Chris & Julie Petersen's Genealogy

Notes


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301 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I87)
 
302 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I63)
 
303 BIOGRAPHY:
1. Son: Sergei
Children: - Alexia (alive in Irkutsk)
Daughter: was in Bratsk (Siberia)
Irene (died from drink)
Daughter: Marina (Irkutsk)
Husband:
Children: possibly

2. Also known as Nadia.

3. The following undated paper was written late 1969 in Nice, France by Catherine Werblovsky Olympieff (also known as Ekaterina Werblovskaya Olympieva) at the request of Patrick Landau through his aunt Alice Nikitina. Patrick's father, Vladimir Landau, even though he was Catherine's cousin, had less knowledge on the family then Catherine. Catherine was the granddaughter of Edouard and Rebecca Herzenberg. The letter was written a couple of years before Catherine's death after she entered into an assisted care facility in Nice. The paper was recently found among personal items previously gathered about 1969 by her daughter Irene Nadia de Lanskoy Petersen. Portions of the letter were written in three languages: English, French, and Russian. Irene, in transcribing the letter, notes that the letter was hard to follow and to make sense of. Irene's transcription dated 31 Jul 2007 with her notes added in [ ].
"What concerns the father and mother of our mother's: Mother's father: Edouard Ocipovitch Herzenberg [or Gerzenberg] Edward son of Joseph Herzenberg born: in Mitava [or Mittau] not far ___, Baltic Provinces - not far from Riga. He died at 76 years of age (had diabetes and malaria) from lung congestion after flu. His wife was his cousin.
Rebecca Herzenberg also married a first cousin. I am not sure of the name of her father; she died in Moscow when I was 6 years old (70 years ago). [Death would be approximately 1899?]
They were probably married in Mitawa and came to Moscow young, because all their children were born in Moscow. The eldest 1) Elizabeth 2) Sonja [or Sonia] (Sofia) mother of Manja or Mania who now lives in Moscow, who had a sister Nadja or Nadia who was born in Moscow. Sonia's husband was Adolf Schneider - son of Aaron Schneider - who had 3 more sons: Nicolas, Alexander, Serge and a daughter Elizabeth Schneider. She got married with Martin Behr (English nationality); they had two children and lived in Moscow. Mrs. Elizabeth Behr died in London (after the Russian Revolution she lived in France, later in England.) Her brother Adolf Schneider was a brother-in-law of our mother's of course.) [This is a repeat of the above.] The Behrs had 2 children. Elisabeth Behr died in London (probably her husband Martin Behr died before.) Mrs. Behr's daughter Olga died in London about a year ago [1968-69?], her brother George Behr still lives in London is married (has 1 daughter who is married too and has 2 boys, 8 and 7.
So my mother Elisabeth was the eldest daughter of Edward and Rebecca Herzenberg born in Moscow like her sister Sonia, the next sister Flora born in Moscow. Flora, married Joseph Offenbacher, had one son Lotar (my first cousin as well as yours). She, her husband, and son died in Germany during the war of Hitler (son Lothar). [Irene notes that another family account says that Lothar committed suicide on account of the war.] [His father] Joseph Offenbacher had an older brother Vasily [William or Wilhelm] Offenbacher who married a cousin of our mother's - Fanny, daughter of Abra[ha]m (whom all children of Edward Herzenberg used to call Uncle Abraham.) He was the husband of Grandfather Edward Herzenberg's sister Theresa. His family name was also like all: Herzenberg. Theresa Herzenberg had many children - daughter Fanny, sons Ludwig, Harry, and 2 other sons and another daughter Sophia married to another Herzenberg (all those marriages were between cousins) who had three children, Robby (Robert) who lives in Sweden and 2 daughters Clara and Roberta (died in Riga - Bolshevik Revolution). [I am not sure if Clara and Roberta are correct for this family grouping.] After Flora Herzenberg, the 4th daughter was my Aunt Anjuta [Anna Herzenberg-Landau]. Then there was another one Genga (Eugenie) married Harry Taube from Riga - were killed by Hitler's army. She was the 5th daughter of Edward Herzenberg. The 6th was Lilja [Lilia] (1st wife of Uncle Max Landau - died in Davos, Switzerland from TB.) Then was another daughter Milja, died very young (she was the 7th daughter). The youngest daughter Tonya [Tonia] died in Moscow. Then there were two brothers, the oldest Ivan (John) married a French young girl from Mussidan, Dordogne, France. She was daughter of the Mayor of that town. Died in the north of Russia where - she was sent sick and was sent with her to Mourmansk (north of Russia). Uncle Vanja's [Vania, Ivan, John all same name wife Lydia died there [note her maiden name was Lydie Buisson]. Uncle Vanja died too in Bolshevik Revolution. Their 3 children: Micha (Michel) died probably in Moscow; his brother Andrei (Andre) Herzenberg and Suzanne Hindzee (Herzenberg) - 1st husband (French) Volant. She has a daughter in Toronto married in Toronto (Alja [or Alice Nikitina] knew her) who has two children, boy and girl. The father's family name is A. [Albert?] Statter - wife Lydie (Suzanne's daughter) - son Albert. [Irene's note: last known address was 33 Stonegate Road, Toronto, Canada, M8Y-1V8; phone 416-251-6295.]
There was yet other families related to us through our mother's. It was a well known dentist. His name was Kovarsky. His wife was the cousin of our mother's. They had a lot of children - 3 brothers Misha (Michael), Leva (Leon), 2 daughters Choura (Alexandra). Chura who now is same age as Suzanne [Herzenberg Hindzee] - the only one alive. I forget the name of the eldest brother deceased. Manja (Mania) in Moscow knows more about that family. What was the name of the mother cousin of our mother's-probably it was yet another of the Herzenberg family. As Alja [Alice Nikitina] will be going to Moscow she will be able to find out more form Manja [Mania]. Then there was yet another family related to the wife of our grandfather through the husband or wife Idelson. There was a girl Lisa Idelson and her brother. I think that Manja must know something about them. They lived in Moscow. I used to go see them with my mother when I was about 8 or 10 years old.
Now George Behr has written from London thanking me for my sympathy condolences on account of the death of his sister Olga Behr. She must have been older than 78 years. he thought that his aunt on his father's side, Nina Karlovna died in Moscow, as well as his cousin Leija, but I think it is relatives on the side of his father Bahr, and the cousin is perhaps of the Schneider family (it is possible that the cousin is still living). All these people lived in Moscow.
Now what concerns the Packschwer family. The one that came to see you with the Vietnamese wife has passed away. His name was Julien Packschwer born in Vitebesk, Russia. He was 72. His younger brother Saveijn (Sahva) engineer in London named himself Packshaw, died in England 3 weeks before Julien, leaving a widow (2nd marriage) and 2 children. It was the death of his younger brother that caused reaction on Julien Packshwer. He died 3 weeks after him. He was found on a street in Nice, France with a cerebral hemorrhage-fell in the street. Police took him to the hospital St. Rock where he died at 19 hours in the evening and remained in a coma. His car 2 CV (small) stayed in the parking where he had left it. It was only his Vietnamese wife [Mado] returning from Saigon 1 month after his death that was able to retrieve that car from the parking. Yet another day or two, it would have been impounded. But as it was the widow herself then came. They did not charge her anything. But as the car was her husband's-she has to wait by inheritance law to be able to sell it and divide up in 4 parts to his children. The eldest son of another marriage Leon is an eye doctor in Paris, then 3 other children. Oldest Robert in Montreal, CA; another son in ___ was in the navy for 3 years. The oldest was in the Air force, married a girl from Morocco - they are going to have a child soon. The daughter Irene married, has a little boy, the husband is serving in the military; they live in Cayrons near Vence, France in the Packshwer house. The widow/mother Mado inherited ¼ of the sum, the children ¾ divided in 4 for each of the 4 children. Through a real estate in Vence, Julien's house of 1000 sq. meters is worth 18 million francs. If the children keep the house, they will in turn need to give on fourth of the cost to the widow who also has the right to half of his monthly pension of 30,000 francs. She came to see me day before yesterday and told me all these details. So here you have it-the relatives. The mother of the Packshwer father was 1st cousin of our mother's through the daughter of the sister of our grandfather Edward Herzenberg maiden name Theresa Herzenberg died in Nice, born I think in Mitawa [Mitau], Baltic Provinces. She was buried with her husband in Nice at the Caucade cemetery.
Now I add what George Behr wrote from London that his wife Janet has seen Aunt Anjuta [Anna Herzenberg] in Monte Carlo, then he wrote about his cousin in Moscow who he thinks has passed away (he is going to find out about it from Manja-he asked their address in Monaco). She was the daughter of the oldest sister Polina Aronovna of his mother. Here is what concerns that family... [Balance of letter missing]." 
Shneider or Schneider, Nadine or Nadja (I3443)
 
304 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I3702)
 
305 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I3695)
 
306 BIOGRAPHY:
1. Surname also known as Skræder (Tailor). First name may also be Valentin.

SOURCES_MISC:
1. Per family group sheets as prepared by Wanda Roos and researched by Eva Gregersen from Bedsted parish records. 
Flatiin Skræder, Johan Hendrich (I1637)
 
307 BIOGRAPHY:
1. The book "John Mangum, American Revolutionary War Soldier and Descendants," 1986, by Delta Ivie Mangum Hale: "William Young Mangum, b. Oct. 5, 1845 Mississippi. Died June 28, 1847 Mt. Pisgah, Union County, Iowa."

BIRTH:
1. Online Ordinance Index 1.02.

DEATH:
1. Per Ancestral File v4.19.

2. Mentioned in sister's biography in the book "Pioneer Women of Faith and Fortitude," Daughters of Utah Pioneers, p. 3338, see Sarah for full quote: "Sarah Frances Mangum Richey Cazier White was born 11 Sep 1838 in Pickins County, Alabama, to William Mangum and Sarah Ada Adair... pioneer of 1852 Wagon Train... Sarah Francis was born at Pickins County, Alabama, 1838, into a family of six children. She was eight when her parents arrived in Nauvoo on Jan. 15, 1846. They arrived to find they could not stay. Persecution was forcing every one out of Illinois and Missouri and by weeks end they were following the Saints across the Mississippi River traveling West. They stopped for one month at Mt. Pisgah, and while there Sarah Francis' one year old brother [William Young] died, and was buried in the Mt. Pisgah burial grounds. The family continued to Council Bluff and stayed four and one half years, another short stay at the Bongo River where Marinda Elizabeth, a one year eight month sister died of cholera and a few days later, at Loup Fork, Sarah's mother became so ill from the disease that her family could only watch helplessly as her life slipped away, on July 3rd, 1852. Sarah Francis was near her fourteenth birthday when they reached the Salt Lake Valley. The family spent the winter in Brigham City and in the Spring of 1853, William married Delight Potter, then the Mangums moved to Payson for four years. Sarah, for a while lived with her aunt Lucinda Richey, and for three months was James Richeys's wife also. She did not like that marriage, got a divorce and went, with her brother Cy Mangum, to Nephi..."

3. Mt. Pisgah, Iowa, Burial Monument, south side:
Rebecca Adair
William P. Adair (s/b William Y. Adair)
Lane Ann Mangum
Jemima Mangum Adair
Wm. Jefferson Adair

BURIAL:
1. Per Ancestral File v4.19

SOURCES_MISC:
1. Nauvoo LDS Land and Records Office research file (copy in my possession as of 2 Jun 2007 and also partially viewable at www.earlylds.com). Includes family group sheet from Ancestral File and copy of the burials listed on the Mt. Pisgah Burial Monument. 
Mangum, William Young (I1401)
 
308 BIOGRAPHY:
1. The book "John Mangum, American Revolutionary War Soldier and Descendants," 1986, p. 29, by Delta Ivie Mangum Hale: "Thomas Jefferson Mangum, b. 8 Dec 1835 Pickens County, Alabama. Died 1839 Pickens Co., AL."

2. Censuses:
1840 US: Northern District, Itawamba Co., Mississippi, related families from full survey of county census:
P. 136a: Samuel Adair, males 0-5:2; 5-10:2; 30-40:1; females 0-5:1; 30-40:1. No slaves listed.
P. 144a: John Mangum, males 15-20:1; 70-80:1; females 10-15:1; 15-20:1; 50-60:1. No slaves listed.
P. 150a: Joseph Adair, males 30-40:1; females 20-30:1. No slaves listed.
P. 156a: Thomas Adair, males 20-30: 1; females 0-5: 1; 15-20:1. No slaves listed.
P. 157a: William Mangum, Jr., males 5-10:1; 20-30:1; females 0-5:1; 5-10:1; 20-30:1. No slaves listed.

BIRTH:
1. Online Ordinance Index 1.02.

DEATH:
1. Per Ancestral File v4.19

SOURCES_MISC:
1. Nauvoo LDS Land and Records Office research file (copy in my possession as of 2 Jun 2007 and also partially viewable at www.earlylds.com). Includes family group sheet from Ancestral File. 
Mangum, Thomas Jefferson (I1390)
 
309 BIOGRAPHY:
1. The book "Monocacy and Catoctin, Some Early Settlers of Frederick and Carroll Counties, MD and Adams County, PA, also Descendants c. 1725-1985," Vol. 1, C.E. SChildknecht, Editor (copy found in the Historical Society of Frederick County, Inc., Frederick, MD.), p. 400:
Rev. Adam Lehman, Nov. 20, 1732 - Aug. 1823, m. Margaret ___, July 7, 1729 - Feb. 1818; lived near Frdk., etc.; and organizer of U.B. Church; children from Bible and Doub Cem.
1. Catherine, b. Feb. 15, 1754.
2. Elizabeth, b. Nov. 26, 1755.
3. Mary, b. June 21, 1758 - Feb. 20, 1845, m. 1778 Rev. Peter Kemp (CK3a), 1749-1811; children earlier.
4. Jacob, Oct. 6, 1759, m. Catherine___ [Two of his children are listed.]
5. Peter, b. Oct. 24, 1761, m. 1788 Catherine Eller (Frdk. Luth.)
6. Isaac, b. Feb. 4, 1763.
7. Adam, b. Sept. 14, 1765, m. 1790 Eva Kascha (Frdk. Luth. record).
8. Martha, b. Sept. 28, 1767; witness of marriage in 1788.
9. David, b. March 11, 1770.
10. Christian, b. Feb. 22, 1772, m. Henrietta; daughter Evaline, b. Oct. 26, 1800.
11. Eva, b. April 23, 1776.

2. The book "The Howard Leytham Stoker Von Dollen Family Histories," FHL 929.273 H833a, by Doris Lewis, 2017 So. 80th Ave., Omaha, Nebraska, 68124, p. 88 [FHL book 929.273 P684pn: "Graybill/Stoker/Eller/Smith/Koons/Pitt Connections," by Norman E. 'Gene' Pitt, 1996, pp. 119-123, has almost the same verbatim except what I note in brackets]: "Catherine, b. 1767; m. [probably 27 May 1788, Frederick Co., MD] Peter Lehman."

MARRIAGE:
1. LDS Ordinance extracted record for the Evangilical Lutheran Church, Frederick, Frederick, Maryland, per Batch M504181, 1743 - 1811, source 0824392, Film 0883763: Peter Lehmann and Catharina Eller, 27 May 1788.

2. FHL Book 929.273EL54h "George Michael Eller and Descendants of His in America," compiled by James W. Hook, 1957, also on FHL film 896571, item 2, p. 16: "Catherine Eller. She may have been the Catherine Eller who married, 27 May 1788, Peter Lehman with Adam and Martha Lehman serving as witnesses. (Evangelical Lutheran Church, Frederick Co., MD.)"

DEATH:
1. LDS Ordinance Index. Unverified. 
Lehman, Peter (I3622)
 
310 BIOGRAPHY:
1. The book "Pioneer Women of Faith and Fortitude" by Daughters of Utah Pioneers for Mariah Henrietta Gay Mendenhall Hales indicates her first spouse was Louis Henry Mendenhall, m. 1858 (he dies 12 Aug 1867 at Franklin, ID). Their children:
Mary Ann, 4 Apr 1860
Ada Maria, 18 Sep 1862
Louis Henry, 18 Mar 1865

2. Parents per Ordinance Index are Thomas Mendenhall and Mary Ann Sinex/Synix.

3. Censuses:
1860 US: Spanish Fork, Utah, Utah, p. 21 of 30, 23 Aug 1860, house 2020, family 1613:
Lewis Mendenhall, 21, farmer, $500, $500, DE.
Maria, 16, MA.
Mary Ann, 3/12, UT.

4. Mormon Pioneer Overland Travel Index, 1847-1868 ©, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, (Salt Lake City, UT: 2004-2007 [online] This index is the most complete listing of individuals and companies in which Mormon pioneer emigrants traveled west to Utah from 1847 through 1868. It is an incomplete listing, as rosters have not been found for all companies. It also identifies sources to learn more about the experiences of each company.). David Wood Company lists members including Thomas Mendenhall (age 46), Cathern Mendenhall (age 47), William Mendenhall (age 37), Sarah Mendenhall (age 34), Susanah Mendenhall (age 18), George Mendenhall (age 16), Lewis Mendenhall (age 13), Mary Mendenhall (age 13), Thomas Mendenhall (age 11), Thomas Mendenhall (age 8), Richard Mendenhall (age 7), John Mendenhall (age 5), & Elizabeth Mendenhall (age 2).

5. Obituaries of daughter Mary mistakenly indicate her father was Thomas Mendenhall. Mary Ann did have a grandfather and uncle named Thomas Mendenhall. Mary Ann's father died when she was seven years old. Evidently whoever reported the obituary was ill-informed as to the proper name of her father.
PHOTO:
1. It is reported on the Internet that there is a known photo of Louis Henry on display at the Franklin, Idaho Museum. The photo on display is incorrectly labeled "Thomas Mendenhall Sr." There is an additional photo on display labeled "Mrs. Thomas Mendenhall Sr.," which is Louis Henry's wife, Maria Henrietta Gay Mendenhall.
BIRTH:
1. Ordinance Index gives two dates 26 Dec 1838/1839. The second date was used for the 1858 endowment whereas the first was in 1932 for parent sealing. I use the second date. The location with 26 Dec 1839 shows as New Castle Co., Delaware. Wilmington, New Castle, Delaware is from Ancestral File which uses the 1838 date.

BURIAL:
1. Not found in the "Index to the Utah County Cemeteries, 1850's to 1996," compiled by Diane R. Parkinson and located at the family history center at the BYU Provo library.

SOURCES_MISC:
1. Per Ancestral File. 
Mendenhall, Lewis Henry (I535)
 
311 BIOGRAPHY:
1. The book "The Howard Leytham Stoker Von Dollen Family Histories," FHL 929.273 H833a, by Doris Lewis, 2017 So. 80th Ave., Omaha, Nebraska, 68124, p. 88 [FHL book 929.273 P684pn: "Graybill/Stoker/Eller/Smith/Koons/Pitt Connections," by Norman E. 'Gene' Pitt, 1996, pp. 119-123, has almost the same verbatim except what I note in brackets]: "John, b. 1762; m. [possibly] Catherine Fight [or Fort]."

2. FHL book 929.273 P684pn: "Graybill/Stoker/Eller/Smith/Koons/Pitt Connections," by Norman E. 'Gene' Pitt, 1996, pp. 119-123 notes that his children may have included Peter, David, and George.

3. FHL Book 929.273EL54h "George Michael Eller and Descendants of His in America," compiled by James W. Hook, 1957, also on FHL film 896571, item 2, pp. 15-16:
"John Eller. No identifiable record of him was found. He may be one of the John Ellers found in the early census records of Rowan Co., N.C. This writer's guess is that he was the John Eller who married Catherine Fight (Fort) 10 Aug 1785. (Rowan Co. Marriages.) She was the daughter of Peter Fight. (Deed Book 19, p. 876, Rowan Co., NC.) One son of theirs probably was Peter Eller, b. in Rowan Co. in 1788, who served during the War of 1812 as a private in Capt. W.L. Dufphey's Company Company of the 3rd Regiment of U.S. Riflemen. (His Hon. Discharge papers, Archives Bldg., Wash., D.C.) For these services he was granted 160 acres of Bounty Land in Missouri which he sold to Henry Fight, his brother-in-law probably, 10 Dec. 1819. (Deed Book 26, p. 112, Rowan Co.) Peter Eller, probably, m. 17 Apr 1809, Susannah Lemly and removed to Montgomery Co., VA and there shown in the 1820 census of that county, aged between 26 and 45 with wife of same age and with six male and one female children under 16. Others sons of John Eller may have been David Eller who had a license dated 31 Jun 1815 to marry Sarah Leonard, a dau. of Valentine Leonard of Davidson County, NC, and George Eller who had a license dated 9 Sep 1814 to marry Caty (Catherine) Eller. (Rowan Co., NC Marriages.)"

MARRIAGE:
1. See notes in quote above from James Hook's book. 
Fight, Catherine (I3623)
 
312 BIOGRAPHY:
1. The book "The Howard Leytham Stoker Von Dollen Family Histories," FHL 929.273 H833a, by Doris Lewis, 2017 So. 80th Ave., Omaha, Nebraska, 68124, p. 88: "...George Michael Eller, our ancestor, who... was in Rowan County with Jacob, Christian and Melchoir Eller at that same time and may have been there for a number years since his son Leonard said he was born at Fort Litters, N.C. in 1759. George Michael Eller bought land next to his brother Henry, in Frederick Co., MD in 1773, so he went back to Frederick County. His wife's name was Anna Marie and was the known mother of the last seven children, and may well have been Peter's and Leonard's mother. The Ellers of North Carolina have been connected with education since that state's earliest days. Academies in Virginia and North Carolina were started by Ellers and a list of the public school personnel today in N.C. is sprinkled with Ellers. Children:
a. Peter, b. 1748; d. 29 Jul 1799 at Ashe Co., NC; m. Elizabeth Dick.
b. Leonard, b. 20 Mar 1752 at Ft. Litters; d. 1839, Hamilton Co., IN; m. Elizabeth Mast.
c. Elizabeth, b. 1756; d. 1777; m. Henry Repp.
d. Jacob, b. 1758; d. 1830, m. Magdalena.
e. George, b. 1760; m. Susannah.
f. John, b. 1762; m. Catherine Fight.
g. Eve, b. 1764.
h. Catherine, b. 1767; m. Peter Lehman.
i. Maria, b. 1769."

2. Mentioned in husband's will per FHL book 929.273 P684pn: "Graybill/Stoker/Eller/Smith/Koons/Pitt Connections," by Norman E. 'Gene' Pitt, 1996, pp. 119-123, see George's notes for full quotation: "George Michael Eller's will, possibly written several years before his death, was proved 25 Aug 1778 (Will Book G M., No. 1, p. 76, Frederick Co., MD) follows: 'In the name of God amen. I George Michael Eller of Frederick County in the province of Maryland living, ...my beloved wife, Anna Maria ...my oldest son Peter Eller ...my son Leonard Eller ...my daughter Elizabeth ...the overplus shall be divided by my Executors among my six youngest children namely, Jacob Eller, George Eller, John Eller, Eve Eller, Cathrine Eller and Maria Eller; further Jacob Eller shall have the Bible..."

3. Email dated 15 Aug 2015 from Devon Dahl , past vice president for research of the Eller Family Association. Some family prognosticators indicate the maiden name of Anna Maria, wife of George Michael Eller, was Schneider. They quote Devon for this infomation and in response for his documentation, he confirms he has no source and he received it as hearsay from Hope Graybill Carr of Carson, Iowa, who was put into a rest home at least 10 years ago. I consider it only a footnote of interest and unreliable until a actual source can be found. Kathleen Stoker Overton, who also had the same information from Devon, discarded it by not including it in her book "Personal Ancestry of Kathleen Stoker" published about 1999 (she just used Ana Marie).

MARRIAGE:
1. Mother of this individual and listing of this individual in father George Michael's will is expertly discussed in the following per FHL Book 929.273EL54h "George Michael Eller and Descendants of His in America," compiled by James W. Hook, 1957, also on FHL film 896571, item 2, pp. 6-14: "George Michael Eller died in Frederick County, Maryland before 25 Aug 1778 when his will, written in the German language and translated and put on record by Thomas Schley, was proved in the Frederick County court. The fact that his will was written in German indicates that he was born in Germany...
The wife of George Michael Eller as given in his will was Anna Maria, but the way the will reads it is apparent that she was not his first wife and very likely not the mother of any of the children named in same. The will bore no date but was proved by its witnesses 25 Aug 1778. This writer suspects that it was written several years before his death. It reads as follows, (Will Book G.M., No. 1, p. 76, Frederick Co., MD):
'In the name of God amen. I George Michael Eller of Frederick County in the province of Maryland living, am for this time sik and not right well but in my sound memory thanks be given unto God therefore seeing my nullity, ordain herein my Last Will and Testament in full love. I recommend my soul into the hands of God that gave it and my body to the earth, to be buried in a Christian like manner at the discretion of my Executors, my Executors shall in the first place pay out of my Estate all my just debts, and the overplus what the Lord gave me in this world I ordain as followith, my beloved wife, Anna Maria I give fifty pounds lawful Money, the small red cow with a white head, thirty bushels of wheat, her bed and her chest she bought (brought) to me, also the small and large Iron Potts, a half dozn peuter plates, one peuter basin, a dozn peuter spoons and a small melt pan, three iron kettles, a small washer tup a water tup and the churn, her spinnin wheel, her lamp, her Bible and Psal mody, one quart tin mog, and a pint do, on quart bottle, and every year fifteen pounds as long as they can live together also her clothing out of my Estate they can agree together, the aforesaid fifteen pounds to be paid to her in the first year only out of my whole estate, and if they can agree to live longer together, then the six younger children shall pay her the same by themselves out of my good consideration I caused to be right and is my last will and Testament that my oldest son Peter Eller, shall have the sum of 97 pounds lawful money, and my son Leonard Eller shall have the sum of 82 pounds and my daughter Elizabeth shall likewise have 82 pounds lawful money; and these said three children shall have that money three years after my decease then my two Executors, namely Henry Eller and Martin Gerber, shall be impowered to sell the Place, wagon and horses, all the creatures and moveables, and shall pay to my beloved wife her part of the same; and the overplus shall be divided by my Executors among my six youngest children namely, Jacob Eller, George Eller, John Eller, Eve Eller, Cathrine Eller and Maria Eller; further Jacob Eller shall have the Bible and to pay to George ten shillings, also shall Jacob have the young colt, if it mare bring the same luky. This is George Michael Eller his x mark and Seal X (Seal) Attested by John Bergers and Henry Schmaus (Smous) - John Bergers, Henry Smouse the above witnesses were sworn Frederick County, 25th August 1778. Then came the above Thomas Schley and made oath on the holy Evangelists of Almighty God, that the within and above writing is a just and true Translation to the best of his knowledge of the original Will of the above named George Michael Eller, which is written in the German language and that he hath not knowingly or intentionally translated any matter of substance contrary to the true meaning of said Will. Certified by George Murdock, Regr.'
The phrases in the above will pertaining to his wife and the things 'she brought to me' and the legacies to her that were made contingent on his six youngest children and her being able 'to live longer together,' indicates that she was not their mother. The name of his first wife was not found. The Evangelical Lutheran Church records of Frederick County, Maryland, records the baptism, on 8 Nov 1756, of Marie Magdalena Aller, daughter of Michael Aller and his wife Salome. (Evangelical Lutheran Church Records, p. 40, Maryland Hist. Soc.) This, doubtless, was another family because in the same year (1756) Carl Aller baptized a daughter Anna Barbara and in 1775 one Michael Aller was recorded as owing money to Mr. Hass, the same probably being for the church. (pp. 42 and 49 Ibid.)
If all facts were known they might show that George Michael Eller was married three times and that his first son Peter was a child by his first wife and all others by his second. Peter was a grown man with a wife and child as early as the late seventeen sixties. His brother, Leonard, was born 20 March 1754. Peter Eller was called 'my eldest son' in the George Michael Eller will and the latter's children, Jacob, George, John, Eve, Catherine and Maria, called 'my six youngest children,' were given the residue of the estate in equal shares. The son, Peter, was given 97 pounds and the son, Leonard, and daughter, Elizabeth, were given 82 pounds apiece. All of this adds up to the fact that Peter, Leonard and Elizabeth were his eldest children and that Peter probably was some years older than the other two, and, maybe, their half brother." 
Anna Maria (I3625)
 
313 BIOGRAPHY:
1. The book "The Howard Leytham Stoker Von Dollen Family Histories," FHL 929.273 H833a, by Doris Lewis, 2017 So. 80th Ave., Omaha, Nebraska, 68124, pp. 88-89:
A. [Same information more or less is found in FHL book 929.273 P684pn: "Graybill/Stoker/Eller/Smith/Koons/Pitt Connections," by Norman E. 'Gene' Pitt, 1996, pp. 119-123 - any additional info is shown bracketed]: "Conrad and Katherine Dick were living in Frederick County, Maryland as early as 1755, when 100 acres were registered on August 15, and named Mon Hime, perhaps after Manheim Township in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania or Manheim, Germany. He sold this land in [Mar] 1764 and 10 years later there is a record of buying 200 acres in Rowan County, North Carolina. His early deeds shows he was a weaver by trade. Conrad later was granted [70 acres of] land [in Wilkes County] next to his son-in-law, Peter Eller, which he sold to him. Another Dick, which is probably some relation, named Susan Dick, married Devault Koons, who in turn were the grandparents of George Koons, who married Mary Eller. Children:
a. John [b. abt 1767/9]; m. Mary ___; John sold land to Michael Stoker in Wilkes Co., NC.
b. Marie Catherine, christened 28 Mar 1758 [in Frederick Co., MD].
c. Elizabeth [b. 1750]; m. Peter Eller."
[d. George.]
B. "Peter was the first son of George Michael Eller. Because there were a number of years between Peter's birth and the others, the question arises if he might not be a child of a first marriage. He grew up in North Carolina and married Elizabeth Dick in 1766. His land grant was close to other Ellers, beginning at the spruce pine on the Upper Ford on Rones Creek. In 1797 he bought the 70 acres which had been granted to his father-in-law, Conrad Dick. This land had been surveyed and chain carriers were listed as Michael Stoker and John Eller, neighbors. Peter had 470 acres at his death... Their oldest daughter, Catherine, married Michael Stoker and their youngest daughter, Mary, married George Koons and their great granddaughter, Betty Oman married Orson Hyde Stoker. Children:
a. John, b. 1767 or 1769; d. 1823; m. Susanna Kerns.
b. Catherine, b. 6 Mar 1773 at Rowan Co., NC; d. 1850 at Council Bluffs, Iowa; m. Michael Stoker.
c. Elizabeth, b. 1780; m. William Pennington.
d. Barbara, b. 1782; m. Pertune.
e. Mary, b. 1783, NC; d. 1872; m. George Koons (a Quaker who was disowned for marrying Mary, who was a Dunkard). She was 18 and he 19.
f. Jacob, b. 1784; d. 1855; m. Catherine White.
g. Henry, b. 1788; d. 1876; m. Elizabeth Johnson.
h. George."

2. FHL book 929.273 P684pn: "Graybill/Stoker/Eller/Smith/Koons/Pitt Connections," by Norman E. 'Gene' Pitt, 1996, pp. 119-123: "Peter Eller, b. abt 1746/8, possibly Germany; d. bef 29 Jul 1799, Ashe Co., NC; md. abt 1766/7, probably in Frederick Co., MD or in NC to Elizabeth 'Betsey' Dick. She was b. abt 1759, the d/o Conrad Dick and Katherine ___ of Frederick Co., MD. Peter was living in Rowan Co., NC as early as 6 Mar 1773. In 1790, he owned 550 acres in Ashe Co., N.C. in 1797, he bought 70 acres in Wilkes Co., NC which earlier had been granted to his father-in-law, Conrad Dick. This land had been surveyed, and the chain carriers were Michael Stoker and John Eller. Peter had 470 acres at the time of his death. The Ellers were Dunkards, members of the Church of the Brethren. They practiced triple immersion, opposed oaths and military service. Peter and Elizabeth lived in NC. Their children were John, Catherine, Peter Jr., Elizabeth, Barbara, Jacob, Mary, Henry and George."

3. Censuses:
1800 US: Ashe County, North Carolina. The total population for Ashe County, North Carolina in 1800 was 2785, including slaves. The 1800 Ashe County Census was the first for the northwestern most county in the Tar Heel State. This county was formed in late 1799 and included all of Wilkes County west of the crest of the Blue Ridge Mountain. The 977 square miles that then composed Ashe County has been further divided, first in 1849 to form Watauga County, North Carolina and again 10 years later to form Alleghany County. This record includes families who may have been living in those areas at the time. The original census was in rough alphabetic order, and this does not facilitate the research of particular communities. I include all interrelated families of this time and place to better show relationships. A word of explanation on some of these families:
A. Mary and Barbara Burkett who married Peter and David Graybeal, had a father named Christian - unsure as to which is correct of the two.
B. Elizabeth Eller appears to be Elizabeth Dick, the wife of Peter Eller who had just died per his probate of 1799.The one daughter is probably Mary; unsure who the two boys are since there should be three: Jacob, Henry, and George. John Eller would be Elizabeth's eldest son and married to Susannah Kerns.
C. Henry Graybeal would have recently married Celia Henson and also the eldest son of [John] Peter and Christina [Wampler] Graybill who also appear to be in this same census. Note that Peter evidently had owned slaves at that time - the census does not say how many.
D. One of the William Hensons could be somehow related to William Henson who marries Nancy Graybill and to Celia Henson who marries Henry Graybeal.
E. The two Koons are probably brothers and are sons of Devault Koon judging from their ages. This would make them uncles to George Koons who eventually marries Mary Eller.
F. James Lewis, b. abt. 1790, marries Christena Graybill in 1807 - there may be a connection with these two James Lewis.
G. William Pennington marries Barbara (or Elizabeth) Eller and may be the younger of the two here listed.
H. Michael Stucker is a misspelling for Michael and Catherine Eller Stoker with their three oldest children: Polly, David, and Elizabeth.
Head of Family; Males 0-9, 10-16, 16-26, 26-45, 45+; Females - 0-9, 10-16, 16-26, 26-45, 45+:
Burkett, Christian; 1-2-0-1-0; 1-0-2-0-0
Burkett, Christian; 4-1-0-1-0; 1-0-1-0-0
Eller, Elizabeth; 1-0-1-0-0; 0-0-1-0-1
Eller, John; 3-0-0-1-0; 1-0-0-1-0
Graybeal, Henry; 0-0-1-0-0; 2-0-1-0-0
Graybeal, Peter; 2-1-1-0-1; 3-1-0-0-1
Henson, William; 0-1-1-0-0; 2-0-1-0-0
Henson, William; 3-0-0-0-1; 1-1-1-0-0
Koons, George; 0-0-1-0-1; 0-0-0-0-1
Koons, John; 0-0-1-0-1; 0-1-2-0-1
Lewis, James; 2-2-1-0-1; 4-1-0-0-1
Lewis, James, Jr.; 1-0-1-0-0; 1-0-1-0-0
Pennington, William; 0-1-0-1-0; 1-2-1-0-1
Pennington, William; 0-0-1-0-0; 0-0-1-0-0
Stucker, Michael; 1-0-0-1-0; 2-0-0-1-0

1810 US: Ashe County, North Carolina; I include several related families in my database for this time and place. Some notes:
A. One of the two William Penningtons is married to an Eller - I assume it is the one with a younger wife.
B. One of the two Christian Burketts is probably the parent of Barbara and Mary who married Graybeal brothers.
C. James Lewis married Christina Graybill.
D. The older Peter Graybill would be John Peter and Christina Wampler Graybill. The other Peter and Henry would be their sons.
E. Adam Wilker could be Adam Welker, father of James Welker who later marries Elizabeth Stoker.
F. Surprisingly there is no Michael Stoker who should be there unless in adjoining county.
G. One of the two George Koons should be the George Koons of this database.
H. Not sure why two J. Ellers unless the transcriber inadvertently named the "J." as both Jacob when in fact the older one is John. Peter Eller would be a brother.
I. The older Peter Graybill would be John Peter Graybill, father of the other two Graybills: Henry and Peter [Jr.].
Head of Family; Males 0-9, 10-16, 16-26, 26-45, 45+; Females - 0-9, 10-16, 16-26, 26-45, 45+; Slaves:
Pennington, W. (William); 1-0-1-0-0; 2-0-1-0-0
Bourket C. (Christian); 2-2-2-0-1; 5-1-1-1-0
Wilker, A. (Adam); 0-1-2-0-1; 0-1-0-0-1
Graybill, H. (Henry); 3-0-0-1-0; 2-0-1-0-0
Lewis, J. (James); 1-0-1-0-0; 1-0-1-0-0
Graybill, P. (Peter); 0-1-0-1-0; 0-1-0-0-1
Graybeal, P. (Peter); 1-0-1-0-0; 1-0-1-0-0
Graybill, H.; 2-0-1-0-0; 3-0-0-1-0
Koons, G. (George); 2-0-0-1-0; 2-0-0-1-0
Pennington, W. (Wm); 2-0-1-0-0; 2-0-0-0-1
Eller, P. (Peter); 3-0-0-1-0; 2-0-0-1-0
Eller, J. (Jacob); 2-3-1-0-0; 2-0-0-1-0
Burket, C. (Christian); 4-1-0-0-1; 0-1-0-0-1
Koontz, G. (George); 1-0-0-1-0; 2-0-1-0-1; 3
Eller, J. (Jacob [John?]); 2-0-0-1-0; 1-0-1-0-0

