Samuel Griswold

Male 1649 - 1672  (22 years)


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  • Name Samuel Griswold 
    Born 18 Nov 1649  Windsor, Hartford, Connecticut, United States Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    Died 6 Jul 1672  Windsor, Hartford, Connecticut, United States Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID I2061  Petersen-de Lanskoy
    Last Modified 21 Jan 2014 

    Father Edward Griswold,   b. 26 Jul 1607, Wooten Wawen, Warwick, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1690/1691, Windsor, Hartford, Connecticut, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 83 years) 
    Mother Margaret,   b. Abt 1609,   d. 23 Aug 1670, Killingworth (now Clinton), Middlesex, Connecticut, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 61 years) 
    Married Abt 1628  of Kenilworth, Warwick, England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Family ID F1035  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Notes 
    • RESEARCH_NOTES:
      1. FHL book 929.242 G868f "The Greswold Family, 12 Generations in England," researched and edited by Robert L. and Esther G. French, comp. by Coralee Griswold [Wethersfeld, CT; 1999]. The authors standardize spelling as Greswold for England and Griswold for America. As of 2012, it appears that this book is the most current evolution of the Griswold ancestry and includes all previous research up to 1999 when it was published. (It also supersedes the author's own work in 1990 for the later English generations). See notes in this database of the original Griswold for a more detailed explanation of the various sources and a bibliography of previously published books that the authors include in this genealogical compilation.
      "Edward12 Griswold (George11, Roger10, John9, John8, John7, John6, John5, William4, Richard3, Ralph2, John1) was christened 26 Jul 1607 in Wooton Wawen, Warwickshire, England. In lieu of a will, Edward on Christmas Day, 1672, signed a conditional inheritance deed of his property to his son John, who was to pay certain legacies; but Edward did not die until 30 Aug 1691, in Killingworth, Middlesex, Connecticut, at the age of 84, and was buried in the Indian River Cemetery in Killingworth, Middlesex, Connecticut. He married (1) Margaret (___) about 1628 in England. ["New England Genealogy," Vol. 1, p.250, cites her surname as HICKS, but the Robert Hicks family was already in Plymouth as of 1621. Records indicate Margaret and Edward were married in England after this date.] She was born about 1609. Margaret died 23 Aug 1670 in Killingworth, Middlesex, Connecticut, and was buried in the cemetery behind the Congregational Church, in Killingworth (now Clinton), Middlesex, Connecticut. Her stone being the oldest marked, "M.G., 1670."
      When the Rev. Ephraim Huit arrived in Windsor, Connecticut with his congregation about 17 Aug 1639 to assist the Rev. John Warham, Edward and Margaret Griswold, their four children: Francis, George, John and Sarah; and Edward's brother Matthew, were with the company. ["Savage's Genealogical Dictionary," Vol. 2, p. 316.] In his own deposition, dated 15 May 1684, Edward stated that he was then aged about seventy-seven years and that, "about the year 1639 Mr. William Whiting, Dec'd, was Undertaker [financial sponsor] for a shipp in England, in which Shipp I came to New England." [Ferris, "Dawes-Gates Ancestral Lines"; Gates & Allied Families; Vol. II; p. 399.] Mr. Huit had been pastor at Knowle and Wroxall, Warwickshire, England. A writer of note upon religious subjects and a powerful preacher of the Puritan faith, he was censured for his non-conformity and silenced by the Bishop of Worcester. This no doubt was the cause of his moving to New England with the company he organized, of which both Edward and Matthew were members.
      Edward speedily became prominent in the affairs of the new community and was frequently mentioned in colonial records. He served as deputy to the General Court from 18 Aug 1658 to 14 Mar 1660 and again from 15 May 1662 to 11 Mar 1663. Edward served repeatedly on juries, at least two of which, in 1651 and 1662, deliberated on witchcraft cases and brought in verdicts of guilty. In 1659 he was one of the men from Windsor to build the fort at Springfield for Mr. Pynchon. He also served as Justice of the Peace.
