Jemima Catherine Mangum

Female 1809 - 1848  (38 years)


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  • Name Jemima Catherine Mangum 
    Born 14 Sep 1809  , Warren, Ohio, United States Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Female 
    Died 28 Apr 1848  Mount Pisgah, Union, Iowa, United States Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Buried Mount Pisgah Cemetery, Mount Pisgah, Union, Iowa, United States Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID I1840  Petersen-de Lanskoy
    Last Modified 8 May 2015 

    Father John Mangum, IV (Patriot),   b. 19 Jan 1763, , Lunenburg, Virginia, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 3 Mar 1843, Fulton, Itawamba, Mississippi, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 80 years) 
    Mother Rebecca Canida,   b. 10 Oct 1785, , , Pennsylvania, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 23 Feb 1847, Winter Quarters (now Florence), Douglas, Nebraska, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 61 years) 
    Married 19 Jan 1809  Eaton Township, Warren, Ohio, United States Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Family ID F755  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Samuel Jefferson Adair,   b. 28 Mar 1806, , Laurens, South Carolina, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 6 Jul 1889, Nutrioso, Apache, Arizona, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 83 years) 
    Married 3 Dec 1829  , Pickens, Alabama, United States Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
     1. William Jefferson Adair,   b. 27 Aug 1830, , Pickens, Alabama, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 31 Oct 1846, Mount Pisgah, Union, Iowa, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 16 years)
     2. John Milton Adair,   b. 8 Jan 1833, , Pickens, Alabama, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Jun 1899, Barclay, Lincoln, Nevada, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 66 years)
     3. Rebecca Frances Adair,   b. 8 Jul 1835, , Pickens, Alabama, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 26 May 1836, , Pickens, Alabama, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 0 years)
    +4. George Washington Adair,   b. 27 Jun 1837, , Pickens, Alabama, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 9 Sep 1909, Hammond, San Juan, New Mexico, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 72 years)
     5. Permelia Jane Adair,   b. 27 Jun 1837, Fulton, Clarke, Alabama, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 16 Dec 1883, Dry Fork, Uintah, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 46 years)
     6. Samuel Newton Adair,   b. 11 Dec 1839, , Itawamba, Mississippi, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 16 May 1924, Luna, Catron, New Mexico, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 84 years)
     7. David L. Sechrist,   b. Abt 1840, , , Tennessee, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 22 Mar 1867  (Age ~ 27 years)  [Adopted]
     8. Joseph Jasper Adair,   b. 23 Jan 1842, , Itawamba, Mississippi, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 8 Sep 1846, Mount Pisgah, Union, Iowa, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 4 years)
     9. Rufus Columbus Burleson Adair,   b. 9 Feb 1844, , Itawamba, Mississippi, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 2 Aug 1858, Washington, Washington, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 14 years)
    +10. Ann Catherine Chestnut,   b. 11 Apr 1844, , , Missouri, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 27 Mar 1863, Washington, Washington, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 18 years)  [Foster]
    +11. Jemima Catherine Adair,   b. 6 Apr 1846, Lexington, Washington, Iowa, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 15 Apr 1926, Murray, Salt Lake, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 80 years)
     12. William Alfred Chestnut,   b. Abt 1847, , , Missouri, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Bef 28 Feb 1877  (Age ~ 30 years)  [Foster]
     13. Ezra Taft Benson Adair,   b. 25 Apr 1848, Mount Pisgah, Union, Iowa, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 26 Apr 1848, Mount Pisgah, Union, Iowa, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 0 years)
    Last Modified 22 Oct 2015 
    Family ID F90  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Notes 
    • RESEARCH_NOTES:
      1. Per "California DAR Ancestry Guide" by the California State Society of the National Society of the DAR, 1976: Daughter of John Mangum, Revolutionary War private from South Carolina: "Jemima, b. Sep 14, 1809; m. Samuel Jefferson Adair."

      2. First name appears Jemima, Gemina, Jemina depending on whose records.

      3. 1900 Federal Census, San Juan County, New Mexico, Precinct No. 6 Bloomfield (Hammond): Adair, George W. Head-W-M- b. June 1837; 63 yrs; Marr. 36 yrs; b. Ala.; father b. No. Carolina; mother b. Ala; Farmer. Note he lists his mother born in Ala. not Ohio.

