families of Early Guilford, Conn., pp. 530-1; Esther Griswold French and Robert Lewis French, The Griswold Family, The First Five Generations in America, p. 13 et seq.; Savage sv Edward, George, Francis, Joseph Griswold; Torrey sv Edward, George, John, Joseph, Francis Griswold; James Bemis.)" 
Mansfield, Sarah (I2126)
 
7104 RESEARCH_NOTES;
1. The book "The Phelps Family of America and their English Ancestors," comp. by Oliver Seymour Phelps of Portland, Oregon and Andrew T. Servin of Lenox, Massachusetts, 1899, pp. 137-138:
"Noah Phelps, b. Hebron, Ct.m 23 Jan 1694, m. Anna Dyer, 1 Oct 1719 in Hebron, Ct. Mr. Phelps settled in Hebron, Ct., where his children were all born; late in life he removed to Hillsdale, Col. Co., N.Y., where he died in 1794, in his 100th year. Children:
I. Noah, b. 21 Nov 1720, m. Mary Tillotson.
II. Barrett, b. 20 Sep 1722, m. Hannah Bigelow.
III. Elijah, b. 31 Jul 1724, m. Jemima Wilcox.
IV. Mary, b. 1 May 1726, m. John Rollo.
V. Hannah, b. 28 Feb 1727, m. Jonathan Sackett, 10 Mar 1748, He b. Hebron, Ct., 26 Dec 1727.
VI. Anna, b. 1 Feb 1730, m. Ebenezer Gilbert.
VII. James, b. 1732, m. Rebecca Curtis.
VIII. Abiijah, b. 8 Mar 1734, m. Huldah Hutchinson, m. 2nd Lucinda (Noble) Miller.
IX. Asa, b. 1736, m. Martha Bronson."

2. Henry R. Stiles, "The History and Genealogies of Ancient Windsor, Connecticut," 1892, v. 2, p. 571:
"Noah Phelps (son of Timothy, g.son of Lt. Timothy, gg.son of William) m. 1 Oct 1719, Anne Dyer. Children (b. Hebron, CT):
a. Noah, b. 21 Nov 1720.
b. Barrett, b. 20 Sep 1722; m. Hannah Bigelow of Colchester, 13 Feb 1751.
c. Elijah, b. 31 Jul 1724; m. Jemima Wilson, 1 Aug 1748.
d. Mary, b. 1 May 1726.
e. Hannah, b. 28 Feb 1727.
f. Anne, b. 19 Feb 1730.
g. (Poss. James, Abijah, et alios.)
[Book does not have any Dyer bibliography.]

3. "The American Genealogist," 22[1945]:213, 215, "Some Untraced Dyers":
p. 213: "Henry3 Dyer d. 1742 at Boston; m. (1) Mary ___, d. 1723-1726 at Lebanon, Conn.; m. (2) at Boston May 12, 1726, Hannah, dau. of Capt. John and Hannah (Webb) Adams, and widow of Samuel Holbrook Jr. (TAG 15:53.) She was b. at Braintree June 24, 1685, d. at Boston, Dec. 21, 1760.
Children: (by first wife)
Mary4, bapt. May 8, at Bistol, R.I. ...
Anne, bapt. Sept. 3, 1699, at Bristol, m. Noah Phelps of Hebron, Conn.
Henry ...
(Probably) Jonas, bapt. 1709-12 at Rehoboth, Mass. ...
(Possibly) Elisha ...
p. 215: "Anne4 Dyer (Henry3) m. at Hebron, Oct. 1, 1719, Noah Phelps, son of Timothy and Martha (Crow) Phelps, b. Hebron, Jan. 23, 1693/4.
Children (Phelps), the first six record at heborn:
Noah5, b. 1720; m. 1742 Mary Tillotson.
Barrett, b. 1722; m. Hannah Bigelow.
Elijah, b. 1724.
Mary, b. 1726.
Hannah, b. 1727.
Anne, b. 1729/30.
James
Abijah
Asa
Lazarus b. 1742
Sarah
Martha.
Noah's will, dated Oct. 11, 1757, proved at Colchester, Conn. May 4, 1764, names wife Anne, son-in-law Daniel Luce, sons Noah, Barrett, Elijah, James, Abijah, Asa, and Lazarus; daus. Mary, Hannah, Sarah and Martha; granddau. Sarah Landon. Daniel Tillotson, exec."

MARRIAGE:
1. Website 4 Sep 2007 www.douglaslibrary.org/barbour. The Douglas Library in Hebron, Connecticut has "Town of Hebron Vital Records: Barbour Collection 1708-1854," p. 101:
"Noah Phelps, m. Ann Dyer, Oct. 1, 1719, v. 1, p. 67."
"Noah Phelps, m. Anne Dyer, Oct. 1, 1719, v. 1, p. 70."
Note: No other entry for Ann Dyer. 
Dyer, Anne (I2111)
 
7105 RESEARCH_NOTES;
1. The book “Genealogy of the Family of Longstreet with Its Related Families…,” by Edward Mayes (Tuttle Antiquarian Books, Inc., Rutland, VT; 1989?), pp. D16-D17:
“DIRCK STOFFELS LANGESTRAET immigrated in 1657, twelve years after the appointment of Stuyvesant as Director of the province, two years after the erection of the church at Flatbush, and seven years before the seizure of the province by Nicholls. He settled at Flatlands (Amersfoort); and this fact, since the village was of less consequence than either Flatbush (only three miles may) or Brooklyn, and was named for a town in Utrecht, from which those who inhabited and named it presumably came, renders it probable that Langestraets were from Utrecht. However that may be, Dirck (or Richard, in the English) was in 1677, a member of the Flatlands church, sitting under the ministry of the Rev. Mr. Zuuren. He may have been for years before that an active member of the church, and probably was; for it must be remembered that the lists in the Flatbush record begin with the year 1677. In 1687, in September, thirteen years after the first cession of the province to England, there was a general administration of an oath of allegiance to the British Crown to all of the Dutch people; and with the others, Dirck took that oath at Flatlands. He appears again on an assessment roll of that village for the year 1693, and on a census roll of 1698. After this his name occurs no more on the Long Island records and it is thought that he moved to Monmouth county, New Jersey.
In his younger manhood, but after his arrival in this province, he married CATHARINA VAN LIEUWEN; afterward, in his older age, some time before, but not far from, February 13, 1690, he married Johanna Havens, widow of Johannis Holsaert. An ante-nuptial agreement made with this second wife is still to be found in the town records of Gravesend; and in it reference is made to his son Stoffel Dircksen. At an early period, date now unknown, he had bought land at Shrewsbury in New Jersey, which he devised by his will to his son Richard. By his first wife Catherina, he had issue as follows:
(1) Stoffel Dircksen, of whom hereafter.
(2) Claasje Dircksen, born about 1672 and who married Abraham Lott, of Jamaica.
(3) Adrian, baptised September 16, 1677. (Adrian; bapt. Sept. 16, 1677; married Christina Janse 1707. On asst. roll of Flatlands 1693, and census of 1698; owned land in Gravesend; moved to Freehold, N. J., and deacon there 1721; died in 1728; wife died after 1726. Issue (all bapt. at Marlboro): 1, Christine, or Katherine, bp. Nov. 27, 1709, mar. Aug. 24, 1741. Wm. Williamson of the Raritan; 2, Jan. bp. Jan. 13, 1712, mar. Dec. 17, 1746 Anije Cowenhoven; 3. Dirck, of Princeton, born about 1713, mar. about 1749, Margaret Shenck, widow of Wm. Cowenhoven; 4, Nellie, born about 1715; 5, Winnifred, born about 1718; 7, Maria, born about 1721, mar. Dec. 5, 1742, Dirck Sutphen; 8, Arianche, born about 1723; Stoffel, born about 1728, mar. Nov. 28, 1753, Nellie Shenck.)
(4) Richard, born about 1680.
(5) A daughter (supposed), who married Samuel Osborne.
(6) Samuel (supposed) married Barbara Antonides.”

2. The book “Register in Alphabetical Order, of the early settlers of Kings County, Long Island, N. Y.; from its first settlement by Europeans to 1700; with contributions to their biographies and genealogies,” by Teunis G. Bergen (New York: S.W. Green's Son, 1881), pp. 181-82:
“Langestraat, Adriaen, bp. Sept. 16, 1677; d. 1728; m. Christina Janse. On ass. roll of Flds of 1693 and cen. of 1698; also owned land in Gd; deacon of Freehold R. D. ch. in 1721, to which place he had removed. In 1723, an Adriaen Langestraet and Christina Janse his w., mem. of Freehold R. D. ch. Issue, all bp. at Marlboro: Christine or Katharine, bp. Nov. 27, 1709, m. Aug. 24, 1741, Wm Williamsen of the Raritan; Jan, bp. Jan. 13, 1712, m. Dec. 17, 1746, Antje Cowenhoven; Dirck of Princeton, b. about 1713, m. about 1749 Margaret Schenck wid. of Wm Cowenhoven; Nelly, b. about 1715; Winnifred, b. about 1718; Maria, b. about 1721, m. Dec. 5, 1742, Dirck Sutphen; Arianche, b. about 1723; and Stoffel, b. about 1726, m. Nov. 28, 1753, Nelly Schenck, as per Rev. G. C. Schenck.
Derick Stoffelsz, emigrated in 1657, m. 1st Catharina Van Lieuwen; m. 2d, prior to Feb. 13, 1690, Johanna Havens wid. of Johannis Holsaert. Mem. of Flds D. ch. in 1677, took the oath of allegiance there in 1687; on ass. roll of said town of 1693 and cen. of 1698. In ante-nuptial agreement with his 2d w. on the Gd rec. of Feb. 13, 1690, reference is made to his s. Stoffel Dircksen. At an early period, as per Rev. G. C. Schenck, he bought land at Shrewsbury, N. J., which he devised by will to his s. Richard. Issue: - Stoffel Dircksen; Claasje Dircksen, b. about 1672, m. Abraham Lott of Ja; Adrian, bp. Sept. 16, 1677; Richard of Shrewsbury, b. about 1680; (sup.) Johannis; and Samuel, (sup.) m. Barbara Antonides. Signed his name “Dirck Stoffels."
(Sup.) Jan or Johannis Dircksen, b. 1629. Appointed Apl. 28, 1666, by the mag. of Flh one of the guardians of Aernout Reynders s. of Reyndert Arensen and Annetien Hermans, said Annetien being dec. and said Aernout having married Annetien Aukens, as per p. 61 of Lib. D of Flh rec. Allowed to follow the occupation of carman by the court in N. A. in 1674, as per p. 494 of Valentine's Manual of 1855. June 8, 1690, he made an affidavit relating to the troubles in N. Y. during Gov. Leisler's administration, as per p. 741 of Vol. III. of Doc. of Col. His.
Stoffel Dircksen of Flds and N. J., m. Mayke Laanen dau. of Gysbrecht Tuysz Lanen Van Pelt of N. U. Deacon of Flds D. ch. in 1698. Removed to the Neversinks in Monmouth Co., N. J., where his descendants abound. In his will, da. Dec. 1, 1739, pro. Mar. 1, 1741, he calls himself Theophilus, an improper change for Stoffel or Christopher. The will of Mayke his w. is da. Apl. 8, 1752, and pro. Mar. 13, 1753. These wills name as their children, Jonica, Catharine, Mary, Sarah, Maria, Ann, and Gisbert. Issue: - Dirck, bp. Apl. 25, 1696, in Bro, m. Jane or Jonica, probably d. at date of his father's will; Jonica or Jane; Catharine, (sup.) m. Jan Sutphen of N. J.; Mary or Maria, bp. May 6, 1702, m. 1st Wm. Hendricksen of N. J., m. 2d (sup.) Dirck Sutphen; Sarah, b. about 1705; Gisbert, b. about 1707, m. Rachel Schenck, d. 1758; Aurie, bp. Nov. 6, 1710, m. May 6, 1754, Lydia Hull; Stoffel, bp. Dec. 25, 1713, resided at Upper Freehold, m. Dec. 16, 1743, Abagail Wooley, d. 1784; Moica, bp. Mar. 6, 1716, m. (sup.) Johannes Leek; and Ann, b. about 1718. Signed his name “Stoffel Langstrat."
Abbreviations: Bro. = Brooklyn; Flds = Flatlands; N.U. = New Utrecht; D. ch = Dutch Church; N.A. = New Amsterdam; cen = census; Gd = Gravesend; Flh = Flatbush."

