Edward Griswold

Male 1607 - 1691  (83 years)


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  • Name Edward Griswold 
    Born 26 Jul 1607  Wooten Wawen, Warwick, England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    Died 1690/1691  Windsor, Hartford, Connecticut, United States Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Buried 1690/1691  Clinton Cemetery, Killingworth (now Clinton), Middlesex, Connecticut, United States Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID I1952  Petersen-de Lanskoy
    Last Modified 21 Jan 2014 

    Father George Griswold,   c. 6 Nov 1574, Wooten Wawen, Warwick, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   bur. Abt 1623, of, Warwick, England Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 48 years) 
    Mother Dousabel Leigh,   b. Abt 1575,   bur. 28 Aug 1615, Wooten Wawen, Warwick, England Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 40 years) 
    Family ID F1873  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 1 Margaret,   b. Abt 1609,   d. 23 Aug 1670, Killingworth (now Clinton), Middlesex, Connecticut, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 61 years) 
    Married Abt 1628  of Kenilworth, Warwick, England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
     1. Francis Griswold,   b. Abt 1629, Kenilworth, Warwick, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1 Oct 1671, Norwich, New London, Connecticut, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 42 years)
     2. Sarah Griswold,   c. 29 Jan 1631, Kenilworth, Warwick, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   bur. 28 Dec 1634, Kenilworth, Warwick, England Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 3 years)
     3. George Griswold,   c. 19 May 1633, Kenilworth, Warwick, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 3 Sep 1704, Poquonoc, Hartford, Connecticut, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 71 years)
     4. Sarah Griswold,   c. 10 Jan 1635, Kenilworth, Warwick, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 6 Nov 1715, of, Hartford, Connecticut, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 80 years)
     5. John Griswold,   c. 10 Jan 1635/1636, Kenilworth, Warwick, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1642, Windsor, Hartford, Connecticut, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 5 years)
     6. Lydia or Liddia Griswold,   c. 17 Nov 1637, Kenilworth, Warwick, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Abt 1637, of Kenilworth, Warwick, England Find all individuals with events at this location
     7. Anne or Hannah Griswold,   c. 19 Jun 1642, Windsor, Hartford, Connecticut, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 3 May 1714, Simsbury, Hartford, Connecticut, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 71 years)
    +8. Mary Griswold,   b. 5 Oct 1644, Windsor, Hartford, Connecticut, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. From 1717 to 1719, Windsor, Hartford, Connecticut, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 72 years)
     9. Deborah Griswold,   c. 28 Jun 1646, Windsor, Hartford, Connecticut, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 7 Feb 1717, Killingworth (now Clinton), Middlesex, Connecticut, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 70 years)
     10. Joseph Griswold,   b. 12 Mar 1647/1648, Windsor, Hartford, Connecticut, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 14 Nov 1716, Windsor, Hartford, Connecticut, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 68 years)
     11. Samuel Griswold,   b. 18 Nov 1649, Windsor, Hartford, Connecticut, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 6 Jul 1672, Windsor, Hartford, Connecticut, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 22 years)
     12. John Griswold,   c. 1 Aug 1652, Windsor, Hartford, Connecticut, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 7 Aug 1717, Killingworth (now Clinton), Middlesex, Connecticut, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 65 years)
    Last Modified 22 Oct 2015 
    Family ID F1035  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 2 Sarah Diamond,   b. Abt 1632, Kenilworth, Warwick, England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Married From 1670 to 25 Dec 1672  of Clinton, Middlesex, Connecticut, United States Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Last Modified 22 Oct 2015 
    Family ID F1874  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Notes 
    • RESEARCH_NOTES:
      1. FHL book 929.242 G868f "The Greswold Family, 12 Generations in England," researched and edited by Robert L. and Esther G. French, comp. by Coralee Griswold [Wethersfeld, CT; 1999]. The authors standardize spelling as Greswold for England and Griswold for America. As of 2012, it appears that this book is the most current evolution of the Griswold ancestry and includes all previous research up to 1999 when it was published. (It also supersedes the author's own work in 1990 for the later English generations). See notes in this database of the original Griswold for a more detailed explanation of the various sources and a bibliography of previously published books that the authors include in this genealogical compilation.
      "Edward12 Griswold (George11, Roger10, John9, John8, John7, John6, John5, William4, Richard3, Ralph2, John1) was christened 26 Jul 1607 in Wooton Wawen, Warwickshire, England. In lieu of a will, Edward on Christmas Day, 1672, signed a conditional inheritance deed of his property to his son John, who was to pay certain legacies; but Edward did not die until 30 Aug 1691, in Killingworth, Middlesex, Connecticut, at the age of 84, and was buried in the Indian River Cemetery in Killingworth, Middlesex, Connecticut. He married (1) Margaret (___) about 1628 in England. ["New England Genealogy," Vol. 1, p.250, cites her surname as HICKS, but the Robert Hicks family was already in Plymouth as of 1621. Records indicate Margaret and Edward were married in England after this date.] She was born about 1609. Margaret died 23 Aug 1670 in Killingworth, Middlesex, Connecticut, and was buried in the cemetery behind the Congregational Church, in Killingworth (now Clinton), Middlesex, Connecticut. Her stone being the oldest marked, "M.G., 1670."
      When the Rev. Ephraim Huit arrived in Windsor, Connecticut with his congregation about 17 Aug 1639 to assist the Rev. John Warham, Edward and Margaret Griswold, their four children: Francis, George, John and Sarah; and Edward's brother Matthew, were with the company. ["Savage's Genealogical Dictionary," Vol. 2, p. 316.] In his own deposition, dated 15 May 1684, Edward stated that he was then aged about seventy-seven years and that, "about the year 1639 Mr. William Whiting, Dec'd, was Undertaker [financial sponsor] for a shipp in England, in which Shipp I came to New England." [Ferris, "Dawes-Gates Ancestral Lines"; Gates & Allied Families; Vol. II; p. 399.] Mr. Huit had been pastor at Knowle and Wroxall, Warwickshire, England. A writer of note upon religious subjects and a powerful preacher of the Puritan faith, he was censured for his non-conformity and silenced by the Bishop of Worcester. This no doubt was the cause of his moving to New England with the company he organized, of which both Edward and Matthew were members.
      Edward speedily became prominent in the affairs of the new community and was frequently mentioned in colonial records. He served as deputy to the General Court from 18 Aug 1658 to 14 Mar 1660 and again from 15 May 1662 to 11 Mar 1663. Edward served repeatedly on juries, at least two of which, in 1651 and 1662, deliberated on witchcraft cases and brought in verdicts of guilty. In 1659 he was one of the men from Windsor to build the fort at Springfield for Mr. Pynchon. He also served as Justice of the Peace.
      Although he was granted land at Poquonoc he did not move there until after the title of the Indians had been fully extinguished in 1642. He was resident there in 1649 with two other families, John Bartlett and Thomas Holcomb. His home stood near the highway at the top of the hill, and contained 29-1/2 acres bounded mostly south and west by Stony Brook and east by the river. His sons George and Joseph received the homestead when he moved to Hammonassett in 1663 with his son John and two daughters, Hannah Westover and Deborah Buell, with their families.
      The present Clinton, Connecticut is the original Killingworth; Main Street is the identical ground where the first settlers took their home lots. These were surveyed in 1663 by Byron Rossiter of Guiliford. Edward was one of the first settlers and doubtless suggested the name from Kenilworth Parish in England. He was the most prominent man in the new settlement and must be given full credit for first organizing this community. He was its first deputy to the General Court. He, with his two sons-in-law, were recorded as freeman in 1669.
      Edward was instrumental in organizing the first church and was its first deacon. He frequently served on important civil matters; his services, counsel and guidance evidently much sought. He also served on the committee to establish a Latin school at New London.
      Ancient land records on file at the office of the Secretary of State, Hartford, show land grants in favor of Edward: one of 200 acres; another of 100 acres given by the town of Killingworth. He showed the spirit of those early English settlers to accumulate large land holdings. They had 11 children:
      i. Francis Griswold [male], born about 1629, died 1 Oct 1671.
      ii. Sarah Griswold, christened 29 Jan 1631, died 6 Nov 1715.
      iii. George Griswold, christened 19 May 1633, died 3 Sep 1704.
      iv. John Griswold, christened 10 Jan 1635 in Kenilworth, Warwickshire, died 1642 in Windsor, Hartford, Connecticut.
      v. Lydia/Liddia Griswold, christened 17 Nov 1637 in Kenilworth, Warwickshire, England, died about 1637 in England, and was buried 1637 in England.
      vi. Ann (Hannah) Griswold, christened 19 Jun 1642, died 3 May 1714.
      vii. Mary Griswold, born 5 Oct 1644, died 1690.
      viii. Deborah Griswold, christened 28 Jun 1646, died 7 Feb 1717.
      ix. Joseph Griswold, born 12 Mar 1647, died 14 Nov 1716.
      x. Samuel Griswold, christened 18 Nov 1649 in Windsor, Hartford, Connecticut, died 6 Jul 1672 in Windsor, Hartford, Connecticut.
      xi. John Griswold, christened 1 Aug 1652, died 7 Aug 1717.
      Edward had 1 stepchild:
      xii. Mary Bemis, born 18 Nov 1654, died 27 Oct 1679.
      Edward married (2) Sarah Diamond before 25 Dec 1672. She was born about 1632 in Kenilworth, Warwickshire, England. She was the daughter of John Diamond and Rebecca (___). No children. Sarah also married (1) John Bemis."

