Philip Frederick

Male 1734 - 1804  (69 years)


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  • Name Philip Frederick 
    Born 26 Aug 1734  of, Palatinate, Germany Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    Died From 7 May 1804 to 6 Nov 1804  Florida, Montgomery, New York, United States Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID I2140  Petersen-de Lanskoy
    Last Modified 17 Jan 2015 

    Father Johan Peter Frederick,   b. Abt 1711, of, Palatinate, Germany Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Aft 1766, of Mohawk Township (now Florida), Tryon (now Montgomery), New York, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 56 years) 
    Mother Anna Phronica or Veronica,   b. Abt 1715, of, Palatinate, Germany Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Married Bef 1734  of, Palatinate, Germany Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Family ID F627  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 1 Maria Sophia Saltz,   b. Abt 1731, of Mill Point, Albany (now Montgomery), New York, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Bef 1804, of Florida, Montgomery, New York, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 72 years) 
    Married 11 Nov 1752  High and Low Dutch Reformed Congregation, Schoharie, Schoharie, New York, United States Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
     1. Peter Frederick,   b. Warrensbush (now Florida), Albany (now Montgomery), New York, United States. Find all individuals with events at this location
    +2. Francis or Frans Frederick,   b. 26 Aug 1753, Warrensbush (now Florida), Albany (now Montgomery), New York, United States. Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Aft 1833, of Danube, Herkimer, New York, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age > 81 years)
     3. Hannah Maria Frederick,   c. 21 Jan 1755, Warrensbush (now Florida), Albany (now Montgomery), New York, United States. Find all individuals with events at this location
     4. Eva or Eve Frederick,   b. 8 Aug 1756, Warrensbush (now Florida), Albany (now Montgomery), New York, United States. Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1 Nov 1830, Glen Township, Montgomery, New York, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 74 years)
     5. Margarita or Margrethe Peggy Frederick,   b. 9 Oct 1758, Warrensbush (now Florida), Albany (now Montgomery), New York, United States. Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 17 Jul 1837, Mendon Township, Monroe, New York, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 78 years)
     6. Magdalena or Lanoah or Lena Frederick,   b. 11 Jun 1760, Warrensbush (now Florida), Albany (now Montgomery), New York, United States. Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 30 Jul 1840, Troy, Albany, New York, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 80 years)
     7. Maria Magdalena Frederick,   c. 13 Sep 1761, Caughnawaga (now Fonda), Albany (now Montgomery), New York, United States. Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Abt 1845, of Springfield, Otsego, New York, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 83 years)
     8. Catrina or Caterina or Catharina Frederick,   b. 13 May 1764, Warrensbush (now Florida), Albany (now Montgomery), New York, United States. Find all individuals with events at this location
     9. Elizabeth Frederick,   b. Abt 1765, Warrensbush (now Florida), Albany (now Montgomery), New York, United States. Find all individuals with events at this location
     10. Sophia Frederick,   b. 12 Sep 1766, Warrensbush (now Florida), Albany (now Montgomery), New York, United States. Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 18 Jun 1861, Camden, Oneida, New York, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 94 years)
    Last Modified 22 Oct 2015 
    Family ID F624  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 2 Sarah,   d. Aft 1804, of Florida, Montgomery, New York, United States Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Married Bef 1804  of Florida, Montgomery, New York, United States Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Last Modified 22 Oct 2015 
    Family ID F1122  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Notes 
    • RESEARCH_NOTES:
      1. Censuses:
      1790 US: http://www.rootsweb.com/~nyherkim/census/mohawk1790.html; 1790 Census, Montgomery County, MohawkTown (it would appear that Philip was relatively prosperous with two "slaves" working with him presumably at his mill):
      1st No.-Free white males over 16 years 2nd No.-Free white males under 16 years 3rd No.-Free white females 4th No.-All other free persons 5th No.-Slaves
      *illegible
      Brittain, Abraham - 1-2-5-0-0 [Abraham Brinton?] Frederick, Francis - 1-3-3-0-0 Frederick, Peter - 1-3-5-0-0 Frederick, Philip - 1-0-1-0-2
      Marlet, Michael - 1-1-4-0-0 Mower, Hendrick - 1-1-1-0-0
      VanHorn, Cornelius - 2-2-5-0-0 VanHorn, Thomas - 1-1-5-0-*
      1800 US: Township of Florida, Montgomery County, New York (copied from Worldconnect: http://www.rootsweb.com/~nyherkim/census/florida1800.html): Frederick, Philip - Males: 1@10-16, 1@16-26, 1@26-45, 1@45+; females: 1@16-26, 1@26-45; no other free persons or slaves.

      2. The Phillip Frederick home built ca. 1750 with accompanying water powered mill still exists at Wellsville, Florida Township, Montgomery Co., New York. It is on county road 143 on the east bank of the Schoharie River between Mill Point and Young Corners. There is a State historical marker and sign marking the site. From the sign, head west down the little lane and the last white house on the left is the Frederick home with new siding. The present owner is Jim Squillace as of Sept. 2007 . In the woods behind and to the left of the house is the remnants of stone walls that were part of the mill. By following the river bank south 50 yards, the walls can be found. The house itself has 3' thick stone foundation and is two stories. The siding is newer and disguises the age of the home. The historical sign reads: "New York. Site of Frederick's Mill at end of lane Philip Frederick and Francis Saltz leased land and built mill, 1750. State Education Department 1935."
      The Francis Saltz home is on the same road heading north across highway 161 onto Lang Road to the end of the Road. The Halcyon Farm/Bed and Breakfast is the current name of the property. Part of the Halcyon building is the original 20' x 20' two story home built by Francis in red brick. He is buried on the property; however, the location of the gravesites has been lost since last reported in the 1920s. My wife and I stayed at the bed and breakfast Sep. 2007.
      Young Corners is named for the Young family associated with the Fredericks. Directly across the river is property still owned by the Van Hoorn family who were also associated with the families. In the river can still be seen part of the dam understructure for the mill. The current owner of the home reports ghosts in the home with doors opening and closing inexplicably. The river used to be a main thoroughfare including during the Civil War. At one point the home was turned into a small hotel. The main door still faces the river and not the road.
      Most genealogies report the family lived in Florida, New York. Florida is not a village, but is a township. The Schoharie separates it from the new township to the west: Glen. Millpoint or Wellsville can be found by traveling southwest from Amsterdam, New York on one highway that changes numbers from 30 to 161 until just before the bridge at the Schoharie River. The Frederick mill is on the road to the left and the Saltz home is on Lang Road is to the right.
      I have photos on file of both.

