Samuel Jefferson Adair

Male 1806 - 1889  (83 years)


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  • Name Samuel Jefferson Adair 
    Born 28 Mar 1806  , Laurens, South Carolina, United States Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    Died 6 Jul 1889  Nutrioso, Apache, Arizona, United States Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Buried 8 Jul 1889  Saint Johns, Apache, Arizona, United States Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID I1839  Petersen-de Lanskoy
    Last Modified 4 Sep 2015 

    Father Thomas Adair,   b. 25 Oct 1771/1777, , Laurens, South Carolina, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1858, , , Mississippi, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 80 years) 
    Mother Rebecca Brown,   b. 3 Nov 1784, , Laurens, South Carolina, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 20 Dec 1846, Mount Pisgah, Union, Iowa, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 62 years) 
    Married Abt 1803  of Laurens, South Carolina, United States Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Family ID F769  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 1 Jemima Catherine Mangum,   b. 14 Sep 1809, , Warren, Ohio, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 28 Apr 1848, Mount Pisgah, Union, Iowa, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 38 years) 
    Married 3 Dec 1829  , Pickens, Alabama, United States Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
     1. William Jefferson Adair,   b. 27 Aug 1830, , Pickens, Alabama, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 31 Oct 1846, Mount Pisgah, Union, Iowa, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 16 years)
     2. John Milton Adair,   b. 8 Jan 1833, , Pickens, Alabama, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Jun 1899, Barclay, Lincoln, Nevada, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 66 years)
     3. Rebecca Frances Adair,   b. 8 Jul 1835, , Pickens, Alabama, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 26 May 1836, , Pickens, Alabama, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 0 years)
    +4. George Washington Adair,   b. 27 Jun 1837, , Pickens, Alabama, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 9 Sep 1909, Hammond, San Juan, New Mexico, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 72 years)
     5. Permelia Jane Adair,   b. 27 Jun 1837, Fulton, Clarke, Alabama, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 16 Dec 1883, Dry Fork, Uintah, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 46 years)
     6. Samuel Newton Adair,   b. 11 Dec 1839, , Itawamba, Mississippi, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 16 May 1924, Luna, Catron, New Mexico, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 84 years)
     7. David L. Sechrist,   b. Abt 1840, , , Tennessee, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 22 Mar 1867  (Age ~ 27 years)  [Adopted]
     8. Joseph Jasper Adair,   b. 23 Jan 1842, , Itawamba, Mississippi, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 8 Sep 1846, Mount Pisgah, Union, Iowa, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 4 years)
     9. Rufus Columbus Burleson Adair,   b. 9 Feb 1844, , Itawamba, Mississippi, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 2 Aug 1858, Washington, Washington, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 14 years)
    +10. Ann Catherine Chestnut,   b. 11 Apr 1844, , , Missouri, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 27 Mar 1863, Washington, Washington, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 18 years)  [Foster]
    +11. Jemima Catherine Adair,   b. 6 Apr 1846, Lexington, Washington, Iowa, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 15 Apr 1926, Murray, Salt Lake, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 80 years)
     12. William Alfred Chestnut,   b. Abt 1847, , , Missouri, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Bef 28 Feb 1877  (Age ~ 30 years)  [Foster]
     13. Ezra Taft Benson Adair,   b. 25 Apr 1848, Mount Pisgah, Union, Iowa, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 26 Apr 1848, Mount Pisgah, Union, Iowa, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 0 years)
    Last Modified 22 Oct 2015 
    Family ID F90  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 2 Nancy F. or S. White,   b. 11 Nov 1811, , Halifax, Virginia, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Aft 1880, of, , Iowa, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age > 70 years) 
    Married Abt 1849  of, Pottawattamie, Iowa, United States Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
     1. Joshua Tumer Adair,   b. 25 Dec 1849, Kanesville (now Council Bluffs), Pottawattamie, Iowa, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 2 Aug 1938, Decatur, Burt, Nebraska, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 88 years)
    Last Modified 22 Oct 2015 
    Family ID F379  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 3 Lucinda 
    Married Bef 1 Jan 1853  of, Utah, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Divorced Yes, date unknown 
    Last Modified 22 Oct 2015 
    Family ID F516  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 4 Rachel Hunter,   b. 13 Oct 1810, , , South Carolina, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 5 Aug 1882, Salem, Utah, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 71 years) 
    Married 9 May 1853  Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Last Modified 22 Oct 2015 
    Family ID F578  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 5 Roxanna M.,   b. 1794, , , England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Aft 1860, of Washington, Washington, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age > 67 years) 
    Married Bef 1856  of Payson, Utah, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Last Modified 22 Oct 2015 
    Family ID F515  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 6 Anne Cathrine Laustdatter,   c. 2 Jul 1815, Guldager, Ribe, Denmark Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 7 Jan 1884, Saint Johns, Apache, Arizona, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 68 years) 
    Married 22 Oct 1864  Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Last Modified 22 Oct 2015 
    Family ID F581  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Notes 
    • RESEARCH_NOTES:
      1. Records from Itawamba County, Mississippi:
      A. Website info:
      a. "Itawamba County Registered Clergy, 1838-1869" lists a transcript of clergy registered with the county which was required to perform marriages at <http://homepages.rootsweb.com/~robfra/clergy.html>; there are about a hundred listed by date with the second oldest listing being: "Samuel Adair: Christian; 5 April 1841." This could be our Samuel.
      b. "Itawamba County 1839 State Tax List" represents some of the first families in the county to pay property taxes at <http://homepages.rootsweb.com/~robfra/taxlist39.html>; includes a listing for "Lamuel A____." This could be a "hard to read" Samuel Adair.
      c. "Itawamba County Marriage Book 1"at <http://homepages.rootsweb.com/~robfra/marr.html> has about 2 dozen marriages solemnized by "Samuel Adair" starting from mid-1841 to late 1844. A couple of recognizable names include;
      i. James M. Mangum and Eliza P. Clarke 23 Jun 1842.
      ii. George Crawford and Jane Mangum 8 Jun 1841.
      d. "Itawamba County Marriage Book 2"at <http://homepages.rootsweb.com/~robfra/marr2.html> has about 6 marriages solemnized by "Samuel Adair, MG" starting from 4 Apr 1842 to 18 Jun 1845. Since no more ceremonies occur after latest date, this could be our Samuel. Additional marriages are in Book 3 with the last entry being 3 Nov 1845.
      e. "Itawamba County State Census, Jan 1841" at <http://homepages.rootsweb.com/~robfra/statecen.html> lists the following Adair families:
      i. Samuel Adair with 7 people in household.
      ii. Wm. Adair with 4.
      iii. Thomas Adair with 4.
      B. Note: the following marriage certificates by Samuel Adair, Minister of the Gospel, per FHL film 901648 "Marriages of Itawamba Co., Mississippi," vol. 1, attest to the information above:
      p. 49: "George Crawford to Jane Mangum. To any Minister of the Gospel, Judge of the State of Mississippi, of Judge, Justice, or Officer of Itawamba County authorized to celebrate marriages: Greeting - You are hereby licensed to celebrate the rites of matrimony between George Crawford and Jane Mangum and you will return unto the office of the Probate Court of said County a certificate hereon of the solemnization thereof. Witness J. Robins, Clerk of said Court and the seal thereunto annexed the 7th day of June 1841. J. Robins, Clerk by the Dept. L.J, Copeland. In virtue hereof the rites of matrimony between George Crawford and Jane Mangum were duly celebrated by me 8th day of June 1841. Samuel Adair, Minister of the Gospel."
      p. 203: "James M. Mangum and Eliza P. Clarke. The State of Mississippi, Itawamba County. To any Minister of the Gospel, Judge of the State of Mississippi, of Judge, Justice, or Officer of said County authorized to celebrate marriage: Greeting - You are hereby licensed to celebrate the rites of matrimony between James M. Mangram and Eliza P. Clarke and you will return unto the office of the Probate Court of said County a certificate hereon of the solemnization thereof. Witness Edwin G. Thomas, Clerk of the Probate Court of said county and the seal thereunto annexed the 21st day of June 1842. In virtue hereof the rites of matrimony between James M. Mangram and Eliza P. Clarke were duly celebrated by me 23rd day of June 1842. Samuel Adair, Minister of the Gospel."
      C. Itawamba County Marriage Books 1-3 (http://www.rootsweb.com/~msitawam/marriage.html) lists the following 30 marriages performed by Samuel Adair. Other records note his registering with the county as a "Christian Minister" on 5 Apr 1841. The last date of 3 Nov 1845 shows that they did not leave for Nauvoo, Illinois prior to that date:
      Hardy W. Norvill/Amelia McCance, 2 Jun 1841.
      George Crawford/Jane Mangum, 8 Jun 1841.
      Archibald Tailor/Louisa Ingle, 27 Jun 1841.
      Neely Sharp/Nancy Dulaney, 3 Aug 1841.
      Adam Yeager/Retha Priddy, 14 Dec 1841.
      John McBride/Louisa Roden, 3 Mar 1842.
      Joseph Thrasher/Nancy Armstrong, 4 Apr 1842.
      James C. Williams/Lidia Franks, 4 May 1842.
      George W. Barnes/Susannah Warren, 1 Jun 1842.
      John Shaw/Ruth Medley, 2 Jun 1842.
      James M. Mangum/Eliza P. Clarke, 23 Jun 1842.
      Samuel Pounds/Polly Ann Dyer, 20 Oct 1842.
      Henry Johnson/Sarah Ingle, 25 Oct 1842.
      James L. Watts/Cilda Franks, 1 Dec 1842.
      William Priddy/Winey Ward, 8 Dec 1842.
      Frederick Parton/Elizabeth Miles, 29 Dec 1842.
      Wm. A. Ayers/Nancy Patton, 29 Jan 1843.
      Thomas H. Winkler/Jane Moonghan, 23 May 1843.
      John E. Ewing/Sary Adair, 13 Jul 1843.
      John Price/Eliza Person, 3 Dec 1843.
      Jesse Watson/Retha Myers, 19 Mar 1844.
      Stephen Herring/Martha Hannah, 18 Sep 1844.
      John H. Pascall/Martha Cook, 8 Oct 1844.
      William Duke/Nancy McVey, 3 Nov 1844.
      Matthew Carter/Martha Turner, 8 Dec 1844.
      Richard C. Long/Frances M. Jones, 26 Dec 1844.
      A. J. Reeves/Cela Ann Priddy, 6 Mar 1845.
      Joseph E. Mangum/Arta Hanna, 27 Mar 1845.
      Joseph M. Watson/Rebecca Roden, 18 Jun 1845.
      G. M. H. Walker/Lucinda Smith, 3 Nov 1845.