      2. The book "The Griswold Family, the First Five Generations in America," comp. and ed. by Esther Griswold French and Robert Lewis French, May 1990, printed by The Griswold Family Association, 116 Garden St., Wethersfield, CT, 06109, pages 6-24. The authors note that their book updates Vol. II, "The Griswold Family England - America," which was published 50 years ago:
      "Edward was baptized July 26, 1607 at Wooten Wawen, Warwickshire, England. He was the son of George Griswold born Nov. 6, 1574, and his first wife Dousabel (possibly Leigh, Lye, Ley) who was buried Aug. 28, 1615 at Wooten Wawen. Edward married ca. 1628 Margaret (surname unknown) who was born ca. 1609, making her age 20 at the birth of her first child and 43 when her last child was born. Margaret died Aug. 23, 1670 at Clinton, originally Killingworth, Conn. Her gravestone marked 'M.G. 1670' is the oldest stone in the cemetery behind the Congregational Church in Clinton. However it does not show the patient devotion nor the hardship endured in rearing her family in that vast wilderness.
      When the Rev. Ephraim Huit arrived in Windsor, Conn. with his congregation about Aug. 17, 1639 to assist the Rev. John Warham, Edward and Margaret Griswold, their four children: Francis, George, John and Sarah; and Edward's brother Matthew, were with the company (Savage's Genealogical Dictionary 2:316). Mr. Huit had been pastor at Knowle and Wroxall, Warwickshire, England; Wroxall being a part of Kenilworth Parish. A writer of note upon religious subjects and a powerful preacher of the Puritan faith, he was censured for his non-conformity and silenced by the Bishop of Worcester. This no doubt was the cause of his moving to New England with the company he orgainzed, of which both Edward and Matthew were members.
      Edward speedily became prominent in the affairs of the new community and was frequently mentioned in colonial records. He served as deputy to the General Court from Aug. 18, 1658 - Mar. 14, 1660 and again from May 15, 1662 - Mar. 11, 1663. In 1659 he was one of the men form Windsor to build the fort at Springfield for Mr. Pynchon. He also served as Justice of Peace. Although he was granted land at Poquonoc he did not move there until after the title of the Indians had been fully extinguished in 1642. He was resident there in 1649 with two other families, John Bartlett and Thomas Holcomb. His home stood near the highway at the top of the hill, and contained 29-1/2 acres bounded mostly south and west by Stony Brook and east by the river. His sons George and Joseph received the homestead when he moved to Hammonassett in 1663 with his son John and two daughters, Hannah Westover and Deborah Buell, with their families.
      The present Clinton, Conn. is the original Killingworth; Main Street is the identical ground where the first settlers took their home lots. These were surveyed in 1663 by Byron Rossiter of Guilford. Edward was one of the first settlers and doubtless suggested the name from Kenilworth parish in England. He was the most prominent man in the new settlement and must be given full credit for first organizing this community. He was its first deputy to the General Court. He, with his two sons-in-law, were recorded as freemen in 1669.
      Edward was instrumental in organizing the first church and was its first deacon. He frequently served on important civil matters; his servieces, counsel and guidance evidently much sought. He also served on the committee to establish a Latin scholl at New London.
      Ancient land records on file at the office of the Secretary of State, Hartford, show land grants in favor of Edward: one of 200 acres; another of 100 acres given by the town of Killingworth. He showed the spirit of those early English settlers to accumulate large land holdings.
      Edward married (2) Sarah Dimond Bemis, daughter of John and Rebecca (Bemis) Dimond and widow of James Bemis, constable of New London, who died in 1665. Her daughter married as his first wife, John, youngest son of Edward and Margaret. The date of Edward's second marriage was before Dec 25, 1672 when a deed of gift to his son John was executed 'of and for natural affection and also for divers other good causes' giving John 'my housing and land lying and being in the the Township of Killingworth' for which John was to pay to:
      'Samuel son of ffrancis Griswold deceased ₤60 when he attains the age of 21 and if he dye before he be twenty-one years of age then John is to pay ₤5 a year to his six sisters the daughters of ffrancis. In case John dye childless and have no issue then the ₤60 or the ₤30 is to be returned by those that inherit the land to the widdow and relict of John Griswold or whom he shall bequeath it to. And all the above sayde land and housing so returne to the eldest sons of George, Joseph and Samuel Griswold the imediat sons of Edward Griswold Snr and if they have no sons then to their eldest daughters. Also the sayde John Griswold is to kepe all the housing in good repayre and to allow to my wife after my decease the use and benefit of the parlors and meadow to kepe two cowes during the time of her widdowhood. Also if John Griswold dye and have no issue his widdow is to enjoy the one halfe of the housing and lands during the time of her widdowhood. Witnesses: Tobias Hull, Jonas Westover. December 25, 1672.'
      Edward died in 1690 in his 84th year, his burial place being unknown, except it may be in the vacant space next to that of Margaret.
      Based on additional research, the order of birth and number of children of Edward and Margaret have been revised from that given in the earlier Griswold family genealogy. Kenilworth Parish Register entries show four children baptized there of which Lydia is the only one who did not come to this country, indicating she died as an infant in England. The first John died in 1642 in Windsor, Conn. The Kenilworth Parish Register begins with the year 1630 so no baptismal record has been found for Francis who was undoubtedly the oldest child, born about 1629 to have been married about 1652 at approximately 23 year of age. Sarah bp. Jan. 29, 1631/2 in Kenilworth is the logical one to have married in 1650. Savage's Genealogical Dictionary and the Kenilworth Parish Records refer to only one Sarah, born in England who came to Windsor with her parents in 1639. She would have been 18 years of age at the time of her marriage in 1650, not 15 nor 12 as has previously been asserted.
      Children, first five born in Kenilworth, England, the rest in Windsor, Conn.:
      Francis b. ca. 1629.
      Sarah, bp. 29 Jan 1631/2.
      George, bp. 19 May 1633.
      John, bp. 10 Jan 1635/6; d. 1642 Windsor, Conn.
      Lydia, bp. 17 Nov 1637; d. England before 1639.
      Ann (Hannah), bp. 19 Jun 1642.
      Mary, b. 5 Oct 1644.
      Deborah, bp. 28 June 1646.
      Joseph, bp. 12 Mar 1647/8.
      Samuel, bp. 18 Nov 1649; d. 6 Jul 1672. Inventory of his estate is dated 26 Feb 1672/3, probated 6 Mar 1672/3. His brother George was appointed administrator.
      John, bp. 1 Aug 1652.
      References: Parish Register, Kenilworth, England; Killingworth and Clinton, Conn. Records; Historic Families of America, p. 297; Conn. Society of Colonial Dames Register; Savage: Genealogical Dictionary of the First Settlers of New England II:316; Dimond Family pp. 13-14; Bemis Family p. 211; NEHGR Vol. V; Magazine of American History I:120-129; Wyllys Papers XXXI; Trumbull: Hartford County II:521, 548, 552; Hartford Probate Records; Stiles: Ancient Windsor I:71, 148, 157, 158; II:351; Anniversary of the First Church, Clinton, Conn. p. 25; Conn. Magazine VIII;489, 504; Booth and Allied Families; Caulkins: History of New London p. 283; History of Norwich, Conn. pp. 92, 176; Conn. Historical Society Collections XXII; Conn. Colony Records I, II, III; TAG 41:214."