      Although he was granted land at Poquonoc he did not move there until after the title of the Indians had been fully extinguished in 1642. He was resident there in 1649 with two other families, John Bartlett and Thomas Holcomb. His home stood near the highway at the top of the hill, and contained 29-1/2 acres bounded mostly south and west by Stony Brook and east by the river. His sons George and Joseph received the homestead when he moved to Hammonassett in 1663 with his son John and two daughters, Hannah Westover and Deborah Buell, with their families.
      The present Clinton, Connecticut is the original Killingworth; Main Street is the identical ground where the first settlers took their home lots. These were surveyed in 1663 by Byron Rossiter of Guiliford. Edward was one of the first settlers and doubtless suggested the name from Kenilworth Parish in England. He was the most prominent man in the new settlement and must be given full credit for first organizing this community. He was its first deputy to the General Court. He, with his two sons-in-law, were recorded as freeman in 1669.
      Edward was instrumental in organizing the first church and was its first deacon. He frequently served on important civil matters; his services, counsel and guidance evidently much sought. He also served on the committee to establish a Latin school at New London.
      Ancient land records on file at the office of the Secretary of State, Hartford, show land grants in favor of Edward: one of 200 acres; another of 100 acres given by the town of Killingworth. He showed the spirit of those early English settlers to accumulate large land holdings. They had 11 children:
      i. Francis Griswold [male], born about 1629, died 1 Oct 1671.
      ii. Sarah Griswold, christened 29 Jan 1631, died 6 Nov 1715.
      iii. George Griswold, christened 19 May 1633, died 3 Sep 1704.
      iv. John Griswold, christened 10 Jan 1635 in Kenilworth, Warwickshire, died 1642 in Windsor, Hartford, Connecticut.
      v. Lydia/Liddia Griswold, christened 17 Nov 1637 in Kenilworth, Warwickshire, England, died about 1637 in England, and was buried 1637 in England.
      vi. Ann (Hannah) Griswold, christened 19 Jun 1642, died 3 May 1714.
      vii. Mary Griswold, born 5 Oct 1644, died 1690.
      viii. Deborah Griswold, christened 28 Jun 1646, died 7 Feb 1717.
      ix. Joseph Griswold, born 12 Mar 1647, died 14 Nov 1716.
      x. Samuel Griswold, christened 18 Nov 1649 in Windsor, Hartford, Connecticut, died 6 Jul 1672 in Windsor, Hartford, Connecticut.
      xi. John Griswold, christened 1 Aug 1652, died 7 Aug 1717.
      Edward had 1 stepchild:
      xii. Mary Bemis, born 18 Nov 1654, died 27 Oct 1679.
      Edward married (2) Sarah Diamond before 25 Dec 1672. She was born about 1632 in Kenilworth, Warwickshire, England. She was the daughter of John Diamond and Rebecca (___). No children. Sarah also married (1) John Bemis."

      2. Henry R. Stiles, "The History and Genealogies of Ancient Windsor, Connecticut," 1892, v. 2, pp. 346-353:
      "Edward, born in Eng. about 1607; m. (1) 1630, in Eng., Margaret ___, who died 23 Aug 1670; her gravestone, inscribed "M.G., 1670,' is known as the oldest monument in Cong. Graveyard, Clinton (formerly Killingworth), Conn.; he m. (2) (1732 or '3, Sara (wid. of James) Bemis of New London.
      Mr. Edward Griswold came to America at the time of the second visit of Mr. George Fenwick, at which date, also, came a large number of new settlers to the Conn. settlement. It was a time when many of the gentry of England and wealthy persons connected with the Warwick patent were intending removel hither; but the breaking out of the Scotch Rebellion compelled King Charles to call a Parliament, and they stayed at home to carry on their struggle with the King and Archbishop Laud. Mr. Griswold undoubtedly came in the interest of some of these patentees. He was attorney for Mr. St. Nicholas of Warwickshire, who had a house built in Windsor, and also a tract of land 'impaled' (fenced), as had Sir Richard Saltonstall. The Rev. Ephraim Huit, who came, also, in 1639, was from the same parish, as, also, the Wyllys family, who settled at Hartford.