      3. The book "Even More Palatine Families, 18th Century Immigrants to the American Colonies and their German, Swiss and Austrian Origins," v. 1, by Henry Z. Jones and Lewis Buncker Rohrbach, copy in Montgomery County, NY, Archives [note that author has an additional two earlier books on the same subject: "The Palatine Families of New York: A Study of the German Immigrants Who arrived in New York in 1710," (1985); "More Palatine Families," (1991), both of which I have reviewed without finding our Fredericks]:
      "Johann Peter Friederich. Peter Freidrick was naturalized 3 July 1759 (Scott & Stryker-Rodda, p. 29). On 8 Jul 1761, the petition of Peter Frederick was referred (see 'Land Patents' 16:45; also 'New York Colony, Calendar of Council Minutes 1668-1783,' compiled by Berthold Fernow, p. 404). Petter Fredrick was on a tax list of Mohawk in 1766 ('Upstate New York in the 1760s,' by Florence Christoph, p. 129). Johann Peter Frederich and wife Anna Veronica (Phronica) had issue:
      a. Philip, banns registered to marry 11 Nov 1752 Maria Sophia Salzer/Sals (Schoharie Reformed Chbk). Some of their ch. are found bpt. in the Ogilvie Records, Trinity Church, NY City. Philip Frederick was naturalized 11 Sep 1761 (Scott & Stryker-Rodda, p. 29). Philip Fredrick was on a tax list of Mohawk in 1766 ('Upstate New York in the 1760s,' by Florence Christoph, p. 129). The will of a Philip Frederick of Florida was dated 7 May 1804 (Montgomery Co. Wills Vol. 1).
      b. Bernhard, bpt. as 'Barent' July 1739 - sp: Barent Vroman and Engel (Fort Hunter Chbk). A Bernhard Friedrich md. 6 Jan 1771 Dorothea Schenck (Stone Arabia Reformed Chbk).
      c. Anna Magdalena, bpt. June 1741 - sp: Joseph... (Fort Hunter Chbk).
      d. Johann Jacob, bpt. 5 June 1743 - sp: Hans Huber and Jacob Naef and wife (Fort Hunter Chbk).
      e. Ludwig (HJ), the Lodewyck Fredrich who md. 31 March 1774 Alida Miller (Caughnawaga Reformed Chbk).
      f. Frans (HJ), the Frans Fredrick who md. 30 Dec 1774 Susanna Cosaadt (Caughnawaga Reformed Chbk). A chapter on Francis Frederick, b. Aug 1753 at Florida Twp., Montgomery Twp., is to be found in 'The Bloodied Mohawk,' by Ken D. Johnson, p. 410."
      [Kerry's notes: I have seen the book "The Bloodied Mohawk" in regards to Franz and it only contains information from his pension application, which I already have on file. Please also note that the author incorrectly assigns Frans as a child of Peter - he was a grandson, not a son. In regards to Ludwig, this is the only reference I can find of him whatsoever; there does not seem to be any christening record for him and his being listed a child of Peter is possible and perhaps likely but not proven. Please also note that even though some church records for the Fredericks are found in New York City Church records, this is only because clergymen from those Churches would travel up to "Mohawk" land. Note also that the Fredericks would use varying Protestant Churches in the vicinity depending apparently on which direction they were traveling or where there was a clergyman available to perform the rites.]

      4. From the book "Compendium of Early Mohawk Valley Families," by Maryly B. Penrose, v. 1, p. 282, Birth/Baptism:
      "Frederick, Phillip and Sophia (Salts):
      Margarita, bapt. 1758 (DRC:2); Sponsors: Pieter Jong and Margariet Jong.
      Magdalena, bapt. 13 Sep 1761 (DRC:6); Sponsors Willem Jong & Eva Jong.
      Catrina, bapt. 1764 (note: parents names crossed out in record) (DRC:12); Sponsors Philip Frederick and Sophia Frederick.

      5. Sir William Johnson was the Indian Agent and representative for the British Government in the early days of the Mohawk Valley. His fortified stone home still stands on the north shore of the Mohawk River opposite of Fort Hunter and is known as Fort Johnson. It was the center of the British Government's relation with the Indian Six Nations. His biography can be easily found on the Internet. The Montgomery County, NY, Archives has the published 14 volumes entitled "The Papers of Sir William Johnson," published by the Division of Archives and History, 1965, The University of the State of New York, Albany, 1965. The letters are full of the dealings with the various Indian groups as well as his local "associates" among whom we find Peter Frederick and his son Philip. I do not find any references to the Saltz's or Cosaadts. The reference to Philip is as follows (see Johan Peter Frederick's notes for references to him):
      Vol. 3, p. 357, Seven Years' War, Peter Servis and Others to the Assembly [requesting naturalization as British subjects - this confirms that Phillip was a foreign born Protestant]: "March 10, 1761. To the Honourable, the Representatives of the Colony of New York, this Humble Petition is addressed. We the undernamed, now Inhabitants of the County of Albany, and Province of New York, being by Education and profession Protestants, but of foreign Birth, are desirous of becoming his Majesty's Liege Subjects in this colony, wherefore humbly pray we may have the Benefit of an Act for our Naturalization, and your petitioners as in Duty bound will ever pray. [26 names listed including Adolph Young, Phillip Frederick, and the two Servis brothers Peter and Christian.]"