3. “A Longstreet Family History,” by Rupert James Longstreet (DeLand, Fla., 1960), available on FHL film 2056005 item 3 or online at :
“CLASSJE DIRCKSEN LANGESTRAET [1] b. 1672, m. Abraham Lott of Long Island. The Reformed Dutch Church record in Brooklyn has this 4-25-1696 entry:
Jan Abraham Lodt and Classje Langstraat, parents. Dirck Langstreet and Johanna Havens, wit.
Dirck Stoffel Langstraat and Mayke Lanen, parents. Dirck Langstraat and Classje, wit.
From the same church records, we establish the children of Classje as follows:
i. Rem ii. Hendrick iii. Jacob iv. Isaac v. Abraham vi. John bp. 4-25-1696 vii. Peter
viii. Charity
Sources:
1. Daniel Perrine and His Descendants, by H.D. Perrine.
2. New York Genealogical and Biographical Record, Oct 1952.” 
Lott, Abraham (I5711)
 
7106 RESEARCH_NOTES;
1. The book, “A history of the Camfield family: with special emphasis on the descendants of John Freeman Camfield and Margaret Singleton Camfield…,” by Ernest Ross Camfield (Privately printed; 1999), “THE FAMILY OF VAN LIEUWEN AND ITS TIES WITH THE CAMFIELDS GENERATION,” p. 265:
“Frederick Van Lieuwen immigrated to New Amsterdam in 1652; which as stated before in the Longstreet section was the year in which the Dutch Admiral, Van Tromp, sailed the English channel with a broom at his mast head, it was seven years after the appointment of Peter Stuyvesant to the Directorship of the new Province, and two years preceding the organization of the first religious congregation on Long Island. He was the first of all those interrelated families to come over. He preceded the Langestraets by five years and the Lanen Van Pelts by eleven years. Not much is known about Frederick Van Lieuwen. He came from Utrecht, having been probably a resident of Leuwen, which is a village in Gelderland, located on the Waal River. He brought his family with him and settled in the village of Jamaica, located on Long Island. He had a total of nine children, many of whose descendants are still in Somerset County, New Jersey. History does not record all their names, however we do know the following: (Sources: "EARLY SETTLERS OF KINGS COUNTY," Bergen, pages 343-344)
CHILDREN:
-Jan Frederick Van Lieuwen. Born: 1647-48 in Utrecht in the Netherlands. He married Aeitje Jans, daughter of Jan Jensen. He was on the assessment rolls of Brooklyn 1675-1693. He was a Deacon in the Reformed Dutch Church; he took the Oath of Allegiance in 1687 in Brooklyn. He had eight children all of who were baptized in the Kings County Reformed Dutch Church.
-Catharina Van Lieuwen. Born about 1648
-Hendrick Van Lieuwen”

2. The book “Genealogy of the Family of Longstreet with Its Related Families…,” by Edward Mayes (Tuttle Antiquarian Books, Inc., Rutland, VT; 1989?), p. D35-D36:
“Frederick Van Lieuwen (or Van Liew, as it was sometimes spelled) immigrated to New Amsterdam in 1612; which, as remarked in connection with the first Longstreets, was the year in which the Dutch Admiral, Van Tromp, sailed the English Channel with a broom at his mast-head, was seven years after the appointment of Peter Stuyvesant to the Directorship of the Province, and two years before the organization of the first religious congregation on Long Island. He was the first of our related families to come over, preceding the Langestraets by five years, and the Lanen van Pelts by eleven years. Not much is known of him. He came from Utrecht, having been probably, at one period, a resident of Leuwen. a village in Gelderland, on the river Waal. He brought his family with him, and settled in the village of Jamaica, on Long Island. He had in all nine children, many of whose descendants are still to be found in Somerset Co., N. Jersey. Their names are not all known, but among them were the following:
(1) Jan Fredericks. Jan Fredericks was probably the oldest child; born in Utrecht about 1647-48. He marred Aeltie Jans, daughter of Jan Jansen. Was on the assessment rolls of Brooklyn in the years 1675. '76, ’83, and '93; deacon in the Reformed Dutch Church there, in 1683; took the oath of allegiance, there, in 1687. Issue: Jan, bapt. Dec. 9. 1677; Margriet, bapt. Mar. 14, 1680; Abraham, bapt. July 9, 1682; Grietje, bapt. Apl. 20, 1685; Dina. bapt. Mar. 25, 1687; Esje, bapt. Nov. 10, 1689: Hendrick. bapt. Apt. 30, 1694: and Elizabeth, bapt. Dec. 13, 1697 -- All in the Kings County Churches.
(2) Catharina, of whom next.
(3) Hendrick. ___ Hendrick was baptised Oct. 14, 1683: married. 1st., ApI. 18, 1713, Geerje Corteiyou of New Utrecht (at which place he probably resided at one time); married, 2nd, Marya ___, and had by her a son, Jurien, who was bapt. Aug. 26, 1721, in New Utrecht.
Catharine Van Lieuwen, wife of Dirck Langstraet, was one of the oldest children, probably the second. She was born about 1648-1650, and in Utrecht, in the Netherlands, in all probability must have married about 1669, as her family began to be born about 1670. We have no indication of the date of her death, further than this: that one of her sons was born about 1680, and her husband married a second time in February, 1690; so that she must have died between those dates. It was probably after 1685.”

3. The book “Register in Alphabetical Order, of the early settlers of Kings County, Long Island, N. Y.; from its first settlement by Europeans to 1700; with contributions to their biographies and genealogies,” by Teunis G. Bergen (New York: S.W. Green's Son, 1881), pp. 343-44:
“Van Liew or Lieuwen, Jan Fredericks, emigrated in 1652, as per his marriage record, from Utrecht, having been probably at one period a resident of Leuwen, a village in Gelderland, on the Waal, in the Netherlands; m. Aeltje Jans dau. of Jan Jansen. On ass. rolls of Bro of 1675, '76, '83 and '93; deacon in the R. D. ch. in 1683; and took the oath of allegiance in Bro in 1687. Issue: - Jan, bp. Dec. 9, 1677; Margriet, bp. Mar. 14, 1680; Abraham, bp. July 9, 1682; Grietje, bp. Apl. 20, 1685; Dina, bp. Mar. 25, 1687; Esje, bp. Nov. 10, 1689; Hendrick, bp. Apl. 30, 1694; and Elizabeth, bp. Dec, 13, 1697 - all in the Kings Co. churches. There was a Frederick Van Liew of Ja, L. I., who emigrated from Utrecht and had 9 children, many of whose descendants are to be found in Somerset Co., N. J., and whose s. Hendrick, bp. Oct. 14, 1683, m. 1st Apl. 18, 1713, Geertje Cortelyou of N. U. (at which place he probably at one period resided), m. 2d Marya ___, and had a s. Jeurien (by 2d w.) bp. Aug. 26, 1721, in N. U.
Abbreviations: Bro. = Brooklyn; Flds = Flatlands; N.U. = New Utrecht; D. ch = Dutch Church; N.A. = New Amsterdam; cen = census; Gd = Gravesend; Flh = Flatbush; Ja = Jamaica.” 
Van Lieuwen, Hendrick (I5627)
 
7107 RESEARCH_NOTES;
1. The book, “A history of the Camfield family: with special emphasis on the descendants of John Freeman Camfield and Margaret Singleton Camfield…,” by Ernest Ross Camfield (Privately printed; 1999), “THE FAMILY OF VAN LIEUWEN AND ITS TIES WITH THE CAMFIELDS GENERATION,” p. 265:
“Frederick Van Lieuwen immigrated to New Amsterdam in 1652; which as stated before in the Longstreet section was the year in which the Dutch Admiral, Van Tromp, sailed the English channel with a broom at his mast head, it was seven years after the appointment of Peter Stuyvesant to the Directorship of the new Province, and two years preceding the organization of the first religious congregation on Long Island. He was the first of all those interrelated families to come over. He preceded the Langestraets by five years and the Lanen Van Pelts by eleven years. Not much is known about Frederick Van Lieuwen. He came from Utrecht, having been probably a resident of Leuwen, which is a village in Gelderland, located on the Waal River. He brought his family with him and settled in the village of Jamaica, located on Long Island. He had a total of nine children, many of whose descendants are still in Somerset County, New Jersey. History does not record all their names, however we do know the following: (Sources: "EARLY SETTLERS OF KINGS COUNTY," Bergen, pages 343-344)
CHILDREN:
-Jan Frederick Van Lieuwen. Born: 1647-48 in Utrecht in the Netherlands. He married Aeitje Jans, daughter of Jan Jensen. He was on the assessment rolls of Brooklyn 1675-1693. He was a Deacon in the Reformed Dutch Church; he took the Oath of Allegiance in 1687 in Brooklyn. He had eight children all of who were baptized in the Kings County Reformed Dutch Church.
-Catharina Van Lieuwen. Born about 1648
-Hendrick Van Lieuwen”

2. The book “Genealogy of the Family of Longstreet with Its Related Families…,” by Edward Mayes (Tuttle Antiquarian Books, Inc., Rutland, VT; 1989?), p. D35-D36:
“Frederick Van Lieuwen (or Van Liew, as it was sometimes spelled) immigrated to New Amsterdam in 1612; which, as remarked in connection with the first Longstreets, was the year in which the Dutch Admiral, Van Tromp, sailed the English Channel with a broom at his mast-head, was seven years after the appointment of Peter Stuyvesant to the Directorship of the Province, and two years before the organization of the first religious congregation on Long Island. He was the first of our related families to come over, preceding the Langestraets by five years, and the Lanen van Pelts by eleven years. Not much is known of him. He came from Utrecht, having been probably, at one period, a resident of Leuwen. a village in Gelderland, on the river Waal. He brought his family with him, and settled in the village of Jamaica, on Long Island. He had in all nine children, many of whose descendants are still to be found in Somerset Co., N. Jersey. Their names are not all known, but among them were the following:
(1) Jan Fredericks. Jan Fredericks was probably the oldest child; born in Utrecht about 1647-48. He marred Aeltie Jans, daughter of Jan Jansen. Was on the assessment rolls of Brooklyn in the years 1675. '76, ’83, and '93; deacon in the Reformed Dutch Church there, in 1683; took the oath of allegiance, there, in 1687. Issue: Jan, bapt. Dec. 9. 1677; Margriet, bapt. Mar. 14, 1680; Abraham, bapt. July 9, 1682; Grietje, bapt. Apl. 20, 1685; Dina. bapt. Mar. 25, 1687; Esje, bapt. Nov. 10, 1689: Hendrick. bapt. Apt. 30, 1694: and Elizabeth, bapt. Dec. 13, 1697 -- All in the Kings County Churches.
(2) Catharina, of whom next.
(3) Hendrick. ___ Hendrick was baptised Oct. 14, 1683: married. 1st., ApI. 18, 1713, Geerje Corteiyou of New Utrecht (at which place he probably resided at one time); married, 2nd, Marya ___, and had by her a son, Jurien, who was bapt. Aug. 26, 1721, in New Utrecht.
Catharine Van Lieuwen, wife of Dirck Langstraet, was one of the oldest children, probably the second. She was born about 1648-1650, and in Utrecht, in the Netherlands, in all probability must have married about 1669, as her family began to be born about 1670. We have no indication of the date of her death, further than this: that one of her sons was born about 1680, and her husband married a second time in February, 1690; so that she must have died between those dates. It was probably after 1685.”