      4. Censuses:
      1830 US: Pickens Co., Alabama, pages 111-112. The first three related families are all on the same page, the next four related families are on the next page, and James Adair (with son Joseph) is on p. 129:
      Thos. Peeks, males 0-5:1; 5-10:1; 20-30:1; females 0-5:1; 5-10:1; 10-15:1; 30-40:1.
      John Mangum, males 5-10:1; 10-15:2; 15-20:1; 60-70:1; females 0-5:1; 5-10:1; 10-15:1; 30-40:1.
      Cyrus Mangum, males 20-30:1; females 0-5:1; 15-20:1.
      Saml. Carson, males 20-30:1; females 20-30:1; 80-90:1.
      Saml. Adair, males 20-30:1; females 20-30:1.
      Thos. Adair, males 5-10:1; 10-15:1; 15-20:1; 50-60:1; females 0-5:1; 5-10:1; 10-15:1; 40-50:1.
      Daniel Clark (next door), males 0-5:1; 30-40:1; females 0-5:1; 20-30:1.
      James Adair, males 0-5:2; 15-20:1; 20-30:2 (Joseph b. 1806); 60-70:1; females 15-20:1; 20-30:2; 60-7-:1; no slaves.

      1840 US: Northern District, Itawamba Co., Mississippi, related families from full survey of county census:
      P. 136a: Samuel Adair, males 0-5:2; 5-10:2; 30-40:1; females 0-5:1; 30-40:1. No slaves listed.
      P. 144a: John Mangum, males 15-20:1; 70-80:1; females 10-15:1; 15-20:1; 50-60:1. No slaves listed.
      P. 150a: Joseph Adair, males 30-40:1; females 20-30:1. No slaves listed.
      P. 156a: Thomas Adair, males 20-30: 1; females 0-5: 1; 15-20:1. No slaves listed.
      P. 157a: William Mangum, Jr., males 5-10:1; 20-30:1; females 0-5:1; 5-10:1; 20-30:1. No slaves listed.

      5. From Don and Carolyn Smith from one of three part writings of Samuel Newton Adair. [When asked who has the original of this, Carolyn referred me to Becky Hamblin [bhamblin79@hotmail.com] to try to locate the original of this; Becky in turn believes Collins Chapman in Mesa may have it since Collins' mother is the granddaughter who hand wrote it for Samuel. It has not yet been located by Becky. The following is one of the three parts [see Samuel Newton Adair's notes for full quotation]: "Luna, New Mexico, October 7, 1919. I, Samuel Newton Adair, will write what I know about my mother's folks. My grandfather's name was John Mangum and he married Rebecca Noles, so my grandmother's name was Rebecca Mangrum, my grandfather Mangum was a revolutionary soldier with General Morgan (one of his minute men). He was taken prisoner with a lot of other men by the british soldiers and they set them on a log and split their heads open, all but my grandfather's and he had some kind of varmint skin cap on and that and the skull stopped the force of the sword and it glanced off and cut his ear nearly off and they turned him lose. He married after the war was over as stated above. Their children are: Cyrus Mangrum, Joseph Mangrum, John Mangrum, William Mangrum and James Mangrum. The daughter's names were: Jeney Mangrum, Gemima Mangrum, Rebecca Mangrum, and Lucinda Mangum. They were all my uncles and aunts. Joseph Mangrum married Emiline Hanner, William married Aunt Sally Adair, John married Aunt Mary Ann Adair, James Mangrum married Jane Clark, my father's niece. I don't know who uncle Cyrus Mangum married. Jeney Mangrum married George Crawford, Gemima Mangrum married Samuel Jefferson Adair, my father. Rebecca Mangrum married Joseph Adair, my father's cousin. Lucinda Mangrum married James Richey, my father's nephew."