      2. Censuses:
      1830 US: Pickens Co., Alabama, pages 111-112. The first three related families are all on the same page, the next four related families are on the next page, and James Adair (with son Joseph) is on p. 129:
      Thos. Peeks, males 0-5:1; 5-10:1; 20-30:1; females 0-5:1; 5-10:1; 10-15:1; 30-40:1.
      John Mangum, males 5-10:1; 10-15:2; 15-20:1; 60-70:1; females 0-5:1; 5-10:1; 10-15:1; 30-40:1.
      Cyrus Mangum, males 20-30:1; females 0-5:1; 15-20:1.
      Saml. Carson, males 20-30:1; females 20-30:1; 80-90:1.
      Saml. Adair, males 20-30:1; females 20-30:1.
      Thos. Adair, males 5-10:1; 10-15:1; 15-20:1; 50-60:1; females 0-5:1; 5-10:1; 10-15:1; 40-50:1.
      Daniel Clark (next door), males 0-5:1; 30-40:1; females 0-5:1; 20-30:1.
      James Adair, males 0-5:2; 15-20:1; 20-30:2 (Joseph b. 1806); 60-70:1; females 15-20:1; 20-30:2; 60-7-:1; no slaves.

      1840 US: Northern District, Itawamba Co., Mississippi, related families from full survey of county census:
      P. 136a: Samuel Adair, males 0-5:2; 5-10:2; 30-40:1; females 0-5:1; 30-40:1. No slaves listed.
      P. 144a: John Mangum, males 15-20:1; 70-80:1; females 10-15:1; 15-20:1; 50-60:1. No slaves listed.
      P. 150a: Joseph Adair, males 30-40:1; females 20-30:1. No slaves listed.
      P. 156a: Thomas Adair, males 20-30: 1; females 0-5: 1; 15-20:1. No slaves listed.
      P. 157a: William Mangum, Jr., males 5-10:1; 20-30:1; females 0-5:1; 5-10:1; 20-30:1. No slaves listed.

      1850 US: District 21, Pottawattamie, Iowa, p. 78b, 13 Sep 1850, entry 217:
      1850 US: District 21, Pottawattamie, Iowa, p. 78b, 13 Sep 1850, entry 217:
      Samuel Adair, 46, Laborer, SC.
      Nancy, 39, VA.
      John, 18, AL.
      George, 15, AL.
      Samuel, 12, AL.
      Rufus, 7, MS.
      Mary, 13, TN.
      Robert, 7, TN.
      Benjamin, 5, TN.
      Jemima, 4, IA.
      Joshua, 1, IA.
      Note: this census locates Samuel in Iowa in 1850 with a previously unknown wife [at least unknown among Utah Adair histories]. It appears Nancy brings into this marriage three children of a previous marriage [Mary, Robert, and Benjamin] who were all born in Tennessee. It also shows a son Joshua only a year old whose birthdate Amy Von Cannon [Iowa descendent of Joshua] states as 25 Dec 1849; this would put a marriage between Samuel and Nancy to approximately no later then March 1849. Samuel's first wife Jemima died 28 Apr 1848. The following census has all of the right children in the proper order except Permelia (Pamelia) who is not listed. It is interesting that the exact next entry [#218] has John Holden, 21, Tenn. and Pamelia, 15, Ala. - could this be Pamelia, George's twin sister, who is misrepresenting her age as not 13 [due to a marriage to this John of which we were not previously aware] but as 15 which in turn leads the family to say that George is also 15 and not 13. This is definite proof that Samuel's second wife was Nancy ___. Apparently she did not want to leave Iowa which was the cause or the result of a separation with Samuel and her retaining her previous natural children plus their common son Joshua. Years later when the RLDS was organized, Nancy and Joshua join like most of the Iowa Saints who remained behind from those who went to Utah. This would explain why Samuel may never have been sealed to Nancy, unlike his other wives, in an LDS temple even though he had the opportunity to do so in Utah [or it may be because she was still alive before he left St. George area for Arizona].

      1851 Iowa State: Pottawattamie County. FHL film 1022203. The entire state was counted but only Pottawattamie listed everyone by name in the household and their ages; other counties only listed the head of the household and a numerical count without names of the various ages by sex in the household. No date is given when the census was taken but it was certified in Dec. 1851; however, the other counties show a Sep 1851 date which also appears more likely for Pottawattamie as well in light of ages given some children with known birthdays in October. Census return:
      Adair: Samuel 45, John M. 18, George 16, Samuel N. 14, Rufus A.B. 10, Jemima 6, Joshua 1. [Note Samuel appears recently separated from his second wife by the time of this census and she is living several pages away in the census under her first married name of Maynard with her children of the Maynard marriage. Joshua Adair is listed twice - once with Nancy Maynard and once with Samuel Adair; evidently the final custodial arrangements for Joshua were not yet settled by the time of the census. Nancy's next husband Andrew Allen is not in the census confirming that Andrew Allen was not a factor in the breakup of Samuel and Nancy's marriage. Her fourth husband Evins O'Banion is listed in the county's census put several pages away. Samuel Adair is also several pages away as well. This confirms the fact that Samuel went west in June 1852 was not the immediate cause of their separation by this census in Sep. 1851. Also note that John and Permelia, his son-in-law and daughter, are living next door. Also the following related families are living as neighbors to each other in the county but several census pages away from Samuel: Thomas/Mary Adair, John/Mary A. Mangum, and William/Sarah Mangum. ]

      1852 Iowa: Pottawattamie County:
      Thomas Adair, 6, 4, 1, 1.
      Samuel Adair, 8, 3, 1, 1. Note also an Andrew Allen and a Jude Allen family is listed 7 and 8 entries below; Andrew Allen marries Samuel's separated wife after 1852 [Nancy did not go west, nor does Andrew Allen; Andrew's first wife Eunice who he separates from because he doesn't want to go west does go to Utah in same company as her children and Samuel in 1852. Jude's daughter Jane eventually marries Bishop John Stoker.]