3. The book “Register in Alphabetical Order, of the early settlers of Kings County, Long Island, N. Y.; from its first settlement by Europeans to 1700; with contributions to their biographies and genealogies,” by Teunis G. Bergen (New York: S.W. Green's Son, 1881), pp. 343-44:
“Van Liew or Lieuwen, Jan Fredericks, emigrated in 1652, as per his marriage record, from Utrecht, having been probably at one period a resident of Leuwen, a village in Gelderland, on the Waal, in the Netherlands; m. Aeltje Jans dau. of Jan Jansen. On ass. rolls of Bro of 1675, '76, '83 and '93; deacon in the R. D. ch. in 1683; and took the oath of allegiance in Bro in 1687. Issue: - Jan, bp. Dec. 9, 1677; Margriet, bp. Mar. 14, 1680; Abraham, bp. July 9, 1682; Grietje, bp. Apl. 20, 1685; Dina, bp. Mar. 25, 1687; Esje, bp. Nov. 10, 1689; Hendrick, bp. Apl. 30, 1694; and Elizabeth, bp. Dec, 13, 1697 - all in the Kings Co. churches. There was a Frederick Van Liew of Ja, L. I., who emigrated from Utrecht and had 9 children, many of whose descendants are to be found in Somerset Co., N. J., and whose s. Hendrick, bp. Oct. 14, 1683, m. 1st Apl. 18, 1713, Geertje Cortelyou of N. U. (at which place he probably at one period resided), m. 2d Marya ___, and had a s. Jeurien (by 2d w.) bp. Aug. 26, 1721, in N. U.
Abbreviations: Bro. = Brooklyn; Flds = Flatlands; N.U. = New Utrecht; D. ch = Dutch Church; N.A. = New Amsterdam; cen = census; Gd = Gravesend; Flh = Flatbush; Ja = Jamaica.” 
Jans, Aeitje (I5626)
 
7108 RESEARCH_NOTES;
1. The book, “A history of the Camfield family: with special emphasis on the descendants of John Freeman Camfield and Margaret Singleton Camfield…,” by Ernest Ross Camfield (Privately printed; 1999), “THE FAMILY OF VAN LIEUWEN AND ITS TIES WITH THE CAMFIELDS GENERATION,” p. 265:
“Frederick Van Lieuwen immigrated to New Amsterdam in 1652; which as stated before in the Longstreet section was the year in which the Dutch Admiral, Van Tromp, sailed the English channel with a broom at his mast head, it was seven years after the appointment of Peter Stuyvesant to the Directorship of the new Province, and two years preceding the organization of the first religious congregation on Long Island. He was the first of all those interrelated families to come over. He preceded the Langestraets by five years and the Lanen Van Pelts by eleven years. Not much is known about Frederick Van Lieuwen. He came from Utrecht, having been probably a resident of Leuwen, which is a village in Gelderland, located on the Waal River. He brought his family with him and settled in the village of Jamaica, located on Long Island. He had a total of nine children, many of whose descendants are still in Somerset County, New Jersey. History does not record all their names, however we do know the following: (Sources: "EARLY SETTLERS OF KINGS COUNTY," Bergen, pages 343-344)
CHILDREN:
-Jan Frederick Van Lieuwen. Born: 1647-48 in Utrecht in the Netherlands. He married Aeitje Jans, daughter of Jan Jensen. He was on the assessment rolls of Brooklyn 1675-1693. He was a Deacon in the Reformed Dutch Church; he took the Oath of Allegiance in 1687 in Brooklyn. He had eight children all of who were baptized in the Kings County Reformed Dutch Church.
-Catharina Van Lieuwen. Born about 1648
-Hendrick Van Lieuwen”

2. The book “Genealogy of the Family of Longstreet with Its Related Families…,” by Edward Mayes (Tuttle Antiquarian Books, Inc., Rutland, VT; 1989?), p. D35-D36:
“Frederick Van Lieuwen (or Van Liew, as it was sometimes spelled) immigrated to New Amsterdam in 1612; which, as remarked in connection with the first Longstreets, was the year in which the Dutch Admiral, Van Tromp, sailed the English Channel with a broom at his mast-head, was seven years after the appointment of Peter Stuyvesant to the Directorship of the Province, and two years before the organization of the first religious congregation on Long Island. He was the first of our related families to come over, preceding the Langestraets by five years, and the Lanen van Pelts by eleven years. Not much is known of him. He came from Utrecht, having been probably, at one period, a resident of Leuwen. a village in Gelderland, on the river Waal. He brought his family with him, and settled in the village of Jamaica, on Long Island. He had in all nine children, many of whose descendants are still to be found in Somerset Co., N. Jersey. Their names are not all known, but among them were the following:
(1) Jan Fredericks. Jan Fredericks was probably the oldest child; born in Utrecht about 1647-48. He marred Aeltie Jans, daughter of Jan Jansen. Was on the assessment rolls of Brooklyn in the years 1675. '76, ’83, and '93; deacon in the Reformed Dutch Church there, in 1683; took the oath of allegiance, there, in 1687. Issue: Jan, bapt. Dec. 9. 1677; Margriet, bapt. Mar. 14, 1680; Abraham, bapt. July 9, 1682; Grietje, bapt. Apl. 20, 1685; Dina. bapt. Mar. 25, 1687; Esje, bapt. Nov. 10, 1689: Hendrick. bapt. Apt. 30, 1694: and Elizabeth, bapt. Dec. 13, 1697 -- All in the Kings County Churches.
(2) Catharina, of whom next.
(3) Hendrick. ___ Hendrick was baptised Oct. 14, 1683: married. 1st., ApI. 18, 1713, Geerje Corteiyou of New Utrecht (at which place he probably resided at one time); married, 2nd, Marya ___, and had by her a son, Jurien, who was bapt. Aug. 26, 1721, in New Utrecht.
Catharine Van Lieuwen, wife of Dirck Langstraet, was one of the oldest children, probably the second. She was born about 1648-1650, and in Utrecht, in the Netherlands, in all probability must have married about 1669, as her family began to be born about 1670. We have no indication of the date of her death, further than this: that one of her sons was born about 1680, and her husband married a second time in February, 1690; so that she must have died between those dates. It was probably after 1685.”

3. The book “Register in Alphabetical Order, of the early settlers of Kings County, Long Island, N. Y.; from its first settlement by Europeans to 1700; with contributions to their biographies and genealogies,” by Teunis G. Bergen (New York: S.W. Green's Son, 1881), pp. 343-44:
“Van Liew or Lieuwen, Jan Fredericks, emigrated in 1652, as per his marriage record, from Utrecht, having been probably at one period a resident of Leuwen, a village in Gelderland, on the Waal, in the Netherlands; m. Aeltje Jans dau. of Jan Jansen. On ass. rolls of Bro of 1675, '76, '83 and '93; deacon in the R. D. ch. in 1683; and took the oath of allegiance in Bro in 1687. Issue: - Jan, bp. Dec. 9, 1677; Margriet, bp. Mar. 14, 1680; Abraham, bp. July 9, 1682; Grietje, bp. Apl. 20, 1685; Dina, bp. Mar. 25, 1687; Esje, bp. Nov. 10, 1689; Hendrick, bp. Apl. 30, 1694; and Elizabeth, bp. Dec, 13, 1697 - all in the Kings Co. churches. There was a Frederick Van Liew of Ja, L. I., who emigrated from Utrecht and had 9 children, many of whose descendants are to be found in Somerset Co., N. J., and whose s. Hendrick, bp. Oct. 14, 1683, m. 1st Apl. 18, 1713, Geertje Cortelyou of N. U. (at which place he probably at one period resided), m. 2d Marya ___, and had a s. Jeurien (by 2d w.) bp. Aug. 26, 1721, in N. U.
Abbreviations: Bro. = Brooklyn; Flds = Flatlands; N.U. = New Utrecht; D. ch = Dutch Church; N.A. = New Amsterdam; cen = census; Gd = Gravesend; Flh = Flatbush; Ja = Jamaica.” 
Van Lieuwen, Jan Frederick (I5625)
 
7109 RESEARCH_NOTES;
1. The book, “A history of the Camfield family: with special emphasis on the descendants of John Freeman Camfield and Margaret Singleton Camfield…,” by Ernest Ross Camfield (Privately printed; 1999), “THE FAMILY OF VAN LIEUWEN AND ITS TIES WITH THE CAMFIELDS GENERATION,” p. 265:
“Frederick Van Lieuwen immigrated to New Amsterdam in 1652; which as stated before in the Longstreet section was the year in which the Dutch Admiral, Van Tromp, sailed the English channel with a broom at his mast head, it was seven years after the appointment of Peter Stuyvesant to the Directorship of the new Province, and two years preceding the organization of the first religious congregation on Long Island. He was the first of all those interrelated families to come over. He preceded the Langestraets by five years and the Lanen Van Pelts by eleven years. Not much is known about Frederick Van Lieuwen. He came from Utrecht, having been probably a resident of Leuwen, which is a village in Gelderland, located on the Waal River. He brought his family with him and settled in the village of Jamaica, located on Long Island. He had a total of nine children, many of whose descendants are still in Somerset County, New Jersey. History does not record all their names, however we do know the following: (Sources: "EARLY SETTLERS OF KINGS COUNTY," Bergen, pages 343-344)
CHILDREN:
-Jan Frederick Van Lieuwen. Born: 1647-48 in Utrecht in the Netherlands. He married Aeitje Jans, daughter of Jan Jensen. He was on the assessment rolls of Brooklyn 1675-1693. He was a Deacon in the Reformed Dutch Church; he took the Oath of Allegiance in 1687 in Brooklyn. He had eight children all of who were baptized in the Kings County Reformed Dutch Church.
-Catharina Van Lieuwen. Born about 1648
-Hendrick Van Lieuwen”

2. The book “Genealogy of the Family of Longstreet with Its Related Families…,” by Edward Mayes (Tuttle Antiquarian Books, Inc., Rutland, VT; 1989?), p. D-15:
“… the first comers were the family of Van Lieuwen, in 1652, in the year when Van Tromp was parading the English Channel with his broom aloft, seven years after the appointment of Peter Stuyvesant to the Directorship of the Province, and two years before the organization of the first congregation on Long Island. Next came the Longstreets, in 1657, five years later, and two years after the building of the church at Flatbush. Then arrived the family of Lanen van Pelt, in 1666, the year before the English seizure of the province, and fourteen years before the organization of the church at New Utrecht.
Although the family of Van Lieuwen preceded the Longstreets by five years, and the natural course of historical statement would therefore demand that account be first given of them, yet the logical arrangement of a genealogical narrative requires that the Longstreets be given precedence: they are the main branch, and any other course would beget confusion.
By way of preliminary, a statement in respect to Dutch names is needed. They then made but little use of family names. Many of them had none. Even in the most formal and important documents men are frequently designated by their Christian names alone; and that, where they were possessed of patronymics. It was, however, the custom to add to a man's own Christian name that of his father. These peculiarities cause much trouble, in tracing genealogies. There is one drawback on this difficulty, however, which is that the name of a person, as written, usually gives the Christian name of his father; thus Stoffel Dircks, means Stoffel the son of Dirck; Thys Janse means Thys the son of Jan. The terminations used for this purpose were various, but principally these: s, z, es, se, ces, en, sz.”