      6. The following is a small excerpt of a larger listing (see Samuel Newton Adair's notes for full transcription), which was received in digital form from Don and Caroline Smith, 2003. Regardless of the title - "Family Records of Samuel Newton Adair" - I am not sure if this is really a transcript of records kept by Samuel Newton Adair or not. Some death dates given for some of the individuals are after the date Samuel Newton Adair himself died. I spoke in person with Collins Chapman of Mesa, Arizona, in Feb. of 2006. He did not recognize it. Collins' family is the source of most of the biographical information on Samuel and Collin's mother was responsible for the autobiography of Samuel Newton Adair who dictated it to her. The following came to me as an addendum to a typed copy of that autobiography; however, I have now seen a portion of the original handwritten dictation and find no such attachment. The following therefore has no documented source that I can find thus far and should be used with caution:
      [A.] "Father: Samuel Jefferson Adair; Mother: Jamima Mangum; Children:
      Rebeca Francis Adair
      William Jefferson Adair
      John Milton Adair
      George Washington Adair
      Pamelia Jane Adair
      Samuel Newton Adair
      Joseph Jasper Adair
      Rufus Columbus Adair
      Jamima Kathrine Adair
      Ezra T. Adair
      [B.] "Samuel Jefferson Adair - Born at Lawrence Co., South Carolina, March 28, 1806. Baptized by Elder John Dowdle, Nov. 27, 1845. Confirmed by Elder John Dowdle, Nov. 30, 1845. Ordained an Elder by Daniel Thomas, a High Priest by John Young in 1855. Married Jamima Mangum. Filled a mission to Southern Utah in 1857. Migrated from Mississippi to Nauvoo, Illinois on Jan. 10, 1846. Died at Nutrioso, Apache County, Arizona, July 6, 1889."
      [C.] "Jamima Mangum - married Samuel Jefferson Adair. Died at Mt. Pisgah, Iowa about 1847.
      Rebeca Francis Adair - Born and died at Pikens County, Alabama.
      William Jefferson Adair - Born at Pikens County, Alabama. Died at Mt. Pisgah, Iowa about 1847.
      John Milton Adair - Born at Pickens County, Alabama. Married Eliza Jane Richey. Died at Lincoln County, Nevada.
      George Washington Adair - Born at Pickens County, Alabama, married Ann Chestnut. Died at San Juan, New Mexico.
      Pamelia Jane Adair - Born at Pikens County, Alabama. Married Charles D. Searle at Payson City, Utah in 1856. Died at Ashley, Uintah County, Utah about 1884.
      Samuel Newton Adair - Born at Itawomba County, Mississippi, Dec. 11, 1839. Baptized by Samuel Jefferson Adair, in 1847. Ordained an Elder by John Freeman. Ordained a High Priest by Apostle Erastus Snow, at Luna, New Mexico Nov. 24, 1885. Married to Helen Gennett Brown by Robert Covington at Washington, Utah, Dec. 15, 1863. Endowed at Endowment House, Salt Lake City, Utah, June 18, 1867. Patriarchal Blessing by Emer Harris. Filled Mission to Moqice [Moqui] Village - Went Nov. 1862. Returned on Jan. 10, 1863. Migrated from Mississippi to Nauvoo. Died at Luna, New Mexico, May 16, 1925.
      Joseph Jasper Adair - Born at Itawomba County, Mississippi. Died at Mt. Pisgah, Iowa about 1847.
      Rufus Columbus Adair - Born at Itawomba County, Mississippi. Died at Washington City, Utah, Aug. 2, 1858.
      Jamima Katherine Adair - Born at Des Moine, Iowa. Married to Frederick Rugg at Washington, Utah, Jan. 11, 1866.
      Ezra T. Adair - Born at Mt. Pisgah, Iowa, 1848. Died at Mt. Pisgah, Iowa, 1848."

      BIOGRAPHY:
      1. The following is a transcript of the LDS Patriarchal Blessing that Jemima received for which I have a copy provided by the LDS Historical Library. (FHL film 392631 LDS "Patriarchal Blessings Index" for index summary of vital data; vol. 10, p. 152.) It reads:
      "Camp of Israel Pisgah near the Head Waters of Gran River. A Blessing by John Smith Patriarch upon the head of Jemima Adair daughter of John & Nancy Mangum born Ohio Sept. 14, 1809 [Note: Index erroneously says Sept. 24, 1800.]
      Sister Jemima I lay my hands upon thy head in the name of Jesus Christ & place upon thee a Father's Blessings inasmuch as thou hast no father thou art entitled to all the blessings of the new & everlasting covenant. Thou are a daughter of Abraham & lawful heir to the Holy Priesthood which shall be conferred upon thee in due time in common with thy companion in the House of the Lord which shall be built upon the Mountains & exalted above the Hills where all nations shall flow as the Prophets have spoken & thou shalt live to see Peace established upon the Earth and mob violence ended forever. Thou shalt have faith to heal the sick in thine house in the absence of thy companion & to hold thy children in life untill they are old. The destroyer shall have no power in thy habitation. Thou shalt be able to redeem thy fathers back to the days of Noah on to where they died in the Gospel by the help of thy companion & assist him in redeeming him & to be exalted in due time to inherit a kingdom & a dominion that shall never pass away but continue to increase untill thine offspring are as numerous as the land of the sea shore & they shall not be exceled by any in the House of Israel. Thou shalt live to see the closing scene of this generation the curtains of Zion extended over the land of America. This is thy blessing with every desire of thine heart inasmuch as you are patient & abide in the truth. Every word shall be fullfilled for I seal it upon thee by the authority of the Priesthood & I seal you up to Eternal Life. Even so amen. J. L Smith Recorder. May 26, 1846."