      1856 Utah Territorial Census was taken because Utah was trying to get statehood to avoid some of the problems that later came. As a result they wanted as many people as possible and frequently included names of everyone in a family without regard to whether they were living or dead. As a result, some of the people listed with the family may not actually have been in the household in 1856. The Adair and Mangums listed included the following heads of households in the Provo and Payson City area: George W. Adair, James Mangum, Joseph Adair (wife Rebecca), Samuel Adair, and Thomas Adair. Source for the following entry is FHL film # 505,913 (index in FHL book 979.2X22u); Ms d 2929 fd. 33, Payson City, p. 8:
      Samuel Adair
      Roxana "
      Ann "
      John M. "
      George "
      Jane "
      Newton "
      Rufus "
      Catherine "
      William "
      Joseph "
      Emily "
      Ezra T. "
      Joshua "
      Eliza J. "

      1860 US: Washington, Washington, Utah, 25 Jul 1860, pg. 1017, #1240/1087 (Samuel Adair, Thomas Adair, Wesley Adair, James Richey, Geo. W. Adair, James Mangum, John Mangum, Valentine Carson, John Price are all listed as neighbors):
      Saml Adair, 51, farmer, $200 real estate, $650 personal property, AL.
      Roxanna M., 66, Eng.
      Catharine G., 14, IA.

      1870 US: Washington, Washington, Utah, enum. 6 Jul 1870, Roll 1613 Book 1, p. 415a, household 96, family 92 (related neighbors out of a total of 108 homes include the following heads of households: John Wesley Adair, Charles Searles, John Milton Adair, Valentine Carson, William Mangum, Jeremiah Stayner, and Samuel J. Adair):
      Samuel Adair, farmer, $300 real estate, $150 personal property, SC.
      Anne, 54, keeping house, Denmark.
      Anne, 4 or 9?, at home, Utah, mother noted of foreign birth. [I believe this to be Jemima Ann Adair; census taker may have assumed Anne was the mother of Anne.]

      1880 US: Show Low Creek, Apache, Arizona, FHL film 1254036, (National Archives Film T9-0036), p. 19D:
      Samuel J. Adair, farmer, age 74, b. SC, both parents b. SC.
      Annie C. Adair, age 65, b. Den., both parents b. Den.
      (Note: Son George W. Adair and family listed as a neighbor in Nutrioso.
      1900 Census, San Juan County, New Mexico, Precinct No. 6 Bloomfield (Hammond): Adair, George W. Head-W-M- b. June 1837; 63 yrs; Marr. 36 yrs; b. Ala.; father b. No. Carolina; mother b. Ala; Farmer. Note he lists his father Samuel born in NC not SC. Census taker's error or some truth?)

      3. It is pretty well established that Samuel did not take his family to Utah until 1852; but did he or did he not go once before in 1848 perhaps for hire or for some other reason. Listed in "Pioneers of 1848" from the files of the daughters of the Utah Pioneers, Journal History, etc.: "Adair, Samuel J., age 42, b. 28 Mar 1806 in So. Carolina as part of the Young Company." No other family members or Adairs listed for 1848." Samuel in 1848 is listed with the Young Company in the DUP files and is also listed with the Heber C. Kimball Company with SUP. He would not have come with both. SUP shows several people coming with the Charles C. Rich Company in 1857 but the Rich Company came in 1847. There are many discrepancies recorded by the DUP/SUP. As for Ina Iverson's biography of Samuel Jefferson Adair, many discrepancies there also. We feel that Samuel Newton Adair's Autobiography is very clear on when they came to Salt Lake and is very good documentation. This is what he said. "I Samuel Newton Adair, Then went on to say on January 10, 1846 moved with my parents to Nauvoo, Illinois. Here we were driven from our homes on account of our religious belief and came to Mt. Pisgah, Iowa where we resided for one and one half years. Here my mother and three brothers died and on account of their deaths we could not go with the pioneers. In the fall of 1848 we moved from Mt. Pisgah to Council Bluffs where we remained until 1852. Then in the summer with a company of saints we crossed the plains with the 10th company with Gardner as our captain." In the Church Almanac it does show a Benjamin Gardner Company. This company was the 10th company to leave for Salt Lake in 1852. They departed Kanesville Iowa on the 2nd of June with 241 people and 45 wagons. We feel that this account is accurate as he was telling his own story. Ina Iverson would have gotten much of her information 3rd and possibly 4th hand. Carolyn Smith went page by page through the complete 1850 Utah Territory census; there was no Samuel Adair listed there. 1848 Pioneer Index Source: Heart Throbs of the West (published by Daughters of Utah Pioneers), Volume 9, pages 469-521: Adair, Samuel J. 42; Mangum, Sarah 4. So what is the source of the 1848 crossing?

      4. See file for copy of map entitled "Arizona, showing early agricultural settlement and roads made and traveled by colonists and Mormon battalion route." Also map "Arizona's Honeymoon Trail - Mormon Wagon Roads" from a booklet edited by Norma Baldwin Ricketts.

      5. See notes with Sarah Mary Chestnut for extensive biography of the Samuel Adair family and her husbands and families.

      6. David Secrist, the young boy Samuel Adair brought across the plains, shows birth Dec 1840 in Mississippi and death of 22 May 1867 per Ancestral File. Information is unverified. He, nor any Chestnut Children, appear in 1856 Utah census by their surnames.

      7. Email from Amy VunCannon 7 Sep 2002: "The relationship of the Adairs and the Allens through my branch's story is that Nancy left Samuel when Joshua was eighteen months old for Andrew Allen, she and Andrew both had decided not to follow the wagon train, both Samuel and Eunice Allen(spouses) were members of the LDS and they both went on to Utah, but I have found no record of Andrew or Nancy as members. But the funny thing is that Nancy's last husband (Evan O'Banion) was a active LDS. I believe one of the Allen researchers told me that there was a story in the family that Nancy and Andrew were deserted by their spouses and they in turn headed off to Utah together, because a woman couldn't travel in the train without a male companion and Samuel was that companion to Eunice until they got there. I figure that makes sense to me - they both needed something from each other, she probably helped with Samuel's children. No proof though, just family tales."

      8. As quoted from the Mangum Book, pp. 681, 682: "The History of Samuel Newton Adair dictated to his granddaughter, Mary Gennette Adair Chapman, tells us a little more about the Adairs: 'On January 10, 1846 at the age of six years, I, Samuel Newton Adair, moved with my parents to Nauvoo, Illinois. When the Saints were driven from their homes in Nauvoo, my family moved to Mt. Pisgah where we lived for one and a half years. Here my mother and three brothers died. In the fall of 1847 [this should probably be 1848 since he says his 3 brothers died at Mt. Pisgah which would include Ezra who died 26 Apr 1848] we moved from Mt. Pisgah to Council Bluffs, Iowa where we remained until 1852. During this summer we crossed the plains with a company of Latter Day Saints. We encountered many hardships. We left our homes, crossed the trackless plains and were traveling in regions inhabited only by Red Men and wild animals. This was done with the thought that we were going to a land where we could worship God according to the dictates of our conscience. We reached Payson, Utah late that summer. During the next summer, the Walker War broke out in Utah. A large number of towns were deserted, including Payson, and some completely destroyed. During this time I stood guard and answered the roll call. (Note: He would have been less than 14 years old.) In the summer of 1853 with a company of men, we went in the night to Allred to move the Saints to Manti. The Indians had driven off their teams, so they couldn't move without help. My father was called by President Brigham Young to the southern part of the state to raise cotton. We left our home in Payson in March 1857 and moved to the Rio Virgin, or Washington, in Southern Utah. Here we remained until the first of June when we returned to Payson [Note: He was 17 and his father Samuel J. was 47 years old.)... My father and I took a trip to Payson and while there my brother, Rufus was killed accidentally with a pistol. [Note: some records say Rufus died at Winter Quarters, on Aug 2, 1847 at age 3 1/2; this would seem to contradict the other records, if correct.] We returned to Washington and remained there until the year 1860, then went to California and remained there until 1861. In November of 1862 I was called to Moqua Village with Jacob Hamblin and others... I was called at the April Conference in 1879 on a mission to Arizona. I sold my home in Washington and left with my family November 10, 1879. We settled in Concho, Arizona. In 1883 we moved to Nutrioso, Arizona and remained there until spring of 1885. We moved to Luna, New Mexico in April of 1885 and have remained here ever since..." [See Samuel Newton Adair's files for full citation.] Kerry's note: the statement of S. Newton going to California in 1860-61; it is unclear if this was him alone or if Samuel Jefferson Adair also went as well - I suspect it was Newton without his father.