      3. The book "The Phelps Family of America and their English Ancestors," comp. by Oliver Seymour Phelps of Portland, Oregon and Andrew T. Servin of Lenox, Massachusetts, 1899, pp. 88-89:
      "Samuel Phelps, b. England, about 1625, emigrated to New England with his father, in ship Mary and John, settling with his father in Dorchester, removing from there to settling of Windsor, Ct., in 1635-6, where he m. Sarah Griswold, and b. Kenilworth, England, and came to New England with her father in 1639. After the death of Mr. Phelps, she m. 2nd Nathaniel Pinney, 21st July, 1670, and had Nathaniel Pinney b. 11th May, 1671, and Sarah Pinney b. 11th Oct., 1673. Mrs. Pinney died 6th Nov., 1715. [Nathaniel Pinney was the brother of Sarah Pinney who married Samuel Phelps' brother William.]
      Mr. Phelps bought 1st Oct., 1657, Thomas Orton's house and land south of road separating it from his father's homestead, and brother William's: the house stood on the rear of the lot just opposite his father's house. This lot was a triangular shape, 4 rods on the rivulet, 60 rods on east and west road, 40 rods on Mill road, and 47 rods on the southeast line. The rear of this lot and house he sold to his brother Nathaniel, and removed to Poquonock, where he had received a grant of land, and where he also bought John Bartlett's place east of Stony Creek, and north of Thomas Holcomb's, and running east of the rivulet. Here he died 15th May, 1669. He witnessed a deed of land to his father by the Indians in 1666.
      January 8th, 1660, he paid rates for short slips, 7 shillings, highest amount assessed that year.
      Town Records - 24th May, 1669, 'There was a day of training; by reason of the death of Samuel Phelps, voted that Benjamin Holcomb supply his place as Way Warden.'
      (Noted - Edward and Matthew Griswold, two brothers, the latter of whom was the ancestor of the two Govs. Griswold, resided in Kenilworth, England, where they had a third brother, Thomas. These two brothers came to New England in 1639, in a vessel sent out by Mr. William Whitney. Edward b. in England, 1607, settled in that part of Windsor, called Poquonock, m. 1st Margaret, and later settled in Killingworth, Ct., one of the first settlers, and a prominent man. His wife died Aug 22nd, 1670. (A slab may be seen in the Clinton, Ct., burying ground, 7 in. by 2-1/2 ft., with inscription M.G. 1670.) Had eleven children all by 1st wife. He m. 2nd Sarah Bemis, daughter of James Bemis, of New London; of his children a daughter Sarah, m. Samuel Phelps, and. m. Nathaniel Pinney. Another daughter, Mary, m. Timothy Phelps son of William the emigrant of 1630.)