      2. Information concerning Mt. Pisgah, Utah:
      A. From 24 Feb 2002 website <http://lserver.aea14.k12.ia.us/SWP/bbrown/Bev.html> "Mt. Pisgah Mormon Settlement": Mount Pisgah is the site of a temporary Mormon settlement located in Union County, Southwest Iowa. At present, a monument, a kiosk and a county park can be found in this area. Each year hundreds of people visit this peaceful sight, some looking for family history, some just enjoying the beautiful view across the Grand River valley. Mt. Pisgah was settled by the Mormons during their trek from Nauvoo to Utah in 1846. The Mormon Trail in Iowa passes through Mt. Pisgah on its way from Garden Grove to Council Bluffs (Winter Quarters). The Mormon Church purchased a small part of what was once the Mt. Pisgah cemetery and in 1888 erected a monument to those who died here. It is inscribed with the names of some of the people who were buried at Mt. Pisgah. In preparation for the 1997 Centennial Celebration, the Mormons enhanced the appearance of the park with new concrete, wrought iron rails and benches." Among related names shown:
      -West side: Ezra T.B. Adair.
      -South side: William P. Mangum, Lane Ann Mangum; Gemima Mangum Adair; William Jefferson Adair. Note Jemima lived only three days after giving birth to her baby Ezra Taft Benson Adair.
      [Note from the Mangum Book cited below: "The names engraved on this monument are also found in the book, 'Exodus to Greatness' by Preston Nibley on page 169."]
      B. From "Our Pioneer Heritage," by the daughters of Utah Pioneers, 1963, vol. 6, p. 249, reprinted in 2000: "Mount Pisgah, Iowa. On May 18, 1846, President Brigham Young and several of the Church leaders arrived at a beautiful garden spot and a fine grove. Orson Pratt gave it the name of Mount Pisgah. Farming was commenced at once as President Young advised the brethren to fence a farm of 500 to 1000, surveying the land into 5, 10, and 20 acre plots. Groups of my migrating Saints arrived in the little colony and soon the population numbered over 2000 souls. William Huntington was the presiding elder, and Robert Campbell was appointed clerk and postmaster of the settlement. In July, 1846, the group at Mt. Pisgah was called upon to raise their quota for the Mormon Battalion. The Saints were advised to go to the Rocky Mountains and during 1852 the town of Mount Pisgah was broken up. Mount Pisgah with this burying ground became the property of a Mr. White, whose son, Alfred, later owned the farm. Mr. White and his family always respected the old cemetery and, in 1888, part of the land was purchased by the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints upon which a granite shaft was raised. On this were engraved in the names of a number of those known to have been interred in the cemetery at Mount Pisgah."
      C. Per Marie Erickson, Reference Librarian, Church History Library, Salt Lake City sent this information: "inscription on the east side of the Mount Pisgah monument: This Monument erected A. D. 1888 in memory of those members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints who died in 1846, 1847, and 1848, during their exodus to seek a home beyond the Rocky Mountains. Interred here is William Huntington, the first presiding elder of the temporary settlement called Pisgah. Leonora Charlotte Snow, daughter of Elder Lorenzo and Charlotte Squires Snow, Isaac Phineas Richards, son of Elder Franklin D. and Jane Snyder Richards." [See hard file for Samuel Jefferson Adair for full listing of all individuals on memorial.]