      6. My current thinking is that the earliest Fredericks, Peter and his children, were Palatine immigrants since Peter and his son Philip were naturalized in the 1760s. This is directly contrary to the publication of Alida Reed wherein she purports that they were descendants of a very early Frederick family from the early 1600s of New Amsterdam (present day New York City). The naturalization on the other hand would mean that they were of foreign birth and not English (the English had taken over New Amsterdam in the 1660s). The area was generally Dutch descendants that had moved up from the old New Amsterdam or Palatine immigrants. We do not know exactly when Peter came to America but it was apparently before 1739 judging from the church christening records of his children beginning in 1739. Assuming a 1734 birth for Peter's son Philip and the fact that Philip was also naturalized, then we could assume Peter family's immigration was between 1734 and 1739. The following gives a general account of the Palatines in the next county west of present day Montgomery County. For a more specific account of the Palatines in the Schoharie river area, see the extensive notes with Philip's father Johan Peter.
      The Burnetsfield Palatines were a specific subgroup of the larger Palatine immigration. Even though it appears the Fredericks were Palatines, they do not appear to be part of the specific Burnetsfield patentees of Herkimer County (part of the original Montgomery County just west of eastern portion of the present Montgomery County in which we find our earliest Fredericks.
      FHL book 974.761D2G "Early Families of Herkimer County New York, Descendants of the Burnetsfield Palatines," by William V.H. Barker, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1986, preface, the book gives some general local history per the following excerpts:
      "Herkimer County, in north central New York's Mohawk Valley, received its name in 1791 in memory of General Nicholas Herkimer, the Revolutionary War militia commander... There were probably in excess of 15,000 Indians in the region about the year 1700, but by the time of the American Revolution their population had eroded to about 10,000... due in part to lack of resistance to European diseases. Their numbers then fell sharply during and just after the Revolution as a result of migrations to Canada and points westward, the exodus being necessitated by the fact that most of the Iroquois, except for the Oneidas, took the British side during the War of Independence..."
      "As to the early Europeans, the Dutch traders of Fort Orange (now Albany) initiated commerce with the Mohawk Valley Indians in the early 1600s... The Dutch traded alcoholic beverages, firearms, tools, and fabrics in exchange for land and beaver hides. In 1664 the British took control of New York State and the Mohawk Valley area came under the jurisdiction of Albany County from that time until about 1774 when it became Tryon county (in 1784 the area was renamed as Montgomery county, the western portion of which was set off in 1791 as Herkimer County). In modern times, Herkimer County bounded by Oneida County on the west and by Montgomery and Fulton Counties on the east. Prior to 1760 there was only limited settlement by the Dutch or English to the west of Schenectady, since the Mohawk region was vulnerable to incursion of the French and their Indian allies from Canada..." [N.B. Tryon was changed to Montgomery because Tryon followed the Tory cause whereas Montgomery was a patriot.]
      "With the exception of a few families, such as the Fondas, Schuylers, and Van Slykes, the Dutch and English seem to have been little induced to settle the Mohawk Valley, and so the opportunity fell to a group of immigrant Germans from the Palatinate, or lower Rhineland area in central Europe. Several thousand of these Palatines had left their German homelands, being much reduced in circumstance after years of warfare with France, and had gone to England at Queen Anne's invitation in 1709... The English temporarily housed many of these people in tents outside London and early in 1710 about 2,000 were placed aboard ships for passage to the American colonies, being promised land in New York in exchange for work in Hudson River camps, to be set up for the production of pitch for use in sealing naval vessels. There were delays in embarking and the Palatines were crowded into undersized and ill provisioned ships so that the Atlantic Ocean crossing itself became a tragedy in which, by New York Gov. Hunter's account, some 466 of them perished. From 1710 to 1712 the German immigrants required government subsidy, and the payment records by Gov. Hunter to heads of households survive (as in Knittle) and are referred to throughout this book as the NY Palatine Subsistence List. The pitch operations having failed, the Germans had to fend for themselves, moving for a while to contested lands in the Schoharie Valley west of Albany."
      "The Palatines remained a displaced people without land entitlement until September 1721 when the Albany City council endorsed their petition to purchase Mohawk Valley land, not closer to Albany then 40 miles west of Ft. Hunter. Then on October 16, 1721, New York Governor William Burnet, presumably wishing to see buffer settlements of a friendly population in the central Mohawk area, granted the appropriate license, which allowed the Palatines, in 1722, to purchase land form the Indians in the vicinity of where the West Canada creek flows into the Mohawk River. Upon completion of the survey of these lands in 1723, and in response to the request of Palatine leaders Joseph Petrie and Conrad Richaert, the deeds were prepared under the designation of the Brunetsfield Patent. At about the same time, other Palatines received land grants at Stone Arabia and elsewhere in the Mohawk Valley... the Burnetsfield Patentees... were wholly within the present county of Herkimer [as opposed to other area Palentines in other parts of the Valley]..."
      "From 1723 onwards, until the French and Indian Wars commenced, [the area] was generally at peace and the residents prospered to the extent that some writers have termed the community almost utopian. Wheat grew abundantly in the fertile soil and the accumulation of livestock and goods was extensive..."
      "At 3 a.m. on Nov. 12, 1757, disaster struck German Flats [as Herkimer was then known] in the form of a surprise raid by a French and Indian war party... 40 killed, 150 prisoners, and much booty taken... After the 1757 devastation there were periods of relief such as the negotiated return of some prisoners in 1758 and the building, in that same year, of Ft. Stanwix as a protective outpost about 35 miles west of German Flats. With the French surrender to English forces at Montreal in 1760, relative peace was restored to the Mohawk Valley, although occasional difficulties with the Indians required that the settlers maintain a more vigilant militia than had been required in earlier years..."
      "Of particular note to the modern-day researcher is the fact that many of the early... families both moved and visited up and down the Mohawk Valley, thereby necessitating the search of church records over a wide geographic area for the presence of relevant marriage and baptism entries. Of note also is the information value of the baptismal sponsors, as those individuals were usually of the same generation (except when a grandparent would be sponsor for a grandchild of the same given name) and most often were brothers or sisters of the parents."
      "The second devastation to fall upon... the surrounding... area came from alignments brought about by the American War of Independence. The British enrolled most of the area Indians, plus several Mohawk Valley settlers as well, to the Tory cause, and in August 1777 the bloody battle of Oriskany pitted former neighbor against neighbor... Oriskany turned the British back to Canada momentarily, but a year later they were back in a more nefarious form of military tactic, that of the hit and run assault on isolated settlements. From 1778 through 1782, the British waged a war of attrition in the Mohawk Valley, with members of raiding parties paid eight dollars for each scalp taken, regardless of the victim's combative status, sex, or age... Sometimes the settlers had to scramble quickly into the forts..."
      "By the end of the American Revolution, the... region was severely depleted in manpower and resources and a new phase of rebuilding began with the expansion westward of New Englanders, who were lured by the open lands of northern New York which had become available with the departure of the Indians. The resultant shift in population base was evident in the 1790 census when about a third of the... area people appear to be new arrivals of English extraction..."