      10. Several streets are named after Adairs in Arizona: Adair Drive and Adair Springs Lane in Pinetop, Adair Drive in Show Low 85901, and Adair Circle in Mesa 85207. Photos on file or accessible from website of Delbert Adair [email: dtadair@worldnet.att.net]. Also 2nd East of Washington City, Utah was known early as Adair Street.

      11. Norma Entrekin 12 Oct 2002 found and read copies of the St. Johns local paper "Orion Era" from 1883; see also newspaper "Apache Chief." Five issues are located in the Univ. of Arizona Tucson Archives. Found also book Udall and Nelson's book "Arizona Pioneer Mormon" and Thomas C. Romney's "Life Story of Miles Park Romney. She reports no family specific information. There does however appear to have been several anti-Mormon papers at the time even with the term "Anti-Mormon" in their masthead.

      12. From Don and Carolyn Smith, one part of three writings of Samuel Newton Adair. [As to source, Carolyn referred me to Becky Hamblin [bhamblin79@hotmail.com] to try to locate the original of this; Becky in turn believes Collins Chapman in Mesa may have it since Collins' mother is the granddaughter who hand wrote it for Samuel]: "Luna, New Mexico, January 22, 1920. I, Samuel Newton Adair, will write what I know about my father's folks. My grandfather on father's side was named Thomas Adair. He married Rebecca Brown. He lived at Lawrence County, South Carolina in 1806. My father was the oldest son of Samuel Jefferson Adair. Thomas Adair was the next oldest son. George Adair was next oldest son. John Wesley Adair was the youngest son and went with the Mormon Battalion in 1846. The girls names were Eliza Adair Price, Sally Adair Mangum, died on the plains in 1852. Mary Ann Adair Mangum married John Mangum."

      13. <http://www.rootsweb.com/%7Emsichs/history.html> has an excellent history on Itawamba County. The following two small excerpts are significant. The first is a newspaper account of Reverend S. Adair, who would be Samuel Jefferson Adair, offering the invocation at the celebration commemorating the death of Pres. Andrew Jackson. The second quote has reference to Joshua Toomer who may the individual from whom Samuel gave a future son the name of Joshua Tumer Adair:
      "By 1845, Fulton had become the center of commerce in Itawamba County, surpassing the town of Van Buren on the Tombigbee River. The town square in Fulton was used for many public events and celebrations. A description of one such celebration is found in a copy of the 10 July 1845 edition of the Fulton Herald: "The celebration was for the purpose of doing honor to the memory of General Andrew Jackson, seventh president of the United States, who died on June 9, 1845 and also in recognition of the day. It came off in a highly creditable manner. There were about 2,000 persons present, and fully one-third of the number were ladies. All stores were closed until after three o'clock in the afternoon and the doors were hung with mourning. At ten o'clock the procession formed on the public square where there was a stand erected for the speakers. Seats were provided for the ladies and Revolutionary soldiers, also for other soldiers who had served under General Jackson. The order of the day was then read by Mayor Cayce after which the Rev. S. Adair, chaplain of the day, offered the prayer. Russell O. Beene delivered the eulogy on the death of General Jackson. The flag was stripped of its mourning and the celebration in honor of the Fourth, a day of remembrance by all Americans, was opened with appropriate address by Mayor Cayce after which, the Declaration of Independence was read by G.B. Gaither. Thomas E. Wren was then introduced and he delivered the oration of the day. Mr. Wren was a young hand at the blacksmith's bellows, but judging from his speech, one would have taken him to have been an orator of many years' practice. The dinner was then announced and if you had been there and cast your eyes over the tables and had seen the luxuries in the way of pound cakes, pies, tarts, prepared by the ladies of the town and county, and the abundance of everything else that was palatable, you would no longer be heard to cry 'if we do not have rain in a few days we will not have anything to eat.' In fact, after all present had satisfied their appetites plenty was left for many more."
      "In 1841 members of the Tannahill family of Scotland immigrated to the new county of Itawamba. After coming down the Tennessee River they landed at Easport in the new county of Tishomingo. A letter dated January 19, 1842 from Fulton to England recollects the journey to Itawamba County: "...on a Sunday night we landed at the town of Easport (containing four log cabins) and the next day we started through the Forest Track for Fulton, Mary mounted on horseback and Robert and I on foot. I carried my gun, but got no chance to shoot. We saw some deer, but they did not allow us to get near them. It was a most awful night at Easport. By the help of poles to steady us, Mary and I got up the bank and got lodging that night in a cabin. The people said they had never seen such a thunderstorm. We did not sleep much. There was in the same room, three men and two females. This is the universal practice here - no separate sleeping appartments. We lay and listed to the thunder rolling overhead and the lightning flashing through a hundred chinks in the cabin... When we got to Mr. T's (Joshua Toomer in Fulton), we found all our people well except Mother... There is very little money current here. Mr. T. is glad to have the yearly accounts of the farmers settled by the cotton which can be turned into specie at Mobile... I wrote this in my own log cabin, which barring a few chinks is not a bad one... The country here is but thinly settled as it is only six years since the Indians left it...We live on bread of Indian corn which is the only kind used here. Their hogs are excellent being fed in the woods on nuts and acorns... All men here are not merely nominally but really equal. The other day a man was taken up here for going to shoot a neighbour. The sheriff allowed him to go at large about the town...he rode about the town, whooping, crowing like a cock and dared the officer at the point of a knife to lay a hand on him... Two men have been shot in Mr. Toomer's store."

      14. Excerpt from a copy of biography by Ina Custer Iverson received by email from Rowland Hinton [hinton12@isp.com] 1 Jan 2006:
      "Samuel is listed in Journal History of Church as crossing the plains in lst division of Brigham Young's company arriving in Salt Lake 24 July 1847. If this is so he must have left Jemima and his children in Winter Quarter while he went to the Rocky Mountains, then returned to find that Jemima and the baby had died."
      Kerry's note: I do not believe the above information is correct based upon censuses, the birth of his son Joshua Tumer Adair, and per other contemporary sources, so I contacted David Wood, the head researcher and official compiler of the LDS pioneer lists for the LDS Church Archives [WoodDL@ldschurch.org]. His 21 Mar 2006 response:
      "Thank you for your e-mail of 19 March, and for your interest in the Mormon Pioneer Overland Travel website. We rely on people like you to help us make this resource as complete and accurate as possible. Thank you especially for drawing our attention to the name of Samuel Jefferson Adair. Samuel is listed on the 1852 Unidentified Company roster on the website because we found his obituary and because we have in our Archives collection his brief autobiographical sketch (click on Samuel's name on the company roster to see the references). Both these sources say that he came to Utah in 1852, but they do not identify the company he traveled with.
      a. "Death of a Veteran," Deseret Evening News, 16 July 1889, 3. Available at the following institutions: Church History Library, Salt Lake City, Utah.
      b. Adare, Samuel, St. George Stake, High Priest Quorum Genealogical Records, 1872-1906, reel 6039, 126, in Record of Members Collection 1836-1970. Available at the following institutions: Church Archives, Salt Lake City, Utah."

      15. The book "Alabama and Mississippi Connections, Historical and Biographical Sketches of Families on Who Settled on Both Sides of the Tombigbee River," by Judy Jacobson, 1999, viewed on the website Ancestry.com contains a good history of the settlement of this area with the counties of Greene, Pickens, and Tuscaloosa in Alabama and counties of Noxubee and Itawamba in Mississippi. Alabama opened for settling after the American victory in the War of 1812 and Mississippi opened up in the 1830s with various Choctaw Indian treaties. This book contains a very good history of these areas as well as genealogies on the Adair, Mangum, Carson, and Richey families. Most of these genealogies are copies of standard LDS Ancestral File entries; however, the following is new information: "After his son's birth, Thomas Adair and his family followed the northern route into Alabama - through Tennessee, stopping at Maury/Rutherford County. He was listed along with William Adair as a juror in Pickens County, Alabama, circa 1824. A Rebecca Adair and a Fereby Clark were granted land in Sec 22 T20 R15W in Pickens County, Alabama, on November 28, 1834. On November 10, 1835, Thomas Jefferson [Jefferson is not mentioned in the record] Adair received land in nearby Sec 20 T20 R15W. His son Samuel was granted eighty acres of land in Sec 9 and Sec 15 T20 R15W in 1836. James and William Adair received land in other townships and ranges. A Joseph also received land in T20 R15W like the Adair of this genealogy ... From Alabama, the family moved west into Itawamba County, Mississippi by 1839..."