      3. Biographical info on this individual's father per the book "John Mangum, American Revolutionary War Soldier and Descendants," 1986, p. 7-16, by Delta Ivie Mangum Hale: "John's second wife died, and he was again left a widower. Following her death he moved to Warren County, Ohio, later changed to Clinton County. It was here that he met his third wife, Rebecca Knowles. The were married Jan. 19, 1809 at Lebanon, Warren County, Ohio. (Marriage Licenses of Warren County, No. 1 and 2, p. 30.) Eight children were born to John and Rebecca. In later life he appeared in court to claim his veteran's pension and gave the following statement regarding his places of residence: 'I was born in Mecklenburg County, Virginia on the 19th of Jan 1763, informed by my mother when I was eleven years old, I had it in a book from the time I entered the service. Until 1805 I resided in Newberry District, So. Carolina. In 1805 I moved to Warren County, afterwards Clinton County, Ohio where I resided until 1811. In 1811 I removed to Giles County, Tennessee where I stayed until 1815. In 1815 I came to St. Claire County, Alabama where I stayed until about 1823 or 1824. Then I removed to Pickens County, Alabama where I have lived ever since and now live.' (Package 370, Vol. 3, Veterans Bureau, National Archives, Washington, D.C.) While living at Warren Co., Ohio, John and Rebecca had a daughter, Gemima, born on Sep. 14, 1809. Two children were born after they moved to Tennessee. These were William on Christmas Day 1811 at Murray or Maury, Tennessee, and Rebecca on Aug. 10, 1814 at Giles, Tennessee. Another two children were born at St. Clair, Alabama. These were John, Jr., born June 10, 1817 and James Mitchell, born Jan. 6, 1820. Another son, Joseph, was born about 1822. The record of his birth date, place and picture are not available to date. A daughter, Jane was born July 14, 1824 at Maury, Tennessee, and their last daughter, Lucinda, was born July 20, 1826 at Carlton, Pickens County, Alabama..."