      7. The Frederick family were involved in the earliest settlement of the Mohawk Valley in the area of present day Fort Hunter and Mill Point in Florida Township, Montgomery County, New York. They and their neighbors were involved in the Tryon Militia that fought at the important American Revolutionary War battles of Oriskany and other Mohawk Valley incursions. Basic history of the area as found at http://www.rootsweb.com/%7Enymontgo/mont1841a.html:
      "This profile of Montgomery County and accompanying engravings comes from an original crumbling copy of the book "Historical Collections of the State of New York," owned by the coordinator. It was printed in 1841 by S. Tuttle, 194 Chatham Square, New York, publisher. The authors were the well-known John W. Barber (author of the Connecticut and Massachusetts Historical Collections) and Henry Howe (author of 'The Memoirs of Eminent American Mechanics'). A later, more commonly found, edition of this work was published in 1845.
      In their preface Mr. Barber and Mr. Howe credit earlier gazetteers as sources of some information - Spafford's Gazetteers of 1813 and 1824, and Gordon's Gazetteer of 1836. The engravings were "with few exceptions, copied from drawings taken on the spot by the compilers of the work."
      Montgomery County was named after the lamented Gen. Montgomery, who fell at the attack on Quebec, in the revolution. Its greatest length is 34 E. and W., greatest breadth N. and S. 13 miles. It was originally taken from Albany and named in honor of William Tryon, then governor of the province. Its name was changed in 1784. It embraced all that part of the state lying west of a line running north and south nearly through the centre of the present county of Schoharie. It was divided into five districts - subdivided into precincts. The Mohawk district included Fort Hunter, Caugnawaga, Johnstown, and Kingsboro'; Canajoharie district embraced the present town of that name, with all the country southward, comprehending Cherry Valley of Otsego, and Harpersfield of Delaware counties; Palatine district, north of the Mohawk, extended over the region so called, and Stone Arabia, &c.; German Flats district and Kingsland covered the most western settlements. The Erie canal crosses the county on the south side of the Mohawk, and the Schenectady and Utica railroad on the north side. The Erie canal passes the Schoharie creek through a pond formed by a dam across the stream below. Its fall within this county is 86 feet, by 12 locks. The county is divided into ten towns. Pop. 35,801.
      [The Township of] FLORIDA, taken from Mohawk in 1793; from Albany 35 miles. Pop. 5,162. The town was settled by some Dutch families from Schenectady, who in 1750 were joined by some Germans, subsequently by Irish and Dutch, and lastly by New Englanders. Fort Hunter, 5 miles SE. of Fonda, is a small settlement. Port Jackson, on the Erie canal, is a flourishing village. Minaville, 4 miles S. of the canal, is a village of about 40 dwellings. Fort Hunter, which formerly stood on the line of the canal in this town, was a place of some importance in colonial history. At this place also stood Queen Anne's Chapel, a stone structure, built by Queen Anne of England for the use of the Mohawk Indians. The English Episcopal missions to the Mohawks appear to have been commenced as early as 1702, and continued down to the beginning of the revolutionary war. [The Township of] MOHAWK, the ancient Caughnawaga, recently organized, was formerly the southern section of the town of Johnstown, from which it was taken in 1837. Pop. 3,106. Since the formation of the new county of Fulton, the seat of justice for Montgomery county has been located in this town. The above is an engraving of the courthouse and hotel recently erected in the new village of Fonda. The railroad passes between these two buildings. The central part of the village of Caughnawaga is about half a mile eastward of the courthouse, and consists of about 30 dwelling-houses, on the north side of the Mohawk, 40 miles from Albany, and 4 miles S. from Johnstown. The village occupies the site of an ancient Indian village, one of the principal towns of the Mohawk tribe. Its name, Caughnawaga, is said to signify "a coffin," which it received from the circumstance of there being, in the river opposite the place, a large black stone, (still to be seen,) resembling a coffin, and projecting above the surface at low water.
      Ancient Church, Mohawk. The annexed is a representation of the ancient Dutch church in Caughnawaga. It is a massive stone structure, and is believed to have been erected in 1763. The following is a copy of the inscription on the stone tablet which was formerly placed over the door. "Komt laett ons op gaen tot den Bergh des Heeren, to den huyse des Godes Jacobs, op dat hy ons leere van syne wegen, en dat wy wandele in syne paden." ["Come ye, and let us go up to the mountain of the Lord; to the house of the God of Jacob, and he will teach us his ways, and we will walk in his paths."] The following, relating to the history of this town, is taken from a newspaper published in Schenectady a few years since. "The Caughnawaga flats extend from the western base of Tripe's Hill to the Cayadutta creek, a distance of four miles. A patent for 2,500 acres of these flats, was granted in the year 1713, to John, Edward, and Margaret Collins. These individuals aliened to Myndert Wemple, Douw Fonda, and Hendrick A. Vrooman; and many of their descendants are proprietors at the present day. "Until 1695, there were no buildings on the site where Caughnawaga now stands, except a Dutch church edifice and a parsonage. This church was founded in 1762, by the patronage of Sir William Johnson. Its principal benefactors were the Fonda, Vrooman, Wemple, and Veeder families. The church edifice is still standing, but in a dilapidated condition. Its first pastor was the Rev. Thomas Romeyn, who died in 1794. He was succeeded by the Rev. Abraham Van Horne, of New Jersey, who continued his pastoral duties until a few years since. "Caughnawaga hardly deserved to be called a hamlet until 1795, when Messrs. Douw and Henry Fonda, of Albany, erected several buildings."