      His first location in Windsor is not known; but he had (see p. 157, Vol. I) a grant of land in Poquonok, to which he removed, in 1649, accompanied by a few families, who there found an 'outpost' settlement. His residence at P. was on the site of the present dwelling of the heirs of the late Eliphalet S. Ladd, and who, on the female side, are Griswold descendants. The spot is a beautiful knoll which overlooks the brook on the west, the Tunxis River on the south and east. As soon as he had fairly established his home, he began to take that active part in public matters which was natural to a man of his character. In 1650 he was a deputy from W. to the General Court, and continued, with the exception of one session, to represent the town until the reception of the charter from King Charles. At this time he was the principal promoter of a new settlement authorized by the court, called Hommonoscett, which lay immediatly west of Saybrook, and to which, about 1663, he removed with his younger children, deeding to his sons, George and Joseph, who remained behind, his W. lands, reserving a small life annuity therefrom. The settlement was organized as a town in 1667 and received, probably from him the name of his old English home Kenilworth, afterwards corrupted to Killingworth, and now known as Clinton. He was the first deputy from K., and continued to be its magistrate and representative for more than 20 years, 1662 to 1678-89, and was succeeded by his son John.
      The 'Col. Rec.' show him to have been a very active, influential menmber of the legislature - pre-eminently one of those men who, in the first half-century, did so much to make the small colony of Connecticut so important a factor in American affairs. As a member of Sessions, he had the pleasure of meeting with his brother Matthew and his one son Francis; and there has, since that time, rarely been an Assembly of Conn. in which some of their lineal descendants have not been members. He was frequently a commisisioner; and, in 1678, was on a committee for establishing a Latin school in New London, and was first deacon of the K. church. He died at K., it is said, in 1691, in 84th year. Children (all by 1st wife; *Kenilworth Engl. Rec.):
      A. Sarah, * b. 1631.
      B. George, * born in Eng., 1633. Rec'd (with his bro. Joseph) his father's W. lands, when the latter rem. to Killingworth; was also a large purchaser of lands from the Indians and an eminently respected citizen; freeman in 1654; he d. 3 Sep 1704; m. Mary (dau. Thos. Holcomb), 3 Oct 1665, who d. 4 Apr 1708.
      C. Francis, b. in Eng., 1635. Was made a freeman 1657, and, before his father left W., he had rem. to Saybrook, and thence to Norwich, Conn., of which he was a first proprietor and an active citizen, and which town he rep. in Gen Court from 1661 inclusive to 1671; he died Oct 1671. wife's name unknown.
      D. Liddia, * born Eng., 1637.
      E. Sarah, * b. in Eng., 1638; m. (1) Samuel (s. William, Sen) Phelps, 10 Nov 1650; (2) 21 July 1670, Nathaniel (s. Humphrey) Pinney.
      F. Ann, b. Windsor; bp. 19 Jun 1642 - O.C.R. and 'Col. Rec.'
      G. Mary, b. W.; bp. 13 Oct 1644; m. Timothy (s. William, Sen) Phelps, 19 Mar 1661.
      H. Deborah, b. and bp. W., 28 Jun 1646 (O.C.R.); m. Samuel (s. William) Buell, 1662; removed to Killingworth.
      I. Joseph, b. and bp. 12 Mar 1647. - O.C.R. - m. Mary (dau. of Samuel) Gaylord, 14 Jul 1670 (O.C.R.); res. W.; d 14 Nov 1716; will dated 6 Sep 1716 (Htfd. co. Prob.); his wife contrib. (the only G. that did so) to Conn. Fund for Relief of Poor of other Colonies, 1676, the sum of 2s. 6d. - O.R.
      J. Samuel, b. and bp. 18 Nov 1649 (O.C.R.); d. 6 Jul 1672.
      H. John, b. and bp. 1 Aug 1652. - O.C.R. - m. (1) Mary ___, who d. 27 Oct 1679; m. (2) Bathsheba ___, who d. 19 Mar 1736; rem. from W. to Kill., prob with his father, and there d. 7 Aug 1717; was a man of property, intelligence, and influence; deacon in ch.; invent. presented 7 Oct 1717, gave lands to sons Samuel, Joseph, Benjamin, and Walter."