      16. FHL book 976.185 H2p "Pickens County Alabama, History and Families," by Rose Publishing Co., P.O. Box 806, Humboldt, TN 38343, 1998, p. 102, has references to some of our family as indicated by an asterisk [*} that I have added with comments that follow. The church is between Carrolton and Pickensville:
      "Big Creek Church.
      A group of early settlers came together and requested a church be organized in this area between Carrollton and Pickensville in order to have a place to worship. Rev. Silas Dobbs and Rev. Charles Stewart met with the group to establish rules and regulations to constitute a Baptist church. They agreed to meet once per month, on Saturday, to transact all church business and on Sunday for a day of worship.
      The founding members were Notley Gilmore, John Mangum*, Charles W. Nalls, Samual Adair*, Robert McVey, Mathew Gilmore, Mary Jane Jones, Anna Hiespeth, Rebecca Mangum*, Jermiah Mangum*, Nancy Huggins*, Alcey Johnson, Rebecca Adair* and Pheobe Clark*. They were declared a regular number of members of the church and entitled to all privileges of the gospel church and its to be known as Big Creek Church on January 10, 1829.
      The building was a wood frame with wood shutters. There was no way to heat the church during cold weather. Many times services were not held because of the cold weather and heavy rains.
      Membership grew rapidly for many years until the Baptist church was organized in Carrollton, and other churches in the areas close by. Both black and white members worshiped together through the late 1860s. The church was divided by a partition in half for the black members to worship with their own pastor until they were able to build their own place of worship.
      As time passed, the church membership grew...
      The membership became smaller and smaller. The members were moving away and going to other churches. The final church record was on December 1891...
      The church was located on Highway 86 West about six miles from Carrollton, Alabama. There is not a building there, but the church cemetery is on the right of the highway, very overgrown and unkept, tombstones falling down and scattered. Many of Pickens County early pioneers are buried there."
      *My comments as to relatives:
      John Mangum - the Patriot, 1763-1843.
      Samual Adair - Samuel Jefferson Adair, 1806-1889. Samuel marries John Mangum's daughter Jemima.
      Rebecca Mangum - most likely John Mangum's wife Rebecca Canida, 1785-1847.
      Jermiah Mangum - no idea who this may be; there is no known Jeremiah Mangum to date in the family. May be a bad transcription for Jemima Mangum, but there are none known with this surname at the time since John Mangum's dau. Jemima had married Samuel Jefferson Adair many years before.
      Nancy Huggins - John Mangum's daughter Nancy, 1794-1877, who married Austin Hudgens.
      Rebecca Adair - most likely Rebecca Brown, 1784-1846, who married Thomas Adair and was mother to Samuel and Phoebe on this list.
      Phoebe Clark - Samuel Jefferson Adair's sister, Fairby, 1809-1836, who married Daniel Clark.
      Photos of the Big Creek Missionary Baptist Church are found in another book, FHL 976.185 H2h "The Heritage of Pickens County, Alabama," by Heritage Publishing Consultants, Inc., PO Box 67, Clanton, AL 35046, 1999, pp. 58-59. The church existed until 1931 and some time after 1942 the old church either fell down or was torn down. Burial date from the early 1830s to 1934.
      FHL book 976.185 V3p "Pickens County, Alabama Cemetery Records 1983," by the Pickens County Genealogical Society, 1984, lists the burials in "Big Creek Cemetery". None with the surnames of the above are shown here except for "Frank F. Hudgins, Co. D. 41st Al. Inf, CSA (no dates)." Frank was most likely Austin and Nancy Hudgen's son.

      17. The following is a small excerpt of a larger listing (see Samuel Newton Adair's notes for full transcription), which was received in digital form from Don and Caroline Smith, 2003. Regardless of the title - "Family Records of Samuel Newton Adair" - I am not sure if this is really a transcript of records kept by Samuel Newton Adair or not. Some death dates given for some of the individuals are after the date Samuel Newton Adair himself died. I spoke in person with Collins Chapman of Mesa, Arizona, in Feb. of 2006. He did not recognize it. Collins' family is the source of most of the biographical information on Samuel and Collin's mother was responsible for the autobiography of Samuel Newton Adair who dictated it to her. The following came to me as an addendum to a typed copy of that autobiography; however, I have now seen a portion of the original handwritten dictation and find no such attachment. The following therefore has no documented source that I can find thus far and should be used with caution:
      [A.] "Father: Samuel Jefferson Adair; Mother: Jamima Mangum; Children:
      Rebeca Francis Adair
      William Jefferson Adair
      John Milton Adair
      George Washington Adair
      Pamelia Jane Adair
      Samuel Newton Adair
      Joseph Jasper Adair
      Rufus Columbus Adair
      Jamima Kathrine Adair
      Ezra T. Adair
      [B.] "Samuel Jefferson Adair - Born at Lawrence Co., South Carolina, March 28, 1806. Baptized by Elder John Dowdle, Nov. 27, 1845. Confirmed by Elder John Dowdle, Nov. 30, 1845. Ordained an Elder by Daniel Thomas, a High Priest by John Young in 1855. Married Jamima Mangum. Filled a mission to Southern Utah in 1857. Migrated from Mississippi to Nauvoo, Illinois on Jan. 10, 1846. Died at Nutrioso, Apache County, Arizona, July 6, 1889."
      [C.] "Jamima Mangum - married Samuel Jefferson Adair. Died at Mt. Pisgah, Iowa about 1847.
      Rebeca Francis Adair - Born and died at Pikens County, Alabama.
      William Jefferson Adair - Born at Pikens County, Alabama. Died at Mt. Pisgah, Iowa about 1847.
      John Milton Adair - Born at Pickens County, Alabama. Married Eliza Jane Richey. Died at Lincoln County, Nevada.
      George Washington Adair - Born at Pickens County, Alabama, married Ann Chestnut. Died at San Juan, New Mexico.
      Pamelia Jane Adair - Born at Pikens County, Alabama. Married Charles D. Searle at Payson City, Utah in 1856. Died at Ashley, Uintah County, Utah about 1884.
      Samuel Newton Adair - Born at Itawomba County, Mississippi, Dec. 11, 1839. Baptized by Samuel Jefferson Adair, in 1847. Ordained an Elder by John Freeman. Ordained a High Priest by Apostle Erastus Snow, at Luna, New Mexico Nov. 24, 1885. Married to Helen Gennett Brown by Robert Covington at Washington, Utah, Dec. 15, 1863. Endowed at Endowment House, Salt Lake City, Utah, June 18, 1867. Patriarchal Blessing by Emer Harris. Filled Mission to Moqice [Moqui] Village - Went Nov. 1862. Returned on Jan. 10, 1863. Migrated from Mississippi to Nauvoo. Died at Luna, New Mexico, May 16, 1925.
      Joseph Jasper Adair - Born at Itawomba County, Mississippi. Died at Mt. Pisgah, Iowa about 1847.
      Rufus Columbus Adair - Born at Itawomba County, Mississippi. Died at Washington City, Utah, Aug. 2, 1858.
      Jamima Katherine Adair - Born at Des Moine, Iowa. Married to Frederick Rugg at Washington, Utah, Jan. 11, 1866.
      Ezra T. Adair - Born at Mt. Pisgah, Iowa, 1848. Died at Mt. Pisgah, Iowa, 1848."