      8. May be the Philip listed as a sponsor in the following record per "Records of the Reformed Protestant Dutch Church of Caughnawaga, now the Reformed Church of Fonda, in the village of Fonda, Montgomery County, N.Y.," New York, unknown, 1917, 748 pp.:
      Catrina, b. 4 Apr, offspring of Willem Philip and Hannah Huisna, baptized 5 May 1782 with sponsors Philip and Catrina Frederick.
      Jacob, b. 9 Apr, offspring of John Metselaer and Lena Cas, baptized 4 May 1783, with sponsors Philip Frederic and Anna Sals.

      9. There is a Michael Frederick (Friederich) of nearby Guiderland in Albany, New York. Many have tried and continue to try to connect him to our Frederick family, but modern researchers have thoroughly shown that he is not related. Additionally he had sons Michael (who married Catherine Wagner) and Thebald (who married Margaret Merkle) who some have erroneously tried to make the sons of our Philip Frederick. Some of the confusion was that both separate families were partially recorded at the Schoharie Church (but never in conjunction with each other). I have transcribed some of the published research and included it in the notes of Philip's father Peter. It conclusively eliminates "Michael" and "Tebalt" from our family.

      10. Some family histories among LDS descendants of the Fredericks list a Mary Frederick born to Philip and Maria Sophia (Saltz) Frederick. I believe this to be erroneous and recopied and recopied among the LDS histories. I find no documentation of a Mary through christenings, marriages, etc. for Mary. I believe some have confused her with Maria who married Thomas Van Horne.

      11. The book "Mohawk Land Records," by Maryly B. Penrose, p. 56, bills of sale [note Mohawk District was the predecessor name for Florida Township. Tryon Co. was changed to Montgomery County after the Rev. War.]:
      "Saltz, Frantz, to Philip Frederick, Francis Cruth, Peter Frederick and Frantz Frederick. Instrument dated 4/28/1784; recorded 3/17/1785. Description: In consideration of several good causes made over all his moveable estate. Signed: Frantz ["X" his mark] Salts. Wit: Wm. Schuyler, Thomas Caine. The instrument was executed in person by Frants Saltz as a voluntary act. (Tryon County Deeds, Book 1, p. 257, 1772-1788)"
      Philip would be his son-in-law, Peter and Francis are grandsons through Philip, and Francis Cruth (Grosch), grandson through son-in-law Peter Grosch.

      12. The book "Our Van Horne Kindred," by Elsie O. Hallenback, 1958, copy in the Montgomery County NY Archives:
      "Cornelius Van Horne, oldest child of Mathias Van Horne and Nelly Crumm, was born in Upper Freehold, NJ on March 10, 1745. When a young man he came to Warrensbush, Tryon Co., NY where he worked for Philip Frederick who had a grist mill and saw mill at Mill Point, along the Schoharie Creek. Philip Frederick was the son of Peter Frederick, a Palatine who had been driven out of south-west Germany during a religious persecution, and emigrated to Mill Point where he settled and raised his family. According to the records of the Old Dutch Reformed Church of Schoharie, NY, he and Sophia Saltz, daughter of Francis Saltz, were registered for marriage on Nov. 11, 1752...
      Francis Saltz was another early settler along the Schoharie Creek, about five miles above its entrance into the Mohawk River. In heh History of Montgomery County, it states 'that one Francis Saltz and Cornelius (Boss) Putman purchased the Shucksburg Patent of 1200 acres of land along the Schoharie Creek, Mr. Saltz taking the half farthest up the creek, and Mr. Putman the lower half. Mr. Saltz later on sold part of this land to his son-in-law by the name of McCreavy; another part to his son-in-law named Young; another part to Philip Frederick, a fourth part to Michael Marlett and the remaining 200 acres he deeded to Peter Crush [Grosch] if he would marry his crippled daughter who had never been able to walk. Mr. Crush accepted this offer, and after building a home on the land, carried his wife to it on his back'...
      Cornelius Van Horne married Eve Frederick, the fifth child of Philip Frederick and Sophia Saltz, and they built a home on the opposite side of the Schoharie Creek from that of her parents. There is an old lease in existence dated May 6, 1792 for this land which was in the very north-east section of the Corry Patent and in the Town of Glen, Montgomery County. It was given to Cornelius Van Horne by Silvanus Wilcox, and the witnesses where Thomas B. Vinman and Abraham Vootsik..."