3. The book “Genealogy of the Family of Longstreet with Its Related Families…,” by Edward Mayes (Tuttle Antiquarian Books, Inc., Rutland, VT; 1989?), p. D35-D36:
“Frederick Van Lieuwen (or Van Liew, as it was sometimes spelled) immigrated to New Amsterdam in 1612; which, as remarked in connection with the first Longstreets, was the year in which the Dutch Admiral, Van Tromp, sailed the English Channel with a broom at his mast-head, was seven years after the appointment of Peter Stuyvesant to the Directorship of the Province, and two years before the organization of the first religious congregation on Long Island. He was the first of our related families to come over, preceding the Langestraets by five years, and the Lanen van Pelts by eleven years. Not much is known of him. He came from Utrecht, having been probably, at one period, a resident of Leuwen. a village in Gelderland, on the river Waal. He brought his family with him, and settled in the village of Jamaica, on Long Island. He had in all nine children, many of whose descendants are still to be found in Somerset Co., N. Jersey. Their names are not all known, but among them were the following:
(1) Jan Fredericks. Jan Fredericks was probably the oldest child; born in Utrecht about 1647-48. He marred Aeltie Jans, daughter of Jan Jansen. Was on the assessment rolls of Brooklyn in the years 1675. '76, ’83, and '93; deacon in the Reformed Dutch Church there, in 1683; took the oath of allegiance, there, in 1687. Issue: Jan, bapt. Dec. 9. 1677; Margriet, bapt. Mar. 14, 1680; Abraham, bapt. July 9, 1682; Grietje, bapt. Apl. 20, 1685; Dina. bapt. Mar. 25, 1687; Esje, bapt. Nov. 10, 1689: Hendrick. bapt. Apt. 30, 1694: and Elizabeth, bapt. Dec. 13, 1697 -- All in the Kings County Churches.
(2) Catharina, of whom next.
(3) Hendrick. ___ Hendrick was baptised Oct. 14, 1683: married. 1st., ApI. 18, 1713, Geerje Corteiyou of New Utrecht (at which place he probably resided at one time); married, 2nd, Marya ___, and had by her a son, Jurien, who was bapt. Aug. 26, 1721, in New Utrecht.
Catharine Van Lieuwen, wife of Dirck Langstraet, was one of the oldest children, probably the second. She was born about 1648-1650, and in Utrecht, in the Netherlands, in all probability must have married about 1669, as her family began to be born about 1670. We have no indication of the date of her death, further than this: that one of her sons was born about 1680, and her husband married a second time in February, 1690; so that she must have died between those dates. It was probably after 1685.”

4. The book “Register in Alphabetical Order, of the early settlers of Kings County, Long Island, N. Y.; from its first settlement by Europeans to 1700; with contributions to their biographies and genealogies,” by Teunis G. Bergen (New York: S.W. Green's Son, 1881), pp. 343-44:
“Van Liew or Lieuwen, Jan Fredericks, emigrated in 1652, as per his marriage record, from Utrecht, having been probably at one period a resident of Leuwen, a village in Gelderland, on the Waal, in the Netherlands; m. Aeltje Jans dau. of Jan Jansen. On ass. rolls of Bro of 1675, '76, '83 and '93; deacon in the R. D. ch. in 1683; and took the oath of allegiance in Bro in 1687. Issue: - Jan, bp. Dec. 9, 1677; Margriet, bp. Mar. 14, 1680; Abraham, bp. July 9, 1682; Grietje, bp. Apl. 20, 1685; Dina, bp. Mar. 25, 1687; Esje, bp. Nov. 10, 1689; Hendrick, bp. Apl. 30, 1694; and Elizabeth, bp. Dec, 13, 1697 - all in the Kings Co. churches. There was a Frederick Van Liew of Ja, L. I., who emigrated from Utrecht and had 9 children, many of whose descendants are to be found in Somerset Co., N. J., and whose s. Hendrick, bp. Oct. 14, 1683, m. 1st Apl. 18, 1713, Geertje Cortelyou of N. U. (at which place he probably at one period resided), m. 2d Marya ___, and had a s. Jeurien (by 2d w.) bp. Aug. 26, 1721, in N. U.
Abbreviations: Bro. = Brooklyn; Flds = Flatlands; N.U. = New Utrecht; D. ch = Dutch Church; N.A. = New Amsterdam; cen = census; Gd = Gravesend; Flh = Flatbush; Ja = Jamaica.” 
Van Lieuwen, Frederick (I5624)
 
7110 RESEARCH_NOTES;
1. The booklet on the Frederick family by Mrs. Alida Reed of Gloversville, NY, 1957 (she died Dec 1966) with copies at the Montgomery Co., NY, Archives and a microfilmed copy on FHL film 1312457, item 4). Alida descends through Hans Jacob Frederick and Margaret Young: "Jacob, b. 1788, md. Elizabeth Weaver (b. 1793, d. 15 Mar 1860, age 67). Children:
Caty, b. 2 Oct 1816
Nancy, b. 1819
Anna, b. 8 Apr 1821."

BIRTH:
1. LDS Online Ordinance Index name extraction: "Elisabeth Weaver, b. 16 Aug 1794, chr. 21 Oct 1794 at the Reformed Protestant Dutch Church, German Flatts Twp., Herkimer, New York, USA; parents are George Michael Weaver and Catharina ____."

BURIAL:
1. 4 Nov 2007 Website http://www.rootsweb.com/~nyfulton/cemeteries/PetersCem.html: "Peter's Cemetery
This cemetery is located east of Rockwood in the town of Johnstown. These inscriptions were copied October 7, 1944 by Dr. R. M. Palmer, Former Fulton County Historian. This transcript can be found at the Johnstown Historical Society, William Street, Johnstown, New York. It was sent in to the Fulton County GenWeb site by James Morrison, archivist for Johnstown Historical Society and was transcribed by Linda Jasztal, March 8, 2000:
'Elizabeth, wife of Jacob Frederick. Died March 15, 1860. In her 67th year.' " 
Weaver, Elizabeth (I4453)
 
7111 RESEARCH_NOTES;
1. The booklet on the Frederick family by Mrs. Alida Reed of Gloversville, NY, 1957 (she died Dec 1966) with copies at the Montgomery Co., NY, Archives and a microfilmed copy on FHL film 1312457, item 4). Alida descends through Hans Jacob Frederick and Margaret Young: "Jacob, b. 1788, md. Elizabeth Weaver (b. 1793, d. 15 Mar 1860, age 67). Children:
Caty, b. 2 Oct 1816
Nancy, b. 1819
Anna, b. 8 apr 1821."

BIRTH:
1. The actual birth place is unknown. Both Jacob Frederick and Margaret Young were of Warrensbush (now Florida Township) in Montgomery Co. They both did eventually end up in Johnstown, which is about 10 miles max from Mill Point and north across the Mohawk River. When they moved is not known except that they did buy land there at Keck Center in 1792. They may have been paying quit-rent on the property before then since it was about the early 1790 when many of the landowners were finally selling the quit-rented land. Alida Reed in her booklet already referenced elsewhere in these note indicates she believes they moved there shortly after the birth of their first child Peter. She is confident that it may have been no later than when Margaret was born in 1785 because the sponsors at Margaret's birth were Jacob Bossert and his wife Margaret. She says, "In the geneology of the Bossart family (sometimes spelled Boshart and Bushart) we find the first of that family did live in the section of Johnstown that leads to Fonda. So they were probably neighbors." I currently use "of Warrensbush."

MARRIAGE:
1. Per 4 Nov 2007 Worldconnect database of Douglas Weaver shows children of this marriage born starting with Caty Frederick, b. 27 Oct 1816 with a baptism occurring at the Caughnawaga Reformed Chuirch, Fonda, Montgomery, NY. 
Frederick, Jacob (I4452)
 
7112 RESEARCH_NOTES;
1. The Following is from Susan P. Canney's site at Rootsweb. His e-mail address is ; note reference to Samuel Gillet's children at the end of the will [Is this the father of Hannah Dickinson?]:
"Little is known of Nathaniel's activities in England. He was no doubt educated, signing the Billingborough bishop's transcript of 1633/4 with a firm hand. He was accordingly appointed town clerk both in Wethersfield and Hadley. Nathaniel arrived in Wethersfield, CT between 26 June 1636, when his daughter was baptized at Billingborough, and July 1638, when his son was born at Wethersfield. It is difficult to say what influences led Nathaniel to emigrate. Perhaps he heard the Puritan doctrines from Rev. Simon Bradstreet, vicar of Horbling from 1696 to 1621. Rev. Bradstreet's son Simon went to Massachusetts in 1630 and rose to prominence in the government of the Bay Colony. Twelve miles to the east of Horbling and Billingborough, Rev. John Cotton expounded his Puritan views from the pulpit at Boston until he fled to New England in 1633. Nathaniel apparently spent little if any time in the Massachusetts Bay Colony, and he was not among the Watertown contingent that settled Wethersfield in 1635. Nathaniel held many positions of trust in the communities of Wethersfield and Hadley. He served on the jury of the Particular Court in 1642. After several years as de facto town clerk of Wethersfield, he was officially appointed to the office in 1645. He held this position until 1659, when he removed to Hadley, Massachusetts. Nathaniel Dickinson served as deputy to the Connecticut General Court from 1646 to 1659. He was elected selectman of Wethersfield in 1646. His homestall consisted of a house, barn, and three acres of land in March 1649. In May 1653 he was a member of the committee to direct a contemplated expedition against the Dutch, and in October 1654 Nathaniel was one of the commissioners appointed to consult with the constables of the various Connecticut towns about "pressing men for the expedition into the Ninigret country." He was also active in church affairs, being a deacon of the Wethersfield church. When dissension arose in the congregations at Wethersfield, Hartford and Windsor, Nathaniel Dickinson and his son John were active in the organization of a new settlement under the leadership of Rev. John Russell. Nathaniel was one of the 59 men who signed the agreement to settle Hadley, Massachusetts, on 18 April 1659. He was selected to survey the original 59 home lots of eight acres each. In Hadley Nathaniel was again chosen town clerk in 1660. He took the freeman's oath on 26 march 1661, and the same year was a member of the committee to erect a meeting house. Soon after the establishment of Hadley, settlers began taking up land on the west side of the Connecticut River. On 21 January 1660/1 Nathaniel was a member of the committee appointed to lay out home lots on the west bank. Twenty-eight lots were surveyed for the original proprietors, among whom were sons Nathaniel, Samuel, and Obadiah, and stepson William Gull. These four were also among the petitioners for a separate township in 1667. The town of Hatfield was established in 1669. In his later years, Nathaniel, Sr., settled briefly in Hatfield but returned to Hadley shortly before his death. Nathaniel was an original member of the Hampshire Troop, organized in March 1663/4 under Capt. John Pynchon. During King Philip's War, 1675-77, Nathaniel lost three sons - John, Joseph, and Azariah. Another son, Obadiah, was captured by the Indians and taken into Canada but escaped and returned in 1679. Nathaniel served as selectman, assessor, and school trustee at times and was a deacon in the Hadley church. Nathaniel died in Hadley on 16 June 1676. He wrote his will on 29 May 1676, ten days after his son John was killed in the Turner's Falls battle. The will was proved the following 26 September, and an inventory of his estate, totaling Đ502 2s 6d, was taken on 22 December 1676. "I Nathll Dickenson Senr late of hadfeyld now of Hadley in ye County of Hampshire upon Conecticutt do make & ordane this my Last will & testement as followeth. Impr making a full surrender of myself Soul & Body unto ye handes of God my Creator & Jesus Christ my alone Saviour & Redeemer relying on him for all yt I need & hope for in this world & yet which is to Come & leaving my body to decent Buriall in hope of a Blessed Resurrection I doe Bestow yt Portion of Outward estate which ye Lord in his fatherlie mercy hath Blessed me with in manner following my debts & funerall expences being first payd I doe give unto my son Nehemiah my house & Barn & homelott with all the preveledges & Appurtenances thereto belonging as alsoe one half of my meadow land in Hadley (except what is after accepted [excepted] with the preveledgs and Appurtenances thereto belonging to be to him & his heirs forever besides what was Thomas Websters. I give to my Daughter in Law Dorcus Widow to my son Azariah four acres & a half of meaddow Land Bounded by my son Thomas his Land East, Francis west, John Hubbard North & ye highway South to be to her & her heirs for Ever. Further I give or abte to her all yt was my due for ye Rent of the rent of my Land from her & Also Doe give to her yt money yt was due to me for my oxen, and also three Pounds yt was Due for a barrell (unpayd) of pork, all & every of ye premises I give to ye sd Dorcus as her own to be her & her heirs for Ever. The rest of my meaddow in Hadly I doe give to be equally Divided betweene all my sons (except Nehemiah) and my Daughters Francis Dickenson and Hannah Clary which my exutors shall either equally divide to all my aforesayd children or else pay to Each their proportion of ye sayd Landes as it shall be Prized on Country Pay within too yeares after my Decease to ym and their heirs for Ever. To my son Thomas I give my house & Lot I Bought of Mr Wattson he paying to Mr Wattson ye thirty pounds yt is yet Due for ye same or if like it not on those termes than it shall be Cast in among my Dvidable Estate to my children. I give to my son Samll my house & homelott in Hatfeild to be to him & his heirs for Ever together wth ye Preveleges & Appurtenances thereto belonging. To my son Obadiah I give all ye Rest of my land in Hatfeild wth ye preveleges & Appurtenance thereto belonging to be to him & his heirs for Ever. And my meaning & will is that these my two sons Samuel & Obadiah shall not come in for a share of my Land in Hadley But given them in Hatfeild shall be instead of it. To my son William Gull I give yt three poundes wch he oweth me for a barll of Pork. All ye Rest of my estate I give to be equally devided amongst all my sons my Daughters Francis Dickinson & Hannah Clary having herein equall shares with there Brethren. I do make & ordane my two sons Thomas & nehemiah Executors of this my last will & testament hereunto as my Last will & testement have subjoyned my hand & seal this present 29th May 1676. Nathaniel Dickenson. In the presence of Joseph Kellogg [and] John Russell, Jur. The Desire of ye testatoe is yt ye share given unto Francis Dickenson may of she see meete be given to Samll Gillits Children. [New England Historical and Genealogical Register Vol. 152]"