      4. Henry R. Stiles, "The History and Genealogies of Ancient Windsor, Connecticut," 1892, v. 2, pp. 346-353:
      "The Connecticut Griswolds are descended from Edward and Matthew, who came to Windsor in 1639, and from Michael, who, some years later, came to Wethersfield. There appears to have been no relationship between the latter and the brothers Griswold of Windsor. [See footnote #1 below.]
      Edward and Matthew came from Kenilworth, Co. Warwick, Eng., in the year 1639, in company with Rev. Mr. Huit's party, who came to Windsor that year. [See footnote #2 below.] They had lived at Kenilworth [see footnote #3 below] and owned property there; but we know not whether it was their birthplace. They had a brother Thomas [see footnote #3 below], who continued to reside there, and the record of his marriage, in 1634, is still to be found in the old Kenilworth Church records, also the baptisms of several of the children of Edward, and the burial of a daughter, but the old church records of K. suffered greatly from the ravages of the War of the Great Rebellion, it has been found impossible to find any other connecting links between that parish and the two emigrant brothers. [See footnote #4 below.]
      It has been claimed that they belonged to the ancient county family of Solihull, near Kenilworth, and, as such, entitled to the use of the family arms, but there exists no evidence to prove the claim. Indeed, all that has been said in regard to their relationship to Humphrey Greswold, lord of the manor of Greet in Yardley, and also rector of Yardley parish; or of their connection with the Greswolds who held Malvern Hall in Solihull, has no foundation in fact, and can be proved untrue.. There is a tradition that the name of their father was George, concerning which see Prof. Salisbury's genealogical article referred to on... [see footnote #6].
      Whatever their local antecedents and connections in England, it is certain that the emigrant brothers Griswold were men of education and property' and, after their arrival in the new colony, were always styled 'Mr.,' which was then equivalent to 'gentleman,' as distinguished from yeomen or tradesmen. Both brothers, though young men when they came to this country (Edward being then 32 and Matthew 19 years old), speedily allied themselves with the best social element of Windsor, took positions of commanding influence, and quickly became prominent in colonial affairs. 'Besides, if it be a principle of heredity that the characteristics, physical, intellectual, moral, and social, of a strongly marked ancestor are repeated in his descendants, so that form the offspring may be inferred what was the progenitor, then, apart form all we know of the first generation of the Griswolds of New England, the qualities developed by succeeding generations of the family have been an accumulating proof that its emigrant ancestors were high-minded, intelligent, Christian 'gentlemen.'''
      Matthew Griswold, the younger brother, did not long remain at Windsor, though (see page 75, Vol. I.) he came very near being a permanent resident here, and we will therefore discuss his history first. Coming to Windsor, 1639, being then 19 years old, he m. 16 Oct 1646, Anna (dau. of Henry Sr. and Elizabeth Saunders) Wolcott of Windsor, and, between that date and 1649/50, removed to Saybrook as agent for Col. Fenwick. He speedily assumed a prominence at that place; was Deputy to the General Court in 1654, and, in the same year, was directed by the Court to go with Capt. Mason to Pequitt and join with Gov. Winthrop to draw the lines between that towne and Uncas, etc. He was largely instrumental in the movements which led up to the settlement of Lyme, on the other side of the Great River, and became the leading and wealthiest man in that town, which was set off from Saybrook in 1665/6. He was frequently a Deputy and Commissioner, Justice of the Peace, Lieutenant of the Trainband, etc. His landed possessions soon assumed baronial proportions, especially upon the shores of Long Island Sound, where, near the mouth of the Connecticut River, he established 'Backhall,' since the family seat of the Griswolds of Lyme.
      He died at Lyme, Conn., 27 Sep 1698, and was buried at Saybrook. His wid. survived him, and was living in Sep 1700, age about 80 yrs. Their children were (1) Elizabeth, b. about 1652; m. (1) John Rogers of N. London; m. (2) Peter Pratt; m. (3) Matthew Beckwith. (2) 'Mr.' Matthews. (3) John, d. young. (4) Sarah, b. abt. 1655; m. Thos. Colton. (5) Anna, b. about 1656; m. Lieut. Abraham Bronson, and was the ancestress of Hon. Henry Matson Waite, until 1854 the Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of Connecticut, and of the late U.S. Chief Justice Morrison Remick Waite.
      Through their only surviving son, Mr. Matthew, b. 1653, who followed in the footsteps of his father in public life, and died full of honors in 1715, they founded a family 'that has been unusually free from the vicissitudes which are apt, in the course of many generations of a family, to occur to lower the social standing of some of its persons, or branches.' Those who would study a singular and (in American family history) an almost unparalleled prominence in public affairs and in intellectual ability, are referred to the Appendix to the Wolcott Genealogy in this work, and to 'The Griswold Family of Connecticut' (already referred to), by Prof. Edward E. Salisbury of New Haven, Conn., an exceedingly interesting and gracefully penned contribution to Connecticut genealogy. [See footnote #6.]
      Edward [see footnote #7], born in Eng. about 1607; m. (1) 1630, in Eng., Margaret ___, who died 23 Aug 1670; her gravestone, inscribed "M.G., 1670,' is known as the oldest monument in Cong. Graveyard, Clinton (formerly Killingworth), Conn.; he m. (2) (1732 or '3, Sara (wid. of James) Bemis of New London.
      Mr. Edward Griswold came to America at the time of the second visit of Mr. George Fenwick, at which date, also, came a large number of new settlers to the Conn. settlement. It was a time when many of the gentry of England and wealthy persons connected with the Warwick patent were intending removal hither; but the breaking out of the Scotch Rebellion compelled King Charles to call a Parliament, and they stayed at home to carry on their struggle with the King and Archbishop Laud. Mr. Griswold undoubtedly came in the interest of some of these patentees. He was attorney for Mr. St. Nicholas of Warwickshire, who had a house built in Windsor, and also a tract of land 'impaled' (fenced), as had Sir Richard Saltonstall. The Rev. Ephraim Huit, who came, also, in 1639, was from the same parish, as, also, the Wyllys family, who settled at Hartford.
      His first location in Windsor is not known; but he had (see p. 157, Vol. I) a grant of land in Poquonok, to which he removed, in 1649, accompanied by a few families, who there found an 'outpost' settlement. His residence at P. was on the site of the present dwelling of the heirs of the late Eliphalet S. Ladd, and who, on the female side, are Griswold descendants. The spot is a beautiful knoll which overlooks the brook on the west, the Tunxis River on the south and east. As soon as he had fairly established his home, he began to take that active part in public matters which was natural to a man of his character. In 1650 he was a deputy from W. to the General Court, and continued, with the exception of one session, to represent the town until the reception of the charter from King Charles. At this time he was the principal promoter of a new settlement authorized by the court, called Hommonoscett, which lay immediately west of Saybrook, and to which, about 1663, he removed with his younger children, deeding to his sons, George and Joseph, who remained behind, his W. lands, reserving a small life annuity there from. The settlement was organized as a town in 1667 and received, probably from him the name of his old English home Kenilworth, afterwards corrupted to Killingworth, and now known as Clinton. He was the first deputy from K., and continued to be its magistrate and representative for more than 20 years, 1662 to 1678-89, and was succeeded by his son John.
      The 'Col. Rec.' show him to have been a very active, influential member of the legislature - pre-eminently one of those men who, in the first half-century, did so much to make the small colony of Connecticut so important a factor in American affairs. As a member of Sessions, he had the pleasure of meeting with his brother Matthew and his one son Francis; and there has, since that time, rarely been an Assembly of Conn. in which some of their lineal descendants have not been members. He was frequently a commissioner; and, in 1678, was on a committee for establishing a Latin school in New London, and was first deacon of the K. church. He died at K., it is said, in 1691, in 84th year. Children (all by 1st wife; *Kenilworth Engl. Rec.):
      A. Sarah, * b. 1631.
      B. George, * born in Eng., 1633. Rec'd (with his bro. Joseph) his father's W. lands, when the latter rem. to Killingworth; was also a large purchaser of lands from the Indians and an eminently respected citizen; freeman in 1654; he d. 3 Sep 1704; m. Mary (dau. Thos. Holcomb), 3 Oct 1665, who d. 4 Apr 1708.
      C. Francis, b. in Eng., 1635. Was made a freeman 1657, and, before his father left W., he had rem. to Saybrook, and thence to Norwich, Conn., of which he was a first proprietor and an active citizen, and which town he rep. in Gen Court from 1661 inclusive to 1671; he died Oct 1671. wife's name unknown.
      D. Liddia, * born Eng., 1637.
      E. Sarah, * b. in Eng., 1638; m. (1) Samuel (s. William, Sen.) Phelps, 10 Nov 1650; (2) 21 July 1670, Nathaniel (s. Humphrey) Pinney.
      F. Ann, b. Windsor; bp. 19 Jun 1642 - O.C.R. and 'Col. Rec.'
      G. Mary, b. W.; bp. 13 Oct 1644; m. Timothy (s. William, Sen.) Phelps, 19 Mar 1661.
      H. Deborah, b. and bp. W., 28 Jun 1646 (O.C.R.); m. Samuel (s. William) Buell, 1662; removed to Killingworth.
      I. Joseph, b. and bp. 12 Mar 1647. - O.C.R. - m. Mary (dau. of Samuel) Gaylord, 14 Jul 1670 (O.C.R.); res. W.; d 14 Nov 1716; will dated 6 Sep 1716 (Htfd. co. Prob.); his wife contrib. (the only G. that did so) to Conn. Fund for Relief of Poor of other Colonies, 1676, the sum of 2s. 6d. - O.R.
      J. Samuel, b. and bp. 18 Nov 1649 (O.C.R.); d. 6 Jul 1672.
      H. John, b. and bp. 1 Aug 1652. - O.C.R. - m. (1) Mary ___, who d. 27 Oct 1679; m. (2) Bathsheba ___, who d. 19 Mar 1736; rem. from W. to Kill., prob. with his father, and there d. 7 Aug 1717; was a man of property, intelligence, and influence; deacon in ch.; invent. presented 7 Oct 1717, gave lands to sons Samuel, Joseph, Benjamin, and Walter."
      Footnotes:
      1. Michael Griswold's Eng. origin is unknown; he d. 1684, his will and the wills of his sons being now on file in 'Htfd. Co. Prob. Rec.' One of the grandsons, Capt. Jacob, was a first settler in Litchfield; another, Maj. Josiah, was famous as a soldier in the French War.
      2. See pp. 74 and 75. The affidavit of Edward, then aged about 77 yrs., as given May 15, 1684, in the celebrated case of Henry Whiting's sons vs. John Bissell, says; 'About the yeare 1639, Mr. Wm. Whiting (deceased) was undertaker for a shipp in England, in which shipp I came to New England': and his brother Matthew (then aged 64) in his affidavit made in the same suit, says: 'Further I testifie that, when I came over to New England about the year 1639.' - 'State Archives, Private Controversies,' Vol. II, Doc. 203, 204.
      3. From 'New London Prob. Rec.': Georg Griswold, aged about 67 yeares, testifyeth as follows: that in his youthfull years he lived with his father in England, in a town called Keillinsworth (Kenilworth was, in Queen Elizabeth's time, called Killingworth), in Warrackshire; he did several times since hear his father Edward Griswould say that the house they then lived in, and lands belonging thereto, was his brother Mathew Griswold's; and have lately seen a letter under the hand of Thomas Griswould of Keilinsworth aboves'd, directed to his brother Mathew Griswould aforesaid, wherein the said Thomas Griswould intimated that he did then live in the abovesaid house belonging to his said brother Mathew Griswould aforesaid.
      'May 9th, 1700. George Griswould appeared before me in Hartford, and made oath to ye above testimony. Joseph Curtiss, Assistant.'
      4. The reference to one Francis Grissell by Dr. J. Hammond Trumbull, mentioned in 'Calend. State Papers, Col. Series,' 1474-1660, 'Lond., and Mag. Am. History,' pp. 121-22, Vol. XI, is all founded on a mistake in spelling. There was no Francis or other Grissell among the Dorchester settlers, and the fact mentioned refers to a person of another name.
      5. The large views of Matthew, very much in advance of his time, are well illustrated by the following item from 'Windsor Town Records': 'April 23d 1663, Hannah Griswold, wife of Matthew Griswold, has a portion of meadow-Land in Windsor Great Meadow, twelve acres more or less... this comes to her as part of her portion that fell to her by the Last will of her brother Christopher Wolcott Dec'd, out of his Estate that was to be Devided among his Relations; and this parcel of meadow is allowed by her Husband Matthew Griswold to be Recorded and made over to Hannah his wife, to remain to her and her children, and their Dispose forever.'
      6. Prof. Salisbury, also, disposes satisfactorily of the tradition that Matthew Griswold was a stone-mason, and that he cut the tombstone of Henry Wolcott in Old Windsor Cemetery.