4. FHL Book 929.273EL54h "George Michael Eller and Descendants of His in America," compiled by James W. Hook, 1957, also on FHL film 896571, item 2, pp. 17-31: "Peter Eller was born, say about 1746 and died in that part of Wilkes County, North Carolina that in 1799 became Ashe County, before 29 Jul 1799 on which date the administration of his estate was given to Betsey and John Eller. He married, say about 1767, probably in Frederick County, Maryland, Elizabeth Dick, daughter of Conrad and Catherine Dick who were living in Frederick Co. as early as 15 Aug 1755 when all of that tract of 'land called Mon Hime' lying on a small creek leading into Beaver Dam Branch in Frederick Co., MD containing 100 acres, was surveyed and patented to Conrad Dick. (B.C. and G.S. No. 5, folio 127, Hall of Records, Annapolis, MD) Beaver Branch is a branch of Little Pipe Creek. Conrad and Catherine Dick, she relinquishing her dower right, sold this land to William Aldridge on 23 Mar 1764 after which they disappear from the Frederick Co. records. He was called a weaver in the deed. (Book J, pp. 244, 245, Frederick Co. Deeds.) Mon Hime, apparently, was his own name for this land and may have been named for the township of Manheim in Bavaria located about 80 miles south of Nurnberg. On 28 March 1758, Marie Catherine Dick, daughter of Conrad Dick and his wife Anna Catherine Dick, was christened in the German Reformed Church of Frederick Co., Maryland.
Conrod Dick (sic) purchased 200 acres of land from Martin Sheets in Rowan Co., NC in 1774. The land was located on Hodgeilkes Co., NC, 28 Nov 1792. A record on film at the Genealogical Society of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints at Salt Lake City (FNCW 5B Land Entries, 1778-1781 and 1783-1785, Wilkes Co., NC) shows that this land was entered 20 Feb 1779 but the order for survey, dated 10 Mar 1787, in the Sec'y of State's office in Raleigh, NC, shows that Coonrod Dick's name had been written in over another name that the original entry may have been made for someone else who later assigned his right to Coonrod (Conrad) Dick. The land was surveyed for Conrod Dick (sic), 13 Apr 1795, and found to contain only 70 acres. Jno. Eller and Mich. Stucker (Stoker) signed the survey as chain carriers. (Grant #1258, Secretary of State Office, Raleigh, N.C.) In view of the fact that Peter Eller, son-in-law of Conrad Dick, entered land on Rones Creek about a year later (24 July 1780), it is reasonable to suppose that the two settled in North Carolina at the same time. Whether they came directly form Frederick County, Md. or not is not clear but the fact that Conrad Dick sold his land in Frederick County, Md. in Mar 1764 and didn't show up in NC until ten years later suggests that he may have lived in some intermediate place, say Virginia, meantime. Conrad Dick sold his 70 acres to Peter Eller, 3 Mar 1797. (Deed Book D, p. 165, Wilkes Col, NC.)
A John Dick, son perhaps of Conrad Dick, was granted 86-1/2 acres on the south fork of New River in Ashe Co., on 27 Jun 1797. John Dick Jr. and Jesse Ray attested the survey. John Dick and John Dick Jr. doubtless were father and son. John Dick was also granted 400 acres of land on the south fork of New River on 13 Jun 1798. This grant was accompanied by a document saying that it was issued to correct errors in an earlier grant not identified but probably the one dated 27 Dec 1797 for 400 acres that, on 3 Jan 1783, had been ordered to be surveyed probably for Robert Nall and actually surveyed for John Dick 22 July 1787. John Nall and Alexander Johnson attested the survey. On 1 Dec 1798, John Dick was granted an additional 100 acres on the south fork of New River. This land was first ordered to be surveyed for William Nall on 11 Nov 1779 and actually surveyed for Robert Nall 24 Jun 1794. How it came to be granted later to John Dick is not clear but very likely it was by assignment. (Grants 1484, 1749, 1547 and 1471, Secretary of State's Office, Raleigh, NC.) That John Dick and his wife Mary once lived in Rowan Co. is indicated by a deed of that county dated 3 Sep 1795 wherein John Dick, of Wilkes Co., sold to Jacob Helfer of Rowan Co., 200 acres of land including improvements located on Bear Creek in Rowan Co. He signed the deed 'Johannes Dick' in German script in his own hand. His wife Mary signed with a mark. (Book 14, p. 523, Rowan Co. Deeds.)
Land grants in North Carolina originated with an entry application which was filed in the county where the land was situated and if not lost are now on file there. This was followed, sometimes soon and sometimes years later by an order from the land office for the tract to be surveyed. Sometimes soon and sometimes years later the survey was made and a surveyor's plat filed with the Secretary of State in Raleigh. Then came the grant which may have been issued reasonably near the date of the survey or sometimes several years later. These grants, orders to survey and the survey itself are on file now in the Secretary of State's office at Raleigh. The two grants to Peter Eller totaling 350 acres on Rones Creek in Wilkes County (now Ashe) mentioned above has an entry date of 10 Mar 1780 in Wilkes Co., NC records. (Land Entries 1778-1781, 1783-1795 Wilkes Co., NC, on film at the Gen. Soc. of the LDS Church in Salt Lake City.) This was followed by a warrant of survey, dated 24 Jul 1780. The survey was made 28 Mar 1787 and the grant issued 18 May 1789. Apparently Peter Eller merely retained his entry privilege and did not ask for a survey and grant until some years later, probably about the time he removed there for his farm on Reedy Creek in Rowan (now Davidson County,) North Carolina. The same situation also applied to the Conrad Dick grant of 150 acres on Rones Creek. The Wilkes county entry date is 20 Feb 1779 whereas the order to survey was issued 10 Mar 1787, the grant 28 Nov 1792 and strangely enough the survey was not made until 13 Apr 1795. Very likely it was a resurvey because it showed that instead of containing 150 acres the tract contained only 70 acres, the same acreage that Conrad Dick sold to Peter Eller, 3 Mar 1797 (supra). Quite often there would be an acreage discrepancy between entry and survey. The reason for this was that the entries were estimates and the surveys actual. Instances are also found where a person would make an entry and not follow through, then at a later date make a new entry on the same land. The Wilkes County, NC entries mentioned above were found on microfilm at the Gen. Soc. of the LDS Church. ((FNCW 5B, Land Entries 1778-1781, 1783-1795, Wilkes Co., NC.) The writer is indebted to Honorable Thad Eure, Secretary of State of North Carolina for his letter of 2 Dec 1955 which explains early land grant procedure in North Carolina.
The date of birth for Elizabeth Dick, wife of Peter Eller, is not known. Her eldest son John Eller was born about 1767-1769 and her youngest son George after 1790. This would indicate that she was born not later than about 1749 or 1750. The 1800 census of Ashe County, N.C. states her age as over 45. She probably was alive in 1830 and, according to the Federal Census of Ashe County of that year, living with her son Jacob, her age being shown as between 70 and 80. The fact that her daughter did not have herself baptized for her mother as well as her father at Nauvoo, Ill. in 1841 as shown below, indicates either that she was then living or, as is more likely, that she had embraced the Mormon faith and was baptized in her own lifetime. [KP: This statement now appears in error since it has been found that Catherine Eller Stoker was baptized for Elizabeth White, her mother in 1843, who appeared to have remarried to Luke White, whose baptism was done by Catherine's daughter Mary (Polly) Stoker in 1841.]
Proof of many facts concerning Peter Eller and his family was gleaned from the microfilm records of the Index to Nauvoo (Illinois) Baptisms for the Dead of the [LDS Church] that are in the custody of the Gen. Soc. of the Church in Salt Lake City. They show the following [Kerry's note: baptisms are currently not done cross-gender; however, when first introduced in 1841 on the banks of the Mississippi River, there were indeed indiscriminate cross-gender proxies.]:
1. That Catherine Stoker, wife of Michael Stoker and daughter of Peter Eller had herself baptized in 1841 for:
a. Her deceased grandfather, Kinrod (Conrad) Dick. (Book A, p. 37)
b. Her deceased grandmother, Catherine Dick (Book A, p. 37)
c. Her deceased father, Peter Eller. (Book A, p. 41)
d. Her deceased brother, John Eller. (Book A, p. 42)
e. Her deceased daughter Rebecca Stoker. (Book C, p. 338)
2. Eller Stoker, son of Catherine Stoker had himself baptized in 1841 for:
a. His deceased uncle, George Eller. (Bk. A, p. 41)
3. Michael Stoker, son of Catherine Stoker had himself baptized in 1841 for:
a. His deceased aunt, Barbara Pertune. It is not clear whether this aunt was a sister of his mother or father. (Book A, p. 94)
From the above it is apparent that Catherine (Eller) Stoker in 1841 was living in or near Nauvoo, Illinois. When she and her husband embraced the faith is not known but indications are that it was some years prior to 1841 when they lived in Jackson County, Ohio.
Peter Eller was living in Rowan County, NC as early as 6 Mar 1773 on which date the Patriarchal Blessing of the [LDS Church] states that Peter Eller's daughter Catherine was born in Rowan Co., NC. Rowan County at that time embraced all of what, in 1777, became Wilkes Co. and of what, in 1799, became Ashe Co. Ashe Co. was set off from Wilkes County in the latter year.
Many counties were formed from what originally was Rowan County, namely Surry and Guilford in 1770, Burke and Wilkes in 1777, Randolph in 1779, Iridell in 1788, Stokes in 1789, Buncomb in 1791, Ashe in 1799, Davidson in 1822, Yancey in 1833, Davie in 1836 and Yadkin in 1850. Some of these counties were grandchildren of Rowan County; for instance Wilkes was taken partly from Burke and partly from Surry, Randolph from Guilford, Buncomb and Yancy form Burke, Ashe from Wilkes and Stokes and Yadkin from Surry. These facts must be kept in mind when tracing early Rowan County families.
Land transactions in western North Carolina between 1740 and 1780 were so frequently unrecorded and in some cases titles supplied by the Earl of Granville and other British proprietors were considered so worthless that property owners found it necessary to have their land holdings legalized by grants from the state. This situation may explain why Peter Eller and many other settlers who are known to have lived in Rowan, and what is now Davidson County, of Western North Carolina during the period cannot be found in the records of that time. They must have done something to support themselves and their families and about all they could have done was farm lands that, by squatter rights, they assumed they owned or lands upon which they worked as laborers or tenants. [Kerry's note: Many may have finally gone for the actual grant after the Revolution since a new local and more responsive government was finally in place.]
As already stated Peter Eller first appears in the land records of North Carolina on 10 Mar and 24 Jul 1780 when he entered upon and obtained orders to have surveyed two parcels of land on the upper ford of Rones Creek in Wilkes County, one containing 200 acres and the other containing 150 acres. Both of these parcels were surveyed to him 28 Mar 1787 and granted to him 18 May 1789. (Grants 878 and 889, Secretary of State Office, Raleigh, NC.) The first parcel ran south of and the second north of the 'upper ford of Roans Creek a branch of New River' in Wilkes County, NC. Roans Creek is on the south fork of New River in Ashe County which county was formed out of Wilkes County in 1799. None of the three papers concerned with these grants namely the entry, the survey, or the grant mention any improvements on the land and as will be shown below it is likely that he did not settle in Roans Creek section until after the land was granted to him 18 May 1789 and probably not until about the time he purchased the 200 acre farm of Andrew Baker at the mouth of Roans Creek 3 Aug 1789. (Deed Book D, p. 242, Wilkes Co., NC.)
Peter Eller, apparently, was living in Rowan County, NC in 1785 upon land located on Reedy Creek, (now in Davidson County), that was granted to him in two parcels, one of which, containing 125 (124) acres was ordered surveyed to him 20 Nov 1785, surveyed to him 21 Nov 1785, and granted to him 18 May 1789, (the latter date being the same that land on Roans Creek in Wilkes County was granted to him). The second tract containing 325 acres was ordered surveyed to him 20 Dec 1785, surveyed to him 17 Jun 1788 and granted to him 12 Aug 1788. The first parcel, according to the order to survey, adjoined the lands of James Chaney, Martin Shukell, John Coonce (Koons) and John Wilson and the second the lands of Isaac Perrimon, Francis Williams, James Chaney and Joseph Greenwood. (Grants 1640 and 1921 Secretary of State's Office, Raleigh, NC.) Both parcels are described as having 'improvements' upon them the larger one showing that Peter Eller was already living on the property when the order to survey was issued to him 20 Dec 1785. The wording of said order to survey is as follows.
'State of North Carolina, No. 2949, James Brandon, Entry officer of claims for Lands in the County of Rowan. To the surveyor of said County, Greeting; You are hereby required as soon as may be to lay off and survey for Peter Ellor a tract or parcel of Land Containing Three Hundred and Twenty five Acres lying in the County Aforesaid on the waters of the South Fork of Reedy Creek and Including his Own Improvement whereon he now lives and Joining James Chaney, Martin Shukill &, observing The Directions of the Act of Assembly in such case made and provided for turning out Lands. Two just and fair plans of such Survey with a Certificate Annexed to each you are to transmit with this Warrant to the Secretary's office Without Delay. Given under my hand at Salisbury the twentieth Day of December Anns. Dom. 1785. Jas. Brandon.'
It will be noted that Peter Eller was living on the land before the order to survey was issued to him. Very likely he had earlier and probably before the Revolutionary War entered upon the land later filing an entry and still later obtaining a survey and grant from the new government of the State of N.C. The reason for believing this to be the case is that the record of the Patriarchal Blessing that was accorded to his eldest daughter Catherine Stoker by Hiram [Hyrum] Smith of the [LDS Church] at Nauvoo, Illinois in July 1843, gave her birth date as 6 March 1773 and the place of her birth as Rowan County, North Carolina. His name was spelled Ellor in the above quoted order to survey and Eller in the survey and grant as well as in the entrys, surveys and grants of the two parcels on Roans Creek in Wilkes County the name was uniformly spelled Eller. Peter Eller sold the land (325) acres covered by the above quoted order to survey to Andrew Farr on 6 Dec 1793. (Deed Book 16, p. 698, Rowan County, NC.) No record was found of the disposal of the 124 (125) acres also granted to him on Reedy Creek but a careful search of the land records of Rowan County probably would disclose it.
George Eller, doubtless Peter Eller's brother, also obtained an order to have surveyed to him 150 acres of land on the 'waters of Reedy Creek' in Rowan County 28 Dec 1778. This land was surveyed for him 24 Sep 1785 and granted to him 25 Oct 1786. It included 'Improvements Bought of Philip Sewell for completement,' and bordered the land of James Chaney, Joseph Mussell, John Olliver and Lewis DeLee. (Grant 1402, Secy. of State's Office, Raleigh, NC.) This writer believes that the George Eller of this grant was the [brother of Peter].
Leonard Eller, doubtless a brother of Peter and George, obtained an order, 19 Jun 1784, to have surveyed for him, 640 acres of land located 'on both sides of Lick Creek in Rowan County, N.C.,' (now Davidson Co.). This land joined the lands of James Riley, William Grist and Michael Ritter and included 'Richard Beams Mill.' The land was surveyed for Leonard Eller, 30 Dec 1791, and found to contain only 416 acres with no reason given for the discrepancy of 224 acres. The land was granted to him 26 November 1793. (Grant 2165, Secretary of State's Office, Raleigh, NC.) On the same date, (26 Nov 1793) he was given two additional grants of land in Rowan Co. both on Sheets Creek, waters of Urray, (now in Davidson County.) one for 348 acres and the other for 150 acres. (Grants 2166 and 2237 Secretary of State's Office, Raleigh, NC.) On 13 Jun 1821 Leonard Eller of Miami Co., Ohio gave power of attorney to Samuel Hoover of Randolph Co., NC empowering him 'to lease or sell' his three tracts of land 'on the waters of Lick Creek and the other two on Sheets Creek all now in the possession of Jacob Hoover late deceased.' (Deed Book 1, p. 257, Davidson County, NC.)
Returning to Peter Eller, it is apparent that he was living in Morgan District of Wilkes County, NC, that now is in Ashe County, in 1790 when the first census was taken. At that time his land holdings on Rones Creek in Ashe County consisted of the 350 acres that the state had granted him and 200 acres that he had purchased from Andrew Baker of Wilkes County, 3 Aug 1789.He sold 200 acres of the land that had been granted to him to Gabriel Barn of Rowan County, 27 Oct 1795. John Eller, his eldest son, was one of the witnesses. (Deed Book B-1, p. 466, Wilkes Co., NC.)
Peter Eller added other property to his holdings on 27 Dec 1797 when two parcels of 50 and 25 acres were granted to him by the State of NC. These parcels were surveyed for him on 21 Mar and 11 May respectively. John Dick, Jr., and Leonard Fouts attested the first survey and Michael Stuckard [Stoker] and Peter Eller, Jr. the second. (Grants 1479 and 1532, Secy. of State's Office, Raleigh, NC.) On 3 Mar 1797 he purchased from Conrad Dick, of Wilkes Co., his father-in-law, doubtless, 70 acres of land in Wilkes Co. The deed was witnessed by John and George Koons. (Deed Book D, p. 165, Wilkes Co., NC.) As already mentioned this land had been entered 20 Feb 1779 and surveyed for Conrad Dick 13 Apr 1795 with Jno. Eller and Mich. Stuckers [Stoker] attesting the survey as chain carriers. The land had been granted to him in the amount of 150 acres on 28 Nov 1792 but when surveyed was found to contain only 70 acres. (Grant 1258, Secy. of State's Office, Raleigh, NC.)
There is some indication that Peter Eller returned to Rowan County after his family was listed in Federal Census of Wilkes Co., in 1790 and lived there until about 1794. He witnessed deeds in Wilkes Co. 19 Jan and 22 Mar 1790. His son John obtained his license in Rowan Co. to marry Susanna Kerns (Kern) 5 Nov 1792 and, on 6 Dec 1793, describing himself as being of Rowan Co., (which could have been an error of the drafter of the deed), Peter Eller sold to Andrew Farr the land that had been granted to him on Reedy Creek in Rowan Co. 12 Aug 1788. (Deed Book 16, p. 698, Rowan Co.) On 27 Oct 1795 describing himself as being of Wilkes Co. he sold land in Wilkes Co. to Gabriel Barn of Rowan Co. (Deed Book B-1, p. 466, Wilkes Co.)
Peter Eller died before 29 July 1799 as evidenced by an entry in an old court record book found by this writer in the courthouse at Wilkesboro, Wilkes Co., NC in October 1954. It reads as follows: 'Betsey Eller and John Eller having made application for Administration on the estate of Peter Eller gave Bowers and John Koons for security who were bound in the sum of 800 pounds and qualified as the law directs.'
Betsey Eller doubtless was Peter's widow and John his eldest son. The time was 1799 when Ashe County was being set off from Wilkes and the year just preceding the one in which the first federal census of Ashe Co. was taken. That census (1800) lists the family of Elizabeth Eller, age over 45, with one male, aged 16-26, one female, aged 16-26 and one male, aged under 10 in her household. Undoubtedly, she had other minor and unmarried children but it was so common in those days to farm adolescent children out as workers for other families when death had taken their father, that it is likely that these additional children were not living at home. Elizabeth Eller is not shown by name in a later census but in 1830 the family of Jacob Eller included one female aged between 70 and 80 who may have been his mother and Peter's widow.
Three deeds in the courthouse at Jefferson, Ashe Co., NC record settlement actions on the property of Peter Eller deceased. In brief they are:
1. Deed Book M, p. 163, dated 7 July 1809 shows Peter Eller, Jacob Eller, George Koontz and William Pennington of the county of Ashe in the state of NC, heirs of Peter Eller, deceased, selling to Leonard Fantz 200 acres of land in Ashe Co. the same apparently being the tract Andrew Baker had deeded to Peter Eller 3 Aug 1789. The deed was signed by all the said heirs except William Pennington. Why Pennington did not sign is not clear.
2. Deed Book F, p. 414, dated 17 Sep 1816, shows John Eller, Peter Eller, Jacob Eller, Henry Eller, Michael Stocker (Stoker), George Koontz and William Pennington all of the County of Ashe in the State of NC, heirs of Peter Eller deceased, selling Luke White Sr. 122 acres of land located on the south fork of New River at the mouth of Rones Creek etc. This deed was signed by all the said heirs named as party of the first part in the deed except George Koontz. Why George Koontz did not sign is not clear.
3. Deed Book F, p. 83, dated 11 Feb 1817 shows John Eller, J.A. (Jacob) Eller, Henry Eller, Michael Stocker (Stoker), George Koontz and William Pennington all of the county of Ashe in the state of N.C., heirs of Peter Eller, deceased, selling to Frederick Black, 25 acres of land on the south fork of New River the land being that warranted to Peter Eller, 3 May 1793 and granted to him 27 Dec 1797. All of these heirs signed the deed.
This writer believes that other heirship deeds exist probably of earlier dates and, if found, would show a Bumgardner heir. The above three deeds distributed only 347 acres of Peter Eller's estate when it appears that it consisted at his death of at least 470 acres. The Bumgardner connection is suggested in an ancient family Bible in which the birth dates of seven children of John Eller, eldest son of Peter and Elizabeth (Dick) Eller was recorded. Another birth entry in this old Bible is that of Simeon Bumgardner, born 8 Jan 1807. This child probably was a son of a daughter of Peter and Elizabeth (Dick) Eller who had marred a Bumgardner, probably James Bumgardner.
The old Bible was printed in the German language at Halle, Germany in 1770 and is now in the possession of Mr. Wade E. Eller of Warrensville, Ashe Co., NC. It may be the Bible which George Michael Eller willed to his son Jacob because on page 17 is written 'Jacob Eller his Bible.' On page 15 of the vorrede or preface is also written 'The Holy Bible Peter Eller.' The only information of genealogical value in the Bible are the dates of birth of all but the youngest child, Mary, of John and Susannah (Kerns) Eller… and of Simeon Bumgarner above mentioned.
The 1790 Fed. Census shows Peter Eller of the Morgan District of Wilkes Co. (that in 1799 became Ashe Co.) with a family of himself and wife, one son over 16, two sons under 16 and 4 females whose ages were not indicated. His eldest son John probably was not living at home at the time and was not included. Peter Eller's name is shown as Peter Ellis in the published census of North Carolina for 1790 but the original records which this writer saw in the Archives Building in Washington, D.C. plainly show it to have been Peter Eller and not Peter Ellis.
The 1800 census of Ashe County shows Elizabeth Eller, aged over 45, doubtless the widow of Peter, with a family of 1 male and 1 female each aged between 16-26 and one son aged under 10. This young son, doubtless, was George Eller, born after 1790.
The personal estate of Peter Eller was sold and an accounting reported to the Nov. 1799 court of Wilkes Co., NC by John Eller, Adr. The property, 111 individual sales, consisted of household utensils and furniture, farm yard tools and accessories, including one tomahawk, ten sheep, fifteen head of cattle, among which were a yoke of yearlings and one yearling bull, hogs, geese, bee hives, etc. The widow took a good deal of the furniture and household accessories including interestingly enough a trumpet which indicates that the early Ellers possessed musical interest. Other items taken by her were one lot of books, a chest, five head of hogs, four cows, one mare colt, two sheep, oven, hammer and anvil, and a pair of saddle bags. Other purchasers were John Eller, Peter Eller, Elizabeth Eller Jr., Michael Stucker (Stoker), Michael Bumgardner, Leonard Bumgardner, John Dick, Leonard Pfouts, Jacob Huntsinger, Daniel Dickson, James Dickson, James Cash, William Cash, Henry Michael Sr., Henry Michael Jr., Daniel Michael, Thomas Baker, Alexander Smith who purchased the tomahawk and some of the farm animals and other items, David Smith, Frederick Younce, Christian Shear, Abraham Shear, Coonrod Coldiron, David Ingram, Balsar Raime, Conrat Grub, William Colward, George Miller, John Calloway, Allen Nowlin, John Holman and John Tirey. The amount of the sale, including the items taken by the widow totaled 300 pounds, 18 shillings, 7 pence. (Will Book 1, pp. 540-41, Wilkes Co., NC.)"

5. The following was posted on the Internet at a site concerning "Brethren-Genealogy" by Dwayne Wrightsman 30 Aug 2009 at http://archiver.rootsweb.ancestry.com/th/read/BRETHREN/2009-08/1251658713 accessed 2 May 2015. See comments about this posting in a separate note below by Rose Green:
"Conrad Dick was the head of the German Dick family that settled in Wilkes/Ashe County, NC, in 1788. His daughter, Maria Elizabetha Dick (baptized 18 December 1746, Evangelisch-Reformierte, Altrip, Pfalz) was married to Peter Eller who also settled with the Dicks in Wilkes/Ashe in 1788. Conrad's son, John Dick, and John's son, John Dick Jr., also arrived in Wilkes/Ashe in 1788. The younger John Dick was a Brethren elder who worked with elder Joseph Roland and elder Isham Gibson with the Long Creek Brethren in Muhlenberg, KY, and with the Sugar Creek Brethren in Sangamon, IL.
The Conrad Dick family is not well known in Brethren history compared to the Adam Dick family (of the Conestoga and Conewago congregations of Lancaster and York Counties, PA). We do not know if these two Dick families were related.
The wife of Conrad Dick was Anna Catharina. Her surname is not given in the literature. However, by checking German Reformed Church records it appears that she was born Anna Catharina Gross, 22 August 1717, Evangelisch-Reformierte, Altrip, Pfalz, daughter of Peter and Elsabetha Gross. At age 18 she married the widower Hans Jakob Bargeld, 15 November 1735, Altrip, Pfalz. By this marriage she bore two sons, Joh. Michel and Joh. Christoffel, whose births, 6 January, 1738, and 9 April, 1741, respectively, were recorded in the Evangelisch-Reformierte, Altrip, Pfalz, church records. Hans Jakob Ba(a)rgeld died 10 May 1744. On 22 February 1746, the widow Catharina Baargeldin married Johann Conrad Dick of Heddesheim. The marriage was recorded in the Evangelisch-Reformierte, Altrip Pfalz, church records. On 18 December 1746, their daughter Maria Elizabeth Dick was baptized, Evangelische-Reformierte, Altrip Pfalz. This was the daughter of Conrad Dick who married Peter Eller, oldest son of George Michael Eller of Frederick County, MD.
Given that Conrad Dick's wife was a widow of a widower, it is possible that Conrad Dick himself had been previously married. Since wife Anna Catharina (nee Gross) was born in 1717, Conrad Dick may have been born earlier than the "about 1725" birth year usually assigned to him in various genealogical accounts. Church birth/baptism records for Conrad Dick and for Adam Dick have not been found. Adam Dick's birth year was 1709 and his death year was 1785 according his German tombstone inscription, Mummerts Cemetery, Hamilton Twp., York Co., PA. Conrad Dick's birth and death years are both unknown.
Heddesheim and Altrip were villages on the outskirts of Manheim/Mannheim, Germany. When Conrad Dick bought 100 acres on a small creek leading into the Beaver Dam Branch of Little Pipe Creek in Frederick County, MD, in 1755, he named his tract "Mon Hime" apparently after his being from Manheim/Mannheim. Conrad Dick could neither read nor write. His family's immigration is unknown, but it was probably sometime between 1747 and 1753. He was naturalized in Maryland in 1760.
In 1758, a second daughter, Maria Catherine Dick, was born to Conrad and Anna Catharina Dick. She was baptized 28 March 1758, German Reformed Church, Frederick, Frederick, Maryland. Apparently the Conrad Dick family was not yet Brethren at that time even though they lived in the Beaver Creek - Pipe Creek among many Brethren families who were picking up and moving to North Carolina.
Conrad Dick sold his "Mon Hime" property on Beaver Creek in Frederick, Maryland, in 1764. Ten years later (1774) he bought 200 acres on Hodge's Fork of the Uwharrie River in North Carolina. He and his son John and his son-in-law Peter Eller settled in various parts of the Rowan County area of North Carolina until they converged in Wilkes County in 1788. Whether or not they were Brethren is unknown but what is known is that they associated with the Brethren on the Uwharrie River, on the Forks of the Yadkin, and on Reedy Creek prior to joining the Brethren settlement on the New River in Wilkes County, NC."

6. Emails from Rose Green, descendant and expert German researcher (rose.green@att.net):
29 Apr 2015: "Given that we've been talking about Birkenau and all [in regards to Johan Michael Roemer], I went back to look at exactly who it is of Conrad Dick's ancestors who lived in that parish. A while back, I found a discussion on a site about Brethren genealogy [see separate note in file of Johann Conrad Dick from Dwayne Wrightsman dated 30 Aug 2009], in which he was identified as a member of that group, and traced to Heddesheim, Rheinland-Pfalz, Germany. His mother was from nearby Altrip and his father from Heddesheim. I discovered that there were printed Familienbuecher (genealogy books where someone has extracted the whole of a town's church records and organized them into neat family groups) for both villages. I ordered them via interlibrary loan, and yes, the whole family showed up. Conrad's mother was from Weschnitz (not in the Pfalz but over near Birkenau), and his grandparents were married in Furth (the Catholic parish that covered Birkenau at the time). (The grandparents were the ones moving up after the 30 Years' War from parts south.)
The Altrip records list a marriage for Johann Conrad Dick on 22 Feb 1746 to Anna Catharina, widow of Hans Jacob Baargeld (marriage 15 Nov 1735, which gives her maiden name as Gross, daughter of Hans Peter Gross and Anna Meyer). Altrip and Heddesheim are very near Mannheim (he named his farm Mon Hime in America). The new location, Berghuelen, Blaubeuren, Wuerttemberg, is quite a bit further away. The Altrip records also apparently include the birth record of Maria Elisabeth Dick, who would be the wife of Peter Eller, if this group is ours, on 14 Dec 1746. This was in the Reformed church. The Gross family goes back several generations (some of the children don't show up in Familysearch; it's more of a direct line thing).
...To me, the Altrip/Heddesheim connection seems to carry more weight than the Berghuelen one (if nothing else because of the Mannheim connection--but also because all of the people seem to show up there)."
2 May 2015: "Yes, I suspect that with the conversion to newer versions of Familysearch, some records have become garbled or incorrectly merged. You are right--all the background details list the name in FS as Anna Maria. And suddenly, she's bam! Ruth, out of nowhere. The Altrip Familenbuch does not list anyone in the Gross family named Ruth. It's not a name that commonly appears in German church records of the time. The siblings of Anna Catharina Gross that are recorded in the Altrip book all have specific death dates in Germany listed. Possibly there were more siblings who died young and would be in the original church records, but I'm not seeing anyone who could be remotely construed as Ruth.
Hannah sounds more English than German to me (Anna in German--unless maybe a nickname for Johanna?), but her husband--he's definitely got a German name, and he's living with all those Germans. The Heddesheim Familienbuch does list a sister to Conrad, Anna Maria, b. 1726. I don't see a Hannah Sophia, but it would be worth checking the actual primary church records in Altrip. Such published books have errors, as we know. I think it's worth putting her down as a hypothesis to be tested.
Regarding Margaret Susan Dick who married Koons, I can't tell from the information given if Dick was her maiden name, or if it was the name of her first husband who died while coming to America. Again, I don't see anyone by that name in the Familienbuch, but Conrad has some brothers who don't have death entries listed. There are certainly other Dick families in the US that don't have any apparent relation to us (Adam Dick--unless way back we have a DNA connection??). But since they all(Koons, etc.) seem to follow each other around, she's probably another one to look into.
In any case, there is a concrete marriage record for a Johann Conrad Dick marrying Anna Catharina Gross on 22 Feb 1746 in Altrip, Pfalz, Germany. The birth of a daughter, Maria Elisabetha Dick, who we suppose to be the one who married Peter Eller, was born in Altrip on 14 Dec 1746.
I suspect that a lot of incorrect merging (and some assumptions based on extracted records taken out of context) have happened in recent years. I have certainly seen several instances of people in Family Tree suddenly being connected to people they have no relation to, just because of a name similarity (and the new situation replacing the previous relationship that was based on detailed research and tangible data). Sometimes it seems like we've gone from the problem of temple work being done over and over for the same individual to some rather overzealous merging. I'm sure we'll get it all straightened out in the end, but it makes for confusion right now.
In any case, here's a summary of what the Familienbuch Heddesheim has to say about Conrad Dick:
Johann Velten (Valentin) Dick (son of Hans Velten Dick, +7 Mar 1735 Heddesheim) oo Anna Margaretha Hinderkircher (b. in the 1690s in Weschnitz, which is near Birkenau, +7 Mar 1742 Heddesheim) on 16 Feb 1718 in Heddesheim. She was the daughter of Johann Joachim Hinderkircher, married in Furth (again, near Birkenau) but from "Tirol," and Susanna Baltzer of Schwaben. Children (born in Heddesheim):
1. Johann Conrad, *3 Feb 1721
2. Justina Magdalena *5 May 1724, +19 Dec 1762 in Heddesheim
3. Johann Christoph, *28 Jul 1725
4. Anna Maria, *28 Dec 1726
5. Tobias, *8 Feb 1729
6. Johann Michael, *22 Mar 1731
Extra children not listed could of course be fit in here, and a search should be done of the church books. After Velten died, Anna Margaretha married a widower in the area, but I don't have a record of any children (not to say there weren't any).
On the Gross side (from the Altrip Familienbuch), I've got Hans Peter Gross of Altrip, no birth info given, but believed to be the son of Johann Ludwig Gross and Catharina of Altrip (md. bef 1692) m. Elisabeth Meyer of Reisen (Birkenau parish again! Her father was Hans Meyer) on 24 Nov 1716 in Altrip. Children born in Altrip:
1. Anna Catharina, 22 Aug 1717
2. Johann Heinrich, *16 Feb 1721, +11 Jun 1722
3. Maria Barbara, *15 Oct 1724, +15 Jun 1762 Altrip. Married Johann Georg Schwitzgöbel of Weisenheim, Sand, Germany 14 Sep 1745 in Altrip
Then Hans Peter Gross married again, this time on 9 May 1730 (Altrip) to Anna Clara Schneider, *25 Sep 1711 Altrip. They had one child that I know of in Altrip:
4. Johann Ludwig Gross, *5 Oct 1732, +25 Apr 1735
Anyway, I think that it might be a very good idea to poke into this some more ... I think I'll order up what records there may be for Altrip and Heddesheim. And I'd love to take another look in the Birkenau area for those people who show up over there."

7. FHL book 929.273 D55h "History of Peter and Christina Shutt Dick Family; Frederick Co. Maryland; Wilkes Co. North Carolina; Muhlenberg Co. Kentucky; Sangamon Co. Illinois; Cass Co. Illinois," compiled by Muriel M. Hoffman; Anchor, Illinois; 1970; Chapter II "Ancestry of Peter Dick":
"Peter Dick was born Oct. 27, 1780 in North Carolina, the son of John and Elizabeth Rolland Dick, also natives of one of the Carolinas, who died in Kentucky when very old. The ancestry was German.(2) (We have reason to believe that John may be a native of Maryland.) Nowhere else is the mother's name recorded except as Mary on a deed in North Carolina.
Morgan District, Wilkes Co. N. Car. 1790 census
John Dick, 1 male over 16; 3 males under 16; 5 females
The following paragraphs are from research contributed by Miss Wilda Chase of Lincoln, Neb. from her Dick family history. The North Carolina research was done by a Dick-Eller descendant and the Kentucky research about Conrod Dick II by a Baptist preacher in Kentucky and that material was given to Miss Chase...
Coonrod Dick appears to be the first found ancestor of this family but little is known about him. He does not appear on any passenger list of those coming to this country. His given name is found spelled variously as Coonrod, Conrad, Kinrod, Koonrod, etc. He was of German birth.
Conrad Dick was in Frederick Co. Md. 15 Aug. 1755 when all that tract of land called "Mon Hime" lying on a small creek leading into Beaver Dam Branch and containing 100 acres was surveyed and patented to him. (B.C. and G.S. #5, folio 127, Hall of Records, Annapolis, Md.) On Mar. 23, 1764 Conrad Dick signed by mark a deed for this land to William Aldridge, his wife, Catherine consenting (J 224-5). Here they disappear from Maryland records.
He appears to be identical with the Conrad Dick found in Wilkes County, North Carolina with others from Frederick Co. Md. 20 Feb.1779, Coonrod Dick enters 150 acres of land (868). 28 March 1792, he was granted 70 acres (1068) which he sold to Peter Eller 3 March 1797. It seems strange he is not found on any census list. He cannot have been living with any of his known children as their families do not include any one of his age. The only possible explanation seems to be that his name was misread and appears as Conrad Fite in the printed census records.
No tombstone nor death records are found for either Conrad or his wife, Catherine (Anna Catherine, on other information). That she was the mother of his children is shown in the marriage record of their granddaughter, Catherine Eller Stoker, and in the baptism of their daughter, Maria Catherine. Probable children of this couple, order of birth unknown were:
1. John Dick. The fact that Elizabeth Eller's son acted as agent for the sale of part of his land after he moved to Kentucky, plus the fact that he had children Coonrad and Catherine makes it seem probable he was their son.
2. Elizabeth Dick married Peter Eller (see later paragraphs).
3. Maria Catherine Dick christened Frederick Co. 28 March, 1758."

8. FHL book 929.273 D55h "History of Peter and Christina Shutt Dick Family; Frederick Co. Maryland; Wilkes Co. North Carolina; Muhlenberg Co. Kentucky; Sangamon Co. Illinois; Cass Co. Illinois," compiled by Muriel M. Hoffman; Anchor, Illinois; 1970; Chapter II "Ancestry of Peter Dick":
"Elizabeth Dick, daughter of Conrad and Catherine Dick married Peter Eller, son of George Michael Eller, who moved to what is now Ashe County, N. Car. from Frederick County, Md. Their land adjoined that of her father and presumed brother, John. They had at least 8 children:
1. John Eller, b. abt 1767 d. 1823, m. 5 Nov. 1792 Susannah Kerns, who died 10 April 1853 age 87 years.
2. Catherine Eller b. Rowan Co. 6 Mar. 1773 d. aft 1850 m. 1791/2 to Michael Stoker b. Frederick Co. Md. 24 Mar. 1762, d. aft. 1836.
3. Peter Eller b. 1777/8 d. Wilkes Co. 1851; m. Mary Pennington, prob. dau of William whose estate he helped to administer on 2 July, 1812 with a William Jr.
4. Elizabeth Eller probably m. William Pennington
5. Jacob Eller b.1784/88 d. 3 Nov. 1855 (census b.1784) m. abt. 1805 to Katherine White b.1789 d. Jan. 3, 1854
6. Mary Eller b. 1784/88 d. 1872 age 84; m. George Koons (Koontz) b. 1785/6 d. 26 Mar. 1848 age 63 years.
7. Henry Eller b.1786/88 d. Ashe Co. abt 1876 m. 1814 Elizabeth Johnson.
8. George Eller b. aft 1790 d. before 1841."

MARRIAGE:
1. Peter Eller: per biography above.

2. A second marriage to Luke White may be surmised from the following LDS records as found in the article "Michael and Catherine Eller Stoker's Descendants in Illinois," by Jimmie "B" Stoker, July 30, 1994, as reprinted in the book "Our Stoker Family Histories 1731-1881," Vol. II, comp. and ed. by Elayne Stoker, 2004, printed by Stevenson's Genealogy Center, Provo, UT. See the notes of Michael Stoker (1762-1838) for the full transcript of this article. This portion of the article lists the proxy baptisms done in Nauvoo, Illinois by Elizabeth's daughter Catherine Eller Stoker and her family in behalf of their dead relatives and friends per the doctrine of Catherine's new Mormon religion:
"A new doctrine taught.
Seymour Brunson's funeral.
On August 10, 1840 forty-year-old Seymour Brunson died in Nauvoo. He was an old Stoker friend. Not only was he one of the first missionaries that had brought the restored gospel to their home in Jackson County, Ohio during 1833, but he had also distinguished himself in Missouri during 1838 as leading out in Joseph Smith's behalf. Colonel Brunson had led some of the Mormon attacks against the Missouri enemies.
At Brunson's funeral Joseph Smith introduced to his followers the ordinance of baptism for the dead. This doctrine would seize the imagination of many members of the church including the Stokers. Joseph taught that "the Saints have the privilege of being baptized for those of their relatives who are dead, whom they believe would have embraced the Gospel, if they had been privileged with hearing it, and who have received the Gospel in the spirit, through the instrumentality of those who have been commissioned to preach to them while in prison."13
Baptism for the dead.
The idea of this ordinance underscores the fact that God is just and will allow all mankind equal opportunity to accept proper baptism in Christ's name. Hence by allowing a proxy to be baptized in behalf of those who had died without being baptized in the proper manner, God would not penalize those of His children who had lived on the earth without hearing the restored gospel. In the hereafter, God would allow them to accept or reject that ordinance which is designed to allow one entrance into Heaven. Individual members of the church could perform baptism for their ancestors who had never heard of the restored gospel.
The Stokers go to Nauvoo to be baptized for their dead relatives.
Stepping into the water on behalf of their dead relatives to be baptized for them was an act that Catherine Eller Stoker was to perform. Many in her family followed her example and were baptized for numerous dead relatives.
During the short time after Joseph Smith had introduced the concept of baptism for the dead, members of the church entered the waters of the Mississippi River to be baptized on behalf of their loved ones. The rite of baptism for the dead was confirmed to the vicinity of Nauvoo.
On January 19, 1841, the Lord commanded that the Saints built a temple with a baptismal font in it. Furthermore, the commandment states that baptism for the dead "belongeth to my house, and cannot be acceptable to me, only in the days of your poverty, wherein ye are not about to build a house unto me."14 On October 3, 1841, as the temporary baptismal font in the Temple basement neared completion, Joseph Smith declared, "There shall be no more baptisms for the dead until the ordinance can be attended to in the Lord's House."15
In 1841 Catherine Eller and members of her family traveled to Nauvoo to perform baptisms for their dead. At this time the church policy allowed men and women to be baptized indiscriminately for each other. Catherine was baptized for her father, Peter Eller, and her brother, John Eller. She may have been baptized for her deceased daughter, Rebecca Stoker at this date. Michael Stoker (1805-1858) was baptized for his Grandfather Stoker, Michael (1762-1838), Eller Stoker (1816-1857) was baptized for his uncle, George Eller.16
It is most probable that these 1841 Stoker baptisms were performed in the Mississippi River. The first baptisms for the dead performed in the Nauvoo Temple font took place on Sunday November 21, 1841 in the basement. This temporary font had been dedicated a couple of weeks earlier and would be used until the Temple was completed with a permanent one.17
The following Stoker family members were baptized for these dead members of their families [Person baptized for/Relationship to above:]
Catherine Eller Stoker:
Elizabeth [Dick Eller] White/Mother
George M. Eller/Grandfather
Kinrod Dick/Grandfather
Catherine Dick/Grandmother
Peter Eller/Father
John Eller/Brother
Rebecca Stoker/Daughter
Michael Stoker (1805-1858):
Michael Stoker/Grandfather
Barbary Pertune/Aunt
Absalom Koons /Cousin
Eller Stoker (1816-1857):
Christian Sherrer/Great uncle
Sarah Sherrer/Great aunt
Jacob Sherrer/Mother's cousin
Catherine Sherrer/Mother's cousin
Philip Baker/Uncle
George Baker/Cousin
George Eller/Uncle
Margaret [Judd] Stoker:
William McQuarey/Uncle
James Welker:
Sarah Wilker/Mother
Elizabeth Stoker Welker
Lear Black/Mother's cousin
William Pennington/Uncle
Mary Polly Stoker Graybill
Molly Coons/Great aunt
Andrew Sherer/Mother's cousin
Andrew Black/Mother's cousin
Catherine Yance/Mother's cousin
Luke White/Step-grandfather
Mary Steemel [Stimmel]/Aunt"

DEATH:
1. Elizabeth died after her husband died in 1799 per the following per FHL Book 929.273EL54h "George Michael Eller and Descendants of His in America," compiled by James W. Hook, 1957, also on FHL film 896571, item 2, pp. 69-87, concerning her son John Eller: "On 29 July 1799 Betsey and John Eller made application to the Court of Pleas of Wilkes County for Administration on the Estate of Peter Eller, deceased. They gave John Bowers and John Koons for security, these two being bound in the sum of 800 pounds and qualified as the law required. Betsey Eller, doubtless was the deceased's widow and mother of John Eller. Late in 1799 Ashe County was formed out of Wilkes County."