2. From the family files at the Windsor, Connecticut, Historical Society is the following typescript:
"An Early Bee Hunter's Adventures. A true story by Francis McGee Thompson.
The first settlement made by the English upon the 'Long' river of the Indians, the 'Fresh' river of the Dutch, now called the Connecticut, was made by William Holmes of Plymouth, who sailed into the mouth in October, 1633, and unloaded from his vessel at a point just below the mouth of Windsor river, the already prepared frame of his house. When he returned to Plymouth he took with him some of the sachems of that region, whom the Pequots had driven out. The Dutch from Manhattan had traded on the 'Long' river with the natives since 1614 and intending to forestall the English, they had early in 1633 erected a small fort where Hartford now stands, which they named 'Good Hope.' The Dutch trained the two small guns in their fort on Holmes' ship and ordered him to stop, but he told them he had commission from the Governor of Plymouth to go up the river, 'and if they did shoote, they must obey their order and proceede.' So he proceeded to his destination. Within two years, churches at Dorchester, Watertown and New Town, with their pastors, had moved bodily to the Connecticut, and settled at Windsor, Wethersfield and Hartford. Among the earliest from Dorchester to Windsor, was Jonathan Gillet, or as more frequently spelled in early times, 'Gillit.' He subsequently removed to Simsbury, and raised a family of ten children.
His third son, Joseph, (bapt. 25 Jul 1641) was one of the early settlers of Deerfield, later the frontier town of the Connecticut valley, and was killed by King Philip's Indians at the massacre of Lothrop and his men at Bloody Brook, 18 Sep 1675. Samuel, younger brother of Joseph, was slain on the retreat of Capt. William Turner after the fight at Turner Falls, 19 May 1676. The next year the widow of Samuel married Stephen Jennings of Hatfield, and that same year she with two of her children, were taken prisoners to Canada. While a prisoner she became the mother of a babe whom she named Captivity Jennings. These prisoners were rescued in 1678. Joseph Gillet was the father of seven children, and his son, John, born 10 Jun 1671 was the hero of this story. [Story continues in notes of Joseph Gillet.]"

3. 20 Mar 2008 http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~bart/Gillet.htm:
"Samuel Gillett baptized in Windsor 22 Jan. 1642/3, married Hannah Dickinson 23 Sept. 1668 in Hadley (Hatfield?), MA, killed 19 May 1676 at Turner's Falls. Samuel & Hannah settled on the frontier at Hatfield, MA. Hannah was born 6 Dec. 1648 in Wethersfield, died after 1687. She was a daughter of Sgt. John & Frances Dickinson. She married (2) Stephen Jennings in Hatfield 15 May 1677 and they removed to Brookfield, MA. Samuel and Hannah had 4 children. Samuel was with Capt. Turner at the Falls Fight at Peskeompsinson [Sheldon, George, "A History of Deerfield, Massachusetts" (1895), 2:173.] in which 37 English were lost including Samuel and Capt. Turner. [Williams, John, "The Redeemed Captive Returning to Zion" (1795/1966), 110.]
Hannah had been remarried only a few months when on 19 Sept. 1677 she and her 5-year old daughter Mary and her 4-year old son Samuel were captured during an Indian attack on Hatfield. Hannah was pregnant at the time. When the authorities refused to pursue the Indians in fear of ambush, her husband and Benjamin Wait set out together to recover the captives who were headed for Canada. After a journey that lasted all winter they reached Canada in January and negotiated a ransom with the French. There Hannah had a daughter she named Captivity Jennings on 22 Jan. 1678. Hannah returned to home with her children in June 1678. [Spear, Burton W., "Search for the Passengers of the Mary & John, 1630," 5:59.] On 22 July 1710 Stephen Jennings while engaged in making hay was ambushed and killed by Indians at Brookfield. Captivity Jennings married Abigah Bartlett. He too was killed by Indians Oct. 1708. [Stiles, Henry R., "The History of Ancient Wethersfield, CT" (1904), 328.]
Samuel Gillett, son of Samuel and Hannah, was born ca. 1673, married Hannah HASTINGS 9 Jan. 1697/8."

4. Article from the Gillette family file at the Windsor Historical Society by Gary Boyd Roberts entitled "Genealogies of Conn. families from the New England Historical and Genealogical Register," vol. II, Baltimore, 1983, Gen. Pub. Co., Inc., pp. 43:
"Samuel Gillett (son of Jonathan), of Windsor, Conn., and Hatfield, Mass., baptized in Windsor 22 Jan 1642/3, slain in the Turners Falls, Mass., fight 19 May 1676. He married in Hadley, Mass., fight 19 May 1676. He married in Hadley, Mass., 23 Sept 1668, Hannah Dickenson of Wethersfield, Conn., and Hadley, Mass., born in Wethersfield 6 Dec 1648, died after 1687, daughter of Sergt. John Dickenson. She married secondly, in Hatfield, 15 May 1677, Stephen Jennings of Hatfield.
On 19 Sep 1677 Hannah (Dickinson) Gillett Jennings was captured with two of her Gillett children and fourteen others by Indians. She was taken to Canada, rescued by the heroic work of her husband and others and reached home again about June 1678 with their two Gillett children and her new born daughter of March 1678, Captivity Jennings.
[Four children listed.]
('Genealogies of Hadley Families Embracing the Early Settlers of the Towns of Hatfield, South Hadley, Amherst and Granby,' by L.M. Boltwood, 1862. The 1863 Hadley History; 1910 Hatfield History.)"

5. The publication "Search for the Passengers of the "Mary & John" 1630," by Burton W. Spear (Toledo, OH; The Mary & John Clearing House, 1989-2004), 1:32-33:
"JONATHAN GILLETT - b.a. 1600, England, d. 29 Aug. 1677, Windsor, Conn. m. Mary Dolbiar, 29 Mar. 1634, St. Andrews Church, Colyton, Devon, England (1607-1685), dau. of Rawkey Dolbiar & Mary Michell of Cadhayne, near Colyton.
Jonathan Gillett came on the "Mary & John" in 1630, either alone or with his younger brother, Nathan. He returned to England to marry and then sailed back to New England soon after. He was the son of Rev. William Gillett, Rector of Chaffcombe, Somerset in 1609, who d. 1641. He served in the Pequot War in 1637 and moved his family from Dorchester, Mass. to Windsor, Conn. in the summer of 1639. He was the Constable of Windsor in 1665 and in 1671 he was granted land in Simsbury, Conn. for his service in the Pequot War. Estate: 273 pounds.
Ten children (1635-1650) (NER 100:275), 75 grandchildren, and 243 great-grandchildren identified.
Children:
1. Jonathan Gillett, Jr.-b.a. 1635, Dorchester, Mass., d. between 1694 & 1698. m. (1) Anna Kelsey, 23 Apr. 1661 (1634-1676), dau. of William Kelsey, the emigrant. m. (2) Miriam Dibble, 14 Dec. 1676, Windsor, dau. of Thomas Dibble. Estate: 360 pounds. Four children by first wife (1665-1673) (NER 100:275), and six by second (1678-1685), and 13 grandchildren.
2. Cornelius Gillett-b.a. July 1636, Dorchester, Mass., d. 26 June 1711, Windsor, Conn. m. Priscilla Kelsey, who d. 1772, dau. of William Kelsey, the emigrant. Estate: 44 pounds. Nine children (1659-1678) (NER 100:277), and 28 grandchildren.
3. Mary Gillett-b. 1638, Dorchester, Mass. m. Peter Brown, 15 July 1658, who d. 1691, called the son of Peter Brown of the Mayflower (1620) but this has been disputed. He bought land in Windsor in 1658 and moved to the Josias Ellsworth place in 1664. Estate: 408 pounds. Eleven children (Windsor-118) and 61 grandchildren. One of his descendants was John Brown, the Abolitionist.
4. Anna Gillett-b. 29 Dec. 1639, Windsor, Conn., d. 4 Jan. 1711. m. Samuel Filley, 29 Oct. 1663, Windsor (1643-1712), s. of William Filley, the emigrant. He moved to Simsbury, Conn., 1669. Twelve children (1667-1683) (Windsor-250), and 26 grandchildren.
5. Joseph Gillett-bpt. 25 July 1641, Windsor, Conn., d. 18 Sept. 1675, killed by Indians at Bloody Brook, near Deerfield, Mass. m. Elizabeth Hawkes (1646-1681), dau. of John & Elizabet Hawkes. Moved from Windsor to Deerfield, 1675. Seven children (1664-1675) (NER 101:46), and 19 grandchildren.
6. Samuel Gillet-bpt. 22 Jan. 1642, Windsor, Conn., d. 19 May 1676, killed in the fight at Turner's Falls, Mass. m. Hannah Dickinson, 23 Sept. 1668, Hadley, Mass. (b. 1648), dau. of John Dickinson. She m. (2) Stephen Jennings, 1677. The year after Samuel's death, Hannah remarried, became pregnant and was captured by Indians in the attack on Hatfield, Mass., along with her daughter Mary (age 5) and son Samuel, Jr. (age 4). When the authorities refused to pursue the Indians, her husband, Stephen Jennings and Benjamin Waite, set out toward Canada to recover the captives. After traveling thru the winter they arrived in Canada in January, 1678 and negotiated a ransom with the French. There, Hannah had a daughter she named Captivity, and she returned to Deerfield, with her other two children and the captives in June. Four children (1669-1674) (NER 101:46), and 14 grandchildren.
7. John Gillett-b. 5 Oct. 1644, Windsor, Conn., d. 1682. m. Mercy Barber, 8 July 1669, Windsor (1651-1725), dau. of Thomas Barber, the emigrant. She m. (2) Capt. George Norton, 1683. Seven children (1671-1682) (NER 101:46), and 29 grandchildren.
8. Abigail Gillett-bpt. 28 June 1646, Windsor, d. 1648.
9. Jeremiah Gillett-b. 12 Feb. 1647, Windsor, Conn., d. 1 Mar. 1692, Windsor. m. Deborah Bartlett, 15 Oct. 1685, Windsor (b. 1666), dau. of Benjamin Bartlett & Deborah Barnard. Four children (1686-1692) (Fyler-30).
10. Josiah Gillett-bpt. 14 July 1650, Windsor, Conn., d. 29 Oct. 1736, Colchester, Conn. m. Joanna Taintor, 20 June 1676 (1657-1735), dau. of Michael Taintor of Branford, Conn. (See NER 4:169). Res: Windsor and Colchester, Conn. Eleven children (1678-1701) (NER Apr. 1893, p. 168), and 53 grandchildren.
References:
Gillett & Allied Families, by L. S. Gillett, 1930.
Gillett Family in Conn., Vol. 1.
Gillett Families, by B. B. Aldridge, 1955. TAG 42:160 (English Wills).
TAG 56:129 (Nathan)
NER 100:272 (Genealogy).
NER 101:43, 153, 237, 283 (Genealogy).
NER Apr. 1893, p. 168 (Genealogy).
TAG Apr. 1971 (Dispute French Ancestry)."