      5. From the book "The Griswold Family: England-America," by Glenn E. Griswold:
      B. 1935 Edition: "Edward Griswold.
      Born in England, 1607; m. there about 1630, Margaret, whose family name and parentage have not been disclosed; neither have we actual records of his birth and mar­riage.
      About Aug. 17, 1639, Rev. Ephraim Huit arrived in Windsor, Connecticut with his company and immediately entered upon his labors assisting Rev. John Warham.
      Rev. Huit had been pastor at Knowle and Wroxall, Warwick­shire, England, Wroxall being a part of Kenilworth Parish. He was a writer of note upon religious subjects and a. powerful preacher of the Puritan faith; he was censured for his non­conformity and silenced by the Bishop of Worcester, which, no doubt, was the moving cause of his organizing his company and for his removal to New England. Edward and Matthew Gris­wold were members of this company, and for this reason it had been thought that the records of Knowle and Wroxall would disclose some clue to the parentage of our ancestors, but thus far they are silent.
      Edward was of the sturdy intellectual type and speedily became prominent in the affairs of the new community, exceedingly active, and was frequently mentioned in colonial records. Served as deputy to the General Court Aug. 18, 1658-Mar. 14, 1660, and May 15, 1662-Mar. 11, 1663. In 1659 he built the Old Fort at Springfield for Mr. Pynchon. Also served as J. P. He was granted land at Poquonoc but he did not remove there until after the title of the Indians had been fully extinguished, 1642. But he was resi­dent there, with two other families, John Bartlett and Thomas Holcomb, in 1649. His home stood near the highway at the top of the hill; had 29 1/2 acres bounded mostly south and west by Stony Brook; east by the river. His sons George and Joseph inherited the homestead.
      In 1663, with his son John, Edward removed to Hammonassett, later called Killingworth.
      The present Clinton, Conn., is the original Killingworth; Main Street is the identical ground where the first settlers took their home lots. These were surveyed in 1663 by Byron Rossiter of Guilford. Edward was one of the first settlers and doubtless suggested the name from Kenilworth Parish in England, and was the most prominent man in the new settlement and must be given full credit for first organizing this community. He was its first deputy to the General Court.
      Among the names entered as planters by the committee we find Edward Griswold, Samuel Buell, and Jonas Westover and in 1669 these were recorded as freemen.
      Edward was largely instrumental in organizing the first church and was its first deacon. Frequently served on important civil matters, his services, counsel and guidance evidently much sought. Served on the committee to establish a Latin school at New London.
      Ancient land records on file at the office of the Secretary of State, Hartford, Conn., show land grants in favor of Edward; one of 200 acres; another of 100 acres given by the town of Killing­worth; he was a large land holder showing the spirit of those English settlers to accumulate large land holdings.
      Margaret died Aug. 23, 1670, and is buried in the Congrega­tional cemetery at Clinton, Conn., her gravestone marked 'M.G. 1670' is the oldest monument. However it does not show or indicate the patient devotion nor the hardship endured in that vast wilderness in rearing her family.
      Edward married second, 1673, Sarah Bemis, widow of James Bemis, constable of New London, who died in 1665. She was the daughter of John and Rebecca (Bemis) Dimond.
      Edward died in his 84th year, his burial place being unknown, except it may be in the vacant space next to that of Margaret. The following children were born to Edward and Margaret; the first five were baptized in Kenilworth Parish, England; others are recorded in Windsor, Conn.:
      Sarah, b. 1631; d. y.
      George, b. 1633.
      Francis, b. 1635.
      Lydia, b. 1637; no further information.
      Sarah, b.1638.
      John, b. 1642; d. y.
      ANN, bapt. June 19, 1642.
      Mary, b. Oct. 5; bapt. Oct. 13, 1644.
      DEBORAH, bapt. June 28, 1646.
      Joseph, bapt. Mar. 12, 1647.
      Samuel; bapt. Nov. 18, 1646; d. July 6, 1672. His estate Feb. 26, 1672 (Hartford Probate, Mar. 1672/3).
      John, bapt. Aug. 1, 1652.
      [Note: book contains a map showing the early map of Killingworth, CT. Edward's land is on the west side of Indian River about five lots from the river's edge. Nearby neighbors with recognizable names include Samuel Buell, Jonas Westover, and Josiah Hull.]
      Windsor and Killingworth, Conn., records.; Historic Families of America, 297; Conn. Soc. Col. Dames Reg.; Savage Gen. Dict., Vol. I., 163, 288; II, 316; Dimond Faro., 13, 14; Bemis Fam., 211; N.E. Register, Vol. V; Mag. Am. Hist., I, 120, 129; Wyllie's Papers, Vol. XXXI, 14,28, 42, 56, 75, 161, 483; Trumbull Hartford County, II, 521, 548, 552; Mainwaring Hartford Probate, I, 60, 103, 112, 121, 130., 252, 253; Stiles Ancient Windsor, I, 75, 148, 157, 158; II, 351; Annie. 1st Church, Clinton, Conn., 25; Conn. Mag. VIII, 489, 504; Booth & Allied Faro.; Caulker's Hist. New Lon. 283; Hist. Norwich, Conn., 92, 176; Conn. Hist. Soc. Coli. XXII; Conn. Colony records, Vol. I, 58, 196, 379, 380, 397, 398, 419; Vol. II, 58, 63, 240, 525; Vol. III, 1, 3, 17, 26, 36, 48, 75, 86, 97, 106, 121, 139, 151, 155, 169."