2. Could Elizabeth been alive as late as 1830? FHL Book 929.273EL54h "George Michael Eller and Descendants of His in America," compiled by James W. Hook, 1957, also on FHL film 896571, item 2, p. 26: "Betsey Eller doubtless was Peter's widow and John his eldest son. The time was 1799 when Ashe County was being set off from Wilkes and the year just preceding the one in which the first federal census of Ashe Co. was taken. That census (1800) lists the family of Elizabeth Eller, age over 45, with one male, aged 16-26, one female, aged 16-26 and one male, aged under 10 in her household. Undoubtedly, she had other minor and unmarried children but it was so common in those days to farm adolescent children out as workers for other families when death had taken their father, that it is likely that these additional children were not living at home. Elizabeth Eller is not shown by name in a later census but in 1830 the family of Jacob Eller included one female aged between 70 and 80 who may have been his mother and Peter's widow."

3. Elizabeth would have to have been deceased by 1843 when her daughter did a proxy baptism in Elizabeth's behalf in Nauvoo. It is curious that Catherine did a bunch of these baptisms in 1841; however, this one was done in 1843 which makes you speculate that perhaps she was still alive in 1841 since the proxy baptisms were only done in behalf of the deceased. Catherine's father Peter Eller as well as her step-father Luke White were both done in 1841, but why not the mother?

2. The following LDS ordinances were done in Nauvoo by Mary Graybill acting as proxy for her family as follows per the book "Annotated Record of Baptism for the Dead, 1840-1845, Hancock County, Illinois - [7 volume set] ," by Black, Susan Easton & Black, Harvey Bishchoff, Provo, UT, BYU Press, 2002, pp. 1452-1453:
"Deceased: Andrew Black, male, Mary Graybill was the Relative of Andrew Black. Source: Nauvoo Baptismal Records of the Dead.
Deceased: Molly Coons, female, Mary Graybill was the Great Niece of Molly Coons. Source: Nauvoo Baptismal Records of the Dead.
Deceased: Andrew Sherer, male, Mary Graybill was the Second Cousin of Molly Coons. Source: Nauvoo Baptismal Records of the Dead.
Deceased: Mary Steemel, female, Mary Graybill was the Niece of Mary Steemel. Date of proxy baptism: 1841. Source: Nauvoo Baptismal Records of the Dead, Book A147.
Deceased: Luke White, male, Mary Graybill was the Step-Granddaughter of Luke White. Date of proxy baptism: 1841. Source: Nauvoo Baptismal Records of the Dead, Book A172. [Also notes sources as Family Search and Ancestral File which is probably the source of the undocumented notes in their entry that Luke White was born about 1745 in Rowan Co., NC, spouse of Elizabeth Dick.]
Deceased: Catherine Yance, female, Mary Graybill was the Relative of Catherine Yance. Source: Nauvoo Baptismal Records of the Dead."

3. The following partial excerpt is from the article "Michael and Catherine Eller Stoker's Descendants in Illinois" by Jimmie "B" Stoker, July 30, 1994 from the book "Our Stoker Family Histories 1731-1881," Vol. II, comp. and ed. by Elayne Stoker, 2004, printed by Stevenson's Genealogy Center, Provo, UT, The numbers in the text refer to endnotes at the end of the article. See Catherine Martha Eller's notes for the full and complete transcript which is quite lengthy and only deals with her children in the Illinois period of Mormon history:
"In 1841 Catherine Eller and members of her family traveled to Nauvoo to perform baptisms for their dead. At this time the church policy allowed men and women to be baptized indiscriminately for each other. Catherine was baptized for her father, Peter Eller, and her brother, John Eller. She may have been baptized for her deceased daughter, Rebecca Stoker at this date. Michael Stoker (1805-1858) was baptized for his Grandfather Stoker, Michael (1762-1838), Eller Stoker (1816-1857) was baptized for his uncle, George Eller.16 It is most probable that these 1841 Stoker baptisms were performed in the Mississippi River. The first baptisms for the dead performed in the Nauvoo Temple font took place on Sunday November 21, 1841 in the basement. This temporary font had been dedicated a couple of weeks earlier and would be used until the Temple was completed with a permanent one.17 The following Stoker family members were baptized for these dead members of their families:
Catherine Eller Stoker [person baptized for/relationship to above]:
Elizabeth [Dick Eller] White/Mother
George M. Eller/Grandfather
Kinrod Dick/Grandfather
Catherine Dick/Grandmother
Peter Eller/Father
John Eller/Brother
Rebecca Stoker/Daughter
Michael Stoker (1805-1858)
Michael Stoker/Grandfather
Barbary Pertune/Aunt
Absalom Koons/Cousin
Eller Stoker (1816-1857)
Christian Sherrer/Great uncle
Sarah Sherrer/Great aunt
Jacob Sherrer/Mother's cousin
Catherine Sherrer/Mother's cousin
Philip Baker/Uncle
George Baker/Cousin
George Eller/Uncle
Margaret [Judd] Stoker
William McQuarey/Uncle
James Welker
Sarah Wilker/Mother
Elizabeth Stoker Welker
Lear Black/Mother's cousin
William Pennington/Uncle
Mary Polly Stoker Graybill
Molly Coons/Great aunt
Andrew Sherer/Mother's cousin
Andrew Black/Mother's cousin
Catherine Yance/Mother's cousin
Luke White/Step-grandfather
Mary Steemel [Stimmel]/Aunt.18"
Certainly Catherine Eller and her Stoker family members were not of the opinion that all was doom [after the martyrdom of Joseph and Hyrum Smith]. Before July was over they were again performing baptisms for dead relatives. On July 28, Catherine Eller was baptized for her dead grandfather, George Michael Eller, her daughter, Elizabeth Stoker Welker, was baptized for William Pennington, one of her mother's brothers-in-law.61" 
Dick, Maria Elizabeth (I1859)
 
314 BIOGRAPHY:
1. The book "The National Cyclopaedia of American Biography": v. 43, p. 55, entry for Henry Minor Huxley (b. 1880): "His first paternal American ancestor was Thomas Huxley, who came to this country from England in 1632 and settled in Cambridge, Mass., later moving to Suffield, Conn. From him and his wife Sarah Spencer, the descent was through Jared and Mary Newton, (etc.)"

2. From various Worldconnect databases as of 21 Sep 2007:
"Thomas first appears in the records in 1660 when he is named in the will of John Wakeman, who was Treasurer of New Haven Connecticut: "I give to my servant Thomas Huxley my short gun with a rest and my hanger which he useth to train with, upon his good behavior, that is, if he shall carry him selfe honestly and faithfully in his place and service to the satisfaction of my executors and overseers, or with the approbation of any two of them. Wakeman died not long after moving to Hartford in 1661, where his will was probated - see Hartford Wills, page 168-9. Thomas took the Oath of Fidelity in New Haven in 1660 and probably moved to Hartford with John Wakeman. Six years later Thomas was married in Hartford where his first son was born the following year. In 1669 he was made a freeman of Hartford. In 1671 his brother-in-law Obadiah Spencer gave Thomas four acres of land which abutted the two acres Thomas had recently bought from John Pantry. In 1674 Thomas sold his land in Hartford and, together with his brother-in-law Thomas Spencer moved his family to Suffield - see Genealogical Descent of the Huxley Family by Jared Huxley. Its not known where he was living during King Phillip's War but may have returned for a time to Hartford after Suffield was abandoned by the settlers, or possibly Westfield where he and Sarah owned land prior to 1680. By 1679 he brought his family back to Suffield where his youngest four children were born and where he remained the rest of his life. He operated a tavern in Suffield and is often mentioned in the town records: "Sergeant Thomas Huxley was by a vote of the town in 1686, chosen keeper of a Public House for Entertainment." He served as a selectman for the town in 1682, 1698, 1703 and 1705 - see Sheldon's Documentary History of Suffield, pages 130, 144, 153. In November 1682 he was granted land for his son Thomas: "Thomas Hucksley, for his son a lot of 12 rod wide on ye west side of High Street ... provided he build upon it and fense it, by March come twelve month." In 1697 he sued Edward Scot for debt and was awarded 39 shillings and court costs - see Pynchon Court Record in Colonial Justices in Wetern Massachusetts by Joseph H. Smith. In 1712, after 46 years of marriage, he lost his wife just 16 days after the death of his oldest son. The following year the town granted him some additional land: "Att a Meeting of the Inhabitants of Suffield Aprill the 2nd, 1713: The Town by a full, and Clear vote, Gave unto the severall persons hereafter named, Land as followeth, viz: to Thomas Huxley eight acres. - page 179. He is last mentioned in the town records in 1716 when he was chosen moderator of one of the meetings: "At a Lawfull meeting of the Inhabitants of Suffield, November 29th, 1716, first, it was voted that Thomas Huxley should be moderator for said meeting. - page 198. He died five years later. Hartford Land Records: Book Dist:349 - Thomas buys two acres from John Pantry - 1671 Book Dist:352 - Thomas is given 4 acres by Obadiah Spencer - 1671 Book Dist:487 - Thomas sells his land in Hartford to George Knight - 1674 Book Dist:406 - Thomas sells land in Hartford - 1679 Suffield Land Grants: Thomas is granted 60 acres of land - 1678 Thomas is granted 8 acres of land - 1713 Hampshire County Deed Books: B:269 - Thomas & Sarah while living in Suffield sell 5 acres in Westfield - 1680."

3. The following partial excerpts about the wives and children of Thomas Spencer are from "The Great Migration Begins: Immigrants to New England 1620-1633," Volumes I-III (see notes of Thomas Spencer for full transcript):
"...Sarah, b. say 1646; m. by 1667 Thomas Huxley (on 26 March 1667 John Winthrop Jr. treated "Huxlye, Sarah, above 20 years, wife of Tho[mas] Huxly of Hartford & daughter of Sergeant Tho[mas] [S]penc[er] of Hartford" [WMJ 710])..."

4. "The American Genealogist," Vol. 27 "The Four Spencer Brothers: Their Ancestors and Descendants," compiled by Donald Lines Jacobus, M. A., pp. 162-63:
"Sarah [Spencer], b ca. 1646; d. 24 Oct. 1712; m. Thomas Huxley, who d. at Suffield, 21 July 1721."

5. FHL book 929.273 Sp33 "The Spencers of the Great Migration," by Jack Taif Spencer and Edith Woolley Spencer (Gateway Press, Baltimore; 1997) vol. 1, pp.157-158:
"Sarah2 Spencer (Thomas1).
b. ca. 1646.
m. Thomas HUXLEY at Suffield, CT. He d. 21 July 1721 at Suffield. A dau. Elizabeth Huxley m. James King who was b. 14 March 1675 at Ipswich, MA. James d. 15 July 1757 at Suffield. He had a large landed estate.
d. 24 Oct 1712."

6. FHL book 929.273 Sp33 "The Spencers of the Great Migration," by Jack Taif Spencer and Edith Woolley Spencer (Gateway Press, Baltimore; 1997) vol. 1, pp. 286-288:
"SGT. Thomas HUXLEY of SUFFIELD, BROTHER-IN-LAW of Thomas2 Spencer.
Thomas2 Spencer had a half-sister, Sarah2 Spencer, who also was an early pioneer of Suffield through her marriage to Sgt. Thomas HUXLEY. Sarah2 was born in Hartford about 1646. Her husband first appears in the Suffield Town Records in 1678. Savage notes that Thomas HUXLEY and Sarah (Spencer) HUXLEY had the following children born in Hartford: Thomas (b. 1668), John, Sarah, Mary, Elizabeth. The children born in Suffield included: Jared, 1680; Hannah, 1682; Nathaniel, 1683 (d. young); William, 1687.
Sarah (Spencer) HUXLEY died 24 Oct 1712, while Thomas HUXLEY died 21 July 1721.
Thomas HUXLEY had a grant for 60 acres on High Street in 1678. By a vote of the town in 1686, HUXLEY was chosen keeper of a "Public House of Entertainment". This tavern was situated on High St. on a lot later owned by CAPT. THADDEUS6 H. Spencer (1768-1825). HUXLEY became a freeman in 1681 and held important town offices (Sheldon). Like Thomas2 Spencer, Thomas HUXLEY was on the list of 34 men who had the "liberty of voting in all town affaires". HUXLEY, Sr. had a son (Thomas, Jr.) who received a grant of eight acres on the west side of High St. in March of 1683.
In March of 1683, Thomas "HUCKSLEY" was chosen one of five Selectmen for the coming year. This nomination was indicative that HUXLEY, Sr. already was held in high esteem by his fellow citizens of Suffield. In April of 1685, the Town Council agreed to a scale of payments for compensating Serj. Thomas HUCKSLEY for digging of graves. In the same year, he received an additional land grant of ten acres "adjoining his meddow".
In March of 1687, Thomas HUXLEY again was chosen as one of five Selectmen for the ensuing year. The same nomination was received in 1688. His elevation to this position seemed continuous for he was also on the list for 1690. Other mentions of HUXLEY Senior included "Surveyor of Highways, 1697. in 1698 he was chosen as one of four "Fence Viewers" for the ensuing year.
On 10 Jan 1710, JohnHUXLEY, along with 24.others voted against a tax levy in support of a "School Master". In 1712, the same JohnHUXLEY was chosen as one of four "Fence Viewers". On 2 April 1713, the Town voted additional land to 102 "Inhabitants" of the Town of Suffield. JohnHUXLEY received seven and one half acres. Samuel3 Spencer was voted five and one half acres along with William3 Spencer who received the same allotment. Thomas HUXLEY (the original settler) received eight acres.
On 29 Jan 17, Jared HUXLEY was chosen as Constable. On 22 March 1715, JohnHUXLEY was elected as one of four "Fence Viewers".
The distribution of land to the various Inhabitants in 1713 continued to arouse a great deal of dissension. On 4 Aug 17 15, 25 persons signed as dissenters to the 1713 allotments. On 4 Aug 1715, 25 persons signed as dissenters to the land allotment of two years earlier. Jared HUXLEY was among the dissenters despite the fact that his father Thomas and brother (?) Johnwere among the beneficiaries of the distribution.
The distribution of lands continued despite the opposition. On 3 Jan 1716, Samuel3 Spencer and William3 Spencer each received ten and one half acres. JohnHUXLEY received twelve and one half acres. At the same meeting, 30 dissenters opposed the distribution. This time, Thomas HUXLEY joined Jared HUXLEY with a negative vote. Eventually, the dissenters were successful in getting the land grants nullified by the Massachusetts General Court which had been made subsequent to 9 March 1713.
At the Town Meeting of 29 Nov 1716, Thomas HUXLEY was chosen as Moderator.
The name of William HUXLEY first appears in the record of 29 Nov 1717 when he was granted half a crown for digging a grave for the child of George GRANGER. We recall that Thomas HUXLEY (father of William?) was paid for grave digging as early as 1685.
In March of 1718, John HUXLEY was sworn in as "Surveyor of Highways" - one of four so chosen.
On 15 May 1718, 41 dissenters again signed a resolution opposed to further meetings on the question of land distribution. Thomas and Jared HUXLEY were among the signers in 1719, Jared HUXLEY was named one of two "Tything Men". In 1720, the Council voted that "JohnHUXLEY should have the use of the burying place for twenty years, provided, he clear it, and fence it, and keep it entire, and leave it fenced when the time is up". In 1721, JohnHUXLEY again was chosen a "Tything Man".
Widow EXPERIENCE HUXLEY was mentioned in the record of 3 Dec 1725. She was EXPERIENCE (GIBBS) HUXLEY, widow of John HUXLEY, whom she had married in 1706.
There is no further mention of the Huxleys for several years. In 1729, however, Jared HUXLEY and Samuel Spencer were listed as "Hogg Reeves" (overseers of swine). Again, there was a hiatus of several years. In 1736, Serj. Jared HUXLEY was paid 5 pounds "for keeping Ishmael Negro for ye time past". The same entry was noted in 1737. In June of 1737, "Jared HUXLEY Sen." was paid 3 shillings for "2 lode of poles in Town". In 1743, Jared HUXLEY received "2/ for Timber for Highways".
The grave digging jobs for JohnHUXLEY seemed to continue on through the years. In 1744, John was paid ten shillings "for diging of the Grave".
In 1745, "JARUT HUXLEY Junior" was on the list as a Highway Surveyor. He held the same position in 1750.
Here the record terminates for the Huxleys because the book which HEZEKIAH Spencer Sheldon had prepared of the Suffield Town meetings from 1660 to 1750 had ended. Alcorn in his "Biography of a Town, 1670-1970" barely mentions the name of Thomas HUXLEY."

BURIAL:
1. No listing for either Thomas or Sarah Huxley per the Internet 6 Jul 2008 at http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~kathycamp/Inscriptions/Page043.htm: Suffield, Hartford County, Connecticut Headstone Inscriptions 1660-1937. This list of inscriptions, town of Suffield, was copied in 1934, under the auspices of the F.E.R.A. and the W.P.A. sponsored by the Connecticut State Library, as compiled under the supervision of Charles R. Hale, State Military Necrologist, assisted by Miss Mary H. Babin, Secretary. Hartford, Connecticut, December 1937. 
Huxley, Thomas (I1967)
 
315 BIOGRAPHY:
1. The book "The National Cyclopaedia of American Biography": v. 43, p. 55, entry for Henry Minor Huxley (b. 1880): "His first paternal American ancestor was Thomas Huxley, who came to this country from England in 1632 and settled in Cambridge, Mass., later moving to Suffield, Conn. From him and his wife Sarah Spencer, the descent was through Jared and Mary Newton, (etc.)"

2. From various Worldconnect databases as of 21 Sep 2007: "Sarah was the oldest of six children of her father's second marriage. She was raised in Hartford, where she was married in April 1666. The following year she was treated by Dr. John Winthrop on 26 March 1667 - see Winthrop Medical Journal. Her first child wasn't born until the spring of 1668. Not long after the end of King Phillip's War her family moved to Suffield where her husband operated a tavern and where her remaining children were born. Sarah was able to raise all but one of her children to adulthood; she lost her 2 year old son in 1683. In 1712, sixteen days after the death of her oldest son, Sarah also died. They may have been suffering from the same illness."

3. The following will transcription for Nathaniel Bearding in 1674 is from various Worldconnect databases as of 21 Sep 2007. It mentions this individual as follows: "I Nathaniel Berding of Hartford upon the River of Connecticut, planter doe in this my last will and testament give unto Abigaill my wife the sum of twenty pounds to be paid her in such pay as may bee comfortable for her not in any horse flesh; I doe also give to Abigaill my wife three cows both which gifts for her to possess and fivety shillings in peas fivety shillings in Indian corne and fivety shillings in pork all at the countey price; my will is also that Abigaill my wife shall have the two ould lower romes and the celler and the leanto for her to dwell in or dispose of all these during the time of her life; I do also give to my son-in-law Thomas Spencer the elder the sum of fivetene pounds to bee paid to him within the space of twoe years after my disease; I doe also give to Samuel Andrews and Elizabeth his wife the sum of fourty pounds to be paid him after the decease of my wife his mother; my parcel of land at Potunck and my household stuff to be to his for partt of that legacy; I doe also give to Sarah Spencer and to Hannah Spencer and to Mary Spencer and to Martha Spencer the fouer daughters of Thomas Spencer the elder the sum of tenn pounds to be equally devided amongst them that is to eather of them fivety shillings to be paid to them after my wife's decease. I do also give to John Andrews twenty shillings; I doe also give to Thomas Andrews twentye shillings to be paid after the discease of my wife their mother; alsoe my will is that my debts and theise legacies may be paid out of my moveable estate that so much as may be of my houseing and other lands may be kept intire. I have desired Paul Peck senior and George Graves to see this my will to bee performed, and i do hereby give to the said Paul Peck and Georg Graves the sum of fourty shillings for each man my debts and these legasyes being paid and my desires in this my will being attended. I go hereby give the remaining part of my estate to Jarrrett Spencer my grandchild whoe is the son of Thomas Spencer the elder; I doe also hereby make the sayd Jarrett my execquitor of this my will. My will also is that Abigaill my wife should have the use of all my household stuff during hir life; my will also is that my execquitor shold kepe all my houseing and barne and fenceing belonging to house and land in repaire; my will is also that what corn or provisions shall be in hand at my discease shall be for Abigail my wife as part of the twenty pounds I have before given hir; my will also is that Abigail my wife shall chose out of my cowes which cowes she will have for the three cowes given hir. In Witness hereof I have hereunto sett my hand dated this 7th of January 1673/4. The inventory of Nathaniel's estate was taken 14 Sep 1674 by Paul Peck, George Grave and Caleb Stanly and was valued at 282.15.10. See Hartford Probate Packets, film #1020549."

4. This individual is mentioned in the following will for Thomas Spencer is from various Worldconnect databases as of 21 Sep 2007. He made his will in 1686 one year prior to his 1687 death; it reads: "I Thomas Spencer senior of Hartford, being at present in good and sownd understanding not knoweing how soon I may be removed hence by death and finding the shodowes of the evening are stretching over me canot but judg that council of the prophet very seasonable set they house in order, etc. I doe therefore make ordayn and apoint this followeing to be my last will and testament hereby makeing null and voyd all former wills and testaments by me made whither by word or writing. First I commit my soule to God in Jesus Christ my dear Savior and redeemer from whom alone I expect salvation and an inheritance among the sainets in light my body to the earth to be decently buried in the comon burying place; for that estate God hath blessed me with, I bequeath and dispose of it as followeth - when my just debts and funerall expences are fully satisyed and payed to my eldest son Obadiah I give my houseing and land in Hartford, all my lands both meadow and upland on the west side and east side of the Connecticut River within the bounds of the Township of Hartford, to be to him his heirs and assigns immediately after my decease and from thence forever, he paying out such legacies as I shall appoynt by this Will. I give to my sayd son allso one cupboard and irons warming pan old fann two forekes peas hook two axes and an old hoe. I give unto my son Thomas the sume of fifteen pounds and Obadiah shall pay ten pounds more to him or to his heires in currant pay corn or cattell to be payd within two or three yeares after my decease as he shall be able. I give unto my son Samuel (he having received a good portion from his Uncle) all my wearing apparrell off all sorts and kinds. I give unto my son Jarred my shop and tooles and twelve pownds, all which are in his hands and I have possest him with them allready. The rest of my moveable estate I give unto my five daughters, Sarah, Elizabeth, Hanna, Mary and Martha, to be equally divided to them by their brother my son Jarrad. I do make my son Obadiah Spencer executor of this my last will and testament and that he may have a refuge to repayre unto for advice if any difficulty should befall him in the executoin of my will I desire Capt. Jno Allyn, Lieut. Caleb Standly and my cousin Samuel Spencer to be the overseers whom I desire to asssit my sol executor their best advice as occasion may call for it. Finally I leave all my children with the Lord and desire his blessing may be their portion that they may love and serve him and live in love and peace one with another when I shall be gathered to my fathers and for the confirmation of this my will and testmanet I have hereunto set my hand this 9th day of September 1686. Thomas Spencer (his mark) Witnesses: John Allyn, Hanna Allyn - Hartford Probate Records 4:262."

5. The book "Families of Early Hartford, Connecticut," Lucius Barnes Barbour, 1982 ed.: "Sgt. Thomas Spencer, son of Gerald and Alice bp. Mch 29, 1607 (Eng.) died Sept. 11, 1687, mar/1 ( ). Mar/2 Sept 11, 1645 (HTR) Sarah Bearding dau. of Nathaniel Bearding. Early member 1st Church [of Hartford]. Name on Founders Monument [in Hartford]. Children by 1st marriage:
Elizabeth, bp. Mch 26, 1648 (HTR) m. Samuel Andrews.
Hannah, b. Apl 25, 1653 (HTR) m/1 Geroge Sexton, m/2 Daniel Brainerd (See Brainerd Gen., p. 32).
Marah/Mary, b. May 18, 1655 (HTR).
Martha, b. Mch 19, 1657-8 (HTR), m. Andrew Benton.
Gerald, m. Hannah Pratt.
Sarah, m. Thomas Huxley.
Children by 2nd marriage:
Obadiah, m. Mary Disbrough.
Thomas of Enfield, m. Esther Andrews.
Samuel.
Cambridge; freeman May 14, 1634; removed in 1639 to Hfd, where he was an original proprietor; his home lot in 1639 was on the east side of Main St., near what is now the junction of Main and Windsor Sts.; served in the Pequot War; chimney viewer 1650; constable north side 1658; surveyor of highways 1672; was sergeant of the train band 1650, and received in 1671 a grant of 60 acres 'for his good service in the country'."

6. The book "The Thomas Spencer Family of Hartford, Connecticut in the Line of Samuel Spencer of Cromwell, Connecticut 1744-1818," comp. by Frank Farnsworth Starr for James J. Goodwin, Hartford, Conn., copy in Connecticut Historical Society Library, Hartford, CT, pp. 13-20:
"Children of Thomas and ___ Spencer,
I. Obadiah, m. Mary Desborough.
II. Thomas, b. Esther Andrews, and lived in Suffield.
III. Samuel, living Sep. 1686.
Children of Thomas and Sarah (Bearding) Spencer,
I. Garrard, m. 22 Dec 1680, Hannah Pratt, and lived in Hartford.
II. Sarah, m. Thomas Huxley of Hartford and Suffield.
III. Elizabeth, bap. 26 Mar 1648; perhaps m. Samuel Andrews of Hartford.
IV. Hannah, b. 15 Apr 1653, Colony Record; b. 25 Apr 1653, Town Record.
V. Mary, b. 18 May 1655.
VI. Martha, b. 19 Mar 1657; perhaps m. ___ Benton."

7. The following partial excerpts about the wives and children of Thomas Spencer are from "The Great Migration Begins: Immigrants to New England 1620-1633," Volumes I-III (see notes of Thomas Spencer for full transcript):
"Thomas Spencer...
Migration: 1633
First Residence: Cambridge
Removes: Hartford 1636...
Estate: ...In his will, dated 9 September 1686 and proved 26 October 1687, "Thomas Spencer Senior of Hartford, ... finding the shadows of the evening are stretching over me," bequeathed to "my eldest son Obadiah ... my housing and land in Hartford, all my lands both meadow and upland on west side and east side of the Connecticut River" in Hartford (he paying certain legacies), along with some personal goods; to "my son Thomas" £15, of which he hath £5; to "my son Samuel (he having received a good portion of his uncle) all my wearing apparell"; to "my son Jarrad my shop & tools & £12, all of which are in his hands"; residue to "my five daughters Sarah, Elizabeth, Hannah, Mary and Martha, to be equally divided to them by their brother my son Jarrad"; "my son Obadiah Spencer my executor"; "Capt. Allyn, Lieut. Caleb Standly and my cousin Samuel Spencer" overseers [Hartford PD Case #5095; Manwaring 1:365]... Marriage: (1) After 2 November 1634 Anne Dorryfall, sister of Barnaby Dorryfall [NEHGR 105:197-99]. "Anne Dorifall, aged 24," sailed on the Elizabeth of Ipswich in 1634 [Hotten 281] and was admitted to Boston church 2 November 1634 as "Ann Derifall, our brother Wm. Coddington's maid servant" [BChR 19]. She died by 1645. (2) Hartford 11 September 1645 Sarah Bearding [HaVR 606], daughter of Nathaniel Bearding of Hartford. Children:
With first wife
i Obadiah ("eldest son"), b. say 1635; m. by about 1666 Mary Disborough (estimated b. of first Child), daughter of Nicholas Disborough [TAG 27:166, 38:209].
ii Thomas, b. say 1637; m. by about 1666 Esther Andrews (estimated b. of first Child), daughter of William Andrews [TAG 27:166-67, 35:57].
iii Samuel, b. about 1639 (if he is the Samuel who d. Windham 8 January 1726/7 aged about 88 [NEHGR 105:198], and if that age at death is not exaggerated); m. by about 1684 Sarah ____ (estimated b. of first child [TAG 27:167]).
With second wife
iv Sarah, b. say 1646; m. by 1667 Thomas Huxley (on 26 March 1667 John Winthrop Jr. treated "Huxlye, Sarah, above 20 years, wife of Tho[mas] Huxly of Hartford & daughter of Sergeant Tho[mas] [S]penc[er] of Hartford" [WMJ 710]).
v Elizabeth, bp. 26 March 1648 [HaVR 579]; m. by about 1668 Samuel Andrews, son of William Andrews [TAG 35:55-59].
vi Jared, b. say 1650; m. Hartford 22 December 1680 Hannah Pratt, daughter of John [HaVR Barbour 301].
vii Hannah, b. Hartford 15 April 1653 [CTVR 31]; said to have married (1) George Sexton, (2) Daniel Brainerd and (3) Jonathan Chapman, but the secondary sources are vague and uncertain, and the evidence for these marriages has not been found.
viii Mary, b. Hartford 18 May 1655 [CTVR 32]; m. Westfield 7 October 1675 Thomas Root [Pynchon VR 31].
ix Martha, b. Hartford 19 March 1657[/8] [CTVR 31]; m. by 1677 Andrew Benton (b. of first Child), son of Andrew Benton [TAG 27:163; NEHGR 60:301-2 (evidence for this marriage not presented in either source)]...
Comments: On 7 September 1652 Thomas Spencer undertook to pay the fine of Sarah Spencer [RPCC 112]."

8. "The American Genealogist," Vol. 27 "The Four Spencer Brothers: Their Ancestors and Descendants," compiled by Donald Lines Jacobus, M. A., pp. 162-63:
"Sarah [Spencer], b ca. 1646; d. 24 Oct. 1712; m. Thomas Huxley, who d. at Suffield, 21 July 1721."

9. FHL book 929.273 Sp33 "The Spencers of the Great Migration," by Jack Taif Spencer and Edith Woolley Spencer (Gateway Press, Baltimore; 1997) vol. 1, pp.157-158:
"The Family of Thomas1 Spencer (1607-1687) and (1) Ann Derifall (Derifield) (ca.1610-1645) and (2) Sarah Bearding (Barding, Berden); d. before 1674; dau. of Nathaniel Bearding. Ann Derifall was a sister of Barnabas Derifall of Braintree, Massachusetts.
Children by Ann Derifall
Obadiah2 Spencer (Thomas1, GerardA, MichaelB, JohnC-D, RobertE, JohnF, RobertG, ThomasH, HenryI).
b. ca. 1639 at Hartford, CT. Took Freeman's at Hartford 20 May 1658.
m. Mary DISROWE (Disborough), dau. of Nicholas Disbrowe. Mary d before 1709. They had seven children.
d. May 1712 at Hartford, CT.
Thomas2 Spencer (Thomas1).
b. ca. 1641 at Hartford, CT.
m. Esther2 Andrews. She d. 6 Mar 1698 at Suffield, CT. Esther was the dau. of William1 Andrews and Abigail (Graves) Andrews of Hartford, CT.
d. 23 July 1689 at Suffield, CT.
Samuel2 Spencer (Thomas1).
b. ca. 1643 at Hartford, CT.
m. Sarah ___ (ca.1660-1733). She d. at Windham, CT.
d. 24 Oct 1727 at Windham, CT.
Children by Sarah Bearding
Sarah2 Spencer (Thomas1).
b. ca. 1646.
m. Thomas HUXLEY at Suffield, CT. He d. 21 July 1721 at Suffield. A dau. Elizabeth Huxley m. James King who was b. 14 March 1675 at Ipswich, MA. James d. 15 July 1757 at Suffield. He had a large landed estate.
d. 24 Oct 1712.
Elizabeth2 Spencer (Thomas1).
bp. 26 Mar 1648 at Hartford, CT.
m. Samuel2 Andrews of Hartford. Samuel Jan. 1712 at Hartford.
d. ?
Gerard2 Spencer (Thomas1).
b. ca 1651.
m. Hannah PRATT (1658-1692) on 22 Dec 1680, dau. of John Pratt.
d. 1712 at Hartford, CT.
Hannah2 Spencer (Thomas1).
b. 15 April 1653 at Hartford, CT.
m. (1) George SEXTON, Jr. m. (2) Daniel BRAINERD, Sr. Nov. 1698.
d. 1713
Mary2 Spencer (Thomas1).
b. 18 May 1655 at Hartford, CT.
m. Thomas ROOT, 7 Oct 1675. He was of Westfield, MA, son of John Root. He d. 16 Aug 1709.
d. 4 Nov 1690 at Westfield, MA.
Martha2 Spencer (Thomas1).
b. 19 Mar 1658 at Hartford, CT.
m. Andrew BARTON (BENTON), Jr. (1653-1704)."

10. FHL book 929.273 Sp33 "The Spencers of the Great Migration," by Jack Taif Spencer and Edith Woolley Spencer (Gateway Press, Baltimore; 1997) vol. 1, pp. 172-177 has a transcript and analysis of the will dated 9 Sep 1686 of Thomas1 Spencer (see his notes for transcript). He mentions all nine of his children, but not his wife Sarah who preceded him in death. Some of his children are also mentioned in the wills of his first wife's brother Barnabas Derifall (who died 1680) and his second wife's father Nathaniel Bearding (who died 1674):
"The Interpretation of the Will of Thomas1 Spencer
Jacobus reported that Sarah Bearding Spencer, wife of Thomas1 Spencer, as dying before 1674 since she was not named in her father's (Nathaniel Bearding) will which was proven in 1674 (year of father's death).
The inventory of of the Thomas1 estate set the total value at ₤139 19 00, but does not mention the value of his shop or tools or of the considerable amount of land which he had purchased during his lifetime. (A separate analysis is being made of the multiple transactions in Hartford and will be published in a different article).
Not mentioned in this Will was the fact that Thomas had received a grant of 60 acres in 1660 in recognition of his military and civic services to the colony and the city of Hartford. It is possible that his woodworking shop and tools were included in the value of "home lot and housing" which was set at 50 pounds.
It is interesting that a nephew, Samuel2 Spencer, the only son of his brother, William1 Spencer, was named as an overseer in the Will. Samuel2 Spencer spent his whole life at Hartford and fathered eight children by Sarah Meakins. Samuel's last Child, in fact, was born just a few months before the death of Thomas1 in 1687...
In an earlier chapter, the present authors gave a detailed account of the inter-connections of the four or five families in Hartford who were related by cross marriages. As a sequel to that story, we have constructed a chart to show the beneficiaries of the estates of four pioneers who willed property and money to their children (or nieces and nephews) and sometimes to grandchildren. The four pioneers in order of death were William1 Andrews (d. 1659), Nathaniel Bearding (d. 1674), Barnabas Derifall (Derifeild) (d. 1680) and Thomas1 Spencer (d. 1687). All were residents of Hartford except Barnabas Derifall who lived in Braintree (West Quincy), Massachusetts.
The children involved as legatees were the nine children of Thomas1 Spencer (Ann Derifall and Sarah Bearding)and the six children of William1 Andrews. The latter also had two wives, of whom only the second has been identified (Abigail Graves). Abigail in later years became the second wife of Nathaniel Bearing (no children).
In order to simplify the chart of beneficiaries, we have not included any of the surviving spouses.
Chart: The Distribution of Assests to children from the Estates of Four Pioneers in New England [KP Note: reformatted for my transcript:]
Various estates:
A. Barnabas Derifall (d. 1680) of Braintree, MA.
B. Thomas1 Derifall (d. 1687) of Hartford.
C. Nathaniel Bearding (d. 1674) of Hartford
D. William1 Andrews (d. 1659) of Hartford
Children of Thomas1 Spencer (1607-1687):
-Obadiah2 Spencer A, B
-Thomas2 Spencer A, B
-Samuel2 Spencer A, B, C
-Sarah2 Spencer Huxley B
-Elizabeth2 Spencer Andrews B
-Gerard2 Spencer B
-Hannah2 Spencer Sexton-Brainerd B, C
-Mary2 Spencer Root B, C
-Martha2 Spencer Benton B, C
Children of William1 Andrews (d. 1659)
-John2 Andrews C, D
-Abigail2 Andrews D
-Elizabeth2 Andrews Grannis D
-Thomas2 Andrews C, D
-Esther2 Andrews Spencer D
-Samuel2 Andrews C, D
The emerging pattern from the chart illustrates the dichotomy which characterized the bequests from Nathaniel Bearding - some assets to his grandchildren in the Thomas1 Spencer family, but excluding any children who had been born to the first wife of Thomas1, Ann Derifall - a not unlikely scenario for those who did not share his bloodlines.
Nathaniel Bearding's legatees among the Andrews children showed some separation, but of a considerably different character. Nathaniel had only two step grandchildren, Esther2 Andrews and Samuel2 Andrews. Samuel2 was a major beneficiary with 40 pounds, while Esther2 Andrews Spencer was not named in the will. On the other hand, Nathaniel Bearding made bequests to John2 Andrews and Thomas2 Andrews who were bore no blood relation to Nathaniel We believe the explanation of the latter two bequests was based on the fact that Abigail Graves Andrews-Bearding had raised the four children (stepchildren) from William Andrews first marriage to Mary Britton as well as her own two children by William1 Andrews.
In the case of the bequests by Thomas1 Spencer, there is an oddity in the fact that his son Samuel2 Spencer essentially was excluded from the will (except for clothing). We do not believe this is an indication of differential favoritism among the sons, but the fact that Samuel2 had been well provided for in the will of his grandfather, Barnabas Derifall of Braintree, Massachusetts.
Abigail2 Andrews was not named in her father's will because she had died (1653) some years before her father's death.
The only other aspect of the estates is the fact that females in general received only token recognition from the father or grandfather as the case might be. It was the sons and grandsons who always were the major legatees."