MARRIAGE:
1. From the book "New England Marriages Prior to 1700," p. 304 for the Gillett family: "Gillet, Samuel (1642-1676), Hatfield & Hannah Dickinson (1648?, 1646-), m/2 Stephen Jennings 1677; 23 Sep 1668; Hadley." 
Dickinson, Hannah (I2232)
 
7113 RESEARCH_NOTES;
1. The periodical "The New York Genealogical and Biographical Record," 120[1989]:10-17, 94-97, 160-163; 121[1990]:221-225, etc., "Descendants of the Rev. Richard Denton," by Walter C. Krumm. I have divided up this article and included each generation with the individual detailed (see notes of Rev. Richard Denton for summary of all other publications and researchers prior to this publication):
"Nathaniel3 Denton (Nathaniel2, Rev. Richard1) was born say 1653 in Hempstead, Long Island. He was twice married, first say 1679 to Deborah Ashman, daughter of Robert Ashman (Queens County Deed Books, Wills Pages, hereafter QCDW, A:43). She is last listed on a land transaction on 3 January 1695/6 (JTR 2:235-6), perhaps dying shortly thereafter. He married second say 1700 to Elizabeth ___, who has been identified as Elizabeth Smith (e.g., TAG 25:75), but that identification has not been substantiated...
Nathaniel's first public office seems to have been as constable in 1682 and 1685 (JTR 1:86,185), and he is undoubtedly the Nathaniel Denton who acted as overseer in taking inventory of the estate and house of Robert Ashman (his late father-in-law) in 1683 (QCDW A:42). Later civic assignments included assessor, fence-viewer "that fences are adequate," townsman, among others, as well as to serve on special commissions. One such searched for a minister, beginning 3 April 1688; he and eleven others (including "Danll Denton Junr") contributed expense money to bring a new minister to Jamaica. They arranged for a parsonage, and by 1694 assessed a town tax to pay the minister's salary (JTR 2:374-5; Nathaniel's quarterly subscription was ₤0-01-10; other Dentons contributing were Samuel, Daniel, and "Widdow" [Nathaniel's mother]). Other projects included evicting land encroachers, investigating moneys gathered by town collectors, and reporting on town surveying work.
Death was already upon him when he drew his will on 29 May 1719, proved two days later. First admitting to being "very weak and sick of body," he listed his heirs and his property holdings (New York Wills 9:176f.; WNYHS 2:219-20):
"to son Nathaniel: houses and house lot he now lives on; half the land on my Neck below Jonathan Waters; half my lot at end of lane at rear of Home Lotts; piece [of land] lying by John Messingers; piece [of land] between Little Plains and land that was Benjamin Denton [identity uncertain]; all my meadow on Long Neck; 10-acre right of Commonage; 10-acre right on plains; my brown horse.
'to son James: land in hollow near his house; my meadow on further East Neck if he pays his brother Robert £10 within a year; 25 acres right of pasturage; 5 acres right on the plains.
"to son Robert: house and lot where he now lives; land he bought called Freemans Farm; land on hills he bought of Wait Smith; half the land that was Widow Ashman's; all his right of parsonage in Jamaica; 5 acres rights of commonage & 5 acres rights of plains if he pays "my" son Nehemiah £20 within a year.
"to sons Timothy and Nehemiah: my own house and lot; lot at rear of Thos. Smith & Capt. Carpenter home lot; lot in hills on East side path and piece on west side.
"to Timothy: my shop and smith tools; £10.
"to wife Elizabeth: best bed and furniture and west room; use of all land given youngest Sons till Timothy is 21.
"to daughter Deborah: the East room; liberty of the cellar and well and orchard ~o long as she remains single.
"to wife and two daughters Deborah and Martha: remainder of movables divided equally. to son-in-law Samuel Dean [widower of daughter Catherine]: 10sh.
"to the five Sons: all his land in the Jerseys; they share the expense of securing better title.
"Executor: son Nathaniel.
"Overseers: Brother Foster [sister Phebe's husband] and Cousin Nehemiah Smith [first wife's nephew]. Witnesses: Samll. Smith, John Carman, Jekemiah Denton [a nephew].
On 3 October 1727, the two youngest sons received their portions (JTR 3:231-2), but the puzzling "land in the Jerseys," not mentioned earlier, never reappears in the records. The will leaves no doubt, however, that the eldest grandson of the Rev. Denton had prospered exceedingly.
Children of Nathaniel Denton and his two wives Deborah (Ashman) and Elizabeth (___), all born at Jamaica, Long Island (which if any of the children were by Elizabeth is not clear):
i. Nathaniel3, b. say 1685.
ii. James, b. say 1687.
iii. Catherine, b. say 1691, d. c. 1718 [she is not mentioned in her father's will of 1719, but her husband is]; m. 8 Oct. 1716 at Jamaica by the Rev. Thomas Poyer to Samuel Dean (REC. 19:55); they had one daughter, Deborah, bap. 1 Sept. 1717 at Jamaica (REC. 19:8).
iv. Robert, b. say 1695.
v. Nehemiah, b. say 1697.
vi. Timothy, b. say 1699.
vii. Deborah, b. say 1701; she was mentioned in the wills of her father and brothers. On 20 July 1751 letters of administration on her estate were issued to her brother James (WNYHS 4:486); perhaps she lived as a spinster in his household.
viii. Martha, b. say 1703; m. say 1722 to Solomon Smith, son of Amos Smith; four children: Amos, Solomon, Martha, and Anne (Eardeley, 12; TAG 25:67)."

2. Citation Information: Judd, Peter H. "Genealogical and Biographical Notes: Haring-Herring, Clark, Denton, White, Griggs, Judd, and Related Families." New York: P.H. Judd, 2005. (Online database. NewEnglandAncestors.org. New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2005.) The statements are sourced, but I did not copy them yet:
"Nathaniel3 Den Jr. ton(Nathaniel2, Richard1), first child of first wife of Nathaniel Denton, b., say, 1653 in Hempstead, L.I. d. ___; m. (1), say, 1679, Deborah Ashman, dau. of Robert Ashman who "is last listed on a land transaction on 3 Jan. 1695/6, perhaps dying shortly thereafter"; m. (2), say 1700, Elizabeth ___.
Krumm notes that land purchases made by Nathaniel Denton Jr. in Jamaica indicate numerous holdings and a process of acquisition that extended throughout his life, "with a marked increase after he had inherited property from his father in 1690." He also notes that "his occupation is most frequently identified as 'yeoman' (a farmer or freeholder under the rank of gentleman), but on 23 March 1692/3, he is called 'shoomaker... In his will he refers to his 'shop and smith tools' as a special legacy."
Nathaniel3 frequently served in civic offices: constable, assessor, fence-viewer, and others in addition to serving on special commissions.
Children of Deborah Ashman and Nathaniel3 Denton, all born Jamaica, Queens:
i. Nathaniel4 Denton, b., say, 1685.
ii. James4 Denton, b., say, 1687.
iii. Catherine4 Denton, b. ca. 1691; d. ca. 1718; was m. 8 Oct. 1716, at Jamaica, by the Rev. Thomas Poyer, to Samuel Dean; one dau., Deborah Dean, bp. 1 Sept. 1717 at Jamaica.
iv. Robert4 Denton, b., say, 1696.
+ v. Nehemiah4 Denton, b., say, 1699.
vi. Deborah4 Denton, b., say, 1701; she was mentioned in the wills of her father and brother; on 20 July 1751.
vii. Martha4 Denton, b., say, 1703; m., say, 1722 to Solomon Smith, son of Amos Smith; four children." 
Ashman, Deborah (I2959)
 