      4. Two biographies from Ina Iverson. The first is dated 1972 and the second 1962. There are some errors including the statement that her father and father-in-law were on the Pioneer journey.
      a. "Jemima C. Mangum (Written by Ina C. Iverson in 1972 for the DUP Camp Pleasant Grove.)
      Jemima Mangum was born 14 Sept. 1809 in Clenton, Warren Co. Ohio. She was the daughter of John Mangum and Rebecca Canida, and the oldest of eight children.
      When Jemima was about eight years old her father moved the Family to St.. Clair County Ala. and about two years later to Pickens Co. In Pickens Co. there also lived the Family of Thomas Adair and his oldest son Samuel and Jemima fell in love and were married 3 Dec. 1829.
      The following year their first child was born, 30 Aug 1830 and given the name William Jefferson. During the next eight years Jemima had four more Children. John Milton, born 8 Jan. 1833. Rebecca Frances born 8 July 1835 and a pair of twins, George Washington and Pamilea born 17 June 1837.
      When these twins were about a year old Samuel and Jemima moved to Itawamba Co. Miss. Here two more children were born, Joseph Jasper born 23 Feb. 1842 and Rufus Columbus born 9 Feb. 1844.
      Later in the year of 1844 James Richie, an Elder in the newly formed Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, commonly called Mormons came to visit Samuel and Jemima and preached to them and they were later Baptized, in the near by river in Nov. of 1845.
      They soon decided to move to Nauvoo, Ill. where this new church had built a city and Temple. Some of their relatives had joined the Church and gone to Nauvoo and others were preparing to move also.
      Unfortunately Samuel and Jemima arrived at the time the mobs of renegades and plunderers were harassing the people in Nauvoo and they were forced to leave almost immediately. Jemima was expecting the birth of another child soon and having to move on was an added hardship.
      They followed the other Saints as far as Iowa where they stopped to let Jemima rest and here their ninth baby was born, 6 Apr. 1846 and was given the name Jemima Catherine.
      It was some time before Jemima was well at all but as soon as they could they moved on as far as Mt. Pisgah, Iowa where the church had set up a temporary resting place. By this time several members of the family were very ill. On the 8th of Sept. 1846 Joseph Jasper passed away and the following month their oldest son William died 31 Oct.
      There was much suffering and illness and Samuel and Jemima lost both of their mothers at this time as well as other relatives. On the 2nd of Oct. 1847 Rufus Columbus was very ill and he too died. Jemima was expecting another baby by the spring of 1848 and they planned to leave for the Rocky Mountains with the first Company to leave in spite of their heartaches and disappointments.
      Their 10th child was born before they could leave on the 25th Apr. 1848 and given the name Ezra Taft Benson. Jemima was very ill and never fully recovered. This baby lived only a few hours and was buried beside his brothers in the burring ground. Jemima followed her infant son in death three days later. She died 18 Apr. 1848 and was laid to rest beside her children.
      Jemima's death left Samuel with six motherless Children, the youngest only two years old. Heart broken but with unwavering faith Samuel gathered his children and meager possessions and traveled to Salt Lake in Brigham Young's Co. Arriving the 21 Sept. 1848.
      On the way west Samuel picked up two other children who had been left to die by thieves who had killed their parents and taken their wagon. These children he raised with his own.
      This history was taken from - Family records in possession of Author, Church Records, Journal of James Ritchie written by his self."
      b. "Jemima Catherine Mangum, Born 14 Sept. Place Warren Co. Died in route to Utah, Written by Ina Marie Custer Iverson, Camp Pleasant Grove, Utah County, Date 6 Feb. 1962.Jemima Catherine Mangum was my third great grandmother. She was born 14 Sept. 1809 in Warren Co. Ohio. Her parents were John Mangum born in Va. and Rebecca Canada Knowles who was born in England.
      Shortly after her birth her parents moved the family to Tenn. and lived in Tenn., Alabama, Ill. during her childhood. We know not why they moved to these places but we know that some time after the organization of' the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints by Joseph Smith, they must have joined this church as we next find them in Nauvoo, Ill. with the saints and some of their temple work was done there.
      Jemima had four brothers and three sisters, making a family of ten. While her family was living in Alabama she met Samuel Jefferson Adair and they were married 3 Dec. 1829. Samuel was the son of Thomas Jefferson Adair and Rebecca Brown. He was one of 11 children.
      Samuel and Jemima's first born was a boy born in 1830 in Alabama and the second son also arrived in Ala. in 1833 and was given the name John Milton. He was followed by a daughter, Rebecca Frances in 1835 and a pair of twins, George Washington and Pamelia born in 1837.
      After the twins were born the family moved to Miss. and Jemima and Samuel were blessed with two more sons, Samuel Newton born 1839 and Rufus Columbus born in 1844. The last of the children of Jemima and Samuel arrived in this world while the family was temprarily camped at winter quarters with the first of the saints to travel Westward, and on the trip to the west.
      These babies were given the names of Jemima Catherine and Ezra Taft Benson.
      When the Latter Day Saints in Feb. of 1846 were forced to leave Ill. by their enemies they commenced their exodus from Nauvoo toward the Rocky Mountains, the advance companies after traveling 145 miles established a temporary settlement at place they called Garden Grove, I now in Decater Co. Iowa, where they put in grain for the benefit of the following companies. Leaving a few families behind to farm and make improvements, the majority of the people continued Westward, among them Jemima and Samuel and their children, Samuel's father and his family and Jemima's parents and their children. A sister of Samuel married William Richie and this family lost three of their children while in Nauvoo, Ill. The Adair, Richie and Mangum families all inter-married and all came to Utah about the same time.
      On the 18 of May 1846, Pres. Young and the others in the company arrived on the middle fork of the Grand River at the place that Parley P. Pratt (who had been sent ahead of the main company to explore) had named Mt. Pisgah.
      It was late May when the companies camped here, and finally a settlement was formed. This became a town and resting place for my ancestors and was known on Iowa maps as a village and post office named Pisgah.
      When this settlement was made the entire country was a vast wilderness of prairies, with grassy rolling hills and groves of timber.
      It was here also that Samuel got his Patriarchal blessing and it was here that misfortune came that must have seemed almost unbearable to these brave pioneers.
      Jemima's mother and Samuels mother could no longer endure the hardships of their lives and left this world for a kinder existence. Then Samuel's youngest sister and Jemima's and Samuel's oldest son, William Jefferson also passed away along with their oldest daughter Rebecca Frances, and they were laid to rest with their grandmothers.
      As was mentioned earlier, it was about this time that the two youngest children of Jemima arrived. The girl, Jemima lived to womanhood, she was born in 1846 while the family was in route to Utah. The last a boy they named Ezra Taft Benson was born 25 April 1848 and he and his mother both passed away before the family could gather together their meager belongings and continue on their journey.
      They were buried there in the burying ground along with those loved ones who had gone before. Jemima's husband, her father and Samuel's father took their three motherless families on to Utah where they helped to establish communities, build churches and have left their mark in history.
      Ref: Early church records; gen. library in S.L.C. Ut.; Utah Gen. and Historical Mag.; Personal knowledge and Family records; Early Deseret News, 9-26, 36 page 5; L. D. S. Temple records."