11. The periodical "Connecticut Nutmegger," by Jack T. Spencer, CSG, "The Families Linked to Sgt. Thomas Spencer, a Co-Founder of Hartford," vol. 29, pp. 14-27:
"I. BACKGROUND
Sgt. THOMAS1 SPENCER was one of the "Four Spencer Brothers" of Bedfordshire, England, who were among the earliest settlers of New England and who almost certainly were passengers in the earliest vessels of the Winthrop Fleet in 1630 or 1631. THOMAS1 was the second oldest of the Spencer Brothers. The older was WILLIAM1 SPENCER (1601-1640). The two youngest brothers were MICHAEL1 SPENCER (1611-1653) and GERARD SPENCER (1614-c.1683). There also was a sister, ELIZABETH1 SPENCER (1602- ) who came to New England as the wife of TIMOTHY TOMLYNS and settled at Lynn, Massachusetts.
The male Spencer siblings (William, Thomas, Michael, Gerard) first settled at Newe Towne (Cambridge, Massachusetts.) A few years later the two older brothers, along with other pioneers, became co-founders of Hartford, Connecticut. Michael and Gerard eventually settled at Lynn, Massachusetts, but Gerard made another move in later years to become the "patriarch" of Haddam, Connecticut.
All of the Spencer siblings were born at Stotfold, co. Bedfordshire, England. Their parents were GERARDA SPENCER (1576- ) and ALICE WHITBREAD SPENCER. These Spencers were descendants of a long line of this surname in Bedfordshire whose ancestry can be traced back with certainty to the middle of the 14th century. Tracing the general lineage to even earlier times, we know that the original ancestors came to England with William the Conqueror in 1066 and participated in the Battle of Hastings. In the ensuing two or three centuries, the "Despencers" ranked among the highest of the Norman nobility, sometimes gaining and sometimes losing (their lives) for this close relationship.
In earlier publications (see reference list), we have described the important activities undertaken by WILLIAM1 SPENCER in the founding of Cambridge, Massachusetts. He was the first Town Clerk of Cambridge and later served as a "Selectman" for several years. William played even more important roles for the General Court of the Massachusetts Bay Company, especially in regard to surveying and setting the boundary lines for many of the towns under the control of the Court. For many years he served as a Deputy representing Newe Towne at the frequent meetings of the General Court in Cambridge and in Boston.
As for ELIZABETH1 SPENCER, we already have documented the activities of her husband, TIMOTHY TOMLINS (see reference list), who was a co-founder of Lynn, Massachusetts in 1630. Timothy, like William Spencer, was a prominent leader in Lynn and served as a Deputy to the General Court and in many other civic and military capacities before his untimely death about 1645.
II. THE FAMILY OF SGT. THOMAS1 SPENCER
The Family of THOMAS1 SPENCER (1607- 1687) and two wives: 1) ANN DERIFALL (1610- ) and SARAH BEARDING (d. before 1674). Ann was a sister of Barnabas Derifall of Braintree, MA. Sarah was the daughter of Nathan Bearding of Hartford. Ann married Thomas ca. 1638; Sarah married Thomas on 11 Sept. 1645 at Hartford. Thomas d. 1 Sept. 1687 at Hartford.
Children by Ann Derifall:
OBADIAH2 SPENCER (Thomas1, GerardA, MichaelB, JohnC-D, RobertE, JohnF, RobertH, ThomasI, HenryJ), b. ca. 1639 at Hartford, CT. Took Freeman's Oath at Hartford 20 May 1658. m. MARY DISBOROUGH, dau. of Nicholas Disborough. Mary d. before 1709. They had children. d. May 1712 at Hartford, CT.
THOMAS2 SPENCER (Thomas1), b. ca. 1641 at Hartford, CT. m. ESTHER2 ANDREWS. She d. 6 Mar 1698 at Suffield. Esther was the dau. of William1 and Abigail (Graves) Andrews of Hartford, CT. d. 23 July 1698 at Suffield, CT.
SPENCER2 (Thomas1) b. ca. 1643 at Hartford, CT. m. SARAH ___ (ca. 1660-1733). She d. at Windham, CT. d. 24 Oct 1727 at Windham, CT.
Children by Sarah Bearding
SARAH2 SPENCER (Thomas1) b. ca. 1646 at Hartford, CT. m. THOMAS HUXLEY at Suffield, C. He d. 21 July 1721 at Suffield. A dau. Elizabeth Huxley m. James King, who was. b. 14 Mar 1675 at Ipswich, MA. James d. 15 July 1757 at Suffield. He had a large landed estate. d. 24 Oct. 1712.
ELIZABETH2 SPENCER (Thomas1) b. bp. 26 Mar 1648 at Hanford, CT. m. SAMUEL2 ANDREWS of Hartford, brother of Esther2 Andrews who m. Thomas2 SPENCER. Samuel Andrews was the son of William1 Andrews and Abigail (Graves) Andrews of Hartford. Samuel d. Jan 1712 at Hartford. d. ?
GERARD2 SPENCER (Thomas1). b. ca 1651 at Hartford, CT. m. HANNAH PRATT (1658-1692) on 22 Dec 1680. She was dau. of John Pratt, d. 1712 at Hartford, CT.
HANNAH2 SPENCER (Thomas1) b. 15 April 1653 at Hartford, CT. m. (1) GEORGE SEXTON, Jr. m. (2) DANIEL Brainerd, Sr. Nov. 1698. d. 1713.
MARY2 SPENCER (Thomas1), b. 18 May 1655 at Hartford, CT. m. THOMAS ROOT, 7 Oct 1675. He was of Westfield, MA., son of John Root. He d. 16 Aug. 1709. d. 4 Nov. 1690 at Westfield, MA.
MARTHA2 SPENCER (Thomas1). B. 19 Mar 1658 at Hartford, CT. m. ANDREW BARTON (BENTON), Jr (1653-1704). He was the son of Andrew Barton Sr., Andrew Jr. d at Hartford, 5 Feb 1704.
All of the children of Sgt. Thowas1 Spencer was born at Hartford, CT, between 1639 and 1658. When the last child was born in 1658, Sgt. Thomas was 51 years of age. ANN DERIFALL, who was mother of the first three children, was born about 1610 in England. The year of birth probably is quite accurate since Ann was listed as age 24 on the passenger list of the "Elizabeth" which sailed from Ipswich, co. Essex, the last of April 1634 (Tepper). The exact year of Ann's death is unknown, although it probably can be set down as 1645 judging by the approximate date of Sarah Bearding's first child in 1646. Ann Derifall was only about 35 years of at the time of her death.
Our interest in the Spencer ancestral line, ultimately will focus on the second son of THOMAS1 SPENCER, that is, THOMAS2 SPENCER, who was born in Hartford about 1641 and died in Suffield, CT. in 1689. THOMAS2 married ESTHER2 ANDREWS of Hartford.
III. THE RELATIVES OF ANN DERIFALL AND HER ASSOCIATION WITH WILLIAM CODDINGTON OF RHODE ISLAND
A careful search of the IGI (International Genealogical Index, 1990) offers no useful clue to the immediate relatives of Ann Derifall in England. The fact that Ann Derifall sailed from Ipswich in eastern England in 1634 has inclined historians to believe that she was perhaps a native of East Anglia. Indeed, there were Derifalls who lived in Little Baddow, co. Essex, which was the residence of Rev. THOMAS HOOKER when he left for New England in 1633. Of interest is the fact that BARNABAS DERIFALL came to New England in that same year, although there is no evidence that he was a member of the BRAINTREE COMPANY sponsored by Rev. Hooker.
The discovery of the connection between the DERIFALLS and the SPENCERS in Connecticut can be credited to Mrs. William C. Clark who published a genealogical study in 1951 in the NEHGS Register. This report proved that Barnabas Derifall of Braintree, Massachusetts, was a brother of Ann Derifall. In the will of Barnabas Derifall prepared in 1680, he named three Spencer brothers (OBADIAH2, THOMAS2, SAMUEL2) as beneficiaries of his estate. These clearly were the same names as the sons of Ann Derifall and Thomas Spencer.
Savage states that Barnabas "Doryfall" came to Boston in the "Mary and Jane," probably on the same ship with WILLIAM CODDINGTON and his second wife, MARY MOSLEY. Not only did Barnabas Derifall have this contact with Coddington, but the latter also owned property at Braintree where Barnabas was an original proprietor.
William Coddington originally was a native of Boston, Lincolnshire, a city often associated with the names of the earliest Pilgrim fathers. Coddington was a powerful figure in the contingent of Puritan leaders who came to America in the very first vessels of the Winthrop Fleet in 1630.
Besides the Derifalls who lived in co. Essex (Little Baddow), there also were families with this surname who lived in London in the area of St. Bride, Fleet Street. The time scale (IGI) was the late 1500's and early 1600's. There were Coddingtons in the same district in this period. We do know also, that William Coddington was in London in 1632, but was postponing his return to New England until 1633 because his new wife was expecting a child. Mary Mosley was a native of the Chelmsford area in co. Essex.
Thus, we have more than one possible scenario for the contact between Barnabas Derifall and William Coddington. Perhaps they had first made contact in London prior to the departure for New England in the "Mary and Jane" in 1633 or they became acquainted later during the actual voyage. However, as we now note above, the Derifalls at Little Baddow in co. Essex could have made their first Puritan connections with the Rev. Thomas Hooker rather than William Coddington.
ANN DERIFALL did not come to New England until 1634 and it is recorded that she became a maid servant to the family of William Coddington, an association not too surprising when we note the close contacts her brother Barnabas must have enjoyed with the Coddington family. Barnabas lived the entire remainder of his life at Braintree until his death in 1680. He became a member of the Boston church in 1633 (year of his arrival) and was elected to Freeman in 1636. His lands were located chiefly in what is now West Quincy, Massachusetts. Barnabas Derifall had no children.
As a final note in the history of William Coddington, he retained his properties at Braintree until 1638, at which time he removed to Rhode Island along with the followers of Anne Hutchinson as a result of religious differences with John Winthrop and other Puritan leaders in Boston and Cambridge. This date of 1638 for Coddington's departure coincides well with the marriage of Ann Derifall to Thomas Spencer and with the sale of his property in Cambridge and his departure for Hartford. The Pequot War of 1637 had become history and Thomas joined other veterans of that war in occupying lots on Sentinel Hill in Hartford. A new life had begun for Sgt. Thomas Spencer and Ann Derifall. William Coddington, too, had begun a new life in Rhode bland which eventually would lead him to be Governor of that new colony for several terms.
IV. UNRAVELING THE SPENCER-ANDREWS-GRAVES-BEARDlNG CONNECTIONS
The second wife of Sgt. Thomas Spencer was SARAH2 BEARDING (BARDING) of Hartford, Connecticut. Since Sarah's father; NATHANIEL BEARDING, also appears in the records as the husband of ABIGAIL (GRAVES) ANDREWS-BEARDING, some writers have overlooked the fact that Sarah Bearding had no blood relationship to Abigail her stepmother.
We shall present one chart of the ANDREWS-GRAVES-BEARDING-SPENCER connections so that the reader can understand more clearly exactly what happened among the various intermarriages.
The first list on the left shows the children descended from WILLIAM ANDREWS, while the list on the right shows the one child (Sarah) of NATHANIEL1 BEARDING. Sandwiched between these two lists are the descendants of THOMAS1 SPENCER and his two wives, ANN DERIFALL and SARAH BEARDING. Connecting lines indicate the intermarriages…
[The author has a chart titled "Interrelations of the Andrews-Graves-Bearding-Spencer Families in Cambridge and Hartford." The relationships can be simply reduced down to the following: (1) Nathaniel1 Bearding's second wife was Abigail Graves, who married as William1 Andrews as his second wife. (2) Nathaniel1 Bearding and Abigail Graves had a daughter Sarah Bearding who married Thomas1 Spencer as his second wife. (3) William1 Andrews and Abigail had a daughter Esther2 Andrews who married Thomas1 Spencer's son Thomas2 Spencer, whose mother was Ann Derifall, the first wife of Thomas1 Spencer.]
THE CHRONOLOGY OF FAMILY INTERRELATIONSHIPS
1634. WILLIAM1 ANDREWS is first mentioned in the history of Cambridge, Massachusetts. Wife #1 was Mary Britton. One child was born about 1632 (John), one in 1634 (Abigail), one in 1636 (Elizabeth), and one in 1638 (Thomas).
1637. WILLIAM1 ANDREWS and his first wife emigrated to Hartford, Connecticut.
1638. William Andrews has a son, THOMAS1 ANDREWS, born in Hartford. This was the last of the four children born to wife number one.
1638-1641. Somewhere in this interval, the first wife of William Andrews dies at Hartford.
1641. William Andrews marries ABIGAIL GRAVES at Hartford (IGI records). The first child, ESTHER2 ANDREWS, is born to William's second wife.
1645. The second child, SAMUEL2 ANDREWS, is born to William Andrews and Abigail (Graves) Andrew. This year also saw the marriage of THOMAS2 SPENCER and SARAH BEARDING, daughter of NATHANIEL BEARDING.
1659. WILLIAM1 ANDREWS dies at Hartford.
1660(?). ABIGAIL (GRAVES) ANDREWS marries NATHANIEL BEARDING of Hartford.
From this chronological arrangement, we can see clearly that ABIGAIL (GRAVES) ANDREWS was a stepmother to SARAH BEARDING and that no genetic relationship existed.
When SAMUEL2 ANDREWS married ELIZABETH2 SPENCER, these individuals had no genetic connections despite the fact that Abigail Graves was the mother of Samuel2 Andrews and the step-grandmother Elizabeth2 Spencer. Likewise, when Esther2 Andrews and Thomas2 Spencer were married, no genetic connection existed since Thomas2 Spencer was the son of Ann Derifall and Esther was the daughter of Abigail (Graves) Andrews.
We have gone into considerable detail to explain these relationships since a cursory examination of the lineage might lead one to some mistaken conclusions. Perhaps the key which finally clarified the relationships was the discovery in the IGI records of the marriage of Wlliam1 Andrews to Abigail Graves in Hartford in 1641.
V. THE EARLY HISTORY OF WILLIAM1 ANDREWS OF CAMBRIDGE AND HARTFORD
Besides the unusual familial relationships among the ANDREWS-GRAVES-BEARDING-SPENCER coalition, there have been some mystifying genealogical questions about the ancestors and immediate relatives of Williarn1 Andrews. There was a large number of immigrants with the surname of ANDREWS who came to New England in the "Great Migration" of the 1630's. Their probably were nearly a half dozen "William Andrews" settling in various towns under the control Massachusetts Bay Company including Newe Towne (Cambridge), Charlestown, Lynn, and Salem. New Haven also was the location for at least one Andrews. The William Andrews of Cambridge, of course, is the main focus of our interest because he was the parent of ESTHER2 Andrews who married THOMAS1 SPENCER. Some historians, however, have confused the William1 Andrews of Cambridge with other men holding the same Christian name.
In order to settle this question, a careful study was made of at least four important records on the history of Cambridge and Hartford. This list included "History of Cambridge" by L.R. Paige; the so-called "Proprietors Records of Cambridge" beginning in 1630; the "History of Hartford" by Love; and finally the many references found in the International Genealogical Index (1991 edition).
These combined references confirm that WILLIAM1 ANDREWS was one of the earliest settlers at Cambridge and that he was the only William Andrews there up to the end of 1637. In September of 1637. William Andrews sold all of his property to Samuel Shepherd and moved on to Hartford, Connecticut. Love confirms that William Andrews was at Hartford in 1637.
Why has so much confusion prevailed in the literature regarding the two wives of William1 Andrews of Cambridge and Hartford? We believe most of the fault can be attributed to the erroneous statements Pope in "The Pioneers of Massachusetts" published in Boston in 1900. Pope had a correct date (25 Sept 1637) for William's sale of his property in Cambridge. However, Pope's statements regarding the death of "wife Mary d. Jan 19. 1640" and a second marriage to Reanna James of Watertown seem to have no connection whatever to our own William Andrews of Cambridge and Hartford. Apparently Pope followed the trail of some other William Andrews, of whom there were several in the Massachusetts Bay area.
The Paige "History of Cambridge" mentions WILLIAM1 ANDREWS in only three places in the early part of the book. William was in a list of inhabitants in 1634 and again on a list of 1635. On 23 November 1635, William is identified as a "Selectman" and appointed to the position of Constable. There the story ends except for the sale of his property in September of 1637.
One of the better histories of the descendants of William1 Andrews of Cambridge is to be found in "Colonial Ancestors," edited by Edward Little. Here, however, the identification of William's history at Cambridge adopts Pope's version which as we have seen is quite erroneous.
There are literally hundreds of William Andrews to be found in England in the early 1600's (IGI), but one entry was found in Lincoln of Lincolnshire where a William Andrews had married a MARY BRITTON on 16 May 1631. St. Botolph (IGI-C0003). Since the first child of William1 Andrews was born about 1632, the chronological fit is almost perfect. Although William1 Andrews was first mentioned in the Cambridge History in 1634 there is a strong likelihood that he was there earlier and that his first child (John2) was born in Newe Towne about 1632. Incidentally, co. Lincolnshire was the scene of much early activity by the Puritans, including the imprisonment of several leaders in the city of Boston before the Pilgrim fathers fled to Holland.
Since William1 Andrews was in the direct line of the Suffield (CT) Spencer and the Spencer pioneers of the Western Reserve of Ohio (Portage County), it is important to highlight the details of his life in Hartford (subsequent to his Cambridge experiences). As we have noted, William and his first wife emigrated from Newe Towne (Cambridge) Hartford in 1637. Although they appear not to have been in the original Hooker group which went to Hartford in 1635 and 1636. William was still considered an original proprietor and a founding father of the city. This is evidenced by the proprietor list of 3 Jan 1640 which gave the names of those inhabitants who had a right to undivided lands (Love). William Andrews had an allocation of 30 acres, while Thomas1 Spencer was listed with 14 acres. It seems that NATHANIEL BEARDING was not rated as a "standard" proprietor because his name was on a list for only 6 acres and was included with those individuals granted lots "at the town's courtesy, with liberty to fetch wood and keep swine or cows by proportion on the common."
During his lifetime in Hartford, William Andrews appears not to have been among the primary leaders of the community. It seems clear, however, that he had been well educated for his time judging by his appointment as one of the first teachers in the town in 1643. He was a member of a jury in 1644 and in 1651 was appointed to the post of Town Clerk. We are reminded of William1 Spencer who held a similar post in Newe Towne as well as Hartford (albeit the latter post was very brief). William Andrews remained as Town Clerk until the time of his death in 1659.
In his will dated 1 April 1659, William1 Andrews seems to have left more authority in the hands of his wife, ABIGAIL (GRAVES) ANDREWS, than was customary for the time (in contrast perhaps to the will of William1 Spencer who died in 1640). Essentially, Abigail Andrews was to remain in control of all the property in Hartford. In case of her remarriage, however, most of the property was to pass to their children. Abigail was to retain the power of Executrix. Based on these limitations, it seems clear that Abigail did not transfer much wealth to her second husband, Nathaniel1 Bearding, due to the restrictions imposed in the will of her first husband.
V. THE BEARDING CONNECTION IN HARTFORD
As to the history of the BEARDINGS (BARDING, BERDEN) in England, there are not many useful clues. Every county in England reported in the IGI (International Genealogical Index) was surveyed for possible leads. In no instance was there found the surname of "Bearding" or "Barding." There were, however, numerous records of BERDEN in many of the northern, central, and southern counties of England. This leads to the conclusion that the Nathaniel1 Bearding (Barding) of Hartford probably originated with the surname of BERDEN in England.
As for the NATHANIEL1 BEARDING of Hartford, his origin remains largely obscured. There is no indication of his being an early resident of Cambridge in the company of Hooker, but he does appear on the list of Hartford settlers in 1640 and Savage even lists him at Hartford in 1636. Nothing seems to be known of his lineage in England. A still more mysterious aspect of Nathaniel is that there is no known official record of a marriage prior to that with ABIGAIL (GRAVES) ANDREWS. We are certain, however, that his daughter, SARAH2 BEARDING, was by Nathaniel's first wife rather than his second wife (see the chronological chart). Nathaniel Bearding died at Hartford on 14 Sept 1674.
The will of Nathaniel Bearding, dated 7 Jan 1673, is preserved in Manwaring's Probate Records. The principal beneficiaries included his widow, Abigail (Graves) Andrews-Bearding, and Thomas1 Spencer (the elder, a son-in-law). Nathaniel provided for all of his daughter's six children (wife of Thomas1 Spencer). Nathaniel also named SAMUEL2 ANDREWS as a legatee, a child by his wife's first marriage to William1 Andrews. Nathaniel was mindful also of the fact that Samuel was married to ELIZABETH2 SPENCER, one of Nathaniel's granddaughters.
Nathaniel had an omission in his will. He did not name ESTHER2 ANDREWS. There also was one rather unusual inclusion, the name of which was the name of JOHN2 ANDREWS, a son by the first wife of William1 Andrews. John2 Andrews was not a blood relative to either Nathaniel or Abigail, but undoubtedly he must have been raised by Abigail Graves after she married William Andrews in 1641 in Hartford.
Although ESTHER2 (ANDREWS) SPENCER was not under the will of Nathaniel Bearding, she was named in her mother's nuncupative will when Abigail died in 1683. Abigail also named Esther's brother, SAMUEL2 ANDREWS, as a beneficiary.
VI. THE RELATIVES OF ABIGAIL GRAVES IN CAMBRIDGE AND HARTFORD
The early records of Newe Towne (Cambridge) and New Haven indicated that there were other immigrants with the GRAVES surname, but their relationship to ABIGAIL (GRAVES) ANDREWS remained unknown until a will of ANN GRAVE was published by H.F. Waters in 1907. ANN GRAVE of England was a resident of "St. Bultolph without Aldgate" London. Three of the beneficiaries in her will made in 1675 were "GEORGE GRAVE the elder of Hartford in Connecticut in New England and JOHN GRAVE of Guilford in the County of New Haven in New England and to their own natural sister also in New England..." The evidence seems very clear that ANN GRAVE of London had been married to a sibling of ABIGAIL, GEORGE, and JOHN GRAVE.
There were several immigrants with the GRAVES surname in the early 1630's in New England, but with a positive identification of GEORGE GRAVES and JOHN GRAVES as siblings of ABIGAIL (GRAVES) ANDREWS, we can review the historical literature on these two individuals.
The first mention of GEORGE GRAVES is found in Paige's "History of Cambridge" where his property is mentioned as located almost on the boundary between Newe Towne (Cambridge) and Charlestowne in 1633. Actually, George's property was within the limits of Newe Towne, but he is never mentioned again in Paige's voluminous history. Love in his "History of Hartford" identifies GEORGE GRAVES as one of the founders in 1636, which would place him among the main Thomas Hooker group which arrived that year. Also, George Graves may well have brought his sister Abigail from Newe Towne since she did not marry WILLIAM1 ANDREWS until 1641 (IGI record). In the record of "Land Distributions in Hartford" for the ensuring years, there were at least 30 references to DEACON GEORGE GRAVES and at least two references to his son, "MARSHALL" GEORGE2 GRAVES.
"Deacon" George Graves was married twice. The IGI (B0142) lists a marriage of George Grave and "Anne Kyne" on 21 Sept. 1623, co. Herts, "Much Haddam." The second marriage was to Sarah Ventres (Kenneth Graves) who was the mother-in-law of Deacon's son George. It seems probable that George-2 and John-2 were born in England, based on the fact that Deacon George first appears in the Charlestowne records in 1634. Mary-2, born 1635, therefore would seem to have born in the Massachusetts Bay Colony.
What of Abigail Grave's brother, John-1 Grave? It seems clear that his permanent residence was at Guilford, New Haven, but we do not know if he had an earlier residence at Charlestowne, possibly with his brother George and sister Abigail. New Haven was not settled until 1638, so there is a possibility that John-1 Graves is revealed in the 1670 Census of Connecticut. There also an Edward Graves in Hartford in 1669 who does not appear related to the descendants of Deacon George Graves.
As to the origin of this particular Graves family in England, there seem to be few clues excepting for two references, one being the marriage mentioned above in co. Hertfordshire. The second reference is found in Cussand's History of Hertfordshire (Mary K. Talcott in the Register). In 1621, co. Herts, Burroughs of Hartford, there was a mention of "George Graue" (sic) in the list of freeholders of that community.
VII. RETROSPECT
We have now reviewed considerable detail the known histories of the spouses and close relatives of St. Thomas-1 Spencer (1607-1687) of Cambridge, Massachusetts and Hartford, Connecticut. As one of the original five Spencer siblings who were among on the very early pioneers of New England and as the ancestor of perhaps hundreds and even thousands of modern-day Spencer descendants in the U.S., we would like to know as much as possible about those relatives who surrounded Sgt. Thomas during his lifetime. The foregoing pages have documented all of the presently known historical facts, especially regarding the Andrews, Derifall (Derifield), Graves, and Bearding (Berden) families.
In our next segment, we shall examine the colorful life of Sgt. Thomas Spencer and his achievements in war and in peace. Although perhaps not as well educated or as brilliant as his older brother, William-1 Spencer (1601-1640), yet Sgt. Thomas lived twice as long and had three times as many children. Thus, Thomas-1 achieved his immortality as surely as William-1 achieved his, but by a rather different and perhaps a more enduring route.
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SPENCER, HENRY C. "Sergeant Thomas Spencer, 1607-1687." Private Communication, 1993.
SPENCER, JACK T. & EDITH W. SPENCER. The Five Spencer Siblings of Bedfordshire, the Role of the Braintree Company, and the Beginnings of Cambridge, Massachusetts: Le Despencer," Vol. 17. Nov. 1993.
SPENCER, JACK T. & EDITH W. SPENCER. `"William1 Spencer (1601-1640), an Early Leader in New England, and his wife, Agnes Harris (1604- ), Ancestress of the Edwards Family of Connecticut." Conn. Nutmegger, Vol. 27, pp. 32-37, 1994.
SPENCER, JACK T. & EDITH W. SPENCER. "The Tomlins Brothers of Early New England and the linkage with the Spencers of Bedfordshire, England." (ln Press).
SPENCER, JACK T. "The Four Spencer Brothers of Bedfordshire in the Earliest Records of New England," (In Press).
STARR, F.F. & JAMES J. GOODWIN. "The Thomas Spencer Family of Hartford, Connecticut in the Line of Samuel Spencer of Cromwell, Connecticut." Hartford, Conn. 1896.
WATERS, HENRY "Genealogical Gleanings in England," 3 Vol. Gen. Publ. Co., Baltimore, 1981. (Reprint of 1907).
WYKER, CLARA BERRY. "Andres Genealogy and Alliances." Decatur, AIabama, 1913.
YOUNG, ALEXANDER. "Chronicles of the First Planters of the Colony of Massachusetts Bay From 1623 to 1636," Corner House Publishers, Williamstown, Mass., 1978.
... "The Original Proprietors of Hartford, Connecticut." The Register. New Eng. Hist. Gen. Soc. vol. 22, 1889.
…The Register Book of the Lands and Houses in the Newe Towne and the Town of Cambridge With the Records of the Proprietors of the Common Lands." Cambridge, 1896.
…International Genealogical Index (Microfiche)." Church of the Latter Day Saints, Salt Lake City. 1991 Edition.
…"Leading Layman in England." The Great Migration Newsletter, Vol. 4, No. 2, 1993.
…"Original Distribution of the Lands in Hartford, Connecticut, Among the Settlers, 1639." Conn. Hist. Soc. Collections, Vol. XIV, 1912.
… "Commemorative Biographical Record of Hartford County, Conn." J.H. Beers & Co. Chicago, 1901.
…"Focus on Hartford." The Great Migration Newsletter, Vol. 3, Oct.-Dec. Issue, 1992."

BURIAL:
1. No listing for either Thomas or Sarah Huxley per the Internet 6 Jul 2008 at http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~kathycamp/Inscriptions/Page043.htm: Suffield, Hartford County, Connecticut Headstone Inscriptions 1660-1937. This list of inscriptions, town of Suffield, was copied in 1934, under the auspices of the F.E.R.A. and the W.P.A. sponsored by the Connecticut State Library, as compiled under the supervision of Charles R. Hale, State Military Necrologist, assisted by Miss Mary H. Babin, Secretary. Hartford, Connecticut, December 1937. 
Spencer, Sarah (I1960)
 
316 BIOGRAPHY:
1. The book "The National Cyclopaedia of American Biography," v. 34, p. 415, entry for John Clarence Hull (b. 1878): "...a descendent of George and Thomasene (Mitchell) Hull, who came from Crewkerne, Somersetshire, England, and arrived in Boston in 1629, becoming early settlers of Dorchester, Mass. From them the descent is through their son, Josiah, and his wife, Elizabeth Loomis, (etc.)."

2. Per 9 Feb 2002 email of Ellen Baker : Elizabeth Loomis (b. around 1619, m. Lt. Josiah Hull, deputy to the General Court in 1659, 1660 and 1662, was the first town recorder of Killingworth, serving in this capacity from Oct 2, 1665 to Nov 5, 1675, was a Lieutenant of the Train Band (1666) and was again elected to serve as deputy to the General Court in 1667 and 1674, had 11 children, Josiah Jr. (m. Elizabeth Talmage?), John (m. Abigail Kelsey), Elizabeth (m. Israel Dibble), Mary (m. #1 John Grant, in King Philip's War, was perambulator, fence viewer, lister, constable and collector; #2 John Cross), Martha (m. John Nettleton), Joseph (fought in the Narragansett War, m. Elizabeth Farnham Swan?), Sarah (m. ?), Naomi (m. Thomas Burnham Jr.), Rebecca (m. John Lyon?), George (died a child) and Thomas (m. Hannah Sheather)).

3. "New England Historical and Genealogical Register," v. 5, p. 228, Article: "Records of Ancient Windsor":
"Josias Hull, m. Elizabeth Loomis, 20 May, 1641; he d. 16 Nov 1675; chil. Josias, b. __ Sep 1642; John, b. 17 Dec 1644; Elisabeth, b. 18 Feb 1646; Mary, b. 2 Oct 1648; Martha, b. 10 Jun 1650; Joseph, b. 10 Aug 1652; Sara, b. 9 Aug 1654; Naomy, b. 17 Feb 1656; Rebeca, b. 10 Aug 1659; George, b. 28 Apr 1662; Thomas, b. 29 May 1665."

4. "New England Historical and Genealogical Register," v. 10, p. 150, Article: "Memoirs of Prince's Subscribers":
"Hull, Mr. Eliphalet, of Fairfield, was the descendant [great grandson] of George, the ancestor of the numerous family bearing the name of Hull, in this ancient town.
In his will, bearing dae Aug. 25, 1659, the devisees of George are Josyas, Cornelius, Elizabeth, Mary, Martha, and Naoma; name of widow not given."

5. The book "The Hull Family in America," pp. 14-16:
A. "George Hull and his first wife Thamsen Michell were the parents of seven children, six of whom were born in Crewkerne, England, and whose names and dates the baptismal records of the church parish contain: Josias Hull, bap. Nov. 16, 1616; d. Nov. 16, 1675; m. 1640, Elizabeth Loomis. [Other children listed.]"
B. "Josiah (Josias) Hull, of Killingworth. He was the eldest son of George, and was baptized at Crewkerne, Somersetshire, England, 10 Nov 1616. He sailed from Plymouth with his parents 30 Mar 1629-1630, in the ship 'Mary and John,' and first settled at Dorchester, Mass. In the same ship came Humphrey Pinney, who afterwards married his sister Mary at Dorchester. He with his father and brother-in-law removed to Windsor in 1637, and we find them there as owners of adjoining lands. We learn from the Connecticut Colonial Records that he with Richard ___, was defendant in a law-suit in 1645; was a member of the Grand Jury 16 Jul 1660. We find his name in the list of those who paid 6 shillings for seating in the Meeting House, 18 Jul 1659. He was among those of the Dragoons that had received powder of Thomas Dibble. After his removal to Killingworth, he sold his seat in the Meeting House 7 Mar 1664, to Nathaniel Bissell. On 20 May 1640, he married at Windsor, Elizabeth, daughter of Joseph Loomis and his wife, Mary White. In 1643-44, he removed to Killingworth, Conn., where he was chosen first Town Recorder October 2, 1665, and was Lieutenant of Train Band in 1666. He was Deputy to the General Court 1659, 1660, 1662, 1667, and 1674. He died at Killingworth 16 Nov 1675, leaving eleven children.
Killingworth was originally bounded on the south by Long Island Sound, on the west by Guilford, east by Saybrook, and north by the wilderness. Killingworth was originally a piece of ground 'left out' as not worth settling.
The present Clinton was the original Killingworth, and Main Street was the identical ground where they took their home lots. These were surveyed in 1663, and alloted to them by 'drawing cuts.' Lot p. 36 Town Records allotted to Josiah Hull, Sr., was on the North side of Main Street, west of Indian River..."

6. Ancestry.com's "Great Migration Begins: Immigrants to New England, 1620-33": "George HULL:
Origin: Crewkerne, Somersetshire Migration: 1632 First Residence: Dorchester Removes: Windsor 1636, Fairfield 1647 Church Membership: Admission to Dorchester church prior to 4 March 1632/3 implied by freemanship. Freeman: 4 March 1632/3 [MBCR 1:367]. Education: Signed his will. Offices: Dorchester selectman, 8 October 1633, 2 November 1635, 27 June 1636, 5 July 1636 [DTR 3, 13, 16, 17]; assessor, 3 November 1633, 2 June 1634 [DTR 4, 7]. Deputy to Massachusetts Bay General Court for Dorchester, 14 May 1634, 25 May 1636 [MBCR 1:116, 174]. Deputy to Connecticut Court for Windsor, May 1637, November 1637, March 1638, April 1638, August 1639, September 1639, January 1639/40, April 1640, February 1640/1, April 1641, September 1641, November 1641, April 1642, August 1642, March 1643, April 1643, September 1643, April 1644, September 1644, September 1645, December 1645, April 1646 [CT Civil List 28-29]. Deputy for Fairfield, May 1649, May 1650, May 1651, October 1655, May 1656 [CT Civil List 28-29]. Magistrate at Fairfield, 29 October 1653 [CCCR 1:249]. Assistant magistrate, 6 October 1651, 18 May 1654 [CCCR 1:226, 257; CT Civil List 29]. Beaver trader, authorized 5 April 1638 [CCCR 1:18]. Assistant commissary general, 18 September 1649 [CCCR 1:198]. Estate: Ordered to build sixty feet of fence, rated for three cows (as "Mr. Hull"), 3 April 1633 [DTR 1]; granted two acres of meadow, 18 February 1635/6 [DTR 15]; granted meadow "that lies before his door where he now dwells," 27 June 1636 [DTR 17]; received Lot #35, four acres, in the meadow beyond Naponset (and perhaps also Lot #55, six acres) [DTR 321]. In the Windsor land inventory on 16 November 1640 George Hull held seven parcels: homelot of seven acres and a half; sixteen acres in the Great Meade; over the Great River twenty-seven rods in length and three miles in breadth; over the Great River four acres and a quarter of meadow; fifteen acres of upland; ten acres and a half of upland; and five acres in the Great Meade [WiLR 1:13]. On 22 November 1653 Daniel Frost sold to George Hull seven acres in the Old Field at Fairfield [Fairfield LR 1:44]. On 24 November 1653 Charles Tainter sold to George Hull six parcels of land: two acres and a fraction in Sasqua Neck; four acres and a half at Uncaway River; seven acres and eight rods in the Great Meadow; three acres and a quarter in the Old Field; thirteen acres and a half in the New Field; and thirteen acres and a fraction "at the planting field at Uncaway Neck" [Fairfield LR 1:44]. On the same day Robert Woolly sold to George Hull one acre in the Old Field and the town granted to George Hull a homelot of six acres and a half [Fairfield LR 1:45]. On 24 November 1653 George Hull sold to Richard Osborne two acres in the Old Field [Fairfield LR 1:46]. On 21 May 1658 "Mr. George Hull" sold to Moses Hoyt two acres in Sasqua Neck [Fairfield LR1:116] and to Austin Samfeild two acres in Sasqua Neck [Fairfield LR 1:117]. On 26 May 1658 "Mr. George Hull" sold to "Josua Jennings" two acres at Sasco Hill [Fairfield LR 1:114]. On 29 November 1653 "Georg[e] Hull hath given unto his son Cornelius Hull upon his marriage" several parcels of land [Fairfield LR 1:48]. In his will, date lost (fire damage) and proved 20 October 1659, George Hull bequeathed to "my loving wife" one-third of the estate; to "my son Josyas Hull another third part of my estate"; to "son Cornelius Hull one little featherbed which is at Boston" and "forty shillings to be paid out of the last third of my estate"; to "my cousin Jane Pinkny" twenty shillings; "my son Josyas Hull and Sarah my loving wife" to be executors; residue to "my four daughters equally to be divided that is to Mary, Martha, Elizabeth, Naomy" [Fairfield PR 1:56]. The "invoice of the estate of Georg[e] Hull late deceased in Fairfield" was taken 25 August 1659 and totalled £58 14s. 4d., with no real estate included [Fairfield PR 1:56-58]. In her will, dated 1659 (day and month lost to fire damage) and proved 20 October 1659, "Sarah [Hull ...] wife unto George Hull late deceased" bequeathed "my house at Boston equally to be divided betwixt all my children"; to "my son Gamaleell" a cupboard; to "my son Georg[e] Phippin" furniture in house at Boston; to "my daughter Rebecca Vickers and my daughter Sarah Yow" moveables; to "my cousin Jane Pinkny" 30s.; residue to "my four sons (to wit) Beniamin Phippin, Joseph, Gamaleell and Georg[e] Phippin"; "my cousin Phillip Pinkny" to be overseer [Fairfield PR 1:61]. The inventory of "the estate of Sarah Hull late deceased in Fairfield" was taken 25 August 1659 and was untotalled; no real estate was included [Fairfield PR 1:61-62]. Birth: By about 1589 (based on date of first marriage), son of Thomas and Joan (Pyssing) Hull [Evans Festschrift 44, 49-50; Dawes-Gates 2:453]. Death: Fairfield after 26 May 1658 [Fairfield LR 1:45] and before 25 August 1659 (date of inventory). Marriage: (1) Crewkerne, Somerset, 27 August 1614 Thomasine Mitchell [Ackley-Bosworth 78]; she died before 1654. (2) After 11 July 1654 Sarah (____) Phippen, widow of David Phippen of Boston [TAG 17:5]; she died at Fairfield shortly before 25 August 1659. Children (first six baptized Crewkerne [TAG 20:supplement 18; Ackley-Bosworth 78]):
i JOSIAS, bp. 10 November 1616; m. Windsor 20 May 1641 Elizabeth Loomis [Grant 46].
ii Mary, bp. 27 July 1618; m. Dorchester by about 1637 HUMPHREY PINNEY 58].
iii Martha, bp. 29 October 1620; named in father's will in 1659; no further record.
iv Elizabeth, bp. 16 October 1625; m. Windsor 4 December 1646 Samuel Gaylord [Grant 42], son of William GAYLORD.
v Cornelius, bp. 13 April 1628; m. about November 1653 Rebecca Jones, daughter of Rev. John Jones (George Hull deeded land to his son Cornelius on 29 November 1653 "upon his marriage" [Fairfield LR 1:48]; in his will of 17 January 1664/5 John Jones made a bequest to his daughter Rebecca Hull [FOOF 1:344]). (In some sources the date of this marriage is given as 19 November 1652, but there is no record of the event in Fairfield vital records; the date would seem to be a misreading and a misuse of the gift of land from father to son on 29 November 1653, which must have been very close to the date of marriage.)
vi JOSHUA, bp. 5 November 1630; no further record.
vii NAOMI, b. say 1632; named in father's will in 1659; no further record.
Associations: George Hull was elder brother of Reverend Joseph Hull who arrived in New England in 1635 [Evans Festschrift 44-51, which summarizes earlier work by the author (John Insley Coddington) and others on the Hull family, and presents new evidence on the ancestry of Joan Pyssing, mother of George and Joseph]. In his will George Hull mentioned cousin Jane Pinkney, and his second wife named cousins Jane and Philip Pinkney in her will. In his account of Philip Pinkney, Jacobus supposes that "[h]e and his wife were perhaps drawn to Fairfield by the marriage of their aunt, Mrs. Sarah Phippen, to George Hull" [FOOF 1:482], but the exact nature of the relationship is not known. Comments: George Hull has been included in some lists of passengers on the Mary & John, but his son Joshua was baptized in Crewkerne on 5 November 1630 and the first record of him in New England is his admission as freeman of Massachusetts Bay on 4 March 1632/3, which makes an arrival date of 1632 far more likely. On 5 March 1639[/40] George Hull and other men returned the appraisal of the estate of the children of Thomas Newberry [RPCC 9]. William Hill named him an overseer in his will, 9 September 1649 [Manwaring 1:128]. George Hull and Alexander Knowles took the inventory of William Cross of Fairfield, 7 September 1655 [Manwaring 1:111]."