7114 RESEARCH_NOTES;
1. The periodical "The New York Genealogical and Biographical Record," 120[1989]:10-17, 94-97, 160-163; 121[1990]:221-225, etc., "Descendants of the Rev. Richard Denton," by Walter C. Krumm. I have divided up this article and included each generation with the individual detailed (see notes of Rev. Richard Denton for summary of all other publications and researchers prior to this publication):
"Nathaniel3 Denton (Nathaniel2, Rev. Richard1) was born say 1653 in Hempstead, Long Island. He was twice married, first say 1679 to Deborah Ashman, daughter of Robert Ashman (Queens County Deed Books, Wills Pages, hereafter QCDW, A:43). She is last listed on a land transaction on 3 January 1695/6 (JTR 2:235-6), perhaps dying shortly thereafter. He married second say 1700 to Elizabeth ___, who has been identified as Elizabeth Smith (e.g., TAG 25:75), but that identification has not been substantiated...
Nathaniel's first public office seems to have been as constable in 1682 and 1685 (JTR 1:86,185), and he is undoubtedly the Nathaniel Denton who acted as overseer in taking inventory of the estate and house of Robert Ashman (his late father-in-law) in 1683 (QCDW A:42). Later civic assignments included assessor, fence-viewer "that fences are adequate," townsman, among others, as well as to serve on special commissions. One such searched for a minister, beginning 3 April 1688; he and eleven others (including "Danll Denton Junr") contributed expense money to bring a new minister to Jamaica. They arranged for a parsonage, and by 1694 assessed a town tax to pay the minister's salary (JTR 2:374-5; Nathaniel's quarterly subscription was ₤0-01-10; other Dentons contributing were Samuel, Daniel, and "Widdow" [Nathaniel's mother]). Other projects included evicting land encroachers, investigating moneys gathered by town collectors, and reporting on town surveying work.
Death was already upon him when he drew his will on 29 May 1719, proved two days later. First admitting to being "very weak and sick of body," he listed his heirs and his property holdings (New York Wills 9:176f.; WNYHS 2:219-20):
"to son Nathaniel: houses and house lot he now lives on; half the land on my Neck below Jonathan Waters; half my lot at end of lane at rear of Home Lotts; piece [of land] lying by John Messingers; piece [of land] between Little Plains and land that was Benjamin Denton [identity uncertain]; all my meadow on Long Neck; 10-acre right of Commonage; 10-acre right on plains; my brown horse.
'to son James: land in hollow near his house; my meadow on further East Neck if he pays his brother Robert £10 within a year; 25 acres right of pasturage; 5 acres right on the plains.
"to son Robert: house and lot where he now lives; land he bought called Freemans Farm; land on hills he bought of Wait Smith; half the land that was Widow Ashman's; all his right of par-sonage in Jamaica; 5 acres rights of commonage & 5 acres rights of plains if he pays "my" son Nehemiah £20 within a year.
"to sons Timothy and Nehemiah: my own house and lot; lot at rear of Thos. Smith & Capt. Carpenter home lot; lot in hills on East side path and piece on west side.
"to Timothy: my shop and smith tools; £10.
"to wife Elizabeth: best bed and furniture and west room; use of all land given youngest Sons till Timothy is 21.
"to daughter Deborah: the East room; liberty of the cellar and well and orchard ~o long as she remains single.
"to wife and two daughters Deborah and Martha: remainder of movables divided equally. to son-in-law Samuel Dean [widower of daughter Catherine]: 10sh.
"to the five Sons: all his land in the Jerseys; they share the expense of securing better title.
"Executor: son Nathaniel.
"Overseers: Brother Foster [sister Phebe's husband] and Cousin Nehemiah Smith [first wife's nephew]. Witnesses: Samll. Smith, John Carman, Jekemiah Denton [a nephew].
On 3 October 1727, the two youngest sons received their portions (JTR 3:231-2), but the puzzling "land in the Jerseys," not mentioned earlier, never reappears in the records. The will leaves no doubt, however, that the eldest grandson of the Rev. Denton had prospered exceedingly.
Children of Nathaniel Denton and his two wives Deborah (Ashman) and Elizabeth (___), all born at Jamaica, Long Island (which if any of the children were by Elizabeth is not clear):
i. Nathaniel3, b. say 1685.
ii. James, b. say 1687.
iii. Catherine, b. say 1691, d. c. 1718 [she is not mentioned in her father's will of 1719, but her husband is]; m. 8 Oct. 1716 at Jamaica by the Rev. Thomas Poyer to Samuel Dean (REC. 19:55); they had one daughter, Deborah, bap. 1 Sept. 1717 at Jamaica (REC. 19:8).
iv. Robert, b. say 1695.
v. Nehemiah, b. say 1697.
vi. Timothy, b. say 1699.
vii. Deborah, b. say 1701; she was mentioned in the wills of her father and brothers. On 20 July 1751 letters of administration on her estate were issued to her brother James (WNYHS 4:486); perhaps she lived as a spinster in his household.
viii. Martha, b. say 1703; m. say 1722 to Solomon Smith, son of Amos Smith; four children: Amos, Solomon, Martha, and Anne (Eardeley, 12; TAG 25:67)."

2. Citation Information: Judd, Peter H. "Genealogical and Biographical Notes: Haring-Herring, Clark, Denton, White, Griggs, Judd, and Related Families." New York: P.H. Judd, 2005. (Online database. NewEnglandAncestors.org. New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2005.) The statements are sourced, but I did not copy them yet:
"Nathaniel3 Denton Jr. (Nathaniel2, Richard1), first child of first wife of Nathaniel Denton, b., say, 1653 in Hempstead, L.I. d. ____; m. (1), say, 1679, DEBORAH ASHMAN, dau. of Robert Ashman who "is last listed on a land transaction on 3 Jan. 1695/6, perhaps dying shortly thereafter"; m. (2), say 1700, Elizabeth ____.
Krumm notes that land purchases made by Nathaniel Denton Jr. in Jamaica indicate numerous holdings and a process of acquisition that extended throughout his life, "with a marked increase after he had inherited property from his father in 1690." He also notes that "his occupation is most frequently identified as 'yeoman' (a farmer or freeholder under the rank of gentleman), but on 23 March 1692/3, he is called 'shoomaker. ... In his will he refers to his 'shop and smith tools' as a special legacy."
Nathaniel3 frequently served in civic offices: constable, assessor, fence-viewer, and others in addition to serving on special commissions.
Children of Deborah Ashman and Nathaniel3 Denton, all born Jamaica, Queens:
i. Nathaniel4 Denton, b., say, 1685.
ii. James4 Denton, b., say, 1687.
iii. Catherine4 Denton, b. ca. 1691; d. ca. 1718; was m. 8 Oct. 1716, at Jamaica, by the Rev. Thomas Poyer, to Samuel DEAN; one dau., Deborah Dean, bp. 1 Sept. 1717 at Jamaica.
iv. Robert4 Denton, b., say, 1696.
+ v. Nehemiah4 Denton, b., say, 1699.
vi. DEBORAH4 Denton, b., say, 1701; she was mentioned in the wills of her father and brother; on 20 July 1751.
vii. Martha4 Denton, b., say, 1703; m., say, 1722 to SOLOMON Smith, son of Amos Smith; four children." 
Smith, Elizabeth (I2955)
 
7115 RESEARCH_NOTES;
1. This individual is supposed and derived from the Danish system of patronymics. 
Jens (I2888)
 
7116 RESEARCH_OTES;
1. The following extraction was made from the "Index to the Kent Lay Subsidy Roll of 1334/5," by H.A. Hanley, B.A. and C.W. Chalklin, M.A., B. Litt accessed 11 Feb 2016. From this index, the actual entries are found in "The Kent Lay Subsidy Roll of 1334/5," by the same authors accessed 12 Feb 2016. The second document more fully explains the history of this Lay Subsity. This was a tax assessed on householders; however, it probably only represents about 50% of the householders since the poorer families were not assessed:
No mentions were found for family surnames Acock/Alcock, Barret, Chepfield, Dancy, Dennett, Eagles, Gateland, Hadwin, Hales, Mills, Morskin, Shelley, Sisley, Strain, Vande Wall, Worme.
Clenche, Thos., 165 (Bailiwick of West in Middeltone [West in Milton]: Tenth).
Feld(e), wid. of Alex., 92 (Hundred of Wyngeham [Wingham]); Jn. atto, 94 (Hundred of Wy [Wye]), 104 (Hundred of Felbergh [Felborough]), 139 (Hundred of Littlele [Little]), 166 (Bailiwick of West in Middeltone [West in Milton]: Tenth); Pet. atte, 72 (Hundred of Ryngeslo [Ringslow]), 157 (Hundred of Folkestane [Folkestone]); Pot, son of Pot. atte, 157 (Hundred of Folkestane [Folkestone]); Rd. atto, 100 (Hundred of Boctone [Boughton]); Robt. atte, 87 (Hundred of Westgate); Robt. son of Rog., 151 (Hundred of Loniberghe [Loningborough]); Sim. atto, 87 (Hundred of Westgate); Thos. atto, 72 (Hundred of Ryngeslo [Ringslow]). Feldeswell, Thos. de, 109 (Hundred of Blakebourne [Blackburn]).
Hoppere, Jn., 131 (Hundred of Schamele [Shamwell]), 152 (Hundred of Loniberghe [Loningborough]); Rd., 114 (Hundred of Lauerkefeld [Larkfield]); Rog., 137 (Hundred of Blakehethe [Blackheath]); Wm., 164 (Bailiwick of Scapeya [Sheppey]).
Hunte, Hounte, Hamon, 86 (Hundred of Westgate); Hen., 145 (Hundred of Akystane [Axton]); Jn., 137 (Hundred of Blakehethe [Blackheath]); Jn. le, 98 (Hundred of Faversham); Pet., 122 (Hundred of Eyhorne [Eythorne]); Rd., 93 (Hundred of Wy [Wye]), 120 (Hundred of Eyhorne [Eythorne]); Walt. le, 139 (Hundred of Bromleg [Bromley]); Wm., 83 (Hundred of Dounhamford [Downhamford]), 120 (Hundred of Eyhorne [Eythorne]).
James, Jn., 116 (Leucata de Tonebregg [Lowy of Tonbridge]); Nich., 145 (Hundred of Akystane [Axton]); Rayner, 142 (Hundred of Codesheath [Codsheath]); Wm., 141 (Hundred of Codesheath [Codsheath]).
[Nicolls alias Webb?] Nichole, Jn., 105 (Hundred of Felbergh [Felborough]), 155 (Hundred of Worthe [Worth]); Margt., 130 (Five Hundred of Rochester); Pet., 165 (Bailiwick of West in Middeltone [West in Milton]: Tenth); Rd., 79 (Hundred of Bleengate [Bleangate]). Webb(e), Adam, 139 (Hundred of Blakehethe [Blackheath]); Agnes, 132 (Hundred of Schamele [Shamwell]); Andr., 159 (Cantuaria [Canterbury]: Tenth); Ellis, 132 (Hundred of Schamele [Shamwell]); Hamon le, 117 (Hundred of Maydenestane [Maidenstone]), 164 (Bailiwick of Scapeya [Sheppey]); Jn., 94 (Hundred of Chert [Chart]), 95 (Hundred of Longhebregge [Longbridge]), 103 (Hundred of Calhelle [Calehill]), 164 (Bailiwick of Scapeya [Sheppey]); Jn. le, 88 (Hundred of Kynhampford [Kinghamford]), 143 (Vill of Dertford [Dartford]), 162 (Bordenne in Middeltone [Borden in Milton]: Tenth); Jordan, 123 (Hundred of Brenchesle [Brenchley]); Jordan le, 142 (Hundred of Codesheath [Codsheath]); Nigel, 84 (Hundred of Petham); Pet., 132 (Hundred of Schamele [Shamwell]); Rd., 82 (Hundred of Eastri [Eastry]), 156 (Hundred of Folkestane [Folkestone]); Rd. le, 86 (Hundred of Westgate); Robt. le, 152 (Hundred of Strete [Street]); Rog., 134 (Hundred of Rokesle [Ruxley]); Sim., 134 (Hundred of Rokesle [Ruxley]); Steph., 94 (Hundred of Wy [Wye]); Steph. le, 122 (Hundred of Twyford); Thos., 92 (Hundred of Wyngeham [Wingham]), 107 (Hundred of Rolvyndenne [Rolvenden]), 149 (Hundred of Oxene [Oxney]); Wm., 84 (Hundred of Petham), 123 (Hundred of Brenchesle [Brenchley]), 130 (Five Hundred of Rochester); Wm. le, 80 (Hundred of Bleengate [Bleangate]), 98 (Hundred of Faversham), 136 (Vill of Lennes); 164 (Bailiwick of Scapeya [Sheppey]).
Renaud, Jn., 137 (Hundred of Blakehethe [Blackheath]). Reynod, Phil., 120 (Hundred of Eyhorne [Eythorne]). Reynold, Alan, 153 (Hundred of Hean [Heane]); Isabel, 93 (Hundred of Wy [Wye]); Jn., 95 (Hundred of Longhebregge [Longbridge]), 101 (Hundred of Calhelle [Calehill]), 120 (Hundred of Eyhorne [Eythorne]), 143 (Vill of Dertford [Dartford]), 153 (Hundred of Hean [Heane]), 161 (Sesaltre [Seasalter]: Tenth); Margery, 128 (Hundred of Chetham and Gillyngham [Chatham and Gillingham]); Rog., 105 (Hundred of Bircholt); Thos., 82 (Hundred of Eastri [Eastry]), 84 (Hundred of Petham), 95 (Hundred of Longhebregge [Longbridge]), 124(2) (Hundred of Brenchesle [Brenchley]), 154 (Hundred of Hamme [Ham]), 161 (Sesaltre [Seasalter]: Tenth); Wm., 85 (Hundred of Whytstaple [Whitstable]), 120 (Hundred of Eyhorne [Eythorne]), 138 (Hundred of Blakehethe [Blackheath]). Reynoldes, Joan, 112 (Hundred of Hoo). 
Acock, John (I323)
 