      18. LDS Family History Library book 976.185H2j "Early Settlers of Pickens County, Alabama," by James Dolphus Johnson, Jr, 1992, is a very helpful analysis of land holdings in the said county. It locates the associated families of Adair, Mangum, and Richey in close proximity to each other. The book provides an alphabetical listing of each land holder and the grant date, location, and size of their land holding, its location. This township is typical at 6 miles by 6 miles with each section being 640 acres or one square mile. There are a total of 36 sections arranged in a grid of 6 x 6 with number 1 being the top right with the count going right to left than dropping down one row and going left to right and so forth with no. 36 being the bottom right corner. I rearrange the following listing by survey township so that the associations can be seen in the various families:
      A. Township 20, Range 15. The bottom center of this township incorporates the north part of the settlement of Carrollton. We also find "Hebron Church" in the township's center (sect. 16). On modern maps, Highway 35 travelling north of Carrollton rough splits this township east and west.
      a. Samuel Adair has two properties. This is Samuel Jefferson Adair who goes to Utah:
      i. S9 (Section 9), 9/30/1836, 40 acres (SE corner of SW 1/4 section).
      ii. S15, 1/31/1836, 40 acres (SW corner of SW 1/4 section).
      b. Joseph Adair has two properties adjoining each other. He is just north of Samuel Adair's first listed property and just west of James Adair's property. Joseph is Samuel Adair's cousin who also goes to Utah. James is most likely Joseph's father who does not go to Utah. Note also he also owns two other properties outside of this Township -- one with his father James and one individually (see B(a) and D(a):
      i. S4, 11/21/1836, 40 acres (SE corner of SW section 1/4).
      ii. S9, 9/26/1836, 40 acres (NW corner of NW section 1/4).
      c. James Adair has two properties adjoining each other. He is just just east of Joseph Adair's property. James is most likely Joseph's father and he does not go to Utah with Joseph. Note also he also owns two other properties outside of this Township -- one with his son Joseph and one individually (see B(a) and C(a):
      i. S3 and S4, 11/1/1837, 40 acres each adjoining each other (S3: SW corner of SW section 1/4; S4: SE corner of SE section 1/4).
      d. Thomas Adair has one property which adjoins the separate property of Furley Clark and R.(Rebecca?) Adair who are his daughter and wife. Thomas and Furley do not go to Utah, but Rebecca does:
      i. S20, 11/10/1835, 40 acres (SW corner of NE 1/4 section).
      e. Furley Clark and R. Adair. This would be daughter and mother: Fairby or Pherrely Adair who married Daniel Clark and Rebecca (Brown) Adair, wife of Thomas Adair. The land adjoins Thomas Adair. Rebecca goes to Utah but "Furley" does not:
      i S20, 11/28/1834, 160 acres (SW 1/4).
      f. John Mangum. His family goes to Utah but he does not. This would be John Mangum "the Patriot." He is just south of Samuel Adair's land in S15. His land directly adjoins that of son William Mangum, son Cyrus Mangum, and son-in-law Austin Hudgins (marries Nancy Mangum). He is just northwest of land of another son-in-law Thomas Peeks (marries Elizabeth Mangum):
      i. S22, 9/23/1834, 80 acres (N half of SW 1/4 section).
      g. William Mangum, the oldest son John Mangum (the "Patriot") from his third marriage. William marries Sally/Sarah Adair and moves to Utah. His land adjoins the land of his father, his brother Cyrus, and of his bro.-in-law Austin Hudgins. Both pieces of his land adjoin each other. Note also he also owns another property outside of this Township (see E(a)):
      i. S21, 7/1/1835, 40 acres (both this and the next piece form the S half of SW 1/4 section).
      ii. S21, 2/20/1836, 40 acres.
      iii. S22, 10/23/1834, 80 acres (W half of NW 1/4 section).
      iv. Note that no date is given but he also is granted 80 in S14 of a separate township (T24, R3).
      h. Cyrus Mangum, son of John Mangum (the "Patriot") from his second marriage. Cyrus does not go to Utah and he and his family are found in the 1850 US Census remaining in this same area; however, he eventually moves to Moulton, Lavaca, Texas where he dies. His land adjoins land of his father, his brother William, and of his bro.-in-law Thomas Peeks:
      i. S22, 1/25/1836, 80 acres (W half of SE 1/4 section).
      ii. S27, 2/27/1830, 80 acres (E half of NE 1/4 section).
      i. Thomas Peeks, son-in-law of John Mangum (the "Patriot") and husband of Elizabeth Mangum, John's dau. from his first marriage. Thomas does not come to Utah and he remains in this area for the rest of his life. He is found here in the 1850 census and his wife alone in the 1860 census. His land adjoins bros.-in-law Austin Hudgins and Cyrus Mangum:
      i. S27, 11/19/1835, 80 acres (I am unsure in which order the three parcels fit into the map; however, all the land is found in two spots on the map: 40 acres SW corner of SE 1/4 section and a L-shaped piece of 120 acres including W half of NE 1/4 and SE corner of NW 1/4).
      ii. S27, 6/17/1836, 40 acres.
      iii. S27, 9/4/1832, 40 acres.
      iv. S21, 9/25/1844, 40 acres. (This is not land he owned but he acts as Trustee for Nancy E. Bryant, who does not appear related to him.)
      j. Austin Hudgins, son-in-law to John Mangum (the "Patriot" and husband to Nancy Mangum, John's dau. from his first marriage). Austin and Nancy remain in the area for the rest of their lives and are found in the local censuses. He had several parcels of land all in close proximity to bros.-in-law Thomas Peeks, Cyrus Mangum, and William Mangum. Rather than trying to sort each parcel out on the map and aligning them to the following acquisitions (many of which added to existing land), I summarize his total holdings as follows: 160 acres NE 1/4 S28, 80 acres W half NW 1/4 S27, 80 acres W half SW 1/4 S27, 120 acres SE 1/4 S27 (SW corner of 40 acres in this 1/4 section owned by Thomas Peeks), 80 acres E half SW 1/4 S26, and 40 acres NE corner NE 1/4 S35:
      i. S22 & 35, 2/20/1855, 120 acres. (Note author erroneously identifies this as Range 16, but maps show it correctly as Range 15.)
      ii. S28, 2/20/1855, 80 acres.
      iii. S26, 6/4/1832, 40 acres.
      iv. S26, 2/25/1835, 40 acres.
      v. S27, 2/27/1830, 80 acres.
      vi. S27, 11/19/1835, 80 acres.
      vii. S27, 8/3/1836, 40 acres.
      viii. S27 & S28, 10/29/1836, 160 acres.
      B. Township 19, Range 16. This township has the small town of Ethelsville at its center. Ethelsville is about 15 miles NW of Carrollton and closer to the Mississippi State line. We only find one family of interest as follows and this land is in addition to other land owned elsewhere:
      a. Joseph and James Adair (joint owners). This is most likely Joseph and his father James. They both separately own land near Carrollton in Township 20, Range 15 (see A(b) and A(c) above). James also owns individually land in Township 21, Range 17 (see C(a) below) for which the date of grant is the same:
      i. S34, 10/18/1834, 160 acres (NE 1/4).
      C. Township 21, Range 17. This township has the small town of Pickensville on its Eastern boundary and the Mississippi State Line for its western boundary. Pickensville is about 11 miles W of Carrollton. The land borders the western shore of the modern lake Aliceville Lake. We only find one family of interest as follows and this land is in addition to other land owned elsewhere:
      a. James Adair. This is most likely James, the father of Joseph. James also owns land near Carrollton in Township 20, Range 15 (see A(c) above) and Ethelsville in Township 19, Range 16 (see B(a) above):
      i. S22, 10/18/1834, 80 acres (E half of NE 1/4). (Note this date is the same as the grant on the Ethelsville parcel.)
      D. Township 22, Range 17. (The author identifies this Township erroneously as 20, but the land map confirms it as Township 22.) This township has the small town of Memphis, AL, on its center and the Mississippi State Line for its western boundary. Memphis is about 13 miles SW of Carrollton. The land borders the western shore of the modern lake Aliceville Lake. It is only about 5 miles south of Pickensville. We only find one family of interest as follows and this land is in addition to other land owned elsewhere:
      a. Joseph Adair. This is most likely the son of James. Joseph also owns land near Carrollton in Township 20, Range 15 (see A(b) above) and Ethelsville in Township 19, Range 16 (see B(a) above):
      i. S3, 10/18/1834, 80 acres (E half of SE 1/4). (Note this date is the same as the grant on the Ethelsville parcel.)
      E. Township 24S, Range 3W. This township has the small village of Cochrane near its eastern boundary and the Mississippi State Line for its western boundary. It is about 18 miles southwest of Carrollton:
      a. William Mangum. William is the son of John Mangum (the "Patriot"). This parcel is in addition to land William Mangum owned near Carrollton in Township 20, Range 15 (see A(g) above):
      i. S14, no date, 80 acres (W half of NE 1/4).
      F. Township 21 & 22, Range 16. Township 21 includes the eastern half of Pickensville on is western side. Township 22 would be the next township south of township 21. William Richey's property would be currently in Pickensville. Even though in the same county, the Richeys at this point of time were not in a township with any of the other associated families since they were about 8 miles away slightly southwest from the main grouping just north of Carrollton. William was of course married in 1820 to Margaret Adair, the daughter of Thomas and Rebecca (Brown) Adair. I do not include the physical locations of these parcels within the section in which they occur. The brother-in-law of William, Neal Tilletson who married Martha Richey, is also found in this county:
      a. Robert Richey. Father of William, James, and David. Only William went to Utah along with Robert's wife Rebecca (Belton) who died on the trail to Utah:
      i. S32 (TWP 21), 1/31/1825, 160 acres.
      ii. S5 (TWP 22), 1/12/1825, 160 acres.
      b. William Richey. He came to Utah:
      i. S7 (TWP 21), 9/17/1833, 40 acres.
      c. James Richey. He is found here in the 1850 Census with wife and two children:
      i. S8 & S9 (TWP 21), 8/13/1833, 80 acres.
      c. David Richey. He is found here in the 1850 Census with extensive family (Census entry may be misspelled as Didama Adair):
      i. S7 (TWP 22), 12/31/1833, 40 acres.
      G. Miscellaneous notes:
      a. I looked for both Moses Pearson and any Carsons associated with the family and found no listings in this book.
      b. There are other Adairs in Pickens County and they are listed in the book. They include Wyman (or Weyman) Adair with five parcels with date range of 1832-1834 in Township 20, Range 16, and in Township 21, Range 16. Also included is William Adair with one parcel dated in 1836 for Township 22, Range 14. These may be distant cousins of our Adairs, but not ones with which there is a documentary association at this time.
      c. This study was undertaken with the goal of confirming the relationship of Joseph Adair with a father named James Adair as is established by Joseph Adair's LDS Patriarchal Blessing in which Joseph names his parents as James and Rebecca Adair. The close relationship found in these particular land records confirm this relationship especially since they also owned land together. There is one caveat, however, and that is that Joseph had a younger brother named Joseph Newton Adair who was born 11 Mar 1812 (Joseph was born 11 Apr 1806). There is the possibility that the James in the land deeds could be the brother and not the father, however, I don't believe this is the case. The 1830 US Census places James Adair and his family in Pickens County with him and his wife being aged 60-70. To be listed in the census he would have had to have had property. There is only one James Adair listed in the census and the younger James Newton Adair may be the male listed in the census that is age 15-20.