      13. The book "History of Montgomery and Fulton Counties, N.Y.," reprinted 2002 (originally printed in the 1880s), p. 11, "Settlers along the Schoharie," notes the earliest residents. South on the river would be about five miles upriver from the Schoharie's mouth into the Mohawk River at Fort Hunter. Also the river is the modern dividing point between Florida Township on the east and Glen Township on the west:
      "Among the pioneer settlers on the east bank of Schoharie creek were Martinus Cline and Francis Saltz, who, about the middle of the last century leased two farms in Warren's Patent, now the Henry C. Pettingill and William Voorhees places, opposite Mill Point. It is said that when they arrived on the ground they flipped a penny for the choice of places, and Saltz, winning the toss, took the southernmost of [the presently known] Voorhees farm. His oldest daughter married Philip Frederick, and they settled on the creek at the place since called Buchanan's Mills [just upriver from Salts], where Frederick cleared a farm and built a house and mill. Here in a few years quite a settlement sprung up.
      Another of the pioneers who settled on the creek within the present town of Florida was Peter Young. He came from New Jersey, and camped near Garret Van Derveer's place. Learning from some Indians, while hunting one day, that a white family who had made a clearing over by the creek had become discouraged and abandoned it, he took possession of the farm, the next above Frederick's mill. The place was in Sir Peter Warren's domain, and Young paid 5s. 10d. rent for ten years, and afterward ₤3. The estate has remained in possession of the Young family from that day to this, the present owner being Miss Anna Young. Peter Young had three sons, the oldest of whom, George, married a daughter of Saltz and moved across the creek; William married a Gardinier and settled in Florida. Peter, Jr., married Margaret Serviss, and kept the homestead.
      During the Revolutionary war this was the retreat of the non-combatants in the neighborhood when threatened by the savage enemy. They formed a camp back of the lake on the farm sheltered by a semi-circle of bushes and hills. Mrs. Young [maiden name: Serviss], whose relatives were Tories, and who was in no fear of them or the Indians, cooked and carried food to the refugees. Another hiding place was on the high point of land on the bank of the creek. At one time there was a large company of women and children encamped here as Indians had been seen up the stream. It was in the autumn and quite cold, and they had risked building a fire. One morning the watchman spied a company of men approaching over the hills to the east of the camp. They were supposed to be the enemy, and panic was created. Some flew to the lakeside camp; others tried to put out the fire, which would betray their positions, but they had no water, and the more they raked it, the more it smoked. They were soon delightfully relieved by the arrival of the party, who proved to be their soldier friends, home on a furlough."

      14. The book "History of Montgomery and Fulton Counties, N.Y.," reprinted 2002 (originally printed in the 1880s):
      A. From a "mass of papers left by Jelles Fonda, and now in the possession of the Van Hornes of Fonda, is 'a List of the persons that are assessed above 5 pounds, with the sums they are to pay, and the number of days they are to work upon the King's highways, annewed.' Though not dated, the document is believed to have been written shortly previous to the Revolution and furnishes a sort of limited census of the inhabitants of this region, with their relative financial standing. Many names now familiar in the same district will be recognized, under the disguise which the orthography of the writer, and perhaps of the times, put upon them. The list is as follows [with over 120 names including names of interest to us - note Wm. Johnson assessed at ₤202 and most others in the range of ₤6-20]:
      Peter Young, quota ₤10, annual assessment 1s 6d, no. of days work 4.
      Frans Salts, quota ₤15, annual assessment 3s, no. of days work 5.
      Peter Frederick and sons, quota ₤12, annual assessment 3s, no. of days work 5.
      [Various Gardeners/Gardeneers {Adam, Samuel, Jacob}; Mallatt {John}; Service {Peter}]
      The book "History of Montgomery and Fulton Counties, N.Y.," reprinted 2002 (originally printed in the 1880s) contains some local history which adds to the historical perspective of the times of Peter Frederick in Montgomery County. I recommend browsing and reading this extensive history of which I have partial copy on file, but I do include a few excerpts in these notes:
      B. The Mohawk Indians maintained two fortified villages which they called castles. The lower castle was named Tionderoga or Dyiondarogon in the Indian tongue and it was at where Fort Hunter was located at the mouth of the Schoharie where it meets the Mohawk river. The second or higher castle was further up the Mohawk river at Canojahorie, which is present day Danube in Herkimer County. The castles usually had log palisades and huts grouped close together for defensive purposes. The Mohawk valley was an ancient and natural route from the Atlantic seaboard to Lake Ontario and as such had British interests push west from the Albany area and French pushing back from the Niagara area. This conflict led to the many years of the French and Indian War. Up to the end of the Revolutionary war, the area was in constant conflict as evidenced by the many forts and historical accounts of atrocities, and massacres. The Frederick family of this era would have been considered in the vanguard of British frontiersmen with a dangerous time and place to live. The earliest white men in the area would have been the French Jesuit priests followed eventually by missionaries of the English Church of England. The Dutch were slow to migrate to this area and were mainly only as far as Fort Orange which became Albany. The civilization followed the Mohawk River west from Albany and then eventually moved up the tributary rivers, which was the case of the Fredericks, Saltzs, and associated families up the Schoharie River from Fort Hunter. Fort Hunter was the first established village in the area in the first decade of the 1700s. Albany would continue to be the main market for the eventual crops produced in later Montgomery County.
      C. William Johnson appears on the scene in 1738 at age 23 to superintend "a large estate, the title to which had been acquired by his uncle, Sir Peter Warren, a British Admiral. This tract, containing some 15,000 acres, lay along the south bank of the Mohawk near the mouth of Schoharie creek and mostly within the present town of Florida. It was called from its proprietor Warrensbush... He was to promote Captain Warren's interests by the sale of small farms in Warrensbush; his own interests by cultivating land for himself, and their joint interests by keeping a store in which they were partners. In 1743 he became connected with the fur trade at Oswego and derived a great revenue from this and his other dealings with the Indians. Having early resolved to remain in the Mohawk valley, he applied himself earnestly to the study of the character and language of the natives. By freely mingling with them and adopting their habits when it suited his interest he soon gained their good will and confidence, and gradually acquired an ascendancy over them never possessed by any other European... A few years after Johnson's arrival on the Mohawk he purchased a tract of land on the north side of the river... In 1744 he built a gristmill on a small steam flowing into the Mohawk... He also erected a stone mansion at his place for his own residence, calling it Fort Johnson, the building still stands and bears its old name." [It was just six years after this that Philip Frederick sets up his mill up the Schoharie River to save his neighbors the trip to Fort Johnson. He uses a used grinding stone that his father-in-law Francis Saltz purchased from William Johnson.]
      D. Original ownership in Florida township area. Walter Butler purchased from the Indians a tract of 86,000 acres which was divided into six tracts, one of which was transferred to Charles Williams and others, August 19th, 1735, and comprised the principal portion of what is now the township of Florida. The parties taking possession of this tract were to pay the yearly rent of 2 shillings, 6 pence for each 100 acres at the Custom House in New York, and agreed to settle and cultivate at least 3 acres out of every 50 within the next three years. Additionally all trees 24 inches in diameter and upwards, at 12 inches from the ground, were to be reserved for masts for the Royal Navy. This was the tract afterward owned by Sir Peter Warren, and known as Warrensbush, probably purchased by him in 1737; as a petition to be allowed to purchase 6,000 acres of land is filed by him in the Secretary of State's office, dated May 5th, 1737. This land remained in the Warren family for nearly sixty years. After the death of Sir Peter Warren, Warrensbush was divided into three parts: one part was conveyed to Charles Fitzroy, otherwise called Lord Southampton; one part to the Earl of Abingdon, and the third to Henry Gage. Abingdon and Gage conveyed their two shares to John Watts, of New York, who was formerly their attorney, and was also a brother-in-law to Sir Peter Warren. David Cady was agent for John Watts in Warrensbush. There was an anxiety to get rid of the vexatious ground rents, but the lease system was well entrenched, and the owners knew well their value; only slowly and gradually was the right to the soil obtained in the late 1780s and 1790s. The following quitclaim of certain leaseholds mentions the Fredericks, Youngs, and Services: "Whereas, John Watts of the city of New York, and Jane, his wife, did purchase from the Earl of Abingdon, of Great Britain, and from Henry gage and Susanna, his wife, and others their trustees, two tracts or parcels of land situated in a place called Warrensburgh, in the town of Mohawk, county of Montgomery, State of New York, formerly part of the estate of Sir Peter Warren... said John Watts hat sold and conveyed sundry lots thereof to David Cady, Nathan Stanton, Ezra Murray, Phillip and Peter Frederick, William and Peter Youngs ... Christian and Peter Service... and sundry others, with covenants on the part of said John Watts to convey the same in full to them on payment of certain sums... Signed and sealed 13 Nov 1793." [I am sure which Peter is spoken of - the immigrant or the son of Philip.]
      E. Extensive other excerpts are included and should also be consulted in the notes of Johan Peter Frederick concerning the times and places in which Philip lived.