      BIRTH:
      1. Date and place per website of Paul Price http://www.softcom.net/users/paulandsteph/gtp/ancestors.html 2 Jan 2002: 14 Oct 1809 in Warren Co., Ohio.

      2. Date and place given in Ordinance Index.

      3. I have discovered two new items that create a bit of a puzzle concerning our ancestor Jemima Mangum who was the daughter of John Mangum (of the Rev. War) and the wife to our Samuel Jefferson Adair.
      First, for a number of years I had heard rumors of an LDS patriarchal blessing possibly given to her in the Spring of 1846 after the LDS Saints had fled that previous winter from Nauvoo. With the help of the LDS Church Archives, I was able to find it. She was at Mt. Pisgah, Iowa, and it was approximately two years thereafter that she dies and is buried at the same place. Here is a transcript of her church blessing:
      "Camp of Israel Pisgah near the Head Waters of Gran River. A Blessing by John Smith Patriarch upon the head of Jemima Adair daughter of John & Nancy Mangum born Ohio Sept. 14, 1809.
      "Sister Jemima I lay my hands upon thy head in the name of Jesus Christ & place upon thee a Father's Blessings inasmuch as thou hast no father thou art entitled to all the blessings of the new & everlasting covenant. Thou are a daughter of Abraham & lawful heir to the Holy Priesthood which shall be conferred upon thee in due time in common with thy companion in the House of the Lord which shall be built upon the Mountains & exalted above the Hills where all nations shall flow as the Prophets have spoken & thou shalt live to see Peace established upon the Earth and mob violence ended forever. Thou shalt have faith to heal the sick in thine house in the absence of thy companion & to hold thy children in life untill they are old. The destroyer shall have no power in thy habitation. Thou shalt be able to redeem thy fathers back to the days of Noah on to where they died in the Gospel by the help of thy companion & assist him in redeeming him & to be exalted in due time to inherit a kingdom & a dominion that shall never pass away but continue to increase untill thine offspring are as numerous as the land of the sea shore & they shall not be exceled by any in the House of Israel. Thou shalt live to see the closing scene of this generation the curtains of Zion extended over the land of America. This is thy blessing with every desire of thine heart inasmuch as you are patient & abide in the truth. Every word shall be fullfilled for I seal it upon thee by the authority of the Priesthood & I seal you up to Eternal Life. Even so amen. J. L Smith Recorder. May 26, 1846."
      As is the practice then and now, the recipient of the blessing provides their birth date, location, and parents. Note that she names her mother as "Nancy" Adair and not Rebecca Adair as we have always had. The birth date and place of 14 Sep 1810 in Ohio is consistent with the same date that Jemima's widowed husband Samuel provides in a church marriage sealing 9 May 1853 at the Endowment House in Salt Lake City.
      John Mangum had at least three wives with Rebecca being the last. According to the marriage record, John and Rebecca Knowles were married 19 Jan 1809 in Warren Co., Ohio. They were both of Eaton Township in that County. Rebecca had been married before to James Knowles, hence her name of Rebecca Knowles in the marriage record. According to records in the temple she was born 10 Oct 1785, so she would have been age 24. With Rebecca John Mangum had eight children with the youngest Lucinda saying in her memoirs that her mother's name was "Rebecca Canada Knowles." Canada is probably the maiden name and is most likely a variation on Canida or Kennedy. Rebecca joins the LDS church, but dies at Winter Quarters, Nebraska in 1847. Clearly her name was not Nancy as Jemima states in the patriarchal blessing. We have never seen the name Nancy used in regards to Rebecca and I don't believe Nancy is a dimunitive form for Rebecca (i.e. Polly for Mary, Anna for Hanna, etc.)
      Now the second part of the mystery lies with the actual marriage record itself, which has just become digitized and can be viewed on line at Family Search with a search of "John Mangram" and "Rebecca Knowles" in Ohio. The ministers or justices of the peace who performed the marriages would right them on a slip of paper and sent them into the county. We can actually look at that piece of paper. I have attached it to this email. Here is the rub: There are two entries on the piece of paper. Generally there is only one entry per paper. Both marriages are by the same justice of the peace and evidently he neglected to report one marriage and thus submiited it in conjunction with the other. The first entry is for an unrelated couple and is dated 1 Sep 1809. The second entry is for our couple and is dated 19 Jan 1809. It is very possible that the justice wrote 1809 rather than 1810 for our couple, otherwise why would they be backward. It was almost three weeks into a new year and he had 1809 on the brain from the entry he had just wrote. So there is a good possibility that the marriage was really 19 Jan 1810, which would be four months after our Jemima Mangum was born.
      Some other thoughts:
      -If 1809 was correct for the marriage as we have always assumed, then Jemima would have been born one week shy of exactly nine months from the marriage date. This is possible, but does seem a bit unlikely.
      -The name Jemima is more in line with John's second wife Jemima/Gemima Goggins/Goggans/Coggins. A very possible scenario could be that the second wife died in conjunction to Jemima's birth in Sept. and John chose to name the new baby in her remembrance. John of course would have had 3 children from his first marriage and 2 from his second with the youngest being about 6 years old. There would be a desire to remarry quickly.
      -One published secondary source indicates this second wife's name as Gurnine Coughlin which is surely a variant on Jemima Coggins. Gurnine/Jemima may be more likely to have a diminitive form of Nancy (subject to more research on names).
      -We can't rule out that there may be actually another wife between Jemima Goggins and Rebecca Canida named Nancy ___. We could assume Nancy ___ died in childbirth when our Jemima was born. The last child for whom we have a record of John and Jemima Goggins is Mary Mangum in 1804 - so there is a gap of five years before our Jemima is born. Of course there could very well have been an unreported child for John and Gemima Goggins whom we have no record that died in the the interim years (birth records were not kept in this time period in frontier Ohio) and Jemima Goggins would then be our Jemima's mother.
      We have always figured we have to follow the Canida line back, but this may no longer be the case depending on how we interpret the above. I have previously done some research into the Goggans - they have some memorable history in the Revolutionary War and are in South Carolina in conjunction with Mangums.