      B. 1943 edition: "Edward Griswold.
      Edward was living in Kenilworth Parish, Warwickshire, England, as late as 1638. Just when the call came to him to seek a new dwelling-place, to build anew in this far country, where unmolested he could follow the dictates of his spiritual under­standing without fear of the hand of tyranny or the condemnation of a bigoted prelate; where he could build freely an enduring heritage of strength for his family, we do not know.
      But we do know that he joined the company of Rev. Ephraim Huit, arriving in Windsor, Conn., some time in 1639. They came to escape the intolerances of the church and state, and in their new-found freedom practiced, at times, even more harsh in­tolerances.
      Edward held an important place in all the early endeavors, and at once became active, energetic, a strong and rigorous man, quickly establishing himself as a leader, a man true to his religious faith, and strict in its application to his daily life, and the com­munity interest.
      He was a typical Englishman of that day. Knowing of the limited opportunity of men of his class to acquire land in England, not being favored by the nobility, he, as well as others, used every endeavor to obtain as large holding of lands in Connecticut as possible and the larger part of what Edward did obtain was by true and honest services, and not by mere grant or purchase. He gave of himself without reservation that the community might live and prosper; he stood upon his own feet, dependable and strong. One who helped to leave us a rockbound legacy of per­sonal liberty that we must carry on that it may endure forever.
      Edward remained in Windsor until 1663. Then he was placed on a committee to procure the required number of inhabitants for a new community, later to be called Killingworth. It was two years before the number was obtained and the settlement com­menced. His two sons-in-law, Samuel Buell and Jonas Westover, also removed there. Here he also served the community in nu­merous capacities, and was a leader in its endeavors. He or­ganized the church and was its first deacon. Records are numerous showing the confidence the community and officials had in him.
      The Wyllys Papers, Vol. XXI, contain many interesting refer­ences to his early financial activities. He seems to have been the Colonial agent of Mr. St. Nicholas, of Knowle, Warwickshire, England. Both Mr. John St. Nicholas and Rev. Ephraim Huit lived at Knowle. Evidently there was an acquaintance be­tween them before Edward came to America.
      In Vol. I-III (1636-1689) Colonial Records, there are numerous references to Edward. Served as deputy to the General Court from Aug. 18, 1658, to Mar. 14, 1660; also 1662-63. Served as deputy from Killingworth 1667-1670; 1671-1677; 1678-1689.
      In the study of the life of Edward Griswold, the American ancestor, it must be kept in mind that we have at present no authentic record of his parents or birthplace. All the various statements thus far published in reference to that are pure con­jecture, and thus have no standing in genealogical history.
      We have thus far collected in the Griswold Family Association, a large number of English records concerning the Griswold genealogy, but none have been found in regard to Edward and his wife except the baptism of their first five children in Kenilworth Parish.
      Various names have been given to Margaret, the wife, but let it be understood that this is without any authority cited, and that no records thus far found have disclosed her name or parent­age; and to set forth something of such importance without positive authority only results in confusion and disappointment. For many years search to solve this question has continued by brilliant historians, without success.
      References:
      Colonial Records, Vol. I (1636-1665), pp. 196, 379, 380, 397, 398, 419; Vol. II (1665-1678), pp. 58, 63, 240, 525; Vol. III (1678-1689), pp. 1., 3, 17, 26, 36, 48, 75, 86, 97, 106, 121, 139, 151, 155, 169, 195, 208, 214, 223, 237, 251, 254, etc.
      Public Records of the Colony (Trumbull), 1850.
      Savage, Vo1. I, 163, 288; II, 316.
      Stiles Ancient Windsor, I, 75, 148, 157, 158; II, 364, 351.
      Wyllys Papers, Vol. XXI, pp. 14, 28, 42, 56, 75, 161, 483.
      N. E. Hist. and Gen. Reg., Vol. V, pp. 226, 365.
      Trumbull's Hartford County, II, 521, 548, 552.
      Manwaring Early Probate Records.
      Vol. I., Hartford District (1635-1700), pp. 60, 103, 112, 121, 130.
      Caulkins' Hist. of New London, p. 283.
      Caulkins' Hist. of Norwich, pp. 92, 176.
      Register of the Society of Colonial Wars.
      Ancestral Heads of New England Families, 1620-1700. F. R. Holmes.
      Genealogy of the Dimon Family.
      PARTICULAR COURT Records:
      1649-50: Served on Petty Jury.
      Feb. 1650: Served on jury in Hartford, trial of John Carring­ton and his wife charged with witchcraft. Jury rendered a verdict of guilty.
      Dec. 1662: Served on jury in the trial of Nathaniel Greensmith, and Rebecca, his wife; jury returned a ver­dict of guilty.
      Mar. .1651-52: Served on jury.
      Dec. 1653: Served on jury.
      Sept. 1654: Served on jury.
      Mar. 1656: Served on jury.
      Mar. 1600-61: Served on jury.
      Jan. 1662: Served on jury.
      May 1662: Served on jury.
      1659-1663: Appointed on various committees, appraiser, etc.
      1667: The Court ordered that the town of Homonoscit shall for the future be named Kenilworth.
      1674: Edward granted 200 acres of land provided he take it up where no former grant be prejudiced.
      1680: Appointed commissioner to layout a highway from Saybrook to Kenilworth, and construct bridge.
      1681-1687: Appointed commissioner on six projects."

      6. The book "The Griswold Family, the First Five Generations in America," comp. and ed. by Esther Griswold French and Robert Lewis French, May 1990, printed by The Griswold Family Association, 116 Garden St., Wethersfield, CT, 06109, pages 6-24. The authors note that their book updates Vol. II, "The Griswold Family England - America," which was published 50 years ago:
      "George (son of Roger, gson of William) was baptized 6 Nov 1574 at Wooten Wawen, died after 1620. Married (1) Dousabel, possibly Leigh (Lye, Ley) who was buried at Wooten Wawen 28 Ag 1615 (TAG 39:177). Her only known child is Edward.
      A letter of Ralph Phillips of Nassau, Rensselaer County, New York, to Donald Lines Jacobus gives the information from the Wooten Wawen parish register that Richard Lye and his wife Dousabelle had a son Richard bp. 1549 and a son Thomas bp. 1552. It is conjectured that one of these sons was the father of Dousabel who married George Griswold. It is also noted that Sir Thomas Leigh was the arbitrator of the entailed land dispute of Roger Griswold.
      George Griswold married (2) about 1616 an unknown wife by whom he had two sons, Matthew and Thomas. "On Nov. 12, 1616 George Grissold purchased from Hugh Underhill and his sister Lettice with her husband, a cottage and garden at Kenilworth." (TAG 41:214) This is undaoubtedly a move taken upon the occasion of his second marriage. There is also the possibility that his second wife was a connection of the Underhills.
      This possibility is further enhanced by the recollection of Edward's son, George, in a disposition taken 9 May 1700 stating that as a youth he had lived with his father Edward in Kenilworth, Warwickshire and had heard that the house they lived in belonged to Edward's brother Matthew.
      If George had settled the property upon his second wife at the time of their marriage, it would have become the property of her oldest son, Matthew, at her death. If both parents had died, Matthew may have been under Edward's guardianship.
      Child by first wife:
      Edward, bp. 26 July 1607 Wooten Wawen.
      Children by second wife:
      Matthew, b. ca. 1620.
      Thomas, b. ca. 1622 at Kenilworth, married c. 1644 to an unknown wife. Death date is also unknown. He remained in England. Children:
      Thomas, b. ca. 1645.
      Matthew, bp. 1 May 1649 Kenilworth, will dated 20 Feb. 1701/2."

      7. The booklet "The Griswold Family in England before 1639 - A Report of the Findings of Bonnie Boone Day Griswold and James Wells Griswold," 1984, Exeter, NH, copy in the library of the Windsor CT. Historical Society. The authors went to England to look up actual records. Quote from pp. 10-13:
      "The search for hard facts about our direct Griswold ancestors in England has yielded information only on Edward. This we found in the Warwickshire County Records Library. Even this information is evidently not new because the names and accurate dates are given in Glen E. Griswold's Vol. II of the Griswold Family. But since he does not cite the source of his information, maybe the following will add a bit.
      The above-mentioned library, located in Warwick, is well staffed and has a good catalog. However, the novice finds it confusing at the beginning. It takes several visits to learn how to use the available resources. We learned that there have been many visitors inquiring about he Griswolds.
      Of great interest is the Kenilworth Parish Register. This is a leather-bound book, about 13 inches long and 5 inches wide. Originally it was a bound blank book with about 200 pages. Entries were made chronologically in ink in four sections: Baptisms (not births), Marriages, Burials, and finally in the back of the book, the 'Beneficences" of Lady Dudley of Kenilworth Castle to the members of the parish at the time of Christmas (read the book 'Kenilworth' by Scott). The librarian had to help us by translating archaic terms of some entries. The handwriting of the book changed from period to period indicating a different recorder. We are sorry to report that an earlier Griswold researcher had marked each of te relevant entries with a penciled X in the margin.
      All the entries that relate to the family of Edward Griswold are listed below. Please note that even for the entries for the same family the spelling of the last name may be different.
      In the section on Baptisms:
      Sarah daughter of Edward Grissold was baptised Jan 29 1631.
      George the sone of Edward Griswold was baptised may 19 1633.
      Sarah the daughter of Edward Grissold and Margaret his wife was baptized Jan 10 1635.
      Liddia the daughter of Edward Grissold and Marg-t his wife was baptised Dec 17 1637.
      In the section for Burials:
      Sarah the daughter of Edward Grissold was burried Dec 28 1634.
      It is interesting to note tha the family names their second daughter Sarah in honor of her older sister who had died only two weeks before the second daughter was baptized.
      These were the only references we could find that apply directly to our family, even though there were many other entries for other Griswold families.
      It was exciting to hold this parish record book in our hands, but it was also frustrating to be so close to the facts we wanted and yet could not find. If the book could only talk, there would be so many answers to our questions.
      The publication, the "American Genealogist," Volumes 39, 40, and 71 reports the extensive work of Genevieve Kiepura and John Hunt. Since their findings take 12 pages of close print, we will attempt to summarize it here. None of the original documents reported here have we seen personally, but the source reported in these articles suggest other areas for investigation.
      The articles clearly represent the extensive and careful work they have done and further dramatize the difficulties encountered because there were so many Griswolds in the area and so many of the families used the traditional first names.
      Mrs. Kiepura reports that the parish regester for Wootten Wawen lists the baptism of "Edward, son of George Griswold, 26 July 1607. There are references to the baptisms of George, son of Roger, 6 Nov. 1574; and to the burial of Dousabele, wife of George Griswold, 28 Aug. 1615. No Matthew or Michael in the index."
      For their research, Mrs. Kiepura and Mr. Hunt had copies of 11 wills that were on file at the Worcester Records Office. Piecing the fragments of facts given in each will to create a sequential chart is like a detective story. However, as a summary, the following is given by Mr. Hunt:
      Roger Griswold of Rowington. Will 1545 [had son:]
      William, b. ca. 1515-20? [had son:]
      Roger of Kenilworth, b. ca. 1540-45?, d. before 1607 [had sons:]
      Roger of Kenilworth, b. ca. 1570? of age by 1607.
      Thomas of Stonley, d. 1620. House in Kenilworth.
      George, bp. 1574 at Wootten Wawen [had sons:]
      Edward, bp. 1607 Wootten Wawen.
      Matthew, b. 1620.
      Thomas of Kenilworth [had sons:]
      Thomas.
      Matthew of Stonley. Will of 1701/2.
      (BDG and JWG Note: We still have not found an English source that proves that Matthew is a brother of Edward. The listing given above is based on the testimony given by George Griswold in 1700 for a court in Connecticut as to what he remembers.)
      In Volume 71 of the 'American Genealogist', Mr. Hunt reports on a copy of a will of 'Thomas Griswold of Stonley, Warwickshire dated the last day of Feb. 1620 wherein the testator, besides mentioning the rent of his house and gorunds in the town and parish of Kenilworth, names his close called Beggerspath and the ground called Broomfield, alias Thickthorn clearly in the vicinity of Kenilworth.'"