7. From the book "The Descendants (by the Female Branches) of Joseph Loomis, who Came from Braintree, England, in the Year 1638 and Settled in Windsor, CT, in 1639," by Elias Loomis (Yale Professor), 1880, v. 1, p. 59:
"Elizabeth Loomis, daughter of Joseph Loomis, m. Josiah Hull, 20 May 1641. Mr. Hull was Deputy to the General Court in 1659, '60 and '62. In 1662 he removed to Killingworth from which place he was Deputy, 1667-74. He d. 16 Nov 1675. His wife was living in 1665. Children:
A. Lt. Josiah, b. 6 Sep 1642, m. Elizabeth ___. He d. Sep. 1670. His widow m. 2d, ___ Tallmadge, and she d. 2 Oct 1677.
B. Lt. John, b. 17 Dec 1644, m. Abigail Kelsey 3 Dec 1668, who d. 12 May 1717. He d. 24 Jul 1728.
C. Elizabeth, b. 18 Feb 1647.
D. Mary, b. 2 Oct 1648, m. John Grant 2 Aug 1666.
E. Martha, b. 10 Jun 1650, m. John Nettleton, 29 May 1669. He d. 18 Mar 1691.
F. Joseph, b. 10 Aug 1652, m. ___. He d. 1709."

8. Elias Loomis "Descendants of Joseph Loomis in America," update of 1875 edition published by Elisha S. Loomis, Berea, Ohio, third (1908) edition, chapter: "The Descendants of Joseph Loomis (1590-1658) in America," subchapter "First Generation, children of Joseph Loomis of Windsor, CT.," pp. 126-128:
"Elizabeth, b. a. 1619, in England; m. Windsor, May 20, 1641, Josiah, eldest child of George Hull, of Windsor. Mr. Hull was Deputy to the General Court in 1659, '60 and 62. In 1662 he removed to Killinworth from which place he was Deputy, 1667-74. He d. Nov. 16, 1675. His wife was living in 1665. Their children, b. Windsor, Conn., were: 1. Lieut. Josiah, 2. Lieut. John, who was ancestor of Capt. Gustavus A. Hull, b. Apr. 18, 1827, U.S. Army, San Francisco, Cal.; also ancestor of Henry H. St. Clair, b. Oct. 18, 1850, Assistant Editor of N.Y. Tribune. 3. Elizabeth, 4. Mary, 5. Martha, ancestress of Rev. Titus Coan, b. Feb. 1, 1801, Missionary to Sandwich Islands, serving 50 years. 6. Joseph, 7. Sarah, 8. Naomi, 9. Rebecca, 10. George, 11. Thomas."

9. FHL book 929.273 F597g "Genealogical Notes on the Founding of New England…," by Ernest Flagg (Hartford, 1926), p. 278:
"Elizabeth [Loomis], about 1619; m. May 20, 1641, Josias hull, son of George of Windsor, who d. Nov. 16, 1675."

10. The book "Dorset Pilgrims," 1989, pp. 159-60: "There were more deputies to the General Court from Windsor [Connecticut] than magistrates because four were elected at a time; but only twenty individuals served as deputy in that quarter-century; these, too, were a cohesive group and six subsequently became magistrates. They served an average of four and a half terms each, but several served considerably longer and these were the most influential... William Phelps for eleven ... Edward Griswold … for five … and with very few exceptions they were men of means, with land and personal property among the most affluent in Windsor. Here, too, the second generation began to make an appearance, in Benjamin Newberry and George Hull's son Josiah, and there was intermarrying. Of the twenty, at least twelve came from the West Country, including eight 'Mary and John' passengers."

11. The book "Ancestors and Descendants of Thomas Rice Lyon and his wife Harriet Wade Rice with related families," by Patty Barthell Myers (2003), pp. 448-51:
"ELIZABETH Loomis, b. Eng. c1619; d. aft 1665; m. Windsor 20 May 1641 JOSIAH HULL of Windsor, d. 16 Nov 1675, s/o George. He was deputy to the General Court 1659, 60, 62. He then removed to Killingworth where he was deputy 1667-74. Children (HULL): Josiah b. Sept 1642; John b. 17 Dec 1644; Elizabeth b. 18 Feb 1647; Mary b. 2 Oct 1648; Martha b. 10 Jun 1650: Joseph b. 10 Aug 1652; Sarah b. 9 Aug 1654; Naomi b. 17 Feb 1657, m. Thomas Burnham; Rebecca b. 10 Aug 1659; George b. 28 Apr 1662, d. soon; Thomas b. 29 May 1655. (Savage & Torrey sv Josiah Hull. NOTE: Savage says Josiah Hull m. Elizabeth, d/o Joseph Bemis, but this is incorrect.)
(William Richard Cutter, New England Family History, p. 985; (Elias Loomis, Desc. of Joseph Loomis)"

12. The book "Emerson-Benson Saga …," by Edmund K. Swigart (Baltimore: Gateway Press, Inc., 1994), pp. 351-53:
"JOSEPH1 LOOMIS (JOHNA LUMACE, JOHNB LUMMYS, THOMASC) was born by 1590, perhaps in Braintree, county Lincoln, England, and died 25 November 1658 at Windsor, CT. He was the son of JOHNA LUMACE, a tailor of Thaxted and Braintree and AGNESA LINGWOOD and JANE MARLAN?, daughter of WILLIAMB and MARGARETA (PERYE) MARLAN? of Braintree. He was also the grandson of JOHNB LUMMYS, a carpenter of Thaxted, and Kryster [sic: Krysten] (Christian (___). JOSEPH1 married 30 June 1616 at Messing, county Essex, England, MARY1 WHITE, daughter of ROBERTA, a wealthy yeoman, and BRIDGETA (ALLGAR) WHITE of Shalford, county Essex. MARY1 was baptized 24 August 1590 at Shalford and died 23 August 1652 at Windsor. MARY1's younger sister, ANNA1, married ancestor JOHN1 PORTER.
United States President Ulysses Simpson Grant (18th Chief Executive), Stephen Grover Cleveland (22nd and 24th), and Gerald Rudolph Ford, (38th), were descendants of MARY1's parents and Millard Fillmore (13th President), of her and her parents.
JOSEPH1 was a woolen draper, He and his wife lived in Braintree until 1628. They moved to London and from there sailed with their eight children 11 April 1638 aboard the "Susan and Ellen", the same ship that ancestor Rev. PETER1 BULKELEY had taken in 1635. The LOOMIS family arrived in Boston 11 July 1638, they may have spent their first year in Dorchester, MA, but moved by land in the summer of 1639 to Windsor, CT, "Probably in the company of Reverend Ephraim Huet who arrived there August 17, 1639" (ref. 3). "On 2 Feb. 1640 he had granted to him 21 acres on the west side of the Connecticut River adjoining the Farmington River" (ref. 6). JOSEPH1 continued to acquire land and served on juries in 1642 and in 1644 with Nathaniel1 Foote, brother of ancestor MARYA FOOTE. "On 6 January 1650, he was sued by" [ancestor WILLIAM1 BUELL] "for trespass and for damage to the extent of seven bushels of corn; one may infer that his stock got away from him" (ref. 3).
JOSEPH1 apparently left no will. His estate was valued at 178 pounds 10 shillings, with "a 'debt in England'" (ref. 3) of 12 pounds 14 shillings 6 pence against it. On December 1658, his wife having predeceased him, his five sons and three daughters (two represented by their husbands) signed an agreement in place of a will to divide JOSEPH's estate equitably among them.
The children of JOSEPH1 and MARY1 (WHITE) LOOMIS, all probably born in Braintree, county Lancaster, England, and probably not all listed in the correct order of birth, were.
I Joseph2, b. 1615, ca. 1616; d. 26 Jun 1687 at Windsor, CT; m. 1/wf 17 Sep 1646, Sarah2 Hill 2/wf 28 Jun 1659, Mary Sherwood.
II Sarah2, b. ca. 1617-8?; d. 1667, 1687, perh. at Hartford, CT; m. by 28 Sep 1640, Nicholas Olmstead.
III. ELIZABETH2, b. ca. 1620?; d. aft. 1665, prob. of Killingworth, CT; m by 20 May 1640-1 at Windsor, CT, JOSIAH2 HULL (see HULL).
IV Mary2, b. 1620?; d. 19 Aug. 1680, prob. at Windsor, CT: m. 1/hs by 1637-8, by 1633, John Skinner, m. 2/hs 13 Nov 1651, prob. at Windsor, Owen Tudor.
V John2, b. ca. 1622?, 1620; d. 2 Sep 1688 at Windsor, CT; m. 3, 6? Feb 1648-9 Elizabeth2 Scott (Thomas1).
VI Thomas2, b. ca. 1624?; 2 Aug 1689, prob. at Windsor, CT; m. 1/wf 1 Nov 1653 Hannah Fox/Fowkes who d. 1662, prob. at Windsor; m. 2/wf 1 Jan 1562-3, Mary2 Judd (Thomas1).
VII Nathaniel2, b. ca 1626?; d. 19 Aug 1688, prob. at Windsor, CT; m. as 1/hs 24 Nov 1653-4, Elizabeth2 Moore (John1) who m. 2/hs aft. 3 Nov 1991, John Case.
VIII Samuel2, b. 1628?; d. 1 Oct 1689, prob. at Westfield, MA; m. 27, 29? Dec 1653, Elizabeth2 Judd (Thomas1), sis. of Mary2 who m. Samuel2's older? bro., Thomas2 as 2/wf.
REFERENCES
1) Brainerd, Dwight, "Ancestry of Thomas Chalmers Brainerd," [Portland, ME, Anthoensen Press, 1948], [hereinafter Brainerd, D.], 301-2.
2) Colket, M. B., op. cit., 196.
3) Ferris, M. W., op. cit., Dawes-Gates, II:453-62; 567-72.
4) Parke, N. G., op. cit., 78.
5) Pierce, R. Andrew, personal correspondence, research and material on the Hull and Loomis lines, 25 May 1993, MAT, Swigart, E. K., Washington, CT.
6) Pitman, H. M., op. cit., 391-2, 396.
7) Roberts, G. B., op cit., 182.
8) Roberts, Gary B., review of the Emerson-Benson ancestral lines and material on the Lingwood, Loomis and White lines, NEHGS Library, Boston, MA, 19 May 1993 with Swigart, E. K., MAT, Swigart, E. K., Washington, CT.
9) Savage, J., op. cit. II:494; III:112-3.
10) Torrey, C. A., op. cit., 139, 401, 472, 545, 677, 757."

MARRIAGE:
1. Ancestry.com's "American Marriages Before 1699": Josias Hull and Elizabeth Loomis, 20 May 1641 at Windsor, CT.

DEATH:
1. Ancestry.com's "Connecticut Town Death Records, pre-1870 (Barbour Collection)," Killingworth Vital Records: Josias Hull, Sr., d. 16 Nov 1675, v. 1, p. 79. 
Hull, Josiah (I2372)
 
317 BIOGRAPHY:
1. The book "The Ramage Family of Laurens, South Carolina," 1999, Martis D. Ramage, Jr., 4218 Ridgemont Drive, Belden MS, 38826, FHL film 2055402, Item 2, p. 10 (also found 24 Oct 2005 Rootsweb Worldconnect database "ellisong" of Georgia Ellison ): "Mary Ramage, a daughter of John and Jean (Jane) Ramage of Laurens County, South Carolina, was born during the early 1760's. Mary Ramage married James Dillard (4 February 1755-4 December 1836), who later became an American Revolutionary Captain. Capt. James Dillard was a son of George Dillard (ca. 1735-3 March 1790) and Priscilla Majors. Capt. James and Mary Ramage Dillard settled near the South Fork Creek in what is now Laurens County, South Carolina (the eastern section). History records that Mary Ramage Dillard was a remarkably little and beautiful woman. Mary was a member of a family who supported independence during the American Revolution. Both Mary's father, John Ramage, her maternal grandfather, Joseph Adair, and her husband, Capt. James Dillard, fought for American independence during the Revolution. Capt. James and Mary Ramage Dillard had a large home on the Enoree River, opposite the Musgrove plantation. On two occasions, Capt. James and Mary Ramage Dillard's home was burned by the British and/or Tories but this did not discourage their desire for American independence. Mary Ramage Dillard is considered an American Revolutionary Heroine because of her midnight ride to warn the Patriots of an impending attack. It seems that Mary's husband, Capt. James Dillard, was away from home serving in the militia at the time. A group of British and Tory Soldiers came to the Dillard home and ordered Mary to prepare a meal for them. While serving the meal, Mary overheard them discussing that they would attack the Americans. After they left, Mary mounted her horse not even taking the time to saddle it and carried the information to the Patriots. Her effort is said to have prevented a Tory victory at Blackstocks, Tarleton's first defeat in South Carolina. Tarleton later recalled seeing a woman on horseback among the trees bordering his march and he believed that she had reported him to Sumter. The Battle at Blackstocks occurred on 20 November 1780. There have been several versions of Mary Ramage Dillard's ride. Several stories stated that Mary had warned Colonel Clarke at Green Springs of an attack by Ferguson and Dunlap. Another indicates that she warned General Greene at Musgrove Mill (19 August 1780). Historians now agree that she warned the Patriots at Blackstocks. Historians have come to this conclusion because the Tory troops were camped at Musgrove's Mill and the Patriots were in camp at Blackstock's Plantation. In a letter written to Lyman Draper in 1873, Mrs. Nancy E. Dillard Boyce, age 71, daughter of Capt. James Dillard and his second wife, stated that the first wife of her father was Mary Ramage, the daughter of John and Jean (Jane) Ramage. Mrs. Boyce's letter also identified Mary Ramage Dillard as the "Mrs. Dillard" who had warned Sumter at Blackstock's on the Tyger River that British soldiers were headed in that direction. Mrs. Boyce also stated that her older sister had been of the opinion that the warning had been to Musgrove's Mill (19 August 1780). Mr. Draper, author of Kings Mountain and Its Heroes which was published in 1881, noted on Mrs. Boyce's letter that the British were already at Musgrove's Mill at the time. One family story concerning Mary Ramage Dillard's ride has been passed down from generation to generation among her Ray descendants of northeast Mississippi. Members of the family say that Mary Ramage Dillard's son, John Dillard, was only a small child at the time. Mary could not take him with her on the ride and had no one to leave him with. She lifted up one end of the bed and set the bedpost down on the end of his nightshirt. The child remained there alone while his mother rode to warn the American Patriots. The British came to the Dillard home, and finding the child alone, took him to a nearby home before returning and burning the Dillard home. On another occasion, Mary Ramage Dillard determined the number of British troops as they marched down a road near her home. By counting the men in each file and then counting the number of files, she was able to calculate the number of British. She gave this information to her husband who conveyed it to the commander of the American Patriots. Mary Ramage Dillard died at the age of 35 in 1795. Capt. James Dillard later married Mary Puckett and they had seven children. The children of Capt. James and Mary Ramage Dillard were: John Dillard, Priscilla Ramage Dillard Garrett, Jane "Jennie" Dillard Burke, Elizabeth Dillard Harris, George W. Dillard, Samuel H. Dillard and Mary "Polly" Dillard Garrett."
Reference: "History of King's Mountain and its Heroes" James Dillard's will filed Laurens County Courthouse

2. Rootsweb Worldconnect 24 Oct 2004 database ":2493884" of Lynda Crabill:
"From: Carolina Herald, March 1990.... by Thomas L. Wallis: "Mary Ramage Dillard, a daughter of John and Jean (Jane) Adair Ramage of Laurens District, South Carolina, was born during the early 1760's. Mary was the wife of James Dillard, who was born in 1755 in Culpeper County, Virginia. James had settled in what is now Laurens County when he was seven years old. James and Mary lived near the South Fork Creek in the eastern section of Laurens County."

3. Biographical information on James Dilliard from Rootsweb Worldconnect 24 Oct 2004 database ":2493884" of Lynda Crabill:
Military Service: Oct 1780 Captain Virginia Militia at King's Mountain 1 Military Service: 1775 Private in the defense of Charleston. Military Service: 3 Feb 1777 2nd Lieutenant 10th Virginia, Continental Army 1 Military Service: 2 Jan 1778 1st Lieutenant Continental Army 1Military Service: 30 May 1778 Resigned the Continental Army 1 Military Service: 1781 Major in South Carolina Militia Note: [JCdillard.GED] Captain James Dillard is on the 1790 census of Laurens County, South Carolina, with two males over 16 years of age, two males under sixteen years of age, three females, and three slaves.
James volunteered his service as a private in the defense of his country. He served the entire war; although he was promoted to Major he is most commonly referred to as Capt. Dillard. He was in battles at Kings Mountain, William's Fort, Cowpens, siege of Ninety-six, and other battles. He received wounds at Cowpens and Basto; and he received two sabre cuts while fighting Indians. Also, his home was burned twice by the British. Once in retaliation for his wife's warning the Colonial troupes of the approaching attack of the British. Even though he received many wounds during the war, he lived to the age of 91. He is buried at Pleasant Hill Baptist Church Cemetery, also know as the Duckett Cemetery on Duncan's Creek. This cemetery is in the eastern part of Laurens County near the Enoree River. He is buried beside his second wife Mary Puckett. American REVOLUTION: The following is a petition which was written in support of Colonel James Williams by the American Revolutionaries who served with him. You will note that Joseph Ramage (note: name spelled Rammage) and John Ramage signed the petition as did Mary Ramage's husband, James Dillard. The original item (item #5767) is housed in the Manuscript Department of the William M. Perkins Library at Duke University, Durham, North Carolina. The petition pre-dates the Battle of Kings Mountain in which Colonel James Williams was killed. Signees were: McCrery Jones Atwood Bourland Craige McCrary Cunningham Robinson Atwood Craig Davis Williams Adair Filby Howerton Young Bean Finney Arther Stapleton Greer Long Whitten Watson Willson Owens Montgomery Gray Manford Goodman Dillard Ewing Goodman Glenn Huddleston Gamble Blake Jones James DILLARD, REVOLUTIONARY WAR PENSIONER, of Laurens County, South Carolina (from Research Note: Dillards of Culpeper County, VA, ... Dorothy Dillard Hughes) The picture of these lusty farmers rushing away from home to join the army for one battle typifies the American spirit. - John Hyde Preston, "A Short History of the American Revolution" James Dillard, however, was in the War from first to last, even after the Peace of Paris in 1783; and his first wife, Mary Ramage, a Revolutionary War heroine, made an all-night ride to warn her husband's company that the British and Tories planned a surprise dawn attack. James Dillard was one of the South Carolina militia who marched into Charles Town (later Charleston) at dawn in June 1776 and then defended the half=completed palmetto log fort on Sullivan's Island (later Fort Moultrie) with such deadly result that the English fleet of twenty ships sailed away to repair itself, taking with it the last English governor of South Carolina. This was one of the bloodiest sea battles of all time. It took place six days before the Declaration of Independence was signed, 4 July 1776. He also fought in the Battle of King's Mountain on 7 October 1780, said to be the turning point in the war, as well as other battles and skirmishes. (James Dillard's pension application; DAR Magazine LXX:9, pp 933-934; Fort Sullivan Chapter Daughters of the American Revolution, Battle of Fort Sullivan: Events Leading to First Decisive Victory.) James Dillard was born in Culpeper County in 1755 or 1756 and died 4 December 1836. He was said to have gone to Ninety-Six District, later Laurens County, in up-state South Carolina when he was 17. In 1773 he witnessed a will in Loundoun County, created in 1757 from Fairfax County, before he left Virginia. From 1775 until 1785 he fought in many of the battles of the Revolutionary War, this last post-Revolutionary War battle against the Cherokees in northeastern Georgia. In South Carolina he married (1) Mary Ramage and (2) Mary Puckett and had seven children by each wife. In 1833 he was awarded a Revolutionary War pension. Because of errors published about wives of this James Dillard, it is necessary to set the record straight; hence this account will include information about James Dillard and his family after he left Culpeper County, VA. From Lyman C. Draper, "King's Mountain and Its Heroes, p. 468. References to Major James Dillard are on pp. 269, 468; and to his wife Mary (Ramage) Dillard on pp.74, 102, 468. The next items refer to James and Mary Ramage Dillard during the Revolution. James Dillard served as a Private in 1775 and in 1776 in the defense of Charleston. In 1778, he went on the Florida Expedition as Sergeant Major and served in the frontiers in 1779. He was chosen Captain in Williams' Regiment in August 1780, serving at Expedition against the Cherokees. His heroic wife, Mrs. Mary Dillard, gave Sumter notice of Tarleton's approach toward Blackstock's. He became a Major in the Militia and died December 4, 1836. LETTER from DAugHTER NANCY DILLARD BOYCE: The following 1873 letters to Lyman Copeland Draper from the surviving children of James and Mary Puckett Dillard from Katherine Reynolds, "The Dillard Family," Vol. 1, pp. 19-21, which also in the Draper Manuscripts, prove that James Dillard had two wives, (1) Mary Ramage and (2) Mary Puckett. VV 11-13 Rev. W.P. Jacobs - - Laurens Co., S.C.,
Dear Sir; In reply to yours of 2nd inst. and to Mr. Draper of Madison, Wisc., Mrs. Duckett and Mrs. Bird and myself, the surviving children of my father James Dillard the following facts were elicited. My father Maj. James Dillard was born in Culpeper co., Va. moved to this state and county when about 17 years of age before the war from American independence, married Mary Ramage and settled near South Fork creek in the Eastern portion of this Lauren co. He volunteered his services as a private in defense of his country. He volunteered his services as private in the army and served a good portion of the time as a major but was never commissioned as such in consequence of commission being lost before captured before it reached him. He served through the war under gen'l Sumpter and Greene was with General Sumpter at the Battle of Eutaw Springs and lost his brother William Dillard who was killed in that battle. He served Gen'l Greene as a scout in this portion of the county on one occasion he together with his friend and comrade Matthew McCrary while on a (p.20) Letter continued: scouting expedition were suddenly halted by two British officers who began to question them and in a few moments the British army made its appearance when my father and Mr. McCrary immediately drew their guns on the officers and ordered them to halt the army and to "about face" themselves which they did giving my father and Mr. McCrary an opportunity to escape. He served during the whole time of the war for American independence. Died in this, Lauren co, near the Enoree River at the advanced age of ninety years, leaving a large family of children only three of whom are now living, Mrs. Narcissa Duckett, Mrs. Sarah S. Byrd and myself. Mrs. Mary Dillard, wife of my father Maj. James Dillard born and raised in the Eastern portion of the Laurens co. and died near the place of her nativity at about the age of 35 years. While her husband was serving with Gen'l Green in the American Army at Musgroves Mill, a party of British Soldiers visited her house and ordered supper w3hile serving them she gained the information that the British army was moving on the camp at Musgroves Mill for the purpose of attacking it that night. She immediately mounted a fleet horse not even taking time to saddle it and carried the information twelve (12) miles to Gen'l Greene who immediately moved camp and made preparations for the battle which came off in a short time afterward. Mrs. Dillard upon her return found the house burned to ashes and the property destroyed. Maj. Dillard's house was burned twice during the war. At another time by the direction of her husband (who was on furlough). She numbered the British army while marching the road near the house, by counting the men in each file and then counting the men in the files. She gave this information to her husband who immediately carried it to the commander of the American army. The above are the facts as we remembered them told by our father. Yours very truly Nancy E: Boyce In addition to the above I would state the tradition that Mrs. Dillard was a beautiful young woman and remarkably little and active. My dear Sir: You will found within all the information that I have been able to gather on the subject you referred to me. Mrs. Nancy E. Boyce an aged Aunt of my wife's and daughter of Mr. James Dillard. This family are among the best in our county but as you may perhaps know up country South Carolinians are very careless about the preservation of historical records so that I cannot give you any lengthy account. I believe the within to be perfectly accurate. Yours truly Clinton, S.C. Wm. P. Jacobs (husband of Mary Jane Dillard, granddaughter of James Dillard) Another Letter dated May 22, 1873. Dear Sir: It has always been the opinion of Mrs. Boyce that it was to Blackstock on Tygen River that Mrs. Dillard carried the intelligence of the approach of the British but she gave up to the opinion of an older sister who was of the opinion that it was to Musgrove's Mill. If it was the former place the distance was 18 miles. Major Dillard was married twice and they are daughters of the 2n wife none of the children of the 1st wife being alive which accounts for the conflicting recollections they remember only what they have heard their father tell them when they were quite young. Major Dillard died December 4, 1836 on Enoree River in the Eastern portion of Laurens co. His record was burned during the war but to best of his recollection he was about ninety years of age. Mrs. Boyce begs that you be thanked for the book you sent. Yours respectfully, A. B. Byrd
[Kerry's note: The above letters are also contained in a booklet prepared by Marty Ramage, P.O. Box 35, Verona, Mississippi, 38879 entitled "Incorrect Information Concerning the Family of Joseph Ramage of Laurens County, South Carolina," FHL 929.273R14ii.] James DILLARD'S Will: Laurens Co. SC Probate Court Estate Papers (index on FHL film 1,029,341 by packet; also from Martha Eastis 6/1986) Bundle 19, #5, proved 27 Feb. 1837; State of SC, will of James Dillard Sr. of Laurens Dist., 6 Feb. 1836, weak and very much afflicted in body; all property be sold; money to: to children of my son George W. Dillard (deceased), to wit, James Dillard and Mary Dillard, $150 each; to child of my daughter Elizabeth Harris (deceased), to wit Mariah Shands, $150. Balance equally divided between wife Mary and Children: John Dillard, Priscilla Garrett, Jane Burk, Samuel Dillard, Mary Garrett, Narcissus Duckett, Nancy F. Boyce, Thomas I. Dillard, James H. Dillard, Sarah E. Dalrymple and Charles H. Dillard. The share to son John Dillard to go to son-in-law John Boyce in trust for the support of John Dillard so it does not go to pay any of the contracts already made by him or hereafter made, except a note which John Boyce my son-in-law holds on him for $84 and some cents. At the death of son John Dillard, the remainder in trust to be divided equally amongst his children to wit James Dillard, the children of William Dillard deceased, James brother, Sarah Prather, Priscilla Dillard, Charles Dillard and Amanda Dillard. Appoint two sons James H. Dillard and Samuel Dillard executors. Wit. N. C. Vance, Wm. L. Craig, Samuel H. Murell. No probate date. (FHL film 1,029,346)"

4. The book "The Ramage Family of Laurens, South Carolina," 1999, Martis D. Ramage, Jr., 4218 Ridgemont Drive, Belden MS, 38826, FHL film 2055402, Item 2, p. 10:
"John and Jean Adair Ramage's land. Joyce Packenham 'Mrs. Wallace' Ramage of Mesa, Arizona, was instrumental in researching the disposition of John and Jean Adair Ramage's land. Of the 500 acre grant which John Ramage received in 1773, all the land has been accounted for with the exception of six acres. The following disposition took place:
5 Jun 1789 - 90 acres were sold to Robert Bell.
1 Jan 1799 - 94 acres were sold to Nathan and Jane Davis.
16 Feb 1799 - 100 acres were sold to Benjamin Ramage.
16 Feb 1799 - 110 acres were sold to Josiah Ramage.
1804 - 100 acres were sold by John Hutson, Robert and Mary Hutson, and Robert and Hannah McCord. There is no record of this 100 acres being sold by John Ramage.
The second generation of Ramages in Laurens County, South Carolina. John Ramage is considered the earliest Ramage to migrate to Laurens County, SC. The next generation of Ramages in Laurens County, SC included: Capt. Joseph Ramage, James Ramage, Mary Ramage Dillard, Josiah Ramage, and Benjamin Ramage. At this time we have documented proof that Mary Ramage Dillard, Josiah Ramage and Benjamin Ramage were children of John Ramage. As for Capt. Joseph Ramage and James Ramage, it is possible that they may have been sons of John Ramage but additional documentation is needed before we can say for certain.
It has always been a family tradition that there were three Ramage brothers who settled in Livingston County, Kentucky from Laurens County, South Carolina. Two of the brothers were thought ot have been James Ramage and Josiah Ramage. We do not have documented proof of a third brother although there was a Jesse Ramage in the Kentucky Militia in 1803. This Jesse Ramage may have been a brother. Jesse Ramage would be considered in the second generation of Ramages in Laurens County, South Carolina if documentation is found to substantiate that he was in fact a brother to James Ramage and Josiah Ramage who migrated to Kentucky. At this time we have found no records in South Carolina pertaining to this Jesse Ramage.
It should also be noted that there may have been females who were part of the second generation. By having been married we have not been able to associate them with our Ramage family.
Capt. Joseph Ramage (mid 1700s-1825) was born in Pennsylvania and moved to South Carolina at an early age (reference: 'Biographical Souvenir of the State of Texas,' F.A. Battey and Co., 1889, pages 95 and 96). He was an American Revolutionary patriot in Laurens District, South Carolina. He married Elizabeth Bourland, a daughter of William and Mary Bourland, who were neighbors of John and Jean/Jane Adair Ramage in Laurens County, SC. The children of Capt. Joseph and Elizabeth Bourland Ramage were: John Ramage, James Ramage, Jane 'Jennet, Jenny' Ramage Bonds, Robert Ramage, Mary 'Polly' Ramage Sparks, Elizabeth Ramage Wesson, Jesse Ramage, Joseph Ramage, Rebecca Ramage Dabage (Dobage), and J.L. Ramage. In 1990, a monument in memory of Capt. Joseph Ramage and his family was erected at the Duncan's Creek Presbyterian Church Cemetery in Laurens County, South Carolina.
James Ramage (1760s-ca. 1831), his wife, Lucy (Lydia), and their family migrated to the Livingston County area of Kentucky during the first decade of the 1800s. James and Lucy (Lydia) Ramage's children included: John Ramage, Thomas Ramage, Judah 'Judith' Ramage Phillips, Jane Ramage Stalion, Josiah Ramage, Nancy Ramage Kidd East Mitchell, Margaret Ramage Glass, and Rebecca Ramage Barlow Pickens (note: land transaction would indicate that Rebecca Ramage Barlow Pickens may have been a daughter of James Ramage but it is not fully documented at this time.)
Mary Ramage Dillard (early 1760s-ca. 1795) considered an American Revolutionary Heroine because of her late night ride to warn the American Patriots of an impending attack. Her effort is said to have prevented a Tory victory at Blackstocks (Tarleton's first defeat in South Carolina). Mary was the wife of Capt. James Dillard. Capt. James Dillard and Mary Ramage were the parents of: John Dillard, Priscella Ramage Dillard Garrett, Jane 'Jennie' Dillard Burke, Elizabeth Dillard Harris, George W. Dillard, Samuel Dillard, and Mary 'Polly' Dillard Garrett. Documentation has been found that proves Mary Ramage Dillard was a daughter of John Ramage.
Josiah Ramage (1760s-1823), his wife, Margaret, and their children migrated to the Livingston County area of Kentucky during the first decade of the 1800s. Land records in Laurens County, SC indicate that Josiah Ramage was a son of John and Jean/Jane Adair Ramage. Josiah and Margaret Ramage's children included: Joseph Francis Ramage (we believe that Joseph Francis Ramage was son of Josiah but it is not fully documented at this time), John Ramage, Mary 'Polly' Ramage McElmurry, William Benjamin Ramage, James Ramage, Jane Ramage McElmurry, Jesse Ramage, Josiah Ramage, Jr., and Sharlet (Charlotte) Ramage McElmurry.
Benjamin Ramage (4 Oct. 1773-ca. 1812) and his wife Eleanor Adair, were the parents of: John Jewel Ramage, Benjamin 'Ben' Ramage, II, and George Washington 'Wash' Ramage. Land records in Laurens Co., SC indicate that Benjamin Rambae was a son of John and Jean/Jane Adair Ramage."

BIRTH:
1. The following excerpt is from "Our Ramage Family," compiled by Martis Donald Ramage, Jr., published 1986, page 115. "Mary Ramage was born between 1760 and 1762. She is one of a number of women honored for service in the American Revolution. Her "midnight ride" warned the Continental Troops of an impending attack by the British. She lived most, if not all, of her life in the Laurens County area of South Carolina. Mary married Captain James Dillard, a Revolutionary Patriot. James Dillard's daughter, by his second wife, stated in 1873 that Mary was 35 years old at the time of her death. After Mary Ramage died between the years of 1795 and 1797, Captain James Dillard remarried. He and his second wife had seven children."

DEATH:
1. The following excerpt is from "Our Ramage Family," compiled by Martis Donald Ramage, Jr., published 1986, page 115. "Mary Ramage was born between 1760 and 1762. She is one of a number of women honored for service in the American Revolution. Her "midnight ride" warned the Continental Troops of an impending attack by the British. She lived most, if not all, of her life in the Laurens County area of South Carolina. Mary married Captain James Dillard, a Revolutionary Patriot. James Dillard's daughter, by his second wife, stated in 1873 that Mary was 35 years old at the time of her death. After Mary Ramage died between the years of 1795 and 1797, Captain James Dillard remarried. He and his second wife had seven children." 
Ramage, Mary (I3783)
 
318 BIOGRAPHY:
1. The book, FHL 929.273 w181wf, "A Wampler Family History," by Roy H. Wampler, Chevy Chase, MD, 1999, pp. 11-26, detail the biographies of Johann Christian Wamfler and his descendants in America:
A. "...By 1749, two years after their immigration in 1747, the Wamplers were taking steps to make their home in York, PA. but there is evidence that during the previous two years at least some members of the family were living in the vicinity of Lancaster, PA. Bergert reports that the records of Trinity Lutheran Church, Lancaster, show that Justina Magdalena Wampfler was listed among the communicants there in 1747 and 1748, with a notation, 'husband Reformed.' Her husband was Christian Wampler, one of the sons of Joh. Christian Wampler. The town of York was established in 1741 by John, Thomas and Richard Penn, Proprietaries and Governors in Chief of Pennsylvania. In 1741 about 103 acres were laid out; in 1752 and 1768 the town was resurveyed as 446.5 acres. One of the early lots was acquired by the Wamplers. 'Lot 160. Christian Wampler obtained ticket, June 15, 1749...' Lot 160 was located on East Philadelphia Street at the northeast corner of its intersection with North George Street, acccording to the map prepared in 1754 by George Stevenson. The histories of York County, Pennsylvania, by Gibson and Prowell state that a Reformed congregation was organized in York, and in 1743 a block house was erected on a lot granted by the Penns. Both these histories give 'a list of some of the more prominent persons who were members before 1754.' Included among the 66 names are Christian Wampler and Christian Wampler, Sr. Burgert also includes a reference to this list, stating: 'Two Christian Wampflers signed the church doctrine in 1754.' An index to the early records of the York County court of Quarter Sessions lists the name of John Christian Wambler (sic) in Docket Book R which covers the period 1754 to 1755. The published index does not indicate the nature of the case before the court to which John Christian Wampler was a party, and the original docket books merely provided short abstracts of the cases. it is unknown whether complete transcripts of cases from the early years are now extant. This court record provides evidence that Joh. Christian Wampler was alive ca. 1754-55, but no record of his death has been found. Records of Christ Lutheran Church, York, contain an entry on the death of his wife in 1758. Included are data on her origins, her marriage and her family: 'Anna Wampler born Jan. 26, 1686, died at 3 a.m., March 30, 1758, and buried in the Reformed Churchyard in York. Her father was Jacob Tritten, her mother Anne (nee Feusser), from Berrothau in Alsace. Came to America in 1747 with her husband, Christian Wampler, who she married in 1715. They had eight children, of whom five survive.' Carter and Glossbrenner's 'History of York County,' publ. in 1834 gives a discussion of the German Reformed Church in York (p. 40): 'The old church of wood was, in this state of the congregation, too small for convenience: it was accordingly removed, and on the 24th of May 1763, the corner stone was laid for a new edifice. This church of stone was complete in the following year, Christian Wamppler (sic) being the architect.' Burgert also gives a short comment on the church of 1763: 'Christian Wampfler was the Baumeister for the new church in 1763.' It is not certain whether the Christian Wampler in question is Johann Christian Wampler or his son, Christian Wampler. Since other records indicate that the younger Christian Wampler was living in Manheim Township in the southern part of York County by about 1756, I am inclined to think that the reference is to the elder Joh. Christina Wampler. No record of his death has been found, and he may well have been alive and active in 1763. Assuming that the estimate of his birth, ca. 1685, is fairly accurate, he would have been about 78 years of age at that time."
B. Extensive biographies follow for their children in the book.
C. Referenced sources:
a. Fred Wampler books as already cited herein.
b. Annette Kunselman Burgert, "Eighteenth Century Emigrnts from the Northern Alsace to America," Picton Press, Camden, ME, 1992.
c. Historical Society of York Co., PA. Vital Records: Records of Christ Lutheran Church, York, PA.
d. R.B. Strassburger, "Pennsylvania German Pioneers; a Publication of the Original Lists of Arrivals in the Port of Philadelphia from 1727 to 1808," 3 volumes, reprinted, Baltimore, 1966.
e. "Notes and Documents Concerning the Manorial History of the Town of York, York Co., PA," comp. by Henry James Young, with additions by P.A. Gross and L.A. Heilman. Special Publication No. 47, South Central Pennsylvania Gen. Society, York, PA; Jan 1992.
f. John Gibson, "History of York County, PA," F. A. Battey Pub. CO., Chicago, 1886.
g. George R. Prowell, "History of York Co., PA," 2 vols. J.H. Beers & Co., Chicago, 1907.
h. "Names Found in York County Court of Quarter Sessions Docket Boooks for 1749-1754," Special Publication No. 12, South Central Pennsylvania Gen. Society, York, PA;1980.
i. "York Co., PA, Church Records of the 18th Century," 3 vols., comp. and ed. by Marlene S. Bates & F. Edward Wright, Family Line Pub., Westminster,MD, 1991.
j. W.C. Carter and A.J. Glossbrenner, "History of York County from ites Erection to the Present Time (1729-1834)," Originally published 1834. New edition ed. by A.M. Aurand Jr., The Aurand Press, Harrisburg, PA, 1930.