      MARRIAGE:
      1. There are two varying dates: date shown at the 1853 temple sealing is "3 Dec 1829 at Pickens, Co., AL" and Samuel Adair was doing the ordinance first hand. There is a second sealing shown in "1864," temple unstated, that says "23 Dec 1829 in Pickens Co., AL." Presumably Samuel also was a participant in the second one as well.

      DEATH:
      1. Alternate death date of 30 or 31 Sep 1848 also indicated.

      BURIAL:
      1. See website <http://lserver.aea14.k12.ia.us/SWP/bbrown/Bev.html> for photos and data on Mt. Pisgah Mormon Settlement including names on cemetery memorial.

      2. Mt. Pisgah, Iowa, Burial Monument, south side:
      Rebecca Adair
      William P. Adair (s/b William Y. Adair)
      Lane Ann Mangum
      Jemima Mangum Adair
      Wm. Jefferson Adair

      PHOTO:
      1. FHL film 2056024 "George Addison Mangum Collection" has a photo type family group sheet for John Mangum's family including a grainy photo supposedly of Gemima Mangum which I have scanned and have in the computer. I question its authenticity since she died in 1848 at Mt. Pisgah. I think this is too early for general popular photography and I think Samuel and Gemima were too far into the frontier for such.

      SOURCES_MISC:
      1. FHL film 2056023-2056026, especially film 5 which contains Mangum-Adair materials. Title is "George Addison Mangum's Genealogical Collection" which is his lifetime work donated to library in 1998; he was born in Utah in 1922, of Blackfoot, ID and is perhaps a brother to Ivey Mangum Hale. Brief summary includes: 2056023, item 1, book of remembrance; item 2, surname index of changes and volumes; item 3, Person materials; 2056024, items 3 thru 6 and 2056026, Mangum/Adair materials. Included are many family group sheets of sidelines and downlines, many of them unconnected.

      2. The book "John Mangum, American Revolutionary War Soldier and Descendants," 1986, by Delta Ivie Mangum Hale. The article on Samuel and Gemima duplicates information already noted above and is not recopied here.

      3. FHL Film 1697868 and book "The Mangums of Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi, Tennessee, Arkansas, Texas, Utah, and Adjoining States," by John T. Palmer, Ph.D. Santa Rosa, CA 95409, 1993, 3rd ed.

      4. Nauvoo LDS Land and Records Office research file (copy in my possession as of 2 Jun 2007 and also partially viewable at www.earlylds.com). Includes family group sheet from Ancestral File.

      ACTION:
      1. Verify Ohio marriage licenses against marriage returns to determine who is Jemima's mother Nancy and when the actual marriage occurred in 1809 or 1810.