      BIOGRAPHY:
      1. From email of 26 Dec 2001 email of Norma Entrekin [nje@mindspring.com]: "The Mangums and Adairs appear to have been family friends and it is thought they moved together from So. Carolina to Alabama about 1828 or 1829 and then later to Mississippi. While in Mississippi, the Mangums and Adairs heard of the Mormons and joined the church there. Shortly after this they moved to Nauvoo, Illinois to be with the Mormons. They were driven from their homes and were forced to cross the Mississippi River in the winter of 1846. Then they established residence in Pottawattamie County, Iowa. This was Indian territory, and they had to get permission from the Indians to settle and do a little farming. While living in Iowa, due to improper food and unhealthy drinking water, and general unhealthy living conditions, there were many deaths in the camps. Samuel's son Ezra Taft Benson Adair was born in Iowa at Mt. Pisgah and died one day later. The baby's mother, and Samuel's wife, Gemima died 2 days later of complications of childbirth at age 39 after having her 10th child. At her death, the living children ranged in ages from 2 to 15. One can only imagine his grief, at losing his wife, new baby and 7 other family members in less than 2 years. Samuel must have loved Children, as he raised 3 extra ones; they were David L. Sechrist, Ann Catherine Chestnut, and her brother, Alfred Chestnut. While in Iowa, Samuel took David L. Sechrist to raise. Later, as they crossed the plains, he took the other two, the Chestnut Children. He later adopted them. It is thought that their parents had died on the trip across the plains. The girl, Ann Catherine Chestnut married Samuel's son, George W. Adair, and later died at 19 in childbirth, I believe, with their second child. The Adairs and Mangums first settled in the Payson-Nephi area. On the 3rd of March, 1857, the Mangums and Adairs left for Dixie [Southern Utah]."

      2. "Pottawatamie County Tax Receipt Received of Samuel Adair Seventy two cts in full, for his State and County tax for the year 1848. C M Johnson, Deputy Collector, June 26th 1849. "

      3. Per "Pioneers and Prominent Men of Utah," Pg 708, Samuel Adair: "Came to Utah in 1848. his children: Jane, m. Charles Searle; Catherine, m. Fred Rugg; Newton, m. Janett; George, m. Emily Tyler; John, m. Jane Hancock. Family lived in "Dixie," Washington C., Utah. Farmer and orchardist. He died in Arizona. [Note: 1848 date is in dispute.]

      4. In dating the early Mormon movement of Samuel, the following contemporaneous accounts of relatives from the book "John Mangum, American Revolution War Soldier" by Delta Mangum are helpful:
      p. 255, chapter 12 - John Mangum and Mary Ann [Adair] Mangum: "...They were with the saints when they left Nauvoo and of course endured the trials and hardships incident to that trek to Utah. However, they with many others remained in the Pottawattamie section of Iowa from 1846 to 1852, then journeyed to Utah to make their home with the Latter-day Saints..."
      p. 25; William Mangum born Dec 25, 1811: "...On January 15, 1846, William left Itawamba County, Mississippi with his family for Nauvoo Illinois, arriving there March 20, 1846. He was there for a week and then crossed the Missouri river and travelled west to Mt. Pisgah, Union County, Iowa where they stayed for four and one half years. From here they moved to Council Bluffs, Iowa where they remained the following winter and then moved on the Bongo River which was a stopping off place for the Westward Emigrants... William and his family arrived in Salt Lake City September 23, 1852 and went onto Brigham City where they spent the winter and then in the spring of 18??, they moved to Payson, Utah..."
      p. 32; Amelia Carolyn Mangum Bigler [William's daughter]; her biography was written by Nelda Tuck - quotes from Amelia's diary of January 11, 1885 [She was born in 1834]: "...Moved from there, [Alabama] with my parents [Sarah and William Mangum] at the age of seven to the state of Mississippi, Itawamba County and in December 1845 was baptized into the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints by a Brother George Steward, confirmed by a Brother Gibbs. Started to Nauvoo about the 15th of January 1846, and arrived there about the 20th of March the same year. Stayed there one week and crossed the Mississippi River and travelled west. Sometimes camping one month at a place. Arrived Mt Pisgah (a settlement of Saints) the day that Father Huntington was buried, Sister Zina Young's father, and my baby brother was buried close to him in a few days. Stayed there four years and a half, and moved to Council Bluffs. Stayed another winter and moved to a settlement on the Bongo river..." She then tells of many deaths and awful burials etc. "We arrived in Salt Lake City on September 23, 1852. Stayed there a few days and came onto Provo and stopped there one week..."
      p. 682; Samuel Newton Adair [Samuel's son]: "On the tenth of January 1846, at the age of six years, I, Samuel Newton Adair, moved with my parents to Nauvoo, Illinois. When the Saints were driven from their homes in Nauvoo, my family moved to Mt Pisgah where we lived for one and a half years. Here my mother and three brothers died. In the fall of 1847 [actually 1848] we moved from Mt. Pisgah to Council Bluffs, Iowa where we remained until 1852..."

      5. Samuel experienced many deaths at Mt. Pisgah, Iowa or Winter Quarters, Neb. Samuel fathered 10 kids by Jemima Catherine Mangum. In 1848, 5 were dead. 4 died at Mt Pisgah and one at Winter Quarters. His mom, Rebecca Brown Adair died 20 Dec 1846, Mt Pisgah. His mother-in-law Rebbeca Canida Mangum died 23 Feb, Winter Quarters. His wife Jemima Catherine died 28 April 1848 at Mt Pisgah.