      15. The book "The Book of Names, Especially Relating to the Early Palatines and the Frist Settlers in the Mohawk Valley," by Lou D. MacWethy, 1933: "Our Early Citizens, Names of those Taking the Oath of Allegiance from 1715 to 1773," comp. by L.F. Bellinger. Vol. 4, Sept. 11, 1761: Phillip Frederick.

      16. The book "The Book of Names, Especially Relating to the Early Palatines and the Frist Settlers in the Mohawk Valley," by Lou D. MacWethy, 1933: "Tryon County Militia, 3rd Regiment, Col. Frederick Fisher":
      Fredreck, Jacob
      Frederick, Peter
      Frederick, Francis
      Fredrick, Philip

      BIRTH:
      1. The source of the birth date of Philip is unknown and the 1734 date appears to have been surmised from earlier family researchers. The 1752 marriage date is proven and by subtracting an average male marriage age of 21 years, then the birthdate may have been circa 1731.

      2. It is probable that the earliest Fredericks, Peter and his children, were Palatine immigrants since Peter and his son Philip were naturalized in the 1760s. This is contrary to the publication of Alida Reed wherein she purports that they were descendants of a very early Frederick family from the early 1600s of New Amsterdam (present day New York City). The naturalization on the other hand would mean that they were of foreign birth and not English (the English had taken over New Amsterdam in the 1660s). The area was generally made up of Dutch descendants that had moved up from the old New Amsterdam or Palatine immigrants. We do not know exactly when Peter came to America but it was apparently before 1739 judging from the church christening records of his children beginning in 1739. Assuming a 1734 birth for Peter's son Philip and the fact that Philip was also naturalized, then we could assume Peter family's immigration was between 1734 and 1739.

      MARRIAGE:
      1. Ordinance index reports name extraction work with marriage at the "High and Low Dutch Reformed Congregation, Schoharie, Schoharie County, New York" per batch M511341, dates 1732-1799, source 534210, film, printout 1205775. Names show up as Philip Frederic and Maria Sophia Salzer. Sealing to spouse done 24 Feb 1979 IFALL. I looked up this record in a transcribed copy of the records at the Montgomery Co., NY Archives: "11 Nov 1752 were registered for marriage, Philip Frederic, legitimate son of Peter Frederich and Maria Sophia Salzer, legitimate daughter of Frans Saltzer, both living in Mohawk's Land." [Note that Mohawk's Land was a general term of basically the frontier in the traditional Mohawk Indian tribal area around Fort Hunter and present day Montgomery County, New York.