      3. From the book "The Griswold Family: England-America," by Glenn E. Griswold, 1935, vols. 2 and 3, pps. 13-34:
      "...Edward died in his 84th year, his burial place being unknown, except it may be in the vacant space next to that of Margaret. The following children were born to Edward and Margaret; the first five were baptized in Kenilworth Parish, England; others are recorded in Windsor, Conn.:
      Sarah, b. 1631; d. y.
      George, b. 1633.
      Francis, b. 1635.
      Lydia, b. 1637; no further information.
      Sarah, b.1638.
      John, b. 1642; d. y.
      ANN, bapt. June 19, 1642.
      Mary, b. Oct. 5; bapt. Oct. 13, 1644.
      DEBORAH, bapt. June 28, 1646.
      Joseph, bapt. Mar. 12, 1647.
      Samuel; bapt. Nov. 18, 1646; d. July 6, 1672. His estate Feb. 26, 1672 (Hartford Probate, Mar. 1672/3).
      John, bapt. Aug. 1, 1652.

      4. The book "The Griswold Family, the First Five Generations in America," comp. and ed. by Esther Griswold French and Robert Lewis French, May 1990, printed by The Griswold Family Association, 116 Garden St., Wethersfield, CT, 06109, pages 6-24. The authors note that their book updates Vol. II, "The Griswold Family England - America," which was published 50 years ago. The following is a partial transcription regarding the children of Edward and Margaret of which the whole transcription can be seen in the notes of Edward Griswold:
      "...When the Rev. Ephraim Huit arrived in Windsor, Conn. with his congregation about Aug. 17, 1639 to assist the Rev. John Warham, Edward and Margaret Griswold, their four children: Francis, George, John and Sarah; and Edward's brother Matthew, were with the company (Savage's Genealogical Dictionary 2:316)...
      ...Although he was granted land at Poquonoc he did not move there until after the title of the Indians had been fully extinguished in 1642. He was resident there in 1649 with two other families, John Bartlett and Thomas Holcomb. His home stood near the highway at the top of the hill, and contained 29-1/2 acres bounded mostly south and west by Stony Brook and east by the river. His sons George and Joseph received the homestead when he moved to Hammonassett in 1663 with his son John and two daughters, Hannah Westover and Deborah Buell, with their families...
      Edward married (2) Sarah Dimond Bemis, daughter of John and Rebecca (Bemis) Dimond and widow of James Bemis, constable of New London, who died in 1665. Her daughter married as his first wife, John, youngest son of Edward and Margaret. The date of Edward's second marriage was before Dec 25, 1672 when a deed of gift to his son John was executed 'of and for natural affection and also for divers other good causes' giving John 'my housing and land lying and being in the the Township of Killingworth' for which John was to pay to:
      'Samuel son of ffrancis Griswold deceased ₤60 when he attains the age of 21 and if he dye before he be twenty-one years of age then John is to pay ₤5 a year to his six sisters the daughters of ffrancis. In case John dye childless and have no issue then the ₤60 or the ₤30 is to be returned by those that inherit the land to the widdow and relict of John Griswold or whom he shall bequeath it to. And all the above sayde land and housing so returne to the eldest sons of George, Joseph and Samuel Griswold the imediat sons of Edward Griswold Snr and if they have no sons then to their eldest daughters. Also the sayde John Griswold is to kepe all the housing in good repayre and to allow to my wife after my decease the use and benefit of the parlors and meadow to kepe two cowes during the time of her widdowhood. Also if John Griswold dye and have no issue his widdow is to enjoy the one halfe of the housing and lands during the time of her widdowhood. Witnesses: Tobias Hull, Jonas Westover. December 25, 1672.'
      Edward died in 1690 in his 84th year, his burial place being unknown, except it may be in the vacant space next to that of Margaret.