2. FHL book 974.8 B4pgp "Eighteenth Century Emigrants from the Northern Alsace to America," by Annette Kunselman Burgert (Camden, ME; Picton Press), pp. 2-3, 520-24:
A brief description of the area from which the Wamplers came from in the Northern Alsace:
"In the eighteenth century, the northwestern section belonged to the Counts of Nassau and was known as the Grafschaft of Nassau-Saarwerden. Several of the families mentioned in the Reformed parish records at Diedendorf actually lived in the neighboring territories of Lixheim and Vinstingen, which are today located in the neighboring Departement of Moselle. Members of these families emigrated to Pennsylvania in the eighteenth century and are included in this study, although the villages are not located in Bas-Rhin today. This area is approximately forty miles northwest of the city of Strasbourg.
As early as 1559, the Count of Nassau granted refuge in Nassau-Saarwerden to Huguenots who were expelled from French territory for religious reasons.
The Grafschaft of Nassau-Saarwerden was occupied by France and Lorraine from 1649-1670 and during this period the Lutheran religion was forbidden and the Catholic church was the official church. After a brief interval, Louis XIV invaded in 1676. In 1698 the county was returned to the jurisdiction of the Counts of Nassau, and the Lutheran religion was once more the official religion...
WAMPFFLER, JOH. CHRISTIAN (Herbitzheim=67260 Sarre-Union)
WAMPFFLER, CHRISTIAN
WAMPFFLER, JOH. LUDWIG
WAMPFFLER, JORG
[Immigration on the ship] "Bilander Vernon," 1747. [Source:] S-H, I: 364 [Ralph Beaver Strassburger and William John Hinke, Pennsylvania German Pioneers. 3 vols. (Norristown, 1934)].
European Records
Diedendorf Reformed KB [Kirchebook (Church book)]:
Joh. Christian Wampffler, linenweaver at (?Spach)-bach, [?Spechbach = 68720 Illprerth] son of the late Christian Wampffler, m. 14 May 1715 Anna, daughter of Jacob Tritt(er) of Herbisheim.
Keskastel Lutheran KB:
Hans Christian Wampffler, linenweaver and bildweber, and wife Anna had:
1. Hans Georg bp. 9 Aug. 1716 at Herbisheim; Sp.: Hans Georg Isenmann; Hans Peter Wampifier; Anna, daughter of the schoolmaster Johannes Bentz.
2. Christian bp. 6 Feb. 1718; Sp.: Lazarus Bitsch; Christian ?Pont; Barbara, daughter of Jacob Dritt [Tritt].
3. Maria Catharina bp. 21 Oct. 1719
Herbitzheim Lutheran KB:
Joh. Christian Wamffler, weaver in Herbitzheim and wife Anna had:
4. Anna Magdalena bp. 7 Mar. 1721, d. 10 Jan. 1742, age 20 years, 10 months, 1 day. Sp.: Johannes Wamffler; Anna Elisabetha Bentz, single; Magdalena Heller, single.
5. Margaretha bp. 12 Oct. 1722; sp. in 1740
6. Maria Barbara b. 26 Aug. 1724, bp. 27 Aug. 1724 Sp. Justus Erb, Maria Barbara Gelbach; Elisabetha Bentz.
7. Hans Adam b. 15 June 1726, bp. 18 June 1726; d. 31 July 1733
8. Joh. Ludwig b. 13 Oct. 1730, bp. 17 Oct. 1730
Christian Wampffler, the younger, inhabitant at Herbitzheim and wife Justina Magdalena had:
1. Anna Margaretha b. 17 Mar. 1746, bp. 20 Mar. 1746; Sp.: Johannes Wampffler, citizen and linenweaver here; Joh. Nickel, son of Christian Hochstädter, the Herrschaffl. Hoffbestander here [q.v.]; Anna Maria, wife of Ulrich Hochstädter, "des Meicker aufdem Witterwald"; Anna
Margaretha, daughter of Joh. Nickel Schneider, citizen and church censor at Herbitzheim.
Verification of this emigrant provided by Dr. Bernd Golzer from the compiled records of Dr. Gerhard Hem: Records of Saarwerden county office for Herbitzheim:
Justina Margretha, wife of Christian Wampfler, Jr., was a daughter of Philipp Christillus, smith at Herbitzheim, and his wife Louisa Pistorius.
Dated 13 Dec. 1765, inventory of Louisa Pistorius Christillus: the daughter Justina has moved to America with her husband Christian Wampfler.
American Records
Christ Lutheran KB, York Co.:
Died 30 Mar. 1758 - Anna Wampler, b. 26 Jan. 1686, buried in the Reformed churchyard in York. Her father was Jacob Tritten, her mother Ann nee Feusser, from Berrothau [?Baerenthal] in Alsace. Came to America in 1747 with her husband, Christian Wampler, whom she had married in 1715. They had eight children, five survive.
Died Easter, 1758 - Georg Hoffeins, b. 10 Nov. 1726 in Blanckenloch, Baden Durlach [Blankenloch = W-7513 Stutensee], son of John Hoffeins and Catharina nee Hensch. Came to America in 1751; m. 1753 Margaret nee Wampfler. They had three children, two survive. Buried in the Lutheran churchyard 28 Mar. 1758.
Trinity Lutheran KB, Lancaster:
Communicants list, 1747- Justina Magdalena Wamblerin, husband Reformed.
Communicants list, 1748- Justina Magdalena Wampfler.
Rev. Jacob Lischy's records, York co. (Unpublished private records of Rev. Jacob Lischy, a Reformed minister who served congregations in York County, PA):
Christian Wampffler and wife Justina had: Anna Rosina bp. 26 June 1757; Sp.: Christoph Michel and Anna Rosina
Joh. Görg Wamffler and wife Eva had: Joh. Görg bp. 23 Apr. 1758; Sp.: Görg Ernst Meyer and Eva
First Reformed KB, York:
Two Christian Wampflers signed the church doctrine in 1754.
Christian Wampfler was the Baumeister for the new church in 1763.
George Wampfler and wife Eva nee Hannspach had:
1. Maria Catharina b. 17 Aug. 1760, bp. 24 Aug. 1760; Sp Geo and Cath Amspacher (Christ Luth York)
2. Elisabeth b. 19 June 1762, bp. 27 June 1762; Sp Nicklaus Schaeffer and wife
3. Margaretha bp. 10 Apr. 1744. Sp.: Ludwig Fridlein
4. A child b 27 July 1777, bp 24 Aug 1777; Sp.: Gottfried Gruber and wife
York co. unrecorded Wills:
Christian Wampffler, probated 12 Oct. 1764. Exrs: Abraham Weldie, Johannes Hunsicker (original in German; neither the original will or a contemporary translation which is noted in the related memorandum are known to exist)."

MARRIAGE:
1. Book, "Wampler Family History 1500s - 1700s," by Fred B. Wampler, Ph.D., p. 63, marriage records for Diedendorf in Alsace: "1715, On May 14 were joined together (in holy matrimony) Johann Christian Wampfler, linen weaver of Sparsbach leg. son of the deceased Christian Wampfler former citizen of the same place (and) the maiden Anna: legitimate daughter of Jacob Trittten seigneurial servant at Herbitzheim."

SOURCES_MISC:
1. Book, "Wampler Family History 1500s - 1700s," by Fred B. Wampler, Ph.D.

2. Rootsweb.com Worldconnect database ":480580" 22 Feb 2003.

3. The book, FHL 929.273 w181wf, "A Wampler Family History," by Roy H. Wampler, Chevy Chase, MD, 1999. 
Tritten, Anna (I3650)
 
319 BIOGRAPHY:
1. The estate probate of Peder Lauridsen is in Viborg Archives (83.2 page 75b). The farm "Dybdal" belongs to the large manor estate "Irup" (G88). In Viborg library are only two estate books for this manor which start in 1756 and are therefor unuseful.

2. The records of the time mention Skyrum not Skyum which is a abnormal based upon that specific priest at that time.

BIRTH:
1. Birth date is calculated from age given at time of death.

MARRIAGE:
1. Marriage date is surmised from birth of first child.

DEATH:
1. Viborg, Denmark Regional Archives; Skyum parish records; microfiche C116.1 plate 3 page 122?; age 62 at time of death.

SOURCES_MISC:
1. Joyce Cupit's website 25 May 2002. 
Lauridtzen Dybdal, Peder (I2859)
 
320 BIOGRAPHY:
1. The following undated paper was written late 1969 in Nice, France by Catherine Werblovsky Olympieff (also known as Ekaterina Werblovskaya Olympieva) at the request of Patrick Landau through his aunt Alice Nikitina. Patrick's father, Vladimir Landau, even though he was Catherine's cousin, had less knowledge on the family then Catherine. Catherine was the granddaughter of Edouard and Rebecca Herzenberg. The letter was written a couple of years before Catherine's death after she entered into an assisted care facility in Nice. The paper was recently found among personal items previously gathered about 1969 by her daughter Irene Nadia de Lanskoy Petersen. Portions of the letter were written in three languages: English, French, and Russian. Irene, in transcribing the letter, notes that the letter was hard to follow and to make sense of. Irene's transcription dated 31 Jul 2007 with her notes added in [ ].
"What concerns the father and mother of our mother's: Mother's father: Edouard Ocipovitch Herzenberg [or Gerzenberg] Edward son of Joseph Herzenberg born: in Mitava [or Mittau] not far ___, Baltic Provinces - not far from Riga. He died at 76 years of age (had diabetes and malaria) from lung congestion after flu. His wife was his cousin.
Rebecca Herzenberg also married a first cousin. I am not sure of the name of her father; she died in Moscow when I was 6 years old (70 years ago). [Death would be approximately 1899?]
They were probably married in Mitawa and came to Moscow young, because all their children were born in Moscow. The eldest 1) Elizabeth 2) Sonja [or Sonia] (Sofia) mother of Manja or Mania who now lives in Moscow, who had a sister Nadja or Nadia who was born in Moscow. Sonia's husband was Adolf Schneider - son of Aaron Schneider - who had 3 more sons: Nicolas, Alexander, Serge and a daughter Elizabeth Schneider. She got married with Martin Behr (English nationality); they had two children and lived in Moscow. Mrs. Elizabeth Behr died in London (after the Russian Revolution she lived in France, later in England.) Her brother Adolf Schneider was a brother-in-law of our mother's of course.) [This is a repeat of the above.] The Behrs had 2 children. Elisabeth Behr died in London (probably her husband Martin Behr died before.) Mrs. Behr's daughter Olga died in London about a year ago [1968-69?], her brother George Behr still lives in London is married (has 1 daughter who is married too and has 2 boys, 8 and 7.
So my mother Elisabeth was the eldest daughter of Edward and Rebecca Herzenberg born in Moscow like her sister Sonia, the next sister Flora born in Moscow. Flora, married Joseph Offenbacher, had one son Lotar (my first cousin as well as yours). She, her husband, and son died in Germany during the war of Hitler (son Lothar). [Irene notes that another family account says that Lothar committed suicide on account of the war.] [His father] Joseph Offenbacher had an older brother Vasily [William or Wilhelm] Offenbacher who married a cousin of our mother's - Fanny, daughter of Abra[ha]m (whom all children of Edward Herzenberg used to call Uncle Abraham.) He was the husband of Grandfather Edward Herzenberg's sister Theresa. His family name was also like all: Herzenberg. Theresa Herzenberg had many children - daughter Fanny, sons Ludwig, Harry, and 2 other sons and another daughter Sophia married to another Herzenberg (all those marriages were between cousins) who had three children, Robby (Robert) who lives in Sweden and 2 daughters Clara and Roberta (died in Riga - Bolshevik Revolution). [I am not sure if Clara and Roberta are correct for this family grouping.] After Flora Herzenberg, the 4th daughter was my Aunt Anjuta [Anna Herzenberg-Landau]. Then there was another one Genga (Eugenie) married Harry Taube from Riga - were killed by Hitler's army. She was the 5th daughter of Edward Herzenberg. The 6th was Lilja [Lilia] (1st wife of Uncle Max Landau - died in Davos, Switzerland from TB.) Then was another daughter Milja, died very young (she was the 7th daughter). The youngest daughter Tonya [Tonia] died in Moscow. Then there were two brothers, the oldest Ivan (John) married a French young girl from Mussidan, Dordogne, France. She was daughter of the Mayor of that town. Died in the north of Russia where - she was sent sick and was sent with her to Mourmansk (north of Russia). Uncle Vanja's [Vania, Ivan, John all same name wife Lydia died there [note her maiden name was Lydie Buisson]. Uncle Vanja died too in Bolshevik Revolution. Their 3 children: Micha (Michel) died probably in Moscow; his brother Andrei (Andre) Herzenberg and Suzanne Hindzee (Herzenberg) - 1st husband (French) Volant. She has a daughter in Toronto married in Toronto (Alja [or Alice Nikitina] knew her) who has two children, boy and girl. The father's family name is A. [Albert?] Statter - wife Lydie (Suzanne's daughter) - son Albert. [Irene's note: last known address was 33 Stonegate Road, Toronto, Canada, M8Y-1V8; phone 416-251-6295.]
There was yet other families related to us through our mother's. It was a well known dentist. His name was Kovarsky. His wife was the cousin of our mother's. They had a lot of children - 3 brothers Misha (Michael), Leva (Leon), 2 daughters Choura (Alexandra). Chura who now is same age as Suzanne [Herzenberg Hindzee] - the only one alive. I forget the name of the eldest brother deceased. Manja (Mania) in Moscow knows more about that family. What was the name of the mother cousin of our mother's-probably it was yet another of the Herzenberg family. As Alja [Alice Nikitina] will be going to Moscow she will be able to find out more form Manja [Mania]. Then there was yet another family related to the wife of our grandfather through the husband or wife Idelson. There was a girl Lisa Idelson and her brother. I think that Manja must know something about them. They lived in Moscow. I used to go see them with my mother when I was about 8 or 10 years old.
Now George Behr has written from London thanking me for my sympathy condolences on account of the death of his sister Olga Behr. She must have been older than 78 years. he thought that his aunt on his father's side, Nina Karlovna died in Moscow, as well as his cousin Leija, but I think it is relatives on the side of his father Bahr, and the cousin is perhaps of the Schneider family (it is possible that the cousin is still living). All these people lived in Moscow.
Now what concerns the Packschwer family. The one that came to see you with the Vietnamese wife has passed away. His name was Julien Packschwer born in Vitebesk, Russia. He was 72. His younger brother Saveijn (Sahva) engineer in London named himself Packshaw, died in England 3 weeks before Julien, leaving a widow (2nd marriage) and 2 children. It was the death of his younger brother that caused reaction on Julien Packshwer. He died 3 weeks after him. He was found on a street in Nice, France with a cerebral hemorrhage-fell in the street. Police took him to the hospital St. Rock where he died at 19 hours in the evening and remained in a coma. His car 2 CV (small) stayed in the parking where he had left it. It was only his Vietnamese wife [Mado] returning from Saigon 1 month after his death that was able to retrieve that car from the parking. Yet another day or two, it would have been impounded. But as it was the widow herself then came. They did not charge her anything. But as the car was her husband's-she has to wait by inheritance law to be able to sell it and divide up in 4 parts to his children. The eldest son of another marriage Leon is an eye doctor in Paris, then 3 other children. Oldest Robert in Montreal, CA; another son in ___ was in the navy for 3 years. The oldest was in the Air force, married a girl from Morocco - they are going to have a child soon. The daughter Irene married, has a little boy, the husband is serving in the military; they live in Cayrons near Vence, France in the Packshwer house. The widow/mother Mado inherited ¼ of the sum, the children ¾ divided in 4 for each of the 4 children. Through a real estate in Vence, Julien's house of 1000 sq. meters is worth 18 million francs. If the children keep the house, they will in turn need to give on fourth of the cost to the widow who also has the right to half of his monthly pension of 30,000 francs. She came to see me day before yesterday and told me all these details. So here you have it-the relatives. The mother of the Packshwer father was 1st cousin of our mother's through the daughter of the sister of our grandfather Edward Herzenberg maiden name Theresa Herzenberg died in Nice, born I think in Mitawa [Mitau], Baltic Provinces. She was buried with her husband in Nice at the Caucade cemetery.
Now I add what George Behr wrote from London that his wife Janet has seen Aunt Anjuta [Anna Herzenberg] in Monte Carlo, then he wrote about his cousin in Moscow who he thinks has passed away (he is going to find out about it from Manja-he asked their address in Monaco). She was the daughter of the oldest sister Polina Aronovna of his mother. Here is what concerns that family... [Balance of letter missing]."

2. In business with his brother-in-law per research work done January 2021 by Konnor Petersen:
A. Z. VERBLOVSKY'S MINERAL-MINING PLANT. PETROGRAD. 1903-1918.
Central Government Historical Archive - Saint Petersburg. Fund 586
FUND DESCRIPTION
FUND INFORMATION
Shortened name: A. Z. VERBLOVSKY'S MINERAL-MINING PLANT. PETROGRAD.
1903-1918.
Date ranges for documents: 1903-1913
Summarization of Documents:
The predecessor of the Northern Mining Joint Stock Company was the Partnership "AZ Verblovsky and Co", founded on April 15, 1903 by the Petersburg merchant of the 1st guild AZ Verblovsky and the pharmacist L.Ya. Herzenberg (I'm not confident on who this is. It could be an unknown son of Jacob Herzenberg - brother of Edouard/Elias - or it could be Leonhard Herzenberg - son of Eleazer brother of Edouard/Elias - but I'm not sure that Eleazer's name in Russian would start with a Я) for the construction of a mineral grinding plant. The enterprise planned to produce artificial cryolite under a patent acquired by A.Z. Verblovsky from the Hertigswalde chemical plant in Saxony (Germany).
On May 19, 1904, A.Z. Verblovsky rented from the owner of the machine-building plant I.A. Goldmer the premises of the copper boiler room and part of the forge to accommodate the mineral-grinding plant, where cryolite, ground heavy spar, gypsum, putty chalk, concrete sand, gravel and crushed stone were produced.
In 1907, the Partnership entered into an agreement with the Sindikat firm for exploration of deposits of heavy spar on the Yuzhno-Oleny Island of the Petrozavodsk region (Olonets province), and since 1908 it has been engaged in exploration of mineral deposits in the Arkhangelsk and Vologda provinces, as well as the exploitation of sand and gravel deposits in the St. Petersburg province.
On February 17, 1909, the composition of the Partnership was expanded to include Yu.A. (most likely Julian Von Landau) and M.A. Landau (Maximilien Landau). On February 5, 1910, to manage his own enterprises, A.Z. Verblovsky established the Northern Mining Joint-Stock Company. In this regard, the Partnership actually turned into an agent-commission office, which consisted of, on January 15, 1911, A.Z. Verblovsky and his employee, the Luga tradesman G.A. Herzenberg (I'm not sure who this would be).
On March 17, 1913, the Partnership was liquidated, and all its assets were transferred to the Northern Mining Joint-Stock Company. Former representatives of the Association were introduced to the board of the Society.
In August 1913, A.Z. Verblovsky, together with the new owners of the Society, railway engineer G.A. Martirosyants, G.A. Herzenberg and Yu.A. Landau, concluded an agreement with the chairman of the Special Commission for the Construction of the Marine and Main Artillery

Ranges for the construction of earthworks for the Priyutino-Ladoga Lake highway.
The joint-stock company was liquidated, and the plant was nationalized on the basis of the Council of People's Commissars' decree on June 28, 1918.
Composition of documents:
Agreements on the establishment and transformation of the Partnership (1903; 1909–1911); on the lease of the premises of the machine-building plant of I.A.Goldmer (1904) and land in the Olonets province. for the development of fossil deposits (1907-1916). Contracts and correspondence on orders for the production of works by the Northern Mining Society (1913–1916).
Permanent link: https://spbarchives.ru/infres/-/archive/cgia/586

At the corner of 1st Murinsky Prospect and Mezhevaya Street, a land plot with a house was owned by a merchant of the first guild, hereditary honorary citizen Adolf Zakharovich Verblovsky. He owned an broker's office for the sale of silk, cloth and manufactured goods in Gostiny Dvor, and also owned a mineral-milling plant on the Stroganovskaya embankment. https://thelib.ru/books/sergey_glezerov/severnye_okrainy_peterburga_lesnoy_grazhdanka_ruchi_udelnaya-read-8.html

MARRIAGE:
1. Patrick Landau of Monaco advises he does not have marriage date nor place for Max and Anna. He state that Max was married to Lilya before and then she died per the info given him by Catherine Werblovsky (of this database).

DEATH:
1. Patrick Landau of Monaco advises he does not have not have the exact death date for Max. He states that all he has is the Book that Alya wrote on herself and it is not exact. 
Landau, Maximilien (I3874)
 
321 BIOGRAPHY:
1. The following undated paper was written late 1969 in Nice, France by Catherine Werblovsky Olympieff (also known as Ekaterina Werblovskaya Olympieva) at the request of Patrick Landau through his aunt Alice Nikitina. Patrick's father, Vladimir Landau, even though he was Catherine's cousin, had less knowledge on the family then Catherine. Catherine was the granddaughter of Edouard and Rebecca Herzenberg. The letter was written a couple of years before Catherine's death after she entered into an assisted care facility in Nice. The paper was recently found among personal items previously gathered about 1969 by her daughter Irene Nadia de Lanskoy Petersen. Portions of the letter were written in three languages: English, French, and Russian. Irene, in transcribing the letter, notes that the letter was hard to follow and to make sense of. Irene's transcription dated 31 Jul 2007 with her notes added in [ ].
"What concerns the father and mother of our mother's: Mother's father: Edouard Ocipovitch Herzenberg [or Gerzenberg] Edward son of Joseph Herzenberg born: in Mitava [or Mittau] not far ___, Baltic Provinces - not far from Riga. He died at 76 years of age (had diabetes and malaria) from lung congestion after flu. His wife was his cousin.
Rebecca Herzenberg also married a first cousin. I am not sure of the name of her father; she died in Moscow when I was 6 years old (70 years ago). [Death would be approximately 1899?]
They were probably married in Mitawa and came to Moscow young, because all their children were born in Moscow. The eldest 1) Elizabeth 2) Sonja [or Sonia] (Sofia) mother of Manja or Mania who now lives in Moscow, who had a sister Nadja or Nadia who was born in Moscow. Sonia's husband was Adolf Schneider - son of Aaron Schneider - who had 3 more sons: Nicolas, Alexander, Serge and a daughter Elizabeth Schneider. She got married with Martin Behr (English nationality); they had two children and lived in Moscow. Mrs. Elizabeth Behr died in London (after the Russian Revolution she lived in France, later in England.) Her brother Adolf Schneider was a brother-in-law of our mother's of course.) [This is a repeat of the above.] The Behrs had 2 children. Elisabeth Behr died in London (probably her husband Martin Behr died before.) Mrs. Behr's daughter Olga died in London about a year ago [1968-69?], her brother George Behr still lives in London is married (has 1 daughter who is married too and has 2 boys, 8 and 7.
So my mother Elisabeth was the eldest daughter of Edward and Rebecca Herzenberg born in Moscow like her sister Sonia, the next sister Flora born in Moscow. Flora, married Joseph Offenbacher, had one son Lotar (my first cousin as well as yours). She, her husband, and son died in Germany during the war of Hitler (son Lothar). [Irene notes that another family account says that Lothar committed suicide on account of the war.] [His father] Joseph Offenbacher had an older brother Vasily [William or Wilhelm] Offenbacher who married a cousin of our mother's - Fanny, daughter of Abra[ha]m (whom all children of Edward Herzenberg used to call Uncle Abraham.) He was the husband of Grandfather Edward Herzenberg's sister Theresa. His family name was also like all: Herzenberg. Theresa Herzenberg had many children - daughter Fanny, sons Ludwig, Harry, and 2 other sons and another daughter Sophia married to another Herzenberg (all those marriages were between cousins) who had three children, Robby (Robert) who lives in Sweden and 2 daughters Clara and Roberta (died in Riga - Bolshevik Revolution). [I am not sure if Clara and Roberta are correct for this family grouping.] After Flora Herzenberg, the 4th daughter was my Aunt Anjuta [Anna Herzenberg-Landau]. Then there was another one Genga (Eugenie) married Harry Taube from Riga - were killed by Hitler's army. She was the 5th daughter of Edward Herzenberg. The 6th was Lilja [Lilia] (1st wife of Uncle Max Landau - died in Davos, Switzerland from TB.) Then was another daughter Milja, died very young (she was the 7th daughter). The youngest daughter Tonya [Tonia] died in Moscow. Then there were two brothers, the oldest Ivan (John) married a French young girl from Mussidan, Dordogne, France. She was daughter of the Mayor of that town. Died in the north of Russia where - she was sent sick and was sent with her to Mourmansk (north of Russia). Uncle Vanja's [Vania, Ivan, John all same name wife Lydia died there [note her maiden name was Lydie Buisson]. Uncle Vanja died too in Bolshevik Revolution. Their 3 children: Micha (Michel) died probably in Moscow; his brother Andrei (Andre) Herzenberg and Suzanne Hindzee (Herzenberg) - 1st husband (French) Volant. She has a daughter in Toronto married in Toronto (Alja [or Alice Nikitina] knew her) who has two children, boy and girl. The father's family name is A. [Albert?] Statter - wife Lydie (Suzanne's daughter) - son Albert. [Irene's note: last known address was 33 Stonegate Road, Toronto, Canada, M8Y-1V8; phone 416-251-6295.]
There was yet other families related to us through our mother's. It was a well known dentist. His name was Kovarsky. His wife was the cousin of our mother's. They had a lot of children - 3 brothers Misha (Michael), Leva (Leon), 2 daughters Choura (Alexandra). Chura who now is same age as Suzanne [Herzenberg Hindzee] - the only one alive. I forget the name of the eldest brother deceased. Manja (Mania) in Moscow knows more about that family. What was the name of the mother cousin of our mother's-probably it was yet another of the Herzenberg family. As Alja [Alice Nikitina] will be going to Moscow she will be able to find out more form Manja [Mania]. Then there was yet another family related to the wife of our grandfather through the husband or wife Idelson. There was a girl Lisa Idelson and her brother. I think that Manja must know something about them. They lived in Moscow. I used to go see them with my mother when I was about 8 or 10 years old.
Now George Behr has written from London thanking me for my sympathy condolences on account of the death of his sister Olga Behr. She must have been older than 78 years. he thought that his aunt on his father's side, Nina Karlovna died in Moscow, as well as his cousin Leija, but I think it is relatives on the side of his father Bahr, and the cousin is perhaps of the Schneider family (it is possible that the cousin is still living). All these people lived in Moscow.
Now what concerns the Packschwer family. The one that came to see you with the Vietnamese wife has passed away. His name was Julien Packschwer born in Vitebesk, Russia. He was 72. His younger brother Saveijn (Sahva) engineer in London named himself Packshaw, died in England 3 weeks before Julien, leaving a widow (2nd marriage) and 2 children. It was the death of his younger brother that caused reaction on Julien Packshwer. He died 3 weeks after him. He was found on a street in Nice, France with a cerebral hemorrhage-fell in the street. Police took him to the hospital St. Rock where he died at 19 hours in the evening and remained in a coma. His car 2 CV (small) stayed in the parking where he had left it. It was only his Vietnamese wife [Mado] returning from Saigon 1 month after his death that was able to retrieve that car from the parking. Yet another day or two, it would have been impounded. But as it was the widow herself then came. They did not charge her anything. But as the car was her husband's-she has to wait by inheritance law to be able to sell it and divide up in 4 parts to his children. The eldest son of another marriage Leon is an eye doctor in Paris, then 3 other children. Oldest Robert in Montreal, CA; another son in ___ was in the navy for 3 years. The oldest was in the Air force, married a girl from Morocco - they are going to have a child soon. The daughter Irene married, has a little boy, the husband is serving in the military; they live in Cayrons near Vence, France in the Packshwer house. The widow/mother Mado inherited ¼ of the sum, the children ¾ divided in 4 for each of the 4 children. Through a real estate in Vence, Julien's house of 1000 sq. meters is worth 18 million francs. If the children keep the house, they will in turn need to give on fourth of the cost to the widow who also has the right to half of his monthly pension of 30,000 francs. She came to see me day before yesterday and told me all these details. So here you have it-the relatives. The mother of the Packshwer father was 1st cousin of our mother's through the daughter of the sister of our grandfather Edward Herzenberg maiden name Theresa Herzenberg died in Nice, born I think in Mitawa [Mitau], Baltic Provinces. She was buried with her husband in Nice at the Caucade cemetery.
Now I add what George Behr wrote from London that his wife Janet has seen Aunt Anjuta [Anna Herzenberg] in Monte Carlo, then he wrote about his cousin in Moscow who he thinks has passed away (he is going to find out about it from Manja-he asked their address in Monaco). She was the daughter of the oldest sister Polina Aronovna of his mother. Here is what concerns that family... [Balance of letter missing]."

MARRIAGE:
1. Ancestry.com's "Publications des bans de mariage de Paris et Ancienne Seine, 1860 à 1902":
A. Anne Lydie Virginie Buisson, 28 Bd. 9'ereire, bann date 9 Jul 1899, father Jean Célestin Buisson, mother: Anne Nancy Lautrette, spouse: Stefanio Joann Herzenberg.
B. Stefanio Joann, Moscow, Russia, father: Edouard Issipovitch; mother: Rebecca Issipouna, spouse: Anne Lydie Virginie Buisson, bann date 9 Jul 1899.

2. http://gw.geneanet.org/chippaux1?lang=en&pz=christiane+marcelle&nz=irle&ocz=0&p=anne+lydie+virginie&n=buisson&oc=0&type=tree accessed 3 May 2016 gives date as 20 Jul 1899. Same contributor provided an image to me by email of the marriage contract which was uploaded to Family Search 7 May 2016. The information abstracted in the record shows:
Marriage dated 20 Jul 1899 at the Mairie (City Hall) of Paris 172 (75017) - Paris - Ile-de-France - France.
Tsefanio Joam Herzenberg, b. 25 Jan 1871 at Moscow, Russia, living there, adult son of Edouard Ossipovitch Herzenberg, merchant at Moscow, and Rebecca Ossipovna his deceased wife. The middle names of the parents mean either son or daughter of Joseph depending on the gender.
Anne Lydie Virginie Buisson, b. 29 Sep 1874 at Limeuil (Dordogne) without profession, residing at 28 Boulevard Péreire, adult dau. of Jean Célestin Buisson, deceased, and of Anne Nancy Lautrette his widow, without profession, residing at Mussidan (Dordogne).
The age of the married couple as well as publication of the forthcoming marriage were attested to by notaries and civil authorities in both Moscow and Dordogne. The couple signs the marriage record as L. Buisson and Juan Herzenberg. The bride's mother signs as N. Buisson. Jean Buisson, 29, brother, residing at the same location as Lydie is also mentioned. Other witnesses are mentioned but none of the names are family.

MISC_SOURCES:
1. http://gw.geneanet.org/chippaux1?lang=en&pz=christiane+marcelle&nz=irle&ocz=0&p=anne+lydie+virginie&n=buisson&oc=0&type=tree accessed 3 May 2016. 
Buisson, Anne Lydie Virginie (I3444)
 
322 BIOGRAPHY:
1. This individual is listed as a witness at the christening of his nephews, both "Christen Nielsen"s, son of Niels Villardsen in 1733 and 1736. He is noted as being from "Oxenboel" which is just west of Vestervig towards Krik.

SOURCES_MISC:
1. Ordinance Index 25 Jun 1999. 
Villardsen or Willadsen, Jens (I2912)
 
323 BIOGRAPHY:
1. This individual is listed as a witness at the christening of his nephews, both "Christen Nielsen"s, son of Niels Villardsen in 1733 and 1736. He is noted in 1733 as being from "Closter".

SOURCES_MISC:
1. Ordinance Index 25 Jun 1999. 
Villardsen or Willadsen, Christen (I2914)
 
324 BIOGRAPHY:
1. Translation from "Aggerland-Vind,Vand, og Sand": In 1861 the teaching post was vacant and a young teacher Niels Soe Pedersen got it. He was very popular among pupils and their parents, but a few years later -- in 1865 -- he drowned in the lake of Flade when he was trying to save some bathing children. A memorial was erected at the church of Agger. His successor was the teacher Osterbol who carried out a deserving work for 12 years."

BIRTH:
1. Per parish records of Vestervig, copy on file with Kerry Petersen, GS 9935 pt 3.

MARRIAGE:
1. Per parish records of Vestervig, copy on file with Kerry Petersen, GS 9935 pt 4. Marriage was on 24 Oct 1862. He died 17 Jul 1865. Niel's widow later remarried his younger brother Niels Christian Laurits Pedersen on 5 Sep 1867.

DEATH:
1. Par. Records Agger, Thisted, Denmark, GS Film 053,241.Copy in Kerry Petersen's files. States that he was 24, died by drowning. He was schoolmaster at church school in Agger. The two death entries above him are for two unrelated children ages 8 and 9 who drowned same day.

2. A copy of a memorial came to America from Denmark with older brother Poul Pedersen and was in hands of his niece (Poul's daughter): Christine Petersen. It reads: "In memory of our blessed deceased Christian teacher and choirmember, Niels Marius Soe Pedersen. Born in Røjkjærin Vestervig County Oct. 25, 1840. And he grew up at home with his parents where he enjoyed a good upbringing. Right after his confirmation he came out among strangers and after having worked a couple of years he prepared himself for the vocation in which he later worked with lots of zeal to pure luck and blessing. Married Oct 24th, 1862 to virgin Ane Margrethe Christensen from Orenbol with whom he lived the happiest life and became father to two sons who are too small to understand what they have lost. Died in Agger by an accident July 17, 1865 - in his best years - almost 24 3/4 years old. He was a faithful, loving, and complaisant father and husband, with great feelings for his work as a teacher and fulfilled his life with uprightness and religious work. Therefore he will be bitterly missed by his deep downbent young widow and her small ones, yes, missed by all with whom he had contact with. He has now as a faithful servant joined God in his happiness, but down here many will share the sorrow over his early death. Blessed by his memory." A poem follows:
1. Save me, was his last word
when he sank in dreadful waves.
Oh, he was in his youth
he had to follow death's message.
2. Save me, was his hope
hope and comfort for the entire life
to his Savior he had great hope
God in Power had taken his road.
3. Save me, he taught the little ones
to pray to the Heavenly Father
and it was always nice for him
to lead them along Christ's footprint.
4. Save me, as a memory must stand
in the bereaved souls
However the future will be
the memory will always stay.
Peace with his dust, Mercy for his soul."
Christine writes a note on the back of the memorial that reads:"In memory of my father's brother who was drowning with his two pupils when he tried to save them. He was a school professor had his own private school." References 2 Tim. ch. 4, vs. 7: " I have fought the good fight..."

BURIAL:
1. Par. Records Agger, Thisted, Denmark, GS Film 053,241. 
Søe-Pedersen, Niels Marius (I1738)
 
325 BIOGRAPHY:
1. Twin with Eunice. 
Stiles, Sarah (I2312)
 
326 BIOGRAPHY:
1. Twin with Sarah. 
Stiles, Eunice (I2313)
 
327 BIOGRAPHY:
1. Two brothers, Wilhelm (or Vasily) and Joseph (or Joseph) Offenbacher marry two cousins, Fanny and Flora Herzenberg. Acquaintance and marriage most likely was in St. Petersburg. Robert Herzenberg's memoirs below indicate two Offenbacher brothers had come to St. Petersburg - Wilhelm had a piano factory and presumably Joseph had the mirror factory.