7117 Rita Silver of Palm Desert passed away on December 5, 2012. She was born on April 13, 1924 in Spokane to Washington pioneers Frank Tarbert & Clara Pennington Tarbert. They lived in areas that were being lumbered off during the creation of Grand Coulee Dam. She graduated from Wenatchee High School in 1942 and attended Washington State College. She met her husband of 58 years, Dr. Merton Silver, while on summer holiday at Lake Tahoe. They married and moved to Davis California where he attended Veterinary School and she worked as Secretary to the Registrar on the UC campus. She is survived by her four children, Pamela, Scott, Joan and Martha, four grand children, two great grandchildren and many nephews and nieces. She was preceded in death by her husband and five siblings. Rita was a two-time past president of the Palm Desert Women's Club, an avid bridge player and she loved to needlepoint. A memorial service will be held at 10:00am on Tuesday, December 11, 2012 at Forest Lawn in Cathedral City. - See more at: http://obituaries.desertsun.com/obituaries/thedesertsun/obituary.aspx?n=rita-silver&pid=161534308#sthash.65AwBGJc.dpuf Tarbert, Reta Mariel (I2721)
 
7118 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I2346)
 
7119 Sarah Ann Waldo was the daughter of Nathan Waldo and "UnKnown" Buck. Sarah Ann Waldo married Orlando M. Smiley. Sarah Ann Waldo died at Elba, Genesee County, New York. Died at Elba, N.Y., two days after the birth of her only child, who died at birth. She married Orlando, son of Francis and Emma (Mattison) Smiley of Litchfield, N.Y. He died at Marshall, Mich. She was his second wife. He married (1), a Knickerbocker, by whom he had one child, Frank, living, 1901, in Genesee Co., N.Y. He married (3), a Bullock and (4), a Knickerbocker, having three daughters by his third wife and two sons by his fourth. he was a farmer, living at Elba until after his fourth marriage, when he removed to Michigan. (Genealogy of the Waldo familly: descendants of Cornelius Waldo of Ipswich, Mass., Pub. 1902; p. 484-485). http://conovergenealogy.com/sisler/sisler-p/p757.htm View and copied 1/19/2015 Waldo, Sarah Ann (I186)
 
7120 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Family F525
 
7121 Sol Gossman appears in the 1850 census with his parents; not married. Family F733
 
7122 Source Family Record, Census Records & Will of Thomas Lawrence Compiler Jessie Waldo Box 231 Ellensburg, WA 98926

BIOGRAPHY: There are many generations of the Lawrence Family buried at Undy, England. Thomas was married about 1806 at Undy, Monmouthshire, England to Jane Prosson, who lived 78 years (born 1775).Thomas lived 71 years. Thomas had a brother named Edward.

Thomas had a brother named Edward.

Source Family Record, Census Records & Will of Thomas Lawrence Compiler Jessie Waldo Box 231 Ellensburg, WA 98926

There are many generations of the Lawrence Family buried at Undy, England.

Thomas lived 71 years.

Thomas was married about 1806 at Undy, Monmouthshire, England to Jane Prosson, who lived 78 years (born 1775).



Thomas had a brother named Edward
.

Source Family Record, Census Records & Will of Thomas Lawrence Compler
Jessie Waldo Box 231 Ellensburg, WA
98926

There are many generations of the Lawrence Family buried at Undy,
England. 
Lawrence, Thomas (I153)
 
7123 SOURCE: Family Group Sheet ; Compiled by Jesse Waldo. Information abtained by Karl Baush 58 N. Elcamino Reaf #201 San Mateo, California 94401 Bausch, Karl Mckeown (I1124)
 
7124 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I3507)
 
7125 SOURCES_MISC:
1. "Ye Historie of Ye Town of Greenwich, County of Fairfield and State of Connecticut", p. 613. Gives parents as John and Mary (Brundage) Merritt of Rye, NY. Birth given as abt. 1712.
https://books.google.com/books?id=gdULAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA566&lpg=PA566&dq=mary+hobby+benjamin+green&source=bl&ots=CiS7wQAAzH&sig=Vvv5HYnxb2KYVtMe3TcVxWkfkRc&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwj3vsDE1pbMAhVmr4MKHXomD5U4ChDoAQgbMAA#v=onepage&q=merritt%2C%20john&f=false

2. "Revised Merritt Records," comp. by Douglas Merritt, 1916, p. 55, https://archive.org/details/revisedmerrittre1916merr. Gives birth as 19 Sep 1734 to the same parents as above. 
Merritt, Mary (I5381)
 
7126 SOURCES_MISC:
1. 18 Dec 2002 website
Hales, Mary (I2470)
 
7127 SOURCES_MISC:
1. 18 Dec 2002 website
Brimstead, Elizabeth (I2452)
 
7128 SOURCES_MISC:
1. 18 Dec 2002 website
Fulligar, William (I1566)
 
7129 SOURCES_MISC:
1. 18 Dec 2002 website
Hales, Caroline (I1396)
 
7130 SOURCES_MISC:
1. 18 Dec 2002 website
Hales, Richard (I1254)
 
7131 SOURCES_MISC:
1. 18 Dec 2002 website
Hales, Mary Isabella (I1251)
 
7132 SOURCES_MISC:
1. 18 Dec 2002 website
Hales, Elias Henry (I1246)
 
7133 SOURCES_MISC:
1. 18 Dec 2002 website
Hales, Thomas (I1238)
 
7134 SOURCES_MISC:
1. 18 Dec 2002 website
Bennett, Margaret (I1230)
 
7135 SOURCES_MISC:
1. 18 Dec 2002 website
Hales, Elizabeth (I1229)
 
7136 SOURCES_MISC:
1. 18 Dec 2002 website
Hodges, Sarah (I1226)
 
7137 SOURCES_MISC:
1. 18 Dec 2002 website
Hales, Elizabeth (I1197)
 
7138 SOURCES_MISC:
1. 18 Dec 2002 website
Batchelor, Mary (I1196)
 
7139 SOURCES_MISC:
1. 18 Dec 2002 website
Hales, Henry (I1194)
 
7140 SOURCES_MISC:
1. 18 Dec 2002 website
Dove, John (I1137)
 
7141 SOURCES_MISC:
1. 18 Dec 2002 website
Susan or Susannah (I988)
 
7142 SOURCES_MISC:
1. 1801 census for Bodum. 
Christensdatter, Johanne (I1633)
 
7143 SOURCES_MISC:
1. 1801 census for Bodum. 
Christensdatter, Johanne (I1629)
 
7144 SOURCES_MISC:
1. 1801 census of Bodum. 
Christensen, Christen (I1630)
 
7145 SOURCES_MISC:
1. Book, "Wampler Family History 1500s - 1700s," by Fred B. Wampler, Ph.D.

2. Rootsweb.com Worldconnect database ":480580" 22 Feb 2003.

3. The book, FHL 929.273 w181wf, "A Wampler Family History," by Roy H. Wampler, Chevy Chase, MD, 1999. 
Kunz, Magdalena (I3647)
 
7146 SOURCES_MISC:
1. FHL book 929.273-K727kf: "Knapp's N' Kin, The Ancestral Lines of Frederick H Knapp and Others," compiled by: Frederick H Knapp, Rt. #2, Box 438C, AB Hwy, Richland, Missouri, 65556; 1987; Revised/Updated 1991. 
Marianne (I4819)
 
7147 SOURCES_MISC:
1. FHL book 929.273-K727kf: "Knapp's N' Kin, The Ancestral Lines of Frederick H Knapp and Others," compiled by: Frederick H Knapp, Rt. #2, Box 438C, AB Hwy, Richland, Missouri, 65556; 1987; Revised/Updated 1991. It notes the following sources, none of which I have yet reviewed:
-NYG&HR, Vol. 11, by J.J. Latting.
-NYG&HR, Vol. 86, by Geo. McCracken.
-NYG&HR, Vol. 87, by Geo. McCracken.
-NYG&HR, Vol. 47 (1893).
-TAG, Vol. 27, by J.L. Jacobus.
-Anc. Heads of NE Fam., by Holmes. 
Dixon, Tobias (I4792)
 
7148 SOURCES_MISC:
1. FHL book 929.273-K727kf: "Knapp's N' Kin, The Ancestral Lines of Frederick H Knapp and Others," compiled by: Frederick H Knapp, Rt. #2, Box 438C, AB Hwy, Richland, Missouri, 65556; 1987; Revised/Updated 1991. It notes the following sources, none of which I have yet reviewed:
-NYG&HR, Vol. 11, by J.J. Latting.
-NYG&HR, Vol. 86, by Geo. McCracken.
-NYG&HR, Vol. 87, by Geo. McCracken.
-NYG&HR, Vol. 47 (1893).
-TAG, Vol. 27, by J.L. Jacobus.
-Anc. Heads of NE Fam., by Holmes. 
Feake, Judith (I4788)
 
7149 SOURCES_MISC:
1. FHL book 929.273-K727kf: "Knapp's N' Kin, The Ancestral Lines of Frederick H Knapp and Others," compiled by: Frederick H Knapp, Rt. #2, Box 438C, AB Hwy, Richland, Missouri, 65556; 1987; Revised/Updated 1991. It notes the following sources, none of which I have yet reviewed:
-NYG&HR, Vol. 11, by J.J. Latting.
-NYG&HR, Vol. 86, by Geo. McCracken.
-NYG&HR, Vol. 87, by Geo. McCracken.
-NYG&HR, Vol. 47 (1893).
-TAG, Vol. 27, by J.L. Jacobus.
-Anc. Heads of NE Fam., by Holmes. 
Feake, Alice (I4787)
 
7150 SOURCES_MISC:
1. FHL book 929.273-K727kf: "Knapp's N' Kin, The Ancestral Lines of Frederick H Knapp and Others," compiled by: Frederick H Knapp, Rt. #2, Box 438C, AB Hwy, Richland, Missouri, 65556; 1987; Revised/Updated 1991. It notes the following sources, none of which I have yet reviewed:
-Feake Fam. of Norfolk, London, and Colonial America, by Geo. McCraken (Jul 1955).
-7 Gen. of Judiths, by Art Gibson (1986).
-Gen Frangments, by J.J. Latting.
-Amer. Ancestry (1963 and 1986) 
Patrick, Mary (I4783)
 

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