      Based on additional research, the order of birth and number of children of Edward and Margaret have been revised from that given in the earlier Griswold family genealogy. Kenilworth Parish Register entries show four children baptized there of which Lydia is the only one who did not come to this country, indicating she died as an infant in England. The first John died in 1642 in Windsor, Conn. The Kenilworth Parish Register begins with the year 1630 so no baptismal record has been found for Francis who was undoubtedly the oldest child, born about 1629 to have been married about 1652 at approximately 23 year of age. Sarah bp. Jan. 29, 1631/2 in Kenilworth is the logical one to have married in 1650. Savage's Genealogical Dictionary and the Kenilworth Parish Records refer to only one Sarah, born in England who came to Windsor with her parents in 1639. She would have been 18 years of age at the time of her marriage in 1650, not 15 nor 12 as has previously been asserted.
      Children, first five born in Kenilworth, England, the rest in Windsor, Conn.:
      Francis b. ca. 1629.
      Sarah, bp. 29 Jan 1631/2.
      George, bp. 19 May 1633.
      John, bp. 10 Jan 1635/6; d. 1642 Windsor, Conn.
      Lydia, bp. 17 Nov 1637; d. England before 1639.
      Ann (Hannah), bp. 19 Jun 1642.
      Mary, b. 5 Oct 1644.
      Deborah, bp. 28 June 1646.
      Joseph, bp. 12 Mar 1647/8.
      Samuel, bp. 18 Nov 1649; d. 6 Jul 1672. Inventory of his estate is dated 26 Feb 1672/3, probated 6 Mar 1672/3. His brother George was appointed administrator.
      John, bp. 1 Aug 1652.
      References: Parish Register, Kenilworth, England; Killingworth and Clinton, Conn. Records; Historic Families of America, p. 297; Conn. Society of Colonial Dames Register; Savage: Genealogical Dictionary of the First Settlers of New England II:316; Dimond Family pp. 13-14; Bemis Family p. 211; NEHGR Vol. V; Magazine of American History I:120-129; Wyllys Papers XXXI; Trumbull: Hartford County II:521, 548, 552; Hartford Probate Records; Stiles: Ancient Windsor I:71, 148, 157, 158; II:351; Anniversary of the First Church, Clinton, Conn. p. 25; Conn. Magazine VIII;489, 504; Booth and Allied Families; Caulkins: History of New London p. 283; History of Norwich, Conn. pp. 92, 176; Conn. Historical Society Collections XXII; Conn. Colony Records I, II, III; TAG 41:214."

      5. "The Connecticut Magazine," Third Quarter, 1908, No. 3, Vol. XII, pp. 323-329, Article: "Recent Investigations in Connecticut Genealogy - Griswolds of Windsor," by Mrs. Julia Welles Griswold Smith, deals mainly with later Griswolds, but does have the following interesting comment in speaking of the children of Edward and Margaret: "Francis settled at Norwich; Sarah and Mary married brothers Samuel and Lieutenant Timothy, sons of Mr. William Phelps, and the Phelps and Griswold families have intermarried ever since. Deborah married Samuel Buell of Killingworth and is recorded as of fine presence and strong character, sometimes written of as 'the mother of all the Buells' in Connecticut. About 1663, after years of public service, Edward, the emigrant, deeded his Windsor lands and house to his sons, George and Joseph, and with some younger children removed to the south shore of the colony and was one of the founders of Killingworth, now Clinton. Here English Margaret died and here her tombstone stands today marked 'M.G. 1670.'
      Edward immediately entered public life in Killingworth as in Windsor, as shown in Stiles and Salisbury Histories, but returning to Windsor for his last years, died in 1691. His sons, George and Joseph, who had remained there, are the ancestors of Windsor Griswolds...
      Windsor had its real estate boom in 1640-50, when land was held at high prices and then dropped, for the obvious reason that if they could not pay Windsor prices there was plenty more land all about.
      The Griswolds for many generations were large land-holders. Edward, first settler, had large acreage. George also bought of the Indians and was man of wealth and importance in Poquonoc. Windsor is an elastic term and includes much of what is since Poquonoc, Simsbury, Tarriffville, East Granby, and so forth. Samuel's property was some of the most beautiful in the state, nearly 500 acres, with views of Farmington River where it breaks through the Talcott Mountains and most romantic scenes of valley and mountain. Tarriffville used to be called Griswold Mills..."