2. The following undated paper was written late 1969 in Nice, France by Catherine Werblovsky Olympieff (also known as Ekaterina Werblovskaya Olympieva) at the request of Patrick Landau through his aunt Alice Nikitina. Patrick's father, Vladimir Landau, even though he was Catherine's cousin, had less knowledge on the family then Catherine. Catherine was the granddaughter of Edouard and Rebecca Herzenberg. The letter was written a couple of years before Catherine's death after she entered into an assisted care facility in Nice. The paper was recently found among personal items previously gathered about 1969 by her daughter Irene Nadia de Lanskoy Petersen. Portions of the letter were written in three languages: English, French, and Russian. Irene, in transcribing the letter, notes that the letter was hard to follow and to make sense of. Irene's transcription dated 31 Jul 2007 with her notes added in [ ].
"What concerns the father and mother of our mother's: Mother's father: Edouard Ocipovitch Herzenberg [or Gerzenberg] Edward son of Joseph Herzenberg born: in Mitava [or Mittau] not far ___, Baltic Provinces - not far from Riga. He died at 76 years of age (had diabetes and malaria) from lung congestion after flu. His wife was his cousin.
Rebecca Herzenberg also married a first cousin. I am not sure of the name of her father; she died in Moscow when I was 6 years old (70 years ago). [Death would be approximately 1899?]
They were probably married in Mitawa and came to Moscow young, because all their children were born in Moscow. The eldest 1) Elizabeth 2) Sonja [or Sonia] (Sofia) mother of Manja or Mania who now lives in Moscow, who had a sister Nadja or Nadia who was born in Moscow. Sonia's husband was Adolf Schneider - son of Aaron Schneider - who had 3 more sons: Nicolas, Alexander, Serge and a daughter Elizabeth Schneider. She got married with Martin Behr (English nationality); they had two children and lived in Moscow. Mrs. Elizabeth Behr died in London (after the Russian Revolution she lived in France, later in England.) Her brother Adolf Schneider was a brother-in-law of our mother's of course.) [This is a repeat of the above.] The Behrs had 2 children. Elisabeth Behr died in London (probably her husband Martin Behr died before.) Mrs. Behr's daughter Olga died in London about a year ago [1968-69?], her brother George Behr still lives in London is married (has 1 daughter who is married too and has 2 boys, 8 and 7.
So my mother Elisabeth was the eldest daughter of Edward and Rebecca Herzenberg born in Moscow like her sister Sonia, the next sister Flora born in Moscow. Flora, married Joseph Offenbacher, had one son Lotar (my first cousin as well as yours). She, her husband, and son died in Germany during the war of Hitler (son Lothar). [Irene notes that another family account says that Lothar committed suicide on account of the war.] [His father] Joseph Offenbacher had an older brother Vasily [William or Wilhelm] Offenbacher who married a cousin of our mother's - Fanny, daughter of Abra[ha]m (whom all children of Edward Herzenberg used to call Uncle Abraham.) He was the husband of Grandfather Edward Herzenberg's sister Theresa. His family name was also like all: Herzenberg. Theresa Herzenberg had many children - daughter Fanny, sons Ludwig, Harry, and 2 other sons and another daughter Sophia married to another Herzenberg (all those marriages were between cousins) who had three children, Robby (Robert) who lives in Sweden and 2 daughters Clara and Roberta (died in Riga - Bolshevik Revolution). [I am not sure if Clara and Roberta are correct for this family grouping.] After Flora Herzenberg, the 4th daughter was my Aunt Anjuta [Anna Herzenberg-Landau]. Then there was another one Genga (Eugenie) married Harry Taube from Riga - were killed by Hitler's army. She was the 5th daughter of Edward Herzenberg. The 6th was Lilja [Lilia] (1st wife of Uncle Max Landau - died in Davos, Switzerland from TB.) Then was another daughter Milja, died very young (she was the 7th daughter). The youngest daughter Tonya [Tonia] died in Moscow. Then there were two brothers, the oldest Ivan (John) married a French young girl from Mussidan, Dordogne, France. She was daughter of the Mayor of that town. Died in the north of Russia where - she was sent sick and was sent with her to Mourmansk (north of Russia). Uncle Vanja's [Vania, Ivan, John all same name wife Lydia died there [note her maiden name was Lydie Buisson]. Uncle Vanja died too in Bolshevik Revolution. Their 3 children: Micha (Michel) died probably in Moscow; his brother Andrei (Andre) Herzenberg and Suzanne Hindzee (Herzenberg) - 1st husband (French) Volant. She has a daughter in Toronto married in Toronto (Alja [or Alice Nikitina] knew her) who has two children, boy and girl. The father's family name is A. [Albert?] Statter - wife Lydie (Suzanne's daughter) - son Albert. [Irene's note: last known address was 33 Stonegate Road, Toronto, Canada, M8Y-1V8; phone 416-251-6295.]
There was yet other families related to us through our mother's. It was a well known dentist. His name was Kovarsky. His wife was the cousin of our mother's. They had a lot of children - 3 brothers Misha (Michael), Leva (Leon), 2 daughters Choura (Alexandra). Chura who now is same age as Suzanne [Herzenberg Hindzee] - the only one alive. I forget the name of the eldest brother deceased. Manja (Mania) in Moscow knows more about that family. What was the name of the mother cousin of our mother's-probably it was yet another of the Herzenberg family. As Alja [Alice Nikitina] will be going to Moscow she will be able to find out more form Manja [Mania]. Then there was yet another family related to the wife of our grandfather through the husband or wife Idelson. There was a girl Lisa Idelson and her brother. I think that Manja must know something about them. They lived in Moscow. I used to go see them with my mother when I was about 8 or 10 years old.
Now George Behr has written from London thanking me for my sympathy condolences on account of the death of his sister Olga Behr. She must have been older than 78 years. he thought that his aunt on his father's side, Nina Karlovna died in Moscow, as well as his cousin Leija, but I think it is relatives on the side of his father Bahr, and the cousin is perhaps of the Schneider family (it is possible that the cousin is still living). All these people lived in Moscow.
Now what concerns the Packschwer family. The one that came to see you with the Vietnamese wife has passed away. His name was Julien Packschwer born in Vitebesk, Russia. He was 72. His younger brother Saveijn (Sahva) engineer in London named himself Packshaw, died in England 3 weeks before Julien, leaving a widow (2nd marriage) and 2 children. It was the death of his younger brother that caused reaction on Julien Packshwer. He died 3 weeks after him. He was found on a street in Nice, France with a cerebral hemorrhage-fell in the street. Police took him to the hospital St. Rock where he died at 19 hours in the evening and remained in a coma. His car 2 CV (small) stayed in the parking where he had left it. It was only his Vietnamese wife [Mado] returning from Saigon 1 month after his death that was able to retrieve that car from the parking. Yet another day or two, it would have been impounded. But as it was the widow herself then came. They did not charge her anything. But as the car was her husband's-she has to wait by inheritance law to be able to sell it and divide up in 4 parts to his children. The eldest son of another marriage Leon is an eye doctor in Paris, then 3 other children. Oldest Robert in Montreal, CA; another son in ___ was in the navy for 3 years. The oldest was in the Air force, married a girl from Morocco - they are going to have a child soon. The daughter Irene married, has a little boy, the husband is serving in the military; they live in Cayrons near Vence, France in the Packshwer house. The widow/mother Mado inherited ¼ of the sum, the children ¾ divided in 4 for each of the 4 children. Through a real estate in Vence, Julien's house of 1000 sq. meters is worth 18 million francs. If the children keep the house, they will in turn need to give on fourth of the cost to the widow who also has the right to half of his monthly pension of 30,000 francs. She came to see me day before yesterday and told me all these details. So here you have it-the relatives. The mother of the Packshwer father was 1st cousin of our mother's through the daughter of the sister of our grandfather Edward Herzenberg maiden name Theresa Herzenberg died in Nice, born I think in Mitawa [Mitau], Baltic Provinces. She was buried with her husband in Nice at the Caucade cemetery.
Now I add what George Behr wrote from London that his wife Janet has seen Aunt Anjuta [Anna Herzenberg] in Monte Carlo, then he wrote about his cousin in Moscow who he thinks has passed away (he is going to find out about it from Manja-he asked their address in Monaco). She was the daughter of the oldest sister Polina Aronovna of his mother. Here is what concerns that family... [Balance of letter missing]." 
Herzenberg, Flora or Helene (I1069)
 
328 BIOGRAPHY:
1. Typescript "Early Adairs of Laurens County, South Carolina. Compiled by Mildred Brownlee; Source Records: Wills; Intestate Estates; Deeds; Court Records; Cemetery Inscriptions. Some dates of birth and death obtained from Lineage Charts. Dates of birth and death subject to correction. Spelling of names subject to correction." [Note that bracketed comments are later additions by other reviewers including myself - Kerry Petersen.]:
A. "The exact date of death for the first wife of Joseph Adair, Sr., cooper, in not known. He married (2) sometime after 1767, Susannah. the widow of Daniel Long.
Long Family:
The pension petition of Robert Long, Revo. soldier, states that he was b. c1763 in County Antrim, Ireland. When he was a few months old, the family came to Pa. where they lived until c1765 or 1766, then came to SC. His father died when Robert Long was age 4 (sometime in 1767). Evidently the father Long did not live long enough after coming to SC to complete arrangements for his grant of land....no record of a grant has been located; however, on the plat for land granted in 1771 to one Jacob Jones near Duncan Creek Presbyterian Church, the adjoining land was shown as belonging to Daniel Long. Deed Bk. F, p. 510 shows sale of the Jones land in 1797 and the deed mentions that the adjoining land is "laid out for Daniel Long Dec'D.." (The Deed Abstracts by Miss Nash does not include mention of Daniel Long, but the original deed book does.) Robert Long further stated in his petition that he had a brother who died in 1776.
Daniel Long, b. Ireland. d. in SC c1767, married in Ireland, Susannah - - who died 9 Apr. 1800; age ?. Chn: Samuel Long, b. 1757, d. 1776, age 19. Bur. Duncan Creek.
Robert Long, b. 1763, d. 30 Jan. 1840, age 80(?). Bur. Duncan Creek; Revo. soldier; mar. Elizabeth, widow of John Finney. In his will, Joseph Adair, cooper, called Robert Long his "son-in-lawase, she would have to be Susannah. True, Joseph Adair refers to Mary Owens as his "daughter" ..simply neglecting to add "-in-law" meaning "step-daughter".
Previous work done on the family of Mary and John Owens reveals that Mary was born c1760-62...a number of years before the death of Daniel Long and before his widow, Susannah, married Joseph Adair. If, as indicated. Mary Owens is a daughter of Susannah, she could not possibly be a daughter of Joseph Adair.
John and Mary Owens named their first son "Daniel". Robert Long named his first son "Daniel". The families of John and Mary Owens and Robert Long were closely associated through the years ..witnessing wills and deeds for each other and in succeeding generations, becoming involved in guardianships, etc. Neither family seems to have been as closely associated with the Adairs.
The final, most decisive evidence that Mary Owens and Robert Long were siblings is this:
Deed Bk. J, p. 80 - Be it known to all whom it may concern that I, Thomas Murdough, for divers reasons do hereby impower and constitute as my agent to transact my temporal concerns, Robert Long Esq. and do hereby authorize him to sell all my moveable effects and rent my plantation and keep a Just account of my temporal concerns. In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal the 16th day of October A.D. 1807.
test John B. Kennedy Thomas Murdough (Seal)
Thomas Beasley
NB: and at my death that there shall be an equal divide of whatever may be remaining of my property between and Robert Long and Mary Owens.
Oath of Thomas Beasley that he was present and saw said Thos. Murdough sign and seal the within writing for the within purpose mentioned and likewise acknowledge the three lines below as part of the same. 17th April 1809. (S) Thomas Beasley.
Recorded April 22nd 1809 by John Garlington, Register.
(This document as drawn up is the equivalent of a Last Will and Testament.)
Duncan Creek Presbyterian Church cemetery: In memory of Thomas MURDOUGH who died 15th August 1809, aged 81 years.
Thomas Murdough was born 1728. It is quite possible that he was a brother of Susannah Long Adair. There must have been kinship because of the fact that Thomas willed his property equally divided between the two living children of Susannah. Descendants of John and Mary Owens have a dim recollection of the name "Muldrow" in their background. The name could have easily been "Murdough"."

2. FHL book 975.731 H2b "A Laurens County Sketchbook," by Julian Stevenson Bolick [with my edited notes added in brackets]:
Pg. 1: "An early record showing an original grant from George III to an ancestor of the Putnams of Gray Court has Laurens District in Craven County. 'Wallace's History of South Carolina" verifies the fact that a vast tract of land to the south of Virginia had been granted in 1663 by Charles II to eight British lords. Craven County, an extensive region covering most of South Carolina and parts of North Carolina, was a part of this sprawling acreage. In 1719 the people threw off the rule of the lords Proprietors, at which time the rights of the government and seven-eighths of the soil were ceded to the king. A later territorial separation placed Laurens in the Ninety Six District. On March 12, 1785, Laurens was made a separate district by an Act of the General Assembly…
"Major Jonathan Downes, a colonial officer, headed a group of influential citizens commissioned to survey the territory. Gentleman Justices serving with Major Downes included James Montgomery [father of Rebecca Montgomery who married James Adair], Silvanus Walker, William Mitcherson and Charles Saxon. After the districting was made legal by the act of legislation, the justices were authorized 'to build and keep in good repair at the charge of the county one good and convenient courthouse with necessary jury rooms and one good and sufficient county gaol together with a pillory, whipping post and stocks…"
Pg. 3: "In 1790 the first government census taken after he adoption of the Constitution gave Laurens District 1,395 heads of families, with a total population of 9,337 including Negro freedmen and slaves. Laurens District, at that time, had a larger population than any other district above Newberry, the latter outnumbering Laurens by only a few hundred…"
Pg. 4: "The first permanent white settler to come to Upper Carolina is believed to have been John Duncan of Aberdeen, Scotland. He first stopped in Pennsylvania, but as early as 1753 he was known to have been in the Ninety Six District on land bordering a creek later named for him.
"On a return to Pennsylvania, Duncan influenced friends to come to Ninety Six and establish homesteads. He brought his own family and a pair of fine stud horses to pull the first wagon ever to roll over soil between the Broad and Saluda rivers. A lush growth of maiden cane bordering the creek had been the deciding factor for closing out his interests in Pennsylvania.
"Two of the settlers to accompany him were David and Charles Little, for whom a community was named later. [David Little, 1767-1812, married Charity Adair].
"Records show early land grants to Andrew McCrary (McCreary), Joseph Adair, Robert Hanna, Thomas Ewing, James Pollock, Thomas Logan and Thomas Craig - all in the group following Mr. Duncan to Carolina."
Pg. 5: "Still another friend of John Duncan was Joshua Palmer, a minister, who was so influential in the new community that when he moved to Indiana about 1828 he carried with him several families from his ecclesiastical society…
"Robert Long was brought to this country at the age of five months, and at the age of two years was moved from Pennsylvania to the South. Robert's father was a well known construction engineer, who by government contract in 1769 built Fort Charlotte on the Savannah River. [Robert Long, son of Daniel Long and Susannah Murdough; Susannah becomes Joseph Adair, Sr.'s second wife after Sarah Lafferty. Brownlee states Daniel died in 1767; is this a different Robert Long? On the other hand the British built the fort for the French and Indian War, which was 1756-1763 - so the 1769 date could be in error.]
"From North Carolina James Williams came, having been attracted to the fertile lands bordering Little River where he pursued farming and engaged in a mercantile business. His plantation was named Mount Pleasant..." [James Williams was the subject of the James Williams Petition that most early Adair men signed.]
Pg. 7: "After peace was secured by a vigorous and successful campaign against the Indians in 1761, the backwoodsmen of Carolina, as all people in the territory remote from Charles Town were called, gave their undivided time to replacing the temporary dwellings with more adequate homes. Many of the settlers had stopped in Virginia, but there it was made clear that only those who belonged to the Established Church were welcome; consequently, the ones believing strongly in freedom of worship came on into Carolina. They were principally Scotch-Irish and by no means adventurers…"
Pg. 17: "LITTLESVILLE: One of the first centers of population in Laurens County was Littlesville on Duncan's Creek. David and Charles Little, mentioned previously in this sketch, had come to this country from 'Doublin,' Ireland. David married Charity Adair, the daughter of a Revolutionary soldier. Members of these two families, the Littles and the Adairs, are buried in the old Duncan's Creek Church cemetery. One of the gravestones bears the inscription 'David Little, a native of Ireland.' It is not known which of the early Adairs was the father of Charity, but the Adairs were in this section, probably as early as were the Little brothers. [Charity was the daughter of Joseph, son of the original Joseph.] Joseph B. [Sr.] came from Ireland in 1711 and died in Laurens County in 1801; Joseph, Jr., [son of Joseph Sr.] was born in Pennsylvania (the state from which John Duncan recruited settlers) in 1733 and died in Laurens in 1812; and John B. was born in Duncan's Creek neighborhood in 1758 and died in Georgia [son of Joseph Jr. and brother to Charity]. Doctor W.S. Glenn of Spartanburg had in his possession in 1930 a map of a very early date which showed a community called Littlesville, about three miles from the historic Duncan's Creek Church. The site is no longer listed even in the crossroad category, the majority of the people from this creek bank settlement having moved to the thriving community of Clinton…
Pp. 42-43: "DUNCAN'S CREEK PRESBYTERIAN: One of the early utilitarian buildings was Duncan's Creek Presbyterian Church in the rural section of Jacks Township. Servants of the John Duncan family had erected a brush arbor about 1753, at which time John Duncan had come into the area. A more permanent building of fieldstones was put up in 1764, and that date is visible in a cornerstone of the presently used building erected in 1842. The date 1764 was retained for historic purposes. The original granite walls, two feet in thickness, and the straight-backed pews of oak attest to the strong faith of the era and of the congregations of that particular church. In recent years the small-outmoded reed organ from the fieldstone church was given to Thornwell Home for children in Clinton, where it is still used on occasions calling for a colonial atmosphere. During the Revolutionary War, the church building served as a place of protection for the people of that area. Often referred to as the mother of Presbyterian churches, it is the oldest church organization in the upper part of the state. Both Lisbon Presbyterian and Clinton First Presbyterian were started as mission extensions of the Duncan's Creek Church. The first minister was the Reverend Hezekiah Balch, year 1776. In the same year John B. Kennedy was ordained and continued as pastor intermittently for fifty years. In 1788 the Duncan's Creek Church became involved in serious difficulties. The majority of the members being canny old Scotchmen, theological discord was instituted over whether to use Rouse's or Watt's version of the Psalms. Sixty-three members seceded to form other churches. Although each plantation had its own burial ground, Duncan's Creek church offered burial plots in its churchyard in 1776. Some of the ancient mounds have lost their identity, but one bearing the marking 'Samuel Long, aged 19 years, November 15th, 1776, is still legible [brother of Robert Long and son of Daniel Long and Susannah Murdough]. Sixteen soldiers of the Revolution are buried in the churchyard. In October of 1964, Duncan's Creek Presbyterian Church observed with appropriate ceremony the two-hundredth anniversary of its founding…"

BURIAL:
1. Per http://www.geocities.com/Heartland/Valley/9708/dcem.html, there is a listing in the Duncan Creek Presbyterian Church cemetery that reads: "Long, Samuel, died Nov. 15, 1776, age 19." 
Long, Samuel (I3728)
 
329 BIOGRAPHY:
1. Typescript "Early Adairs of Laurens County, South Carolina. Compiled by Mildred Brownlee; Source Records: Wills; Intestate Estates; Deeds; Court Records; Cemetery Inscriptions. Some dates of birth and death obtained from Lineage Charts. Dates of birth and death subject to correction. Spelling of names subject to correction." [Note that bracketed comments are later additions by other reviewers including myself - Kerry Petersen.]:
A. "Laurens County, South Carolina - Will Book A-1, p. 19:
'I, Joseph Adair of the State of So. Carolina & County of Laurens cooper; yet of sound & perfect understanding & memory; do constitute this my last will & testament & desire it may be received as such. First I most humbly bequeath my soul to God my maker, beseeching his most gracious exceptance of it, through all sufficient merits & meditations of my most compassionate Redeemer Jesus Christ who gave himself to be an atonement for my sins & is able to save to the uttermost all that come to God by him seeing he ever liveth to make intersession for them & who I trust will not reject me a returning penitent sinner when I come to Him for mercy; In this hope & confidence I render up my soul with comfort, humbly beseeching the most glorious & blessed Trinity, one God most Holy most merciful & gratious to prepare me for my disolution then take me to himself into that place of rest & incomparable felicity which He hath prepared for all that love his holy name, Amen; Blessed be God I give my body to the earth from whence it was taken, in full assurance of its resurrection from therein at the last day; As for my burial, I desire it may be decent without pomp or state at the discretion of my dear wife who I doubt not will manage it with all prudence; As to my worldly estate I will & positively order that all my debts be paid & next I give & bequeath to Susanna my dearly beloved wife all my stock of black cattle & hogs with all the pewter of my dresser; one hundred & sixty Continental dollars which is in the hands of my son Joseph Adair & all the store of my grain that may be mine at the time of my death for her support; Also all the farming utentials that belong to me at my death; Also my beds & bed furniture to possess the same during her life, & at her decease to go to my son James Adair, Also to my son Joseph Adair I give & bequeath the remainder of the Continental money that remains in his hands; Also one long posted bedstead & my armed chair; Also I give & bequeath to my son James Adair the one-half of my coopers tools; & other utentials belonging to my trade with the whole of my wearing apparel, & also my chest at the decease of my wife; Also to my son Benjamin Adair, I give & bequeath the other half of my coopers tools & utentials belonging to my trade & also the half of that twenty pounds old currency which he had of me for which he was to have palled a graveyard which he never performed; Also to my daughter Jean Ramage, I give & bequeath my brass seals; Also to my daughter Sarah Adair, I give & bequeath that other half of that twenty pounds old currency which is in the hands of my son Benjamin Adair; Also I give her at the death of my wife, that iron pot that was her mothers with my iron crook; Also I give & bequeath my daughter Mary Owens my biggest iron pot & my course flax hackle at the decease of her mother & to her husband John Owens the one-half of the sawed plank of my loft and floor; & if it shall please God to call me home by this present disease, it is my will that the money he owes me should go to defray my funeral charges; Also to Robert Long my son-in-law, I give & bequeath the other half of plank of my loft & floor; And I do by these presents nominate constitute & appoint & ordain as the executors of this my last will & testament my truly & well beloved sons Joseph & James Adair; & I do hereby revoke & disavow & make null & void every former will by me made ratifying & confirming this & no other to be my last will & testament. In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand & affixed my seal this 9th day of January in the year of our Lord 1788.
s) Joseph Adair
wit: James Montgomery, William Borland, James (J) Greer'
Recording date of the will is not stated. Judging by dates of other estate records recorded on pages preceding and following page 19, the will appears to have been recorded sometime in 1789 or early 1790.
There are no loose probate papers for the estate of Joseph Adair; Sr.
Joseph Adair, Sr., cooper, married in Ireland? Or in Pa. ? a first wife, said to have been Sarah Laferty. Laurens Co. SC records give no proof data for this wife. She was the mother of Joseph's children. Joseph Adair's will was written 9 Jan. 1788 and proved 1789/90, recorded in Will Book A-1, p. 19. The following children are mentioned in the will:
1. Joseph Adair, b. 12 Apr. 1735 (from lineage chart), died 17 Oct. 1812. He was called Joseph Adair, Sr. after the death of his father.
2. James Adair. b. Dec. 1747, d. 23 Mar. 1831 in Indiana. Proved to have been son of Joseph Adair, Sr. cooper, by the Power-of-Attorney issued to his brother, Benjamin Adair. (Deed Bk. G, p. 666.)
3. Benjamin Adair, b. 1752, d, 3 Sept. 1823.
4. Jean/Jane Adair, b. before 1755, married (John ?) Ramage. [Listed in will as Jean Ramage; some misread writing on will as Leah but it is definitely Jean.]
5. Sarah Adair - Single in 1788? Or married to an Adair?"
B. "Sarah Adair, dau. of Joseph Adair, Sr., cooper, was either a single woman in 1788 when her father wrote his will or she was mar. to an Adair. No further data." 
Adair, Sarah (I3721)
 
330 BIOGRAPHY:
1. Typescript "Early Adairs of Laurens County, South Carolina. Compiled by Mildred Brownlee; Source Records: Wills; Intestate Estates; Deeds; Court Records; Cemetery Inscriptions. Some dates of birth and death obtained from Lineage Charts. Dates of birth and death subject to correction. Spelling of names subject to correction." [Note that bracketed comments are later additions by other reviewers including myself - Kerry Petersen.]:

BIOGRAPHY:
1. Typescript "Early Adairs of Laurens County, South Carolina. Compiled by Mildred Brownlee; Source Records: Wills; Intestate Estates; Deeds; Court Records; Cemetery Inscriptions. Some dates of birth and death obtained from Lineage Charts. Dates of birth and death subject to correction. Spelling of names subject to correction." [Note that bracketed comments are later additions by other reviewers including myself - Kerry Petersen.]:
A. "The exact date of death for the first wife of Joseph Adair, Sr., cooper, in not known. He married (2) sometime after 1767, Susannah. the widow of Daniel Long.
Long Family:
The pension petition of Robert Long, Revo. soldier, states that he was b. c1763 in County Antrim, Ireland. When he was a few months old, the family came to Pa. where they lived until c1765 or 1766, then came to SC. His father died when Robert Long was age 4 (sometime in 1767). Evidently the father Long did not live long enough after coming to SC to complete arrangements for his grant of land....no record of a grant has been located; however, on the plat for land granted in 1771 to one Jacob Jones near Duncan Creek Presbyterian Church, the adjoining land was shown as belonging to Daniel Long. Deed Bk. F, p. 510 shows sale of the Jones land in 1797 and the deed mentions that the adjoining land is "laid out for Daniel Long Dec'D.." (The Deed Abstracts by Miss Nash does not include mention of Daniel Long, but the original deed book does.) Robert Long further stated in his petition that he had a brother who died in 1776.
Daniel Long, b. Ireland. d. in SC c1767, married in Ireland, Susannah - - who died 9 Apr. 1800; age ?. Chn: Samuel Long, b. 1757, d. 1776, age 19. Bur. Duncan Creek.
Robert Long, b. 1763, d. 30 Jan. 1840, age 80(?). Bur. Duncan Creek; Revo. soldier; mar. Elizabeth, widow of John Finney. In his will, Joseph Adair, cooper, called Robert Long his "son-in-law", a Colonial term for "step-son".
Mary Long, b. 1760-62, married John Owens. The wording of the will of Joseph Adair, cooper, in 1788 clearly indicates that the mother of Mary Owens is still living at that date, in which case, she would have to be Susannah. True, Joseph Adair refers to Mary Owens as his "daughter" ..simply neglecting to add "-in-law" meaning "step-daughter".
Previous work done on the family of Mary and John Owens reveals that Mary was born c1760-62...a number of years before the death of Daniel Long and before his widow, Susannah, married Joseph Adair. If, as indicated. Mary Owens is a daughter of Susannah, she could not possibly be a daughter of Joseph Adair.
John and Mary Owens named their first son "Daniel". Robert Long named his first son "Daniel". The families of John and Mary Owens and Robert Long were closely associated through the years ..witnessing wills and deeds for each other and in succeeding generations, becoming involved in guardianships, etc. Neither family seems to have been as closely associated with the Adairs.
The final, most decisive evidence that Mary Owens and Robert Long were siblings is this:
Deed Bk. J, p. 80 - Be it known to all whom it may concern that I, Thomas Murdough, for divers reasons do hereby impower and constitute as my agent to transact my temporal concerns, Robert Long Esq. and do hereby authorize him to sell all my moveable effects and rent my plantation and keep a Just account of my temporal concerns. In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal the 16th day of October A.D. 1807.
test John B. Kennedy Thomas Murdough (Seal)
Thomas Beasley
NB: and at my death that there shall be an equal divide of whatever may be remaining of my property between and Robert Long and Mary Owens.
Oath of Thomas Beasley that he was present and saw said Thos. Murdough sign and seal the within writing for the within purpose mentioned and likewise acknowledge the three lines below as part of the same. 17th April 1809. (S) Thomas Beasley.
Recorded April 22nd 1809 by John Garlington, Register.
(This document as drawn up is the equivalent of a Last Will and Testament.)
Duncan Creek Presbyterian Church cemetery: In memory of Thomas MURDOUGH who died 15th August 1809, aged 81 years.
Thomas Murdough was born 1728. It is quite possible that he was a brother of Susannah Long Adair. There must have been kinship because of the fact that Thomas willed his property equally divided between the two living children of Susannah. Descendants of John and Mary Owens have a dim recollection of the name "Muldrow" in their background. The name could have easily been "Murdough"." 
Long, Daniel (I3709)
 
331 BIOGRAPHY:
1. Typescript "Early Adairs of Laurens County, South Carolina. Compiled by Mildred Brownlee; Source Records: Wills; Intestate Estates; Deeds; Court Records; Cemetery Inscriptions. Some dates of birth and death obtained from Lineage Charts. Dates of birth and death subject to correction. Spelling of names subject to correction." [Note that bracketed comments are later additions by other reviewers including myself - Kerry Petersen.]:
A. "Laurens County, South Carolina - Will Book A-1, p. 19:
'I, Joseph Adair of the State of So. Carolina & County of Laurens cooper; yet of sound & perfect understanding & memory; do constitute this my last will & testament & desire it may be received as such. First I most humbly bequeath my soul to God my maker, beseeching his most gracious exceptance of it, through all sufficient merits & meditations of my most compassionate Redeemer Jesus Christ who gave himself to be an atonement for my sins & is able to save to the uttermost all that come to God by him seeing he ever liveth to make intersession for them & who I trust will not reject me a returning penitent sinner when I come to Him for mercy; In this hope & confidence I render up my soul with comfort, humbly beseeching the most glorious & blessed Trinity, one God most Holy most merciful & gratious to prepare me for my disolution then take me to himself into that place of rest & incomparable felicity which He hath prepared for all that love his holy name, Amen; Blessed be God I give my body to the earth from whence it was taken, in full assurance of its resurrection from therein at the last day; As for my burial, I desire it may be decent without pomp or state at the discretion of my dear wife who I doubt not will manage it with all prudence; As to my worldly estate I will & positively order that all my debts be paid & next I give & bequeath to Susanna my dearly beloved wife all my stock of black cattle & hogs with all the pewter of my dresser; one hundred & sixty Continental dollars which is in the hands of my son Joseph Adair & all the store of my grain that may be mine at the time of my death for her support; Also all the farming utentials that belong to me at my death; Also my beds & bed furniture to possess the same during her life, & at her decease to go to my son James Adair, Also to my son Joseph Adair I give & bequeath the remainder of the Continental money that remains in his hands; Also one long posted bedstead & my armed chair; Also I give & bequeath to my son James Adair the one-half of my coopers tools; & other utentials belonging to my trade with the whole of my wearing apparel, & also my chest at the decease of my wife; Also to my son Benjamin Adair, I give & bequeath the other half of my coopers tools & utentials belonging to my trade & also the half of that twenty pounds old currency which he had of me for which he was to have palled a graveyard which he never performed; Also to my daughter Jean Ramage, I give & bequeath my brass seals; Also to my daughter Sarah Adair, I give & bequeath that other half of that twenty pounds old currency which is in the hands of my son Benjamin Adair; Also I give her at the death of my wife, that iron pot that was her mothers with my iron crook; Also I give & bequeath my daughter Mary Owens my biggest iron pot & my course flax hackle at the decease of her mother & to her husband John Owens the one-half of the sawed plank of my loft and floor; & if it shall please God to call me home by this present disease, it is my will that the money he owes me should go to defray my funeral charges; Also to Robert Long my son-in-law, I give & bequeath the other half of plank of my loft & floor; And I do by these presents nominate constitute & appoint & ordain as the executors of this my last will & testament my truly & well beloved sons Joseph & James Adair; & I do hereby revoke & disavow & make null & void every former will by me made ratifying & confirming this & no other to be my last will & testament. In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand & affixed my seal this 9th day of January in the year of our Lord 1788.
s) Joseph Adair
wit: James Montgomery, William Borland, James (J) Greer'
Recording date of the will is not stated. Judging by dates of other estate records recorded on pages preceding and following page 19, the will appears to have been recorded sometime in 1789 or early 1790.
There are no loose probate papers for the estate of Joseph Adair; Sr.
Joseph Adair, Sr., cooper, married in Ireland? Or in Pa. ? a first wife, said to have been Sarah Laferty. Laurens Co. SC records give no proof data for this wife. She was the mother of Joseph's children. Joseph Adair's will was written 9 Jan. 1788 and proved 1789/90, recorded in Will Book A-1, p. 19. The following children are mentioned in the will:
1. Joseph Adair, b. 12 Apr. 1735 (from lineage chart), died 17 Oct. 1812. He was called Joseph Adair, Sr. after the death of his father.
2. James Adair. b. Dec. 1747, d. 23 Mar. 1831 in Indiana. Proved to have been son of Joseph Adair, Sr. cooper, by the Power-of-Attorney issued to his brother, Benjamin Adair. (Deed Bk. G, p. 666.)
3. Benjamin Adair, b. 1752, d, 3 Sept. 1823.
4. Jean/Jane Adair, b. before 1755, married (John ?) Ramage. [Listed in will as Jean Ramage; some misread writing on will as Leah but it is definitely Jean.]
5. Sarah Adair - Single in 1788? Or married to an Adair?"

B. "The exact date of death for the first wife of Joseph Adair, Sr., cooper, in not known. He married (2) sometime after 1767, Susannah, the widow of Daniel Long.
Long Family:
The pension petition of Robert Long, Revo. soldier, states that he was b. c1763 in County Antrim, Ireland. When he was a few months old, the family came to Pa. where they lived until c1765 or 1766, then came to SC. His father died when Robert Long was age 4 (sometime in 1767). Evidently the father Long did not live long enough after coming to SC to complete arrangements for his grant of land....no record of a grant has been located; however, on the plat for land granted in 1771 to one Jacob Jones near Duncan Creek Presbyterian Church, the adjoining land was shown as belonging to Daniel Long. Deed Bk. F, p. 510 shows sale of the Jones land in 1797 and the deed mentions that the adjoining land is "laid out for Daniel Long Dec'D.." (The Deed Abstracts by Miss Nash does not include mention of Daniel Long, but the original deed book does.) Robert Long further stated in his petition that he had a brother who died in 1776.
Daniel Long, b. Ireland. d. in SC c1767, married in Ireland, Susannah - - who died 9 Apr. 1800; age ?. Chn: Samuel Long, b. 1757, d. 1776, age 19. Bur. Duncan Creek.
Robert Long, b. 1763, d. 30 Jan. 1840, age 80(?). Bur. Duncan Creek; Revo. soldier; mar. Elizabeth, widow of John Finney. In his will, Joseph Adair, cooper, called Robert Long his "son-in-law", a Colonial term for "step-son".
Mary Long, b. 1760-62, married John Owens. The wording of the will of Joseph Adair, cooper, in 1788 clearly indicates that the mother of Mary Owens is still living at that date, in which case, she would have to be Susannah. True, Joseph Adair refers to Mary Owens as his "daughter" ..simply neglecting to add "-in-law" meaning "step-daughter".
Previous work done on the family of Mary and John Owens reveals that Mary was born c1760-62...a number of years before the death of Daniel Long and before his widow, Susannah, married Joseph Adair. If, as indicated. Mary Owens is a daughter of Susannah, she could not possibly be a daughter of Joseph Adair.
John and Mary Owens named their first son "Daniel". Robert Long named his first son "Daniel". The families of John and Mary Owens and Robert Long were closely associated through the years ..witnessing wills and deeds for each other and in succeeding generations, becoming involved in guardianships, etc. Neither family seems to have been as closely associated with the Adairs.
The final, most decisive evidence that Mary Owens and Robert Long were siblings is this:
Deed Bk. J, p. 80 - Be it known to all whom it may concern that I, Thomas Murdough, for divers reasons do hereby impower and constitute as my agent to transact my temporal concerns, Robert Long Esq. and do hereby authorize him to sell all my moveable effects and rent my plantation and keep a Just account of my temporal concerns. In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal the 16th day of October A.D. 1807.
test John B. Kennedy Thomas Murdough (Seal)
Thomas Beasley
NB: and at my death that there shall be an equal divide of whatever may be remaining of my property between and Robert Long and Mary Owens.
Oath of Thomas Beasley that he was present and saw said Thos. Murdough sign and seal the within writing for the within purpose mentioned and likewise acknowledge the three lines below as part of the same. 17th April 1809. (S) Thomas Beasley.
Recorded April 22nd 1809 by John Garlington, Register.
(This document as drawn up is the equivalent of a Last Will and Testament.)
Duncan Creek Presbyterian Church cemetery: In memory of Thomas MURDOUGH who died 15th August 1809, aged 81 years.
Thomas Murdough was born 1728. It is quite possible that he was a brother of Susannah Long Adair. There must have been kinship because of the fact that Thomas willed his property equally divided between the two living children of Susannah. Descendants of John and Mary Owens have a dim recollection of the name "Muldrow" in their background. The name could have easily been "Murdough"."

2. The following Thos Murdough could be the brother of Susannah. Laurens County Estate Book A-1, p. 216: "Sale of Robert deceased to Richard Bell December 1792. Pd to Thos Murdough, George Ross, Thos. McCrery, William Gray, John Robertson."

BURIAL:
1. Per http://www.geocities.com/Heartland/Valley/9708/dcem.html, there is a listing in the Duncan Creek Presbyterian Church cemetery that reads: "Adair, Susanna, 1723 - April 9, 1800" 
Murdough, Susannah (I3708)
 
332 BIOGRAPHY:
1. Typescript "Early Adairs of Laurens County, South Carolina. Compiled by Mildred Brownlee; Source Records: Wills; Intestate Estates; Deeds; Court Records; Cemetery Inscriptions. Some dates of birth and death obtained from Lineage Charts. Dates of birth and death subject to correction. Spelling of names subject to correction." [Note that bracketed comments are later additions by other reviewers including myself - Kerry Petersen.]:
"Joseph Adair, b. 12 Apr. 1735 (from a chart), d. 17 Oct. 1812, said in Dr. Adair's History to have married Sarah Dillard but Laurens Co. legal documents prove that the Joseph Adair whose wife was Sarah, was a son of James Adair, Sr., cooper (died before 1796) and his wife, Eleanor.
The only record found to date naming a wife of Joseph Adair, son of Joseph Adair, cooper, is the deed from Book J. p. 50 which documents her as being Elizabeth Adair in 1808. Whether she was a 1st wife, 2nd. wife, etc., we have no positive record. She evidently had died before Joseph Adair wrote his will in 1812 in which he named no wife but "my eight children".
Deed Bk. J, p. 100 - Shows a plat of 340 a. on Miller's Fork of Duncan Creek measured out for Joseph Adair and Elisha Adair. Joseph Adair for $100 paid by Elisha Adair deeds to said Elisha Adair all that tract of land containing 340 a. more or less, part of tract. of land including 800 a.* originally granted to Joseph Adair on 13 Sept. 1774. Said tract is to remain in possession of said Joseph Adair during his natural life and also that of his wife during her natural life so that this conveyance is not to take place or be of fore during the natural life of either the said Joseph Adair or his wife but the land hereby conveyed ie. to remain the property or the said Joseph Adair during his life as tho this conveyance had never been made or entered into. In witness whereof I, the said Joseph Adair, have hereunto set my hand and seal the 15 day of July 1802.
Joseph Adair (seal)
In presence of James Adair, John Hunter
Recorded Aug. 31. 1809.
(Either the Register of Deeds recorded in error the 800 a. figure as a single grant or the 800 a. was intended to represent the accumulation of several smaller grants. No single grant of 800 a. to a Joseph Adair has been located.)
Deed Bk. J, p. 50 - Joseph Adair and Elisha Adair for $350 deed to Alexander Wilkinson, a tract of land containing 150 a. more or less, on the waters of Duncan Creek, on a branch called Miller's Branch beginning at a poplar thence S 74 E 40ch 50 links to a white oak. thence due E 13.70 to a stake, thence N 79 W 24.46. etc., mentioning "meanders of said creek" to the beginning corner. 4 Nov. 1808.
Joseph Adair (Seal), Elisha Adair (Seal)
In presents of Thomas McCrary, Senr., James Adair
South Carolina, Laurens District) I, JA Elmore, one of the Justices of Quorum for the said district, do hereby certify unto all whom it may concern that Elizabeth Adair, Senr., the wife of the within named Joseph Adair, Senior and Elizabeth Adair, Junr., the wife of the within named Elisha Adair did this day appear before me and upon being privately and separately examined by me did voluntarily renounce, release, and forever relinquish unto the within named Alexander Wilkinson all their right and claim of dower of, in, or to the premises within mentioned. 23 Nov. 1808.
her mark Elizabeth E Adair, Elizh. Adair
(L.S.) JA Elmore, J.Q.
Recorded 14 Jan. 1809.
(The 150 a. above is evidently part of the 340 a. which Joseph Adair had previously deeded to Elisha Adair but retained life estate for himself and his wife. In order to insure that there would be no future legal entanglements, both Joseph Adair and Elisha Adair entered into the sale of the land. Their wives, both of whom were named "Elizabeth", released dower rights.)
*It should be noted here that Joseph Adair of above deed was called Sr. after the death of his father. During the period with which we are concerned, the terms "Sr." and rily "son of" but could be nephew, grandson, cousin and sometimes not related by blood. When a man known as "Sr." died, the man of the same name who had previously been known as "Jr." now became "Sr." Very confusing, to say the least. The terms "Sr." and "Jr." were also occasionally used with women's names.
Records of the eight children named in the will of Joseph Adair who died in 1812 begin on page 6. A copy of his will can be found in Will Book D-1, p. 105. Probate records are in Box 3, pkg. 6.
Recorded in Will Book D-l, Page 104, Bundle 65, pkg. 10. Proven January 14, 1813. David Anderson Ordy. Will of Joseph Adair:
"State of South Carolina Laurens District. In the name of God, Amen. Know all men by those presents that I Joseph Adair of tho same State and District are now in good health and in my natural senses at this date and time make this my last will and testament. At my death I bequeath my body to tho tomb, my soul to the almighty God, my maker and created and Jesus Christ my redeemer. Likewise I give and bequeath unto John Adair my son all the land that I layed off for him, that Richard Hollen and John Frier now lives on and one Negro woman named Jude. Likewise, I give and bequeath unto my son James Adair all that part of a tract of land he now lives on lying on the South Side of Little Dunkins Creek bounded on land of Thomas McCrary, Alexander Wilkerson, Elisha Adair and one Negro man named Duke. Likewise, I give and bequeath unto my son Robert Adair the money that he did receive from Alexander Wilkerson for a tract of land made over by me and my son Elisha Adair to said Wilkerson and one Negro girl named Tamer. Likewise I give and bequeath to my son Elisha Adair all that part of land I now live on containing three hundred and seventy five acres more or less, resurvayed by John A. Elmore one Negro boy named Morris, one new waggon and all her harness. Likewise, I give and bequeath unto my grandson Joseph Adair, son of Elisha Adair, one set of silver coat buttons, and one set of silver breeches buttons to my son Robert Adair. I likewise, give and bequeath unto my daughter E1izabeth and her husband John Huston, one Negro girl named Clartis to be thern during there natural life, and at their death to be equally divided among all Elizabeth Huston's children of her natural body. Likewise, I give and bequeath unto my daughter Jean, wife of Thomas Holland. one Negro girl named Dice. Likewise, I give unto my daughter Cassy, wife of Thomas McCrary one Negro woman named Lid. Likewise, I give and bequeath, unto Charity, wife of David Little, one Negro woman named Sarah and all the rest of my perishable property to be equally divided among my eight children of my natural body. I hereby set my hand and seal this 20th of January, 1812. It being the thirty sixth and thirty seventh years of American Independency. And l do here appoint Elisha Adair and John Adair my Executors.
Joseph Adair (Seal)
Witness present: Richard Holland, William Adair, George McCrary
Recorded in Will Book D-1, Page 105. Recorded date not available. Proven Jan, 15, 1813. David Anderson Ordy." 
Elizabeth (I3688)
 
333 BIOGRAPHY:
1. Typescript "Early Adairs of Laurens County, South Carolina. Compiled by Mildred Brownlee; Source Records: Wills; Intestate Estates; Deeds; Court Records; Cemetery Inscriptions. Some dates of birth and death obtained from Lineage Charts. Dates of birth and death subject to correction. Spelling of names subject to correction." [Note that bracketed comments are later additions by other reviewers including myself - Kerry Petersen.]:
"Joseph Adair, Sr., cooper, married in Ireland? Or in Pa. ? a first wife, said to have been Sarah Laferty. Laurens Co. SC records give no proof data for this wife. She was the mother of Joseph's children. Joseph Adair's will was written 9 Jan. 1788 and proved 1789/90, recorded in Will Book A-1, p. 19. The following children are mentioned in the will:
1. Joseph Adair, b. 12 Apr. 1735 (from lineage chart), died 17 Oct. 1812. He was called Joseph Adair, Sr. after the death of his father.
2. James Adair. b. Dec. 1747, d. 23 Mar. 1831 in Indiana. Proved to have been son of Joseph Adair, Sr. cooper, by the Power-of-Attorney issued to his brother, Benjamin Adair. (Deed Bk. G, p. 666.)
3. Benjamin Adair, b. 1752, d, 3 Sept. 1823.
4. Jean/Jane Adair, b. before 1755, married (John ?) Ramage.
5. Sarah Adair - Single in 1788? Or married to an Adair?"