      DEATH:
      1. Source of Philip's children is from his will probate, a transcribed copy of which is on file with me and is entitled "Wills 0506564, Montgomery County, New York." Also summarized in the book "Compendium of Early Mohawk Valley Families" by Maryly B. Penrose, vol. 1, p. 282, and noted as "WMC 56:153-54." It also appears that he had married a second time to a Sarah who had a son, Samuel Roadwell, from a previous marriage. Son-in-law Cornelius Van Horn is mentioned. It may also be assumed that the first three daughters Margaret, Sophiah, and Elizabeth were married since they only received a dollar; the last four daughters Eve, Lanah, Hannah, and Mary, were probably unmarried since they received equal portion of the adjusted estate. Will dated 7 May 1804 and probated 6 Nov 1804. Text:
      "The people of the State of New York by the Grace of God free and independent: To All to whom these presents shall come or may concern, send, Greeting: Know ye that at Johnstown in the County of Montgomery before James Lansing Esq.: Surrogate of our said County, the last Will and Testament of Philip Frederick deceased, (a copy where of is hereunto annexed) was proved, and is now approved and allowed of by us, and the said deceased having whilst he lived, and at the time of his Death, Goods, Chattels or Credits within this State by means whereof the proving and registering the said Will and the granting Administration of all and singular the said Goods, Chattels and Credits and also the auditing, allowing and final discharging the Account thereof, doth belong into us; the Administration of all and singular the Goods Chattels and Credits of the said deceased, and anyway concerning his Will, is granted unto David Cady and Cornelius Van Horn, Executors in the said Will named, they being first duly sworn well and faithfully to Administer the same, and to make and exhibit a true and perfect Inventory of all and singular the said Goods Chattels and Credits and also to render a just and true Account thereof when there unto required. In testimony whereof we have caused the seal of Office of our said Surrogate to be hereunto affixed. Witness James Lansing Esquire Surrogate of the Said County at Johnstown the sixth Day of November in the year of our Lord One Thousand Eight Hundred and Four, and of our independence the twenty ninth. James Lansing.
      In the name of God Amen, I Phillip Fredrick of the Town of Florida County of Montgomery being weak in Body but perfectly sound in Mind and Memory and calling to Mind the morality of the Body, and that it is appointed for all Men once to die, do make and ordain this my last Will and Testament in manner and form following, that is to say, principally and first of all I recommend my Soul into the Hands of God who gave it, and my Body to the Earth to be buried in a decent and christian manner at the discretion of my Executors, doubting not but I shall receive the same at the general Resurection by the mighty power of God, and as touching such wordly Estate wherewith it hath pleased God to bless me within this life, first place I will and order that my honest Debts and furnal Charges be first paid out of my personal Estate, Secondly I will and order that my beloved Wife Sarah shall have all my Houshold Furneture, and I also will and order that she shall have two of the best Cows, and my Mare which she raised on Cows Milk for her own, to dispose of as she thinks fit, I also will and order that she shall have the one half of my House and Barn and one third of all my real Estate during her life, I also will and order that my Executors shall give unto her fifty dollars out of my personal Estate after my Debts are paid, I also will and order that my Wifes Son Samuel roadwell shall have my small Gun, I also will and order that my Son Francis shall have my old Mill Stones and with all the Mill Irons, I also give unto him my long Gun caled my hunting Gun, I will and order that my Carpenter Tools shall be equally divided between my Son Franices and by grand Son Phillip Fredrick, I also will and order after all my Debts are paid that my Executors shall give unto my three Daughters namely Margaret, Sophiah and Elizabeth one dollar each, I also will and order after my Death that all my Debts shall be first paid, and then I will and order that all my reall and personal Estate Sall be divided between my four other Daughters namely Eve, Lanah, Hannah and Mary - equally and after the Death of my beloved Wife Sarah, I will and order that the rest of my reall estate shall be equally divided between the four last mentioned Daughters, and I do hereby constitute and appoint and ordain my Friend David Cady Esqr. and Cornelius Van Horn my Son in Law, both of the County of Montgomery Executors of this my last Will and testament, and do hereby revoke and disanul all former Wills by me made and do by these present ratify and confirm this as my last Will and Testament. In witness whereof I have hereunto set my Hand and affixed my Seal this seventh Day of May in the Year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and four. Signed sealed and delivered by the said Phillip Fredrick as and for the last Will and Testament in the presence of us who ware present at the signing and sealing thereof, David Cady, James Parsons, Easton Tallman. (Phillip Fredrick FF his mark.)
      Be it remembered that on the sixth Day of November in the Year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and four personally appeared before me James Lansisng Esquire Surrogate of the County of Montgomery, David Cady one of the subscribing witnessed to the within Will, who being duly sworn depostih and saith that he saw Philip Frederick sign and seal and heard him publish and declare the within Instrument as and for his last Will and testament; that the said Philip Frederick was at the time thereof (according to the best of this Deponents Knowledge and Belief) of sound and disposing Mind Memory and Understanding; That the Name of this Deponent subscribed thereto as Witness is of his own proper writing; That he saw James Parsons and Easton Tallman subscribe their Names as Witnesses to the Execution thereof; and that he together with the said James Parsons and Easton Tallman subscribed as Witnesses as aforesaid in the Testators presence. James Lansing.
      The preceding are true copes of the Original of the last Will and Testament of Philip Frederick deceased; of the Certificate of the proof thereof, and of the Letters testamentary thereon. Registered the 6th Day of November 1804 by me. James Lansing E. Surrogate.
      Be it remembered that on the said sixth Day of November last mentioned, personally appeared before me the said Surragate, David Cady and Cornelius Van Horn Executors in the last Will and Testament of the said Philip Frederick deceased named, and were duly sworn to the faithful, performance of the Executorship. James Lansing."

      SOURCES_MISC:
      1. Per family group sheet archive record submitted by Mary J. King Timothy (4ggniece). She references: "Hist. Montgomery Co.; N.Y. M.1, p. 113; Wills of Montgomery Co. M.12a, p. 13, vol. 2; N.Y. Mls, p. 167; F.N.Y F4b, p. 2; F.N. Y. S.4a, p. 293." Copy in files of Kerry Petersen.