      8. The booklet "The Griswold Family in England before 1639 - A Report of the Findings of Bonnie Boone Day Griswold and James Wells Griswold," 1984, Exeter, NH, copy in the library of the Windsor CT. Historical Society. The authors went to England to look up actual records at the Warwickshire County Records Library where they also found a book entitled "Warwickshire Worthies." On p. 445 is a rather detailed report on the Rev. Huit who accompanied Edward Griswold on his emigration to New England. It is as follows:
      "Appears to have been a staunch member of the Puritanical party, and was for a time 'preacher at Roxall.' In his 'Anatomy of Conscience,' printed in 1626, he is descirbed as 'Preacher of God's Word at Knowl.' Previous to living in Warwickshire he resided in Cheshire. Archbishop Laud, in the account of his province in 1638, says in reference to Mr. Huit, 'He hath taken upon him to keep fasts in his parish by his own appointment, and hath contemned the decent ceremonies commanded by the Church. My Lord, the Bishop of Worcester, proceeds against him, and intends, either to reform or punish him.'
      In 1644 he was the pastor of the church at Windsor n New England, where he had been for several years.
      In the same year three editors published another of his works, entitled 'The Whole Prophicie of Daniel, explained by a Paraphrase, Analysis, and Brief Comments.' The dedication was to 'the lady Katherine Brooke, Dowager to the Right Honorable Robert, Lord Brooke.' (Lord Brooke was Lord of the Manor and lived at Knowle Hall.) Originally, as it appears, Mr. Huit had intended to dedicate this work to Lord Brooke, who after reading it would gladly have had it published 'if money could have procured its freedom.' 'The three joint editors, taking advantage of a new parliament, issue the work hoping it may prove serviceable.'"

      9. From the "Connecticut Nutmegger," Sep. 1992, pp. 190, 191:
      "Were Edward & Michael Griswold Related? By Esther Griswold French and Robert Lewis French, CSG #5269 Genealogists, The Griswold Family Association of America
      For many years proof has been sought to relate Edward Griswold of Windsor and his younger half-brother Matthew of Old Lyme to Michael Griswold of Wethersfield. Speculation has ranged from the traditional "three brothers who came from England" to a seemingly more definite link that is based on reference to Manwaring's Hartford Probate III: 360.
      On the basis of the Manwaring reference, Glenn E. Griswold wrote in "The Griswold Family England-America" Volume II:19 (1935), that the will of George Griswold (George, Edward) "seems to link the families of Edward and Michael by its reference to Jacob Griswold."
      The name of Jacob was used exclusively at that time by the descendants of Michael. Since the name does not appear in the descendants of Edward, the theory was proposed that there was a relationship between Edward and Michael, using this will as evidence in its support.
      The will referred to was made in 1746 by George (George, Edward) who evidently had never married and had no "right heirs of his own body" as the phrase was used at that time. Since he was about 80 years old, he had accumulated a fairly large estate. He left his property to his nephews, grand-nephews and a niece, even though in the will two of them are referred to as cousins. The term cousin was used in those days to indicate a relationship within an extended family.
      The following benefited from the will: His "cousin Hezekiah," "cousin John," and Isaac, sons of his brother John; Pelatiah, son of his brother Daniel; "George, son of Daniel of Bolton," a great-nephew, grandson of his brother Daniel; George Griswold 2nd of Windsor, a first cousin once removed being the son of his first cousin Joseph (Joseph, Edward); Zerviah (Benjamin, George, Edward), wife and second cousin of George Griswold 2nd of Windsor, his great niece; Joseph Barnard, a great-nephew, son of his niece Abigail (Edward, George, Edward).
      With the legatees placed as descendants of George, and as nephews and nieces or cousins of George, it was extremely unlikely that he would have left any property outside of his family. Therefore any descendant of Michael named Jacob seemed distinctly improbably as an heir.
      The State of Connecticut has done a magnificent job in microfilming all the original documents ever filed for estates. These microfilms are in the State Library at Hartford, and are available to all researchers. The original documents thus can be seen on the film, and copies made.
      In the case of the will of George the legatess are all listed above with the exception of "Jacob." That name has been misread. It is JOAB, a son of George 2nd of Windsore and his wife Zerviah. From the very small and different type of script used in 1746 it is easy to see how the error occurred. However, one can see the difference in the names by careful scrutiny. Moreover, he is the only Joab appearing in the index to Volume II of "The Griswold Family England-America."
      To date, we have been unable to find any evidence that Edward and MIchael were related. In the material we have from Warwichshire, England, dating back to the 13th and 14th centuries, the name of Michael was never used by that Griswold family in any record known to us. However since there were Griswolds in other counties of England, we must look farther than has yet been done to find the origins of Michael Griswold."

      10."The Connecticut Magazine," Third Quarter, 1908, No. 3, Vol. XII, pp. 323-329, Article: "Recent Investigations in Connecticut Genealogy - Griswolds of Windsor," by Mrs. Julia Welles Griswold Smith, deals mainly with later Griswolds, but does have a couple of interesting comments which I quote as follows:
      A. "It were a needless task to describe the early Griswold settlers of Windsor and Lyme. They were men of education and property and were always styled 'Mr.,' equivalent to gentleman, as distinguished from yeoman or tradesman, (Salisbury,) and they came at a time when many sons, especially younger sons of gentry, animated by a spirit of enterprise or adventure, sought broad estates in the New World."
      B. In speaking of the children of Edward and Margaret: "Francis settled at Norwich; Sarah and Mary married brothers Samuel and Lieutenant Timothy, sons of Mr. William Phelps, and the Phelps and Griswold families have intermarried ever since. Deborah married Samuel Buell of Killingworth and is recorded as of fine presence and strong character, sometimes written of as 'the mother of all the Buells' in Connecticut. About 1663, after years of public service, Edward, the emigrant, deeded his Windsor lands and house to his sons, George and Joseph, and with some younger children removed to the south shore of the colony and was one of the founders of Killingworth, now Clinton. Here English Margaret died and here her tombstone stands today marked 'M.G. 1670.'
      Edward immediately entered public life in Killingworth as in Windsor, as shown in Stiles and Salisbury Histories, but returning to Windsor for his last years, died in 1691. His sons, George and Joseph, who had remained there, are the ancestors of Windsor Griswolds."
      C. "Windsor had its real estate boom in 1640-50, when land was held at high prices and then dropped, for the obvious reason that if they could not pay Windsor prices there was plenty more land all about.
      The Griswolds for many generations were large land-holders. Edward, first settler, had large acreage. George also bought of the Indians and was man of wealth and importance in Poquonoc. Windsor is an elastic term and includes much of what is since Poquonoc, Simsbury, Tarriffville, East Granby, and so forth. Samuel's property was some of the most beautiful in the state, nearly 500 acres, with views of Farmington River where it breaks through the Talcott Mountains and most romantic scenes of valley and mountain. Tarriffville used to be called Griswold Mills..."