MARRIAGE:
1. Jett Hanna mentions that the marriage of Joseph Adair (Eldare) and Sarah Lafferty (Luffirty)seemed to be recorded in Holy Trinity (Old Swedes) Church in Wilmington, DE which were published in 1890 by the Historical Society of Delaware. Their first son, James was born in 1747 according to his tombstone in Indiana. Jett Hanna also notes that there was also a marriage April 1746, Jane Adare to Hugh Romage and that there may be other Adair marriages in the book, a reprint of which can be ordered from the church at www.oldswedes.org
Old Swedes Church, 606 Church Street, Wilmington, DE 19801; constructed in 1698-1699. This is a place of history. Trinity Parish Web site Church was established as a Swedish Lutheran Church. The church building was constructed in 1698-1699. The church was placed under the jurisdiction of the Protestant Episcopal Church in 1791. It flourishes today as the nation's oldest church building still standing as originally built. It is still in regular use for worship. In recognition of its unique role for worship by numerous communities of immigrants: the Swedes at Fort Christina and the colony of New Sweden; the Dutch in the area centered at New Amstel (now New Castle, DE); the English in New Castle county of the colony of Pennsylvania; and finally Americans from many nations in the state of Delaware. Old Swedes was designated a Registered National Historic Landmark on March 29, 1963. The church and churchyard has sustained 15,000 burials and is active to this day.

2. "The Records of Holy Trinity (Old Swedes) Church, Wilmington, Del., from 1697 to 1773 and Catalogue and Errata of the Records of Holy Trinity (Old Swedes) Church, Wilmington, Del., from 1697-1773, translated from the Original Swedish by Horace Burr, with an Abstract of the English Records from 1773 to 1810." Reprinted, two volumes in one, for Clearfield Company, Inc. by Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, MD, 1999.

3. On file is a photo of the following marriage record. The record is significant since it is the oldest record we have of our Adair family in America. It is the marriage record of Joseph Adare (Adair) and Sarah Lafferty in Sep 1747 in the Old Swede's Church in Wilmington, Delaware. It is strongly presumed (in my case certain) that Joseph was the brother of James Adair who married Eleanor. Together they are in the early records of Laurens Co., SC in the 1760s. James is the father to Joseph who marries Sarah ___ who in turn have Thomas Adair who marries Rebecca Brown. Joseph in the marriage record is shortly thereafter in Pennsylvania in the early 1850's then to South Carolina. The Adair family may have come to America then through Delaware. There is no provable link thus far overseas.
The name Lafferty is interesting because using LDS temple records from the St. George Temple in Utah, James above probably had a son named Lafferty Adair in honor evidently of his sister-in-law. The records show Samuel Jefferson Adair, grandson to Joseph (son of James above), doing a baptism by proxy for the dead 14 Feb 1877. Samuel lists himself as a grand nephew in the baptismal record making Lafferty the son of the original James and ties the two original Laurens Co. brothers Joseph and James by the use of the name Lafferty both as surname and prename.
If you also look at the top middle of the page, you will find a Jane Adair marrying Hugh Ramage. The surname Ramage also occurs in Laurens Co., SC in colonial times associated with the Adairs; however, I have not yet researched a Hugh Ramage specifically but so far find no information on him. We cannot yet connect Jane Adair, but there is a chance she could be a sister - but that is speculation thus far.
The church has website at http://www.oldswedes.org/ It has a very interesting story and is still in service since colonial days.
Cousin Jett Hanna reports: "The church was one of the few in the area that serviced new immigrants-mostly "Scotch Irish" at the time-because it's members were technically dissenters like the Presbyterians since they were Swedish protestants. They got along just fine with Presbyterians who were mostly passing through to somewhere else."
The source is at LDS FHL SLC was "Robert Adair 1770-1845 (An Adair Family History); In Memory of Oscar Lee Adair (1899-1975)," compiled by Shirley Brown Adair, 309 Dartbrook, Rockwall, Texas, 75087, (214) 771-2662. Copyright March 1995. FHL 929.273 Ad11as.
Rebecca Garrett Patterson is the researcher who found the record but date not stated nor her address or email. 
Laferty, Sarah (I3686)
 
334 BIOGRAPHY:
1. Typescript "Early Adairs of Laurens County, South Carolina." Compiled by Mildred Brownlee; Source Records: Wills; Intestate Estates; Deeds; Court Records; Cemetery Inscriptions. Some dates of birth and death obtained from Lineage Charts. Dates of birth and death subject to correction. Spelling of names subject to correction.
"Elizabeth Adair - "to my daughter Elizabeth, and her husband, John Huston. one Negro girl, Clarris".
Elizabeth Adair, b. c1757/58 married (1) c1775, Lt. George Davis, b. 9 Sept. 1752 (date from family chart), died in Revo. War 1781/83. 3 chn:
Mary Davis. b, 14 June 1776, married Robert Cunningham Hanna.
Hannah Davis, b. c1778, married Robert McCord.
George Davis, b. 11 Mar. 1780, died young.
The estate of George Davis was administered in Abbeville Co. in 1784 by Jno. Houston, Joseph and Benjamin Adair. (Abbe. Will Abstracts - Pauline Young, p. 96). Accounts Audited for Revo. service show that the indent for George Davis was paid to John Huston. He also collected the annuity paid to the widow Davis and her children. (These papers at SC Archives, Columbia.) Elizabeth Adair Davis married (2) before 21 Feb. 1784, John Huston/Hughston. The name is spelled differently in various legal documents but grave markers in Spartanburg Co, cemeteries show the name Hughston.
John Hughston died in Spartanburg Co. ~ June 1812; Elizabeth Adair Davis Hughston died 12 Nov. 1822. Children:
Joseph Hughston, b. 20 Sept. 1784.
Elisha Hughston, b. 4 Oct. 1788.
Nancy or Agnes Hughston, b. 4 Aug. 1786, mar. James Wilson. (Nancy Hughston, wife of James Wilson, died ante 1829 leaving 3 chn: Elizabeth Wilson, John Wilson, Jr., Benjamin Wilson.)
Jane Hughston, b. 6 May 1791.
John Farmer Hughston, b. 13 July 1793.
Archibald Hughston, b. 13 July, 1795.
Casey Hughston, b 5 Mar. 1798.
Leroy Hughston, b. 22 May 1800.
Elizabeth A. Hughston, b. 25 Dec. 1802.
These two mentioned in Laurens Co, Court Record. No dates available.
Mary Hughston)
Hannah Hughston)"

2. "Compensation for Revolutionary Service.. South Carolina House of Representatives-Annuities, Claims, and Pension Reports. 1787 Jany 17 pd. Eliz'h Adair Hutson, late wid. of George Davis for self and 3 children. (Note: Original papers in SC Archives show that John Huston collected the Indent for Lt. George Davis and also the annuities for Elizabeth and her chn.)"

3. James Williams Petition listing the Adair family Patriots. Note that Thomas Adair's parents are the ones listed as number 4 (Joseph and Sarah) and his grandparents are number 3 (James and Eleanor). Most of the other Adairs were brothers or cousins. The petition has come to me from Mildred Brownlee's manuscript "Early Adairs of Laurens County, South Carolina" and also from the "South Carolina Magazine of Ancestral Research," vol. 15, p. 32. James Williams was one of the most renown Patriots of the Laurens area and this listing of signers of the petition of the area gives us a good source of patriots also associated with him. Col. James Williams and Capt. Josiah Greer were also military leaders of many of these same individuals during the 1778 American invasion of British East Florida per the source of Doctor George Ross' medical reimbursement papers quoted in this database under Rebecca Montgomery's notes. This petition typescript is item #5767, Manuscript Dept., Wm. M. Perkins Library at Duke University, Durham NC. Submitted by Mrs. Mary Ann McCrary and published with permission of the Manuscript Dept. This petition pre-dates the Battle of Kings Mountain (7 Oct 1780), as Col. James Williams was killed at that time. [NB: a second version of the petition was located in the South Carolina Library in 1999 and the gaps in the Duke University petition were filled in as indicated by brackets.] {Any notes or comments added by me are in these brackets.}
"To his Excellen[cy John Rutledge, E]sq. Governor & Commander in Chief in & [over th]e state of South Carolina, the Honourable the privy Counsel, the Honourable the Senate & House of Representatives in General Assembly.
Whereas we (the zealous friends to our country, and to all who love and distinguish themselves in her cause) do understand & are exceeding sorry to hear that there are false & [evilly designing] Accusations either lying on or about to shortly be laid against James Williams, our present Colonel in & over Little River Regiment, and designed (as we believe) by the private Enemies of our country to deprive us of so worthy a friend of his Country in general a good officer to us in particular & thereby do a very singular Piece of Service to the common enemies of America. We do briefly & anxiously remonstrate this: that we experimentally know Colo. James Williams to have been a zealous Patriot from the commencement of the America contest with Briten; and to have always stood foremost in every occasion when called upon to the defence of his country. We do further declare that we have never known said Colo. [Jas.].Williams to distress any individuals in the Regiment who voluntarily & judiciously, when legally called upon and commanded to the field, have turned out in the Defence if their Native Rights & Privileges together with that of their Country; & we do avow it from our knowledge, that whensoever Colo. Jas. Williams either directly or indirectly executed any distressing things, it was upon the stubborn & refractory, whose practices of obstinacy declare them inimical to their country: & and that this he did, as being last promissing Effort to reduce them to the dutiful obedience of loyal & fellow citizens. Without delaying you; we your humble Petitioners do earnestly beg that you will hear this our faithful Remonstrance & proceed with our respected Colo. James Williams & all such unjust & disaffected Clamours as may come before you against him, as your superior Judgements may direct: only begging leave to conclude with this one Remark, that doubtless you know that such clamours are frequently the necessary Effect of Disaffection to the Country.
[Signed:] Robt. McCrery Lt. Colo.; George Davis, Capt.; Matthew McCrar[e]y, Lt.; George Young; Matthew Cunningham; Andrew McCrary; James Greer; [James Dillard]; [John Owens]; [Samuel Ewing]; [William Davis]; [Absolom Filby]; [John McCrary Sener]; [John McCrary Juner]; [Robert Long]; [Matthew McCrary]; [William Bean]; [John Williams J.P {note J.P. is crossed out}]; [Wm. Arthur Capt.]; Josiah Greer; Joseph Ramage; John Robinson; John Bourland; John Greer Juner; Isaac Adair; Jms. Adair; [Thos McCrery J.P.]; [James Ones]; [Andrew Ones]; [John Watson]; [Hughes Manford (?)]; [David Watson]; [Isaac Greer]; [James Ralley]; [John Ramage]; [John Glenn]; [John Jones (M L. (?)]; Henry Atwood; James Adair, Sr.; Joseph Adair Jr.; Joseph Adair; Benjamin Adair; Joseph Adair Sr.; James Adair Jr., son of James; [William Adair]; [John Finney]; [John Adair]; [John Adair Sener]; [James Craige]; [William Craig]; [James Howerton]; [Phillip Whitten]; [John Gray]; [John Greer]; [James Montgomery]; Thomas Ewing; William Blake; James Gamble; [Edward Stapleton]; [John Gamble]; [William Huddleston]; [James Huddleston]; [Alexander Adair]; [Benjamin Willson]; [Benja. Goodman]; [Daniel Williams]
Suggested identification of the Adairs who signed this petition:
1. Isaac Adair - Killed in Apr. 1781, left widow, Ruth.
2. Jms. Adair - b. 1747, son of' Joseph Adair, Sr.; mar. Rebecca Montgomery.
3. James Adair, Sr. - died before 1796; wife, Eleanor.
4. Joseph Adair, Jr. - Son of above James & Eleanor; wife Sarah.
5. Joseph Adair - died 1812; son of Joseph Adair, Sr.
6. Benjamin Adair - died 1823; son of Joseph Adair, Sr.; wife Nancy.
7. Joseph Adair, Sr. - died 1789-90; wife: Susannah.
8. James Adair, Jr., son of James - son of James Adair & wife Eleanor; died 1818, wife Hannah.
9. William Adair - died 1780-84. Estate administered 1784, Abbe. Wills, p. 10.
10. John Adair - died 1813 in Ga., wife Jane; son of Joseph Adair; grandson of Joseph Adair, Sr.
11. John Adair, Sr. - Killed in 1782, wife Sarah. Abbe. Wills, p. 10. Probable son of Joseph Adair, Sr. {Kerry's note: or maybe James Adair, Sr.}
12. Alexander Adair - Scotch-Irish immigrant in 1767? See Protestant Immigrants to SC - Janie Revill, p. 74.
{Note the above suggestions are as provided by Mildred Brownlee. I make the following additions of individuals related to the Adairs:
13. James Gamble - father of William Gamble who marries Martha Adair, daughter of James Adair who was son of James Adair, Sr., the original settler and cooper.
14. Robert Long - Son of Susannah Murdough from her first marriage before she married Joseph Adair the cooper.
15. John Owens - Husband of Mary Long. Mary was the sister of Robert Long and a daughter of Susannah Murdough from her first marriage before Joseph Adair.
16. John Ramage - Husband to Jean or Jane Adair, the daughter of Joseph Adair the cooper and his first wife Sarah Laferty.
17. George Davis - Died 1781- 1783. First husband to Elizabeth Adair, daughter of Joseph Adair, Jr. and Elizabeth ___.
18. James Montgomery - Father to Rebecca who married James Adair, the saddler and son of Joseph Adair the cooper. James' other daughter Isabella married Dr. George Ross who was a physician with many of the above in their East Florida expedition in the early days of the Rev. War.
19. John Jones - There were two John Jones in the area at the time. One was the husband of Hannah Adair, daughter of James and Eleanor Adair. Unsure which John Jones this may be. Our John Jones died before Sep 1788." 
Davis, George (I3733)
 
335 BIOGRAPHY:
1. Typescript "Early Adairs of Laurens County, South Carolina." Compiled by Mildred Brownlee; Source Records: Wills; Intestate Estates; Deeds; Court Records; Cemetery Inscriptions. Some dates of birth and death obtained from Lineage Charts. Dates of birth and death subject to correction. Spelling of names subject to correction. [Note that bracketed comments are later additions by other reviewers including myself - Kerry Petersen.]
A. "James Adair - "to son, James Adair, the tract of land he now lives on, lying on the S side of Little Duncan Creek. add. Thos. McCrary. Alexander Wilkerson, & Elisha Adair; also a Negro man Duke."
Deed Bk. K, p. 235 - 6 Jan. 1819, James Adair to Wm. Gamble, 135 a. on Miller's Fork, part of an original grant to Joseph Adair, adj. James Howerton and land formerly belonging to Elisha Adair. Release of dower by Rebecca Adair. (Here is another James Adair whose wife was named Rebecca...maiden name not known.)
Nothing further of this James Adair has been found in Laurens Co. records. In 1823, Elisha Adair owned a slave Duke. Same Duke?" 
Rebecca (I3732)
 
336 BIOGRAPHY:
1. Typescript "Early Adairs of Laurens County, South Carolina." Compiled by Mildred Brownlee; Source Records: Wills; Intestate Estates; Deeds; Court Records; Cemetery Inscriptions. Some dates of birth and death obtained from Lineage Charts. Dates of birth and death subject to correction. Spelling of names subject to correction. [Note that bracketed comments are later additions by other reviewers including myself - Kerry Petersen.]
A. "There was a William Adair who evidently died single sometime between 1780 and 1784 (Abbey. Wills, p. 10-11) and also an Isaac Adair who was killed in the Revolution in 1781. (Annuity Claim). His widow Ruth (Greer?), had moved to Ga. by 1799. (Deed Bk, F, p. 471). Both these men were of the Duncan Creek area; both signed the Williams Petition in 1780 and both would have been born c1764 or before."

B. "Isaac Adair of Duncan Creek area signed the Williams petition in 1780; was killed in the Revo War for which his widow, Ruth Adair was paid an annuity from the State.
"Deed Bk. B, p. 416 - 22 Aug. 1788, John Greer, Sr. to Ruth Adair, 150 a. on Duncan Creek, part of a 300 a. tract where said John Greer now lives, adj. land laid out to Joseph Greer and Bazel Prather. Wit: John Owins, Josiah Greer, John Robinson.
"Deed Bk. F, p. 471 - 17 Aug. 1799, James Adair, planter, by Power of Attorney for Ruth Adair of the State of Ga., to Bazel Prather, blacksmith, 150 a. on Duncan Cr. being half of a tract containing 300 ac on the northernmost side of Duncan Creek, bound to the SE on sd. creek & then vacant on all other sides when granted to John Greer, 17 Mar. 1756 (?? Land grant map shows 1774). Wit: John Daniel Kern, Obidiah Roberts, Samuel Bishop, Jr.
"Nothing is known as to parents of Isaac Adair and names of his children, if any, are not known."

C. "Compensation for Revolutionary Service.. South Carolina House of Representatives-Annuities, Claims, and Pension Reports.
178[6] Feb. 10 pd. Ruth Adair, one years annuity[, 8.15.]
178[5] Sept. 21 pd. Ruth Adair, widow of Isaac, killed in Apr'l '81, [8.15.]"
[Note: Brownlee had the years wrong showing the Feb. annuity in 1785 and Sept.'s in 1786; it should be reversed as I have corrected it above. I also added the amount. Source: "The South Carolina Magazine of Ancestral Research," vol. 1, pp. 69, 156, which also prefaces the list with the following comment: "Compensation for Revolutionary Service. The Following records are preserved in their original form at the South Carolina Archives. They are entitled 'House of Representatives / Annuities, Claims, and Pension Reports,' and although they are unsigned, they evidently were transmitted by the State Treasurer to the House of Representatives."]

2. FHL film 446460, Patron Research Dept. film for Marie G. Sheranian: "Land grants recorded at Clerk's Office, Laurens, S.C.:
June 30, 1789, Ruth Adair from John Greer Sr, 100 A. on Duncan's creek, Bk B, p. 416.
Aug 13, 1788, Ruth Adair from John Greer Sr, 150 A. on Duncan's creek, Bk B, p. 417."

3. Ancestry.com "Georgia Tax Index, 1789-1799 Record," lists: "Ruth Adair, Jackson County, year 1799, District Tuttle, p. 16."

4. Excerpts of "Adairs" from the book "Laurens County South Carolina - Minutes of the County Court, 1786-1789," by Brent H. Holcomb, SCMar, Columbia, South Carolina, 2004. The book notes: "This is a record that has only been recently found after being lost for so many years. It is incomplete missing the first 54 pages, pages 103-126, and an unknown number of pages at the end of the volume. There is at least one other volume, still missing, covering the years 1790-1799."
It also notes: "Laurens County was formed in 1785 as a county of Ninety Six District. In that year justices of the peace were elected by the General Assembly to be administrators of the county courts. Within the pages of these court minutes are small court cases, lists of deeds presented to be recorded, applications for administrations on estates and wills proved (beginning in 1787), jury lists, petitions of various kinds, appointments for various offices, apprenticeships, estray animals tolled, and other items. The cases heard for debt or damages could not exceed £50, and cases heard for personal damages could not exceed £20. Criminal cases heard could not call for the loss of life or corporal punishment. Larger court cases were heard in the district courts, such as Ninety-Six."
The records have several listings for the known Adair family. There is also mention of Ruth Adair (Ruth: a widow of Isaac Adair who died in 1781 in the Rev. War and whose maiden name was probably Grier/Greer). The quotation:
Pg. 179, 11 Sep 1787: A Bond from John Grier to Ruth Adair Conditioned to make a sufficient right & Title to 150 acres of land proven in open court by James Montgomery and James Grier and ordered to be Recorded." 
Greer, Ruth (I3707)
 
337 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I3699)
 
338 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I3692)
 
339 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I3465)
 
340 BIOGRAPHY:
1. Vestervig parish records as observed in Denmark by Chris Petersen, C.121, nr2, page 27.States:"Inger Nielsdatter, born: 31 marts 1734 in Randrup in Vestervig parish. Father: Niels Willadsen."

2. Last name also known as Willadzen.

BIRTH:
1. From records observed by Chris Petersen in Denmark with translation copy in files of Kerry Petersen:Vestervig church book C121 nr 1. pg. 47 Niels Willadzen, born 5 post trinitatis 1698 in randrup, Vestervig parish, father: Willadz Nielsen, mother: Inger Jensdatter. (5 post is interpreted by Kerry as 5 days after holy movable feast day of trinitatis which was on 19 June in 1698 making this 24 Jun 1698.)

SOURCES_MISC:
1. Ordinance Index 25 Jun 1999. 
Villardsen or Willadsen, Niels (I1721)
 
341 BIOGRAPHY:
1. Viborg, Denmark Regional Archives; Skyum parish records; microfiche C116.1 plate 3 page 140; confirmation in 1774 in Skyum church.

CHRISTENING:
1. Viborg, Denmark Regional Archives; Skyum parish records; microfiche C116.1 plate 1 page ?; sponsors are Anders Dahl, Mads Knakkergaard, the mother of the mother in Silstrup (Tilsted Parish). 
Pedersdatter, Anna (I2866)
 
342 BIOGRAPHY:
1. Viborg, Denmark Regional Archives; Skyum parish records; microfiche C116.1 plate 3 page 140; Confirmation in Skyum parish in 1770.

CHRISTENING:
1. Viborg, Denmark Regional Archives; Skyum parish records; microfiche C116.1 plate 1 page ?; sponsors are Niels Knakkergaard, Peder Andersen, Anders Pedersen, Catharina Dybdal, and Bodil Mouridtzdatter. 
Pedersdatter, Dorthea (I2864)
 
343 BIOGRAPHY:
1. Was a childhood sweetheart of her husband.

2. LDS Church censuses:
a. May 1 to 13, 1950 for Lorin Farr Ward of Ben Lomond Stake: Address: 999 Canyon Road, previously of Terrace 1st Ward of Weber Stake:
Charles Henry, Deacon, b. 17 Jul 1917, Ogden.
Ruth McLean, 26 Nov 1917, Ogden.
Kenneth Lee, 14 Sep 1940, Ogden.
Suzan, 24 Oct 1942, Ogden.
Bonnie, 25 Oct 1944, Ogden.
B. May 2 to 14, 1955 Lorin Farr Ward of Lorin Farr Stake, 879 16th, previously of Ogden 1st Ward of Weber Stake:
Charles Henry (Jack), Deacon, b. 17 Jul 1917, Ogden.
Ruth McLean, 26 Nov 1917, Ogden.
Kenneth Lee, 14 Sep 1940, Ogden.
Suzan, 24 Oct 1942, Ogden.
Bonnie, 25 Oct 1944, Ogden.
Charles Henry, 21 Mar 1953.
C. 1960 FHL film 471495, 6 May 1960, 879 16th St., Lorin Farr Ward, Lorin Farr Stake, all born in Ogden, records previously part of Ogden 1st Ward of the Weber Stake residing at 5 Victory Rd.:
Charles Henry Hales, b. 17 Jul 1917.
Ruth McLean, b. 26 Nov 1917.
Suzan Hales, b. 24 Oct 1942.
Bonnie Hales, b. 25 Oct 1944.
Charles Henry Hales, 21 Mar 1953.

3. Parents are Levi Clarence McLean and Clarrisa May Cafferty.

4. Censuses:
1940 US: Ogden 2nd Ward, Weber, Utah, 879 16th Street, #309, next door to Ruth's parents Levi and Clarica McLean, 1 Apr 1940:
Charles H. Hales, 22, UT, knife setter at sugar mill.
Ruth M., wife, 22, UT.

OBITUARY:
1. Ogden, Utah newspaper: "Ruth M. Hales. Clinton - Ruth McLean Hales left this earth on Tuesday, April 5, 2005, with the same dignity and grace as she lived each day. She was born November 26, 1917, in Ogden, Utah to Levi C. and Clarissa May McLean. She was the ninth of ten children and her sister, Verda Larsen of Alexandria, Virginia, survives her. Ruth married Charles H. "Jack" Hales on November 30, 1937, and from that union they had four children: Kenneth (Linda) Hales, Boise, ID; Suzan (Robert) Meyer, North Ogden; Bonnie (Lyle) Larson, Roy; Charles (Sally) Hales, Los Alamos, NM.; six grandchildren, Roger Hales, Scott Hales, Kathy Judd, Crissy Muse, Mike Larson, Dave Larson and 16 great-grandchildren. Ruth was preceded in death by her husband Jack, her first born Ken, her parents, six brothers and two sisters. Our entire family wishes to thank the following individuals and organizations for their love, patience and care for our Mother: Dr. Nancy Zega and her staff Diane and Joann; the Directors and Staff of Country Pines Assisted Living and IHC Hospice.
Remember me when flowers bloom
Early in the spring
Remember me on sunny days
In the fun that summer brings
Remember me in the fall
As you walk through the leaves of gold
And in wintertime - remember me
In the stories that are told
But most of all remember
Each day - right from the start
I will be forever near
For I lived within your heart
- Judith Karen Bulock
Funeral services will be held Monday at 11 a.m. at Lindquist's Ogden Mortuary, 3408 Washington Blvd. Friends may call at the mortuary on Sunday from 6 to 8 p.m. and Monday 10 to 10:45 a.m. Interment, Ogden City Cemetery. Email condolences to the family at lom@lindquistmortuary.com."
(Photo of Ruth and her husband Jack accompanies the obituary.)

SOURCES_MISC:
1. Per www.hales.org 21 Dec 2002.

2. The book: "The Ebenezer Hanks Story," author Kerry William Bate; 1982; Address: Kerry Bate, 543 East 600 South, SLC, UT, 84 102. 
McLean, Ruth (I132)
 
344 BIOGRAPHY:
1. Was a general inspector of airports and ended up in Irkutsk to retire. 
Skornyakov, Ivan (I3484)
 
345 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I113)
 
346 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I3489)
 
347 BIOGRAPHY:
1.This individual is listed as a witness at the christening of his nephew, Christen Nielsen, son of Niels Villardsen in 1736.

SOURCES_MISC:
1. Ordinance Index 25 Jun 1999. 
Villardsen or Willadsen, Mads (I2913)
 
348 BIOGRAPHY:
1. "Extremely smart, excellent chess player." Musha Vavchenko.

2. Alternate name: Tséfanio Joam HERZENBERG. See http://gw.geneanet.org/chippaux1?lang=en&pz=christiane+marcelle&nz=irle&ocz=0&p=tsefanio+joam&n=herzenberg&oc=0&type=tree

3. The following undated paper was written late 1969 in Nice, France by Catherine Werblovsky Olympieff (also known as Ekaterina Werblovskaya Olympieva) at the request of Patrick Landau through his aunt Alice Nikitina. Patrick's father, Vladimir Landau, even though he was Catherine's cousin, had less knowledge on the family then Catherine. Catherine was the granddaughter of Edouard and Rebecca Herzenberg. The letter was written a couple of years before Catherine's death after she entered into an assisted care facility in Nice. The paper was recently found among personal items previously gathered about 1969 by her daughter Irene Nadia de Lanskoy Petersen. Portions of the letter were written in three languages: English, French, and Russian. Irene, in transcribing the letter, notes that the letter was hard to follow and to make sense of. Irene's transcription dated 31 Jul 2007 with her notes added in [ ].
"What concerns the father and mother of our mother's: Mother's father: Edouard Ocipovitch Herzenberg [or Gerzenberg] Edward son of Joseph Herzenberg born: in Mitava [or Mittau] not far ___, Baltic Provinces - not far from Riga. He died at 76 years of age (had diabetes and malaria) from lung congestion after flu. His wife was his cousin.
Rebecca Herzenberg also married a first cousin. I am not sure of the name of her father; she died in Moscow when I was 6 years old (70 years ago). [Death would be approximately 1899?]
They were probably married in Mitawa and came to Moscow young, because all their children were born in Moscow. The eldest 1) Elizabeth 2) Sonja [or Sonia] (Sofia) mother of Manja or Mania who now lives in Moscow, who had a sister Nadja or Nadia who was born in Moscow. Sonia's husband was Adolf Schneider - son of Aaron Schneider - who had 3 more sons: Nicolas, Alexander, Serge and a daughter Elizabeth Schneider. She got married with Martin Behr (English nationality); they had two children and lived in Moscow. Mrs. Elizabeth Behr died in London (after the Russian Revolution she lived in France, later in England.) Her brother Adolf Schneider was a brother-in-law of our mother's of course.) [This is a repeat of the above.] The Behrs had 2 children. Elisabeth Behr died in London (probably her husband Martin Behr died before.) Mrs. Behr's daughter Olga died in London about a year ago [1968-69?], her brother George Behr still lives in London is married (has 1 daughter who is married too and has 2 boys, 8 and 7.
So my mother Elisabeth was the eldest daughter of Edward and Rebecca Herzenberg born in Moscow like her sister Sonia, the next sister Flora born in Moscow. Flora, married Joseph Offenbacher, had one son Lotar (my first cousin as well as yours). She, her husband, and son died in Germany during the war of Hitler (son Lothar). [Irene notes that another family account says that Lothar committed suicide on account of the war.] [His father] Joseph Offenbacher had an older brother Vasily [William or Wilhelm] Offenbacher who married a cousin of our mother's - Fanny, daughter of Abra[ha]m (whom all children of Edward Herzenberg used to call Uncle Abraham.) He was the husband of Grandfather Edward Herzenberg's sister Theresa. His family name was also like all: Herzenberg. Theresa Herzenberg had many children - daughter Fanny, sons Ludwig, Harry, and 2 other sons and another daughter Sophia married to another Herzenberg (all those marriages were between cousins) who had three children, Robby (Robert) who lives in Sweden and 2 daughters Clara and Roberta (died in Riga - Bolshevik Revolution). [I am not sure if Clara and Roberta are correct for this family grouping.] After Flora Herzenberg, the 4th daughter was my Aunt Anjuta [Anna Herzenberg-Landau]. Then there was another one Genga (Eugenie) married Harry Taube from Riga - were killed by Hitler's army. She was the 5th daughter of Edward Herzenberg. The 6th was Lilja [Lilia] (1st wife of Uncle Max Landau - died in Davos, Switzerland from TB.) Then was another daughter Milja, died very young (she was the 7th daughter). The youngest daughter Tonya [Tonia] died in Moscow. Then there were two brothers, the oldest Ivan (John) married a French young girl from Mussidan, Dordogne, France. She was daughter of the Mayor of that town. Died in the north of Russia where - she was sent sick and was sent with her to Mourmansk (north of Russia). Uncle Vanja's [Vania, Ivan, John all same name wife Lydia died there [note her maiden name was Lydie Buisson]. Uncle Vanja died too in Bolshevik Revolution. Their 3 children: Micha (Michel) died probably in Moscow; his brother Andrei (Andre) Herzenberg and Suzanne Hindzee (Herzenberg) - 1st husband (French) Volant. She has a daughter in Toronto married in Toronto (Alja [or Alice Nikitina] knew her) who has two children, boy and girl. The father's family name is A. [Albert?] Statter - wife Lydie (Suzanne's daughter) - son Albert. [Irene's note: last known address was 33 Stonegate Road, Toronto, Canada, M8Y-1V8; phone 416-251-6295.]
There was yet other families related to us through our mother's. It was a well known dentist. His name was Kovarsky. His wife was the cousin of our mother's. They had a lot of children - 3 brothers Misha (Michael), Leva (Leon), 2 daughters Choura (Alexandra). Chura who now is same age as Suzanne [Herzenberg Hindzee] - the only one alive. I forget the name of the eldest brother deceased. Manja (Mania) in Moscow knows more about that family. What was the name of the mother cousin of our mother's-probably it was yet another of the Herzenberg family. As Alja [Alice Nikitina] will be going to Moscow she will be able to find out more form Manja [Mania]. Then there was yet another family related to the wife of our grandfather through the husband or wife Idelson. There was a girl Lisa Idelson and her brother. I think that Manja must know something about them. They lived in Moscow. I used to go see them with my mother when I was about 8 or 10 years old.
Now George Behr has written from London thanking me for my sympathy condolences on account of the death of his sister Olga Behr. She must have been older than 78 years. he thought that his aunt on his father's side, Nina Karlovna died in Moscow, as well as his cousin Leija, but I think it is relatives on the side of his father Bahr, and the cousin is perhaps of the Schneider family (it is possible that the cousin is still living). All these people lived in Moscow.
Now what concerns the Packschwer family. The one that came to see you with the Vietnamese wife has passed away. His name was Julien Packschwer born in Vitebesk, Russia. He was 72. His younger brother Saveijn (Sahva) engineer in London named himself Packshaw, died in England 3 weeks before Julien, leaving a widow (2nd marriage) and 2 children. It was the death of his younger brother that caused reaction on Julien Packshwer. He died 3 weeks after him. He was found on a street in Nice, France with a cerebral hemorrhage-fell in the street. Police took him to the hospital St. Rock where he died at 19 hours in the evening and remained in a coma. His car 2 CV (small) stayed in the parking where he had left it. It was only his Vietnamese wife [Mado] returning from Saigon 1 month after his death that was able to retrieve that car from the parking. Yet another day or two, it would have been impounded. But as it was the widow herself then came. They did not charge her anything. But as the car was her husband's-she has to wait by inheritance law to be able to sell it and divide up in 4 parts to his children. The eldest son of another marriage Leon is an eye doctor in Paris, then 3 other children. Oldest Robert in Montreal, CA; another son in ___ was in the navy for 3 years. The oldest was in the Air force, married a girl from Morocco - they are going to have a child soon. The daughter Irene married, has a little boy, the husband is serving in the military; they live in Cayrons near Vence, France in the Packshwer house. The widow/mother Mado inherited ¼ of the sum, the children ¾ divided in 4 for each of the 4 children. Through a real estate in Vence, Julien's house of 1000 sq. meters is worth 18 million francs. If the children keep the house, they will in turn need to give on fourth of the cost to the widow who also has the right to half of his monthly pension of 30,000 francs. She came to see me day before yesterday and told me all these details. So here you have it-the relatives. The mother of the Packshwer father was 1st cousin of our mother's through the daughter of the sister of our grandfather Edward Herzenberg maiden name Theresa Herzenberg died in Nice, born I think in Mitawa [Mitau], Baltic Provinces. She was buried with her husband in Nice at the Caucade cemetery.
Now I add what George Behr wrote from London that his wife Janet has seen Aunt Anjuta [Anna Herzenberg] in Monte Carlo, then he wrote about his cousin in Moscow who he thinks has passed away (he is going to find out about it from Manja-he asked their address in Monaco). She was the daughter of the oldest sister Polina Aronovna of his mother. Here is what concerns that family... [Balance of letter missing]."

MARRIAGE:
1. Ancestry.com's "Publications des bans de mariage de Paris et Ancienne Seine, 1860 à 1902":
A. Anne Lydie Virginie Buisson, 28 Bd. 9'ereire, bann date 9 Jul 1899, father Jean Célestin Buisson, mother: Anne Nancy Lautrette, spouse: Stefanio Joann Herzenberg.
B. Stefanio Joann, Moscow, Russia, father: Edouard Issipovitch; mother: Rebecca Issipovna, spouse: Anne Lydie Virginie Buisson, bann date 9 Jul 1899.

2. http://gw.geneanet.org/chippaux1?lang=en&pz=christiane+marcelle&nz=irle&ocz=0&p=anne+lydie+virginie&n=buisson&oc=0&type=tree accessed 3 May 2016 gives date as 20 Jul 1899. Same contributor provided an image to me by email of the marriage contract which was uploaded to Family Search 7 May 2016. The information abstracted in the record shows:
Marriage dated 20 Jul 1899 at the Mairie (City Hall) of Paris 172 (75017) - Paris - Ile-de-France - France.
Tsefanio Joam Herzenberg, b. 25 Jan 1871 at Moscow, Russia, living there, adult son of Edouard Ossipovitch Herzenberg, merchant at Moscow, and Rebecca Ossipovna his deceased wife. The middle names of the parents mean either son or daughter of Joseph depending on the gender.
Anne Lydie Virginie Buisson, b. 29 Sep 1874 at Limeuil (Dordogne) without profession, residing at 28 Boulevard Péreire, adult dau. of Jean Célestin Buisson, deceased, and of Anne Nancy Lautrette his widow, without profession, residing at Mussidan (Dordogne).
The age of the married couple as well as publication of the forthcoming marriage were attested to by notaries and civil authorities in both Moscow and Dordogne. The couple signs the marriage record as L. Buisson and Juan Herzenberg. The bride's mother signs as N. Buisson. Jean Buisson, 29, brother, residing at the same location as Lydie is also mentioned. Other witnesses are mentioned but none of the names are family.

MISC_SOURCES:
1. http://gw.geneanet.org/chippaux1?lang=en&pz=christiane+marcelle&nz=irle&ocz=0&p=anne+lydie+virginie&n=buisson&oc=0&type=tree accessed 3 May 2016. 
Herzenberg, Stephan Ivan or John (I3468)
 
349 BIOGRAPHY:
1. According to Archive Record family group sheet for father as submitted by Mrs. Wanda Roos, last name also known as Smed (blacksmith). Also found as witness at Enevold Christensen's christening in 1838: "Smallholder Johannes Jensen of Visby".

CHRISTENING:
1. FHL film # 053071; Hurup Parish Record, 1784 - 1868

2. Viborg, Denmark Regional Archives; Hurup Parish Records; Microfiche C122.1, plate 1, page 23b. Sponsors: Ane Kirstine Jensdatter carried the Child; Mads Sorensen; Jens Bisgaard; Jacob Michelsen; Christensen of (?) Knudtoft. Christened at home 9 Sep 1803 and at the church 21 Oct 1803.

DEATH:
1. Variant may be 16 Oct 1882 at Visby, Thisted, Denmark.

SOURCES_MISC:
1. Per gedcom dated 6 Jan 1999 of Wayne Westergard, 785 W 1300 South, Woods Cross, Utah 84087 (801) 295-2906. 
Jensen, Johannes (I1623)
 
350 BIOGRAPHY:
1. Died as an infant. She was about two years old. This is written in her sister's own hand on a family group sheet that Irene Petersen has. 
Werblowsky, Natalie (I243)
 

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