      11. It is pretty well accepted that Michael Griswold was not a known relation to the emigrant brothers Edward and Matthew. I do however have on file an article about the home that Michael Griswold built and that is still standing in Wethersfield, CT. The article is from "Post Haste" and entitled "Special Yankees... a house and a lady," by Cynthia Long. The article is from the Griswold family file at the Windsor, CT, Historical Society. It contains photos of the house that Michael built in 1680 and which is still occupied by a Griswold. The house is now owned by the Griswold Family Association.

      12. From the book "The Griswold Family," by Edward Elbridge Salisbury, privately published 1884, copy in Windsor, Conn. Historical Society Library. Some of the information is dated and has since been updated with more modern research; but the book contains many prime sources not found in other Griswold publications. I do not quote the portions wherein Mr. Salisbury dismisses that the two other Griswolds in New England, Francis and Michael, were not brothers of Edward, Matthew, and Thomas. Pp. 3-4,8:
      "From a valuable document in the New London Probate Office (relating to a lawsuit in which the only son of our first Matthew Griswold was involved), we obtain proof that, beside Edward and Matthew, there was another brother, Thomas by name, who remained in the old English homestead; and the same paper gives documentary evidence as to what part of England the emigrants came from. It deserves to be quoted here, exactly and in full:
      'George Griswold, aged about 67 years, testifyeth as followeth - that in his youthfull years he lived with his father in England, in a town called Keillinsworth (Author's note: 'In Queen Elizabeth's time Kenilworth was called Killingworth.') in Warrackshire; he did severall times since hear his father Edward Griswould say that the house they then lived in, and lands belonging thereto, was his borther Mathew Griswould's; and have lately seen a letter under the hand of Thomas Griswould of Keillinsworth abovesd, direct to his brother Mathew Griswould aforesaid, wherein the said Thomas Griswould intimated that he did then live in the above said house belonging to his said brother Mathew Griswould aforesaid.
      'May 9th 1700. George Griswould appeared before me in Hartford, and made oath to ye above testimony.' 'Joseph Curtiss, Assistant.'
      "...To come, then, to the two emigrants, a tradition remains to be alluded to, that their emigration was in company with the Rev. Ephraim Huet of Windsor, who 'had been a minister of Wraxall, near Kenilworth, in Warwickshire, was proceeded against by Archbiship Laud, 1638, for neglect of ceremonies, came next year.' ('Geneal. Dict.,' by James Savage, Boston, 1860, ii. 490') Savage thought this tradition plainly erroneous, for the reason that George, son of Edward Griswold, in his deposition above cited, testified that he lived with his father in England 'in his youthfull years,' which, according to Savage, must have extended later than to the year 1639. But the year of Huet's emigration, this very year 1639, being now fixed, independently, as the date of the emigration of Edward and Matthew Griswold, the tradition of their companionship with Huet gains in probability; while Savage's objection is quite set aside by the fact that George Griswold, having been 67 years old in 1700 (as he himself affirmed) was born about 1633, not in 1638 - as Savage says - and could, therefore, well speak, when advanced in life, of a time prior to 1639 as having been in the days of his youth."

      13. From the book "The Griswold Family," by Edward Elbridge Salisbury, privately published 1884, copy in Windsor, Conn. Historical Society Library. The book contains many prime sources not found in other Griswold publications. In the previous part of the book, Mr. Salisbury documents that Edward, Matthew, and Thomas are brothers (see these individuals' notes for a transcription). Pp. 3-5:
      "With regard to the ancestry of the three brothers whom we thus distinctly trace, we have no certain information reaching beyond their father. A deposition lately found among the papers of Rev. F.W. Chapman, 'a full and true copy' of an original now lost, enables me to begin the Griswold pedigree one generation further back than it has been hitherto traced. This valuable document is in these words:
      'The testimony of Captain George Griswold, aged about 72 years, and the testimony of Mr. John Griswold, aged about 69 years, they both being sons of George Griswold, The Deponents being both of Windsor in the county of Hartford and colony of Connecticut in New England, is as follows;
      'Viz., that our Grandfather's name was Edward Griswold, and it was formerly and has ever since been always accepted and reputed that our said Grandfathers's father's name was George Griswold, and the said George Griswold our Great Grandfather had three sons, the eldest named Edward, the second named Matthew, and third or youngest son named Thomas, and the said Edward the eldest son, and the said Matthew the second son, came into new England from Killingsworth in Warwickshire in England; and in all our discourses amongst the families of said Griswolds in New England, together with other elderly observing gentlemen, they are and have ever been so accepted and reputed to be, without contradiciton or gainsaying, according to the best of our rememberance.
      'And the Deponents fruther add and say that the above named Edward Griswold's eldest son has always been called and reputed to be Francis Griswold, without any contradiction or gainsaying as aforesaid that we know of.
      'Windsor in Hartford county in Connecticut, New England personally appeared on the 19th day of January Anno Dom. 1737-8, Captain George Griswold and John Griswold the above named Deponents, and made solemn oath, in due form of law, to the truth of the above written testimony, before me. Henry Allyn, Justice Peace.'
      (Author notes: This copy was given to Mr. Chapman by Mr. J.S. Griswold of Benson, Vt., whose brother Mr. W.D. Griswold, now of St. Louis, Mo., writes to me respecting the original paper as follows: 'As regards the original paper, I remember to have seen it on occasion of a visit I made to my native home in 1841. My Father, then alive, showed it to me, and I read it over and over with great interest, and I then took a copy of it, which I think I have sent to some inquirer, without retaining a copy of the copy. The affidavit was evidently taken in aid of some pending legal proceeding, and in anticipation of some legal use. It was inherited by my Father with the old papers and muniments of his Father, and that is all that can be said of its history.' In anothre letter Mr. Griswold says: 'I read it over repeatedly, and critically observed the paper, old and faded, and the writing of style verifying its age.' These two Griswolds brothers are descendants of Edward Griswold, through his son Francis.)"

      14. From the book "The Griswold Family," by Edward Elbridge Salisbury, privately published 1884, copy in Windsor, Conn. Historical Society Library, pp. 8-10:
      "Edward Griswold, the eldest of the two emigrant brothers, also lived the longest, dying in 1691, as is said, in his eighty-fourth year. (Savage's Genealogical Dictionary, 1860, ii, 316.) A colonial record of 1649 shows him to have been, at that time, still residing in Windsor, where his sons Francis and George likewise and their families. (Public Records of the Col. of Conn., 1636-1665. Harford, 1850, p. 196.) It is believed that he removed to Killingworth, now Clinton, Conn., in 1663, and gave to this New England town the name of his old place of residence in Warwickshire. He was Deputy to the General Court, before this, in 1662. Under the year 1667, as 'Mr.Edw. Grissell,' he is enrolled a Deputy, and, as 'Mr. Edward Griswold,' a Commisioner 'for Kenilworth.' (Public Records, 1665-1677, Hartford, 1852, pp. 58, 63.) In 1674 there was a grant made to him of 200 acres of land, which were laid out, after long delay, in 1682, 'at the north end of Lyme bounds.' (Public Records, p. 240, and note.) As "Mr. Edward Griswould' he was Deputy 'fr. Kellingworth' in 1678, when he was also nominated for election as Assistant and as Commissioner; represented his town in every Court held from that year on to 1689; and was, during this period, repeatedly made Commissioner. (Public Records, 1678-1689, Hartford, 185