      6. Note: ten names of the first men to Dixie were among Adairs, Mangums, Richeys, and Prices who were all interrelated by marriage. Excerpt taken from book "Under Dixie Skies," a history of Washington County, Utah [similar accounts are found in the books "I Was Called to Dixie" by Andrew Karl Larson, 1961, p. 67 and "A History of Washington County, from Isolation to Destiny," by Douglas D. Alder and Karl F. Brooks, pp. 28, 29]: "(Samuel Adair) In keeping with Brigham Young's policy of making the Church self-sustaining, a company was called to settle on the Mill Creek (which is now part of Washington Co.) primarily for the purpose of raising cotton. What should be more logical than to send men who had had experience in cotton culture? A number of converts who came from the South were accordingly called to go into what was later known as Utah's Dixie. Two groups went in the spring of 1857. The first group, consisting of ten families under the leadership of Samuel Adair [apparently, Robert D. Covington and Samuel J. Adair were the leaders of two groups, who were called to the 'Cotton Mission'], left Payson, Utah on the 3rd of March and arrived at the site of what was subsequently called Washington on the 15th day of April. They camped near the river on a piece of land later designated as the "Sand Plot," but on the advice of Amasa Lyman, who was passing through on his way from San Bernardino to Salt Lake City, they moved up to the place where the town now stands. The second company [under Covington] left Salt lake City early in April and camped on the 5th of May at the Samuel Adair Spring, on the east side of the valley, just a short distance north of the present US highway 91. The following were members of the two original companies and others who settled at Washington in 1857. Robert D. Covington, Harrison Pearce, James B. Regran [or Reagan], Willam B. [or R.] Slade, Joseph Smith, William Hawley, John Couch Sr., John Couch Jr., John Mangum, James [B.] Wilkins, Alfred Johnson, John W. Freeman, James D. McCullough, William H. Crawford, Umpstead Rencher, Balus Spouse [or Sprouse], James Richie [or Richey], Samuel Adair, Oscar Tyler, George Spencer, Jr., J. Holden, Joseph Adair, Joseph Hatfield, William Dameron, Preston Thomas, William Fream, George [W.] Adair, [Samuel?] Newton Adair, John Clark, Thomas W. Smith, Simes [or Sims] B. Matheny, Stephen and William Dugas [or Duggins], William J. Young, Enoch Dodge, John Price, and Robert Lloyd. William Darby Cooper was also an early settler. [Bleak, 'Annals of the Southern Utah Mission,' p. 34, the heads of the families listed by Bleak also include in addition to those above: Upstead Rencher, George Hawley, John Hawley, John Adair, Thomas Adair, J. Holden, William Mangum. Later research by Harold Cahoon of the Washington City Historical Society has added the following names to the original settler list: Newton L.N. Adair [Samuel Newton Adair?], John W. Clark, James Nichols Mathews, Gabriel R. Coley, and John D. Lee.] The trial that the settlers of Washington, in Washington Co., were to endure were probably the most discouraging and severe of any of the early settlers of Utah. When Robert Gardiner passed through the town on his way to settle in St. George in December 1861, he reflected that of all the trials he had to endure, the prospect of his wives and children one day looking like the poor malaria plagued creatures he saw in Washington was what appalled him most of all. He says in his journal: 'Here we found some of our old neighbors who received us very kind but the appearance of these brethren and their wives and children was rather discouraging. Nearly all of them had the fever and ague or chills as they called it in this country. They had worked hard and worn out their clothes and had replaced them from the cotton they had raised on their own farms which their women had carded, spun, and wove by had, colored with weeds. Men's shirts, women's dresses and sunbonetts were all made of the same piece; and their clothes and their faces were of the same color, being a kind of blue, as most everyone had the chills. This tried me more than anything I have had seen in my Mormon experience thinking that my wives and Children, from the nature of the climate, would have to look as sickly as those now around me.' This coupled with the trouble and struggle they had trying to build a dam in the Virgin River for irrigation purposes, which was washed out every spring, made the life of the saints that settled Washington probably the most trying of any early settlers." The book "History of Washington County" adds: "Their new home was to be called Washington, as determined in advance by Brigham Young and his counselors. Its location was also fixed - the benchland overlooking the Washington fields. The town was located near several fine springs which have favored the community above others in Dixie. The fields likewise provided a lush expanse of farmland. Washington appeared to have advantages over other communities, but this did not prove to be so. Those broad fields were formed by ancient floods; and modern floods would haunt Washington - not the town but the irrigation projects. And the springs created marshes. There insects would spread malaria. So the Washington Saints were spared little; their plight, fighting malaria and rebuilding washed-out dams, would equal, if not surpass, the tests their neighbors encountered." The book "A History of Washington County, From Isolation to Destiny," by Douglas D. Alder and Karl F. Brooks, p. 66: "...cotton seed from Nancy Pearce Anderson in Parowan, who had brought seeds with her from her home in South Carolina. Plants grew to maturity and did well, and farmers carefully kept seeds for the next year. Settlers in Washington brought cotton seed with them and raised cotton in the 1857 planting season. One party of Saints there, under Samuel Adair, were southerners from North Carolina, Virginia, Tennessee, and Texas who knew about cotton raising. Southerners also came south with the Covington company. Soon cotton also was growing in Toquerville and Grafton. That success impressed Brigham Young who then sent a party of fifteen men to the confluence of the Virgin and the Santa Clara in January 1858 to experiment with raising cotton on a larger scale. Joseph Horne headed the group which located where John D. Lee advised calling the community Heberville. During the growing season, they faced the trials of heat, thirst, disease, and broken irrigation dams. Setbacks drove the costs up, but by Sept. they were able to deliver 575 pounds of cotton to Salt Lake City at a cost of $3.40 per pound. They returned the next year with a smaller group and faced serious water and disease problems, but they delivered a load of cotton to Brigham Young at $1.90 per pound. This was still too costly to compete with cotton raised by southern states where rainfall eliminated the need for irrigation, but it suggested possible success for Mormon attempts at self-sufficiency. With the outbreak of the Civil War in the eastern part of the United States, the idea of raising cotton in Utah's Dixie became more important. The evidence existed that cotton could be successfully raised in Washington County, and decisions had already been made to expand the mission in the south for political and geographical reasons. Therefore, one of the key instructions given to the newest Dixie missionaries was to raise cotton. The realities of the cotton-raising enterprise were soon upon the Saints in Southern Utah, however. Once they brought water to the land, overcoming the difficulties of irrigation, they faced harsh facts about their harvest. The cotton was so bulky that transporting it to either Salt lake City or California was very costly. Brigham Young opposed selling the cotton outside the territory. If raw cotton could be woven into cloth in Utah, he felt, the Latter-day Saints would not have to buy textiles from gentiles (non-Mormons). It was good logic, but it did not face market realities. Dixie farmers could hardly give away their crop to northeners. Their grapes (as wine), dried fruit, and grain could be sold in Salt Lake City, but the cotton was a problem. That reality caused Dixie farmers to plant less cotton, not more. Within a short time, it was clear that building a cotton factory in Dixie was the only effective way to keep the farmers growing cotton."

      8. Three monuments erected in Washington City, Washington, Utah:
      A. "Adair Spring, The Birthplace of Utah's Dixie, Washington City, Utah - Erected by the citizens of Washington City & The Washington City Historical Society, 1996. In early 1857 Brigham Young called a group of Southerners on a cotton mission to Southern Utah to raise cotton. Samuel Newton Adair [this is a mistake; should be Samuel Jefferson Adair, see correction below], the leader of ten families, arrived at this spot April 15, 1857, after leaving Payson, Utah on March 3. They camped here a short time and then moved down near the Virgin River on what became known as the Sand Plot. Apostle Amasa M. Lyman who was passing through the area recommended they move back to the spring area which they did. Robert Dockery Covington arrived here May 5 or 6, 1857, with 28 more Southern families. They left the Salt Lake area shortly after the LDS Spring Conference held around April 6. On May 6 or 7 a two day meeting was held at this site under the direction of Isaac C. Haight, President of the Parowan Stake. They sang songs, prayed and selected Robert D. Covington to be the President of the LDS branch, and Harrison Pearce and James B. Reagan as assistants. Wm. R. Slade and James D. McCullough were appointed Justices of the Peace, John Hawley and James Matthews as constables, G.R. Coley as stray pound keeper and Wm. R. Slade, Geo. Hawley and G.W. Spencer as school trustees. They named their city Washington. It was too late to plant wheat, so they prepared the ground for corn and went right to work making dams and ditches to water their crops. Their homes were their wagon boxes, willow and mud huts and dugouts dug in the bank east of this monument. Their new home soon was called 'Dixie'. Those who came in the spring of 1857 were: [43 names listed; the following names are those related.] Adair, George W.; Adair, John M.; Adair, Joseph; Adair, Newton (L.N.)[Samuel Newton]; Adair, Samuel [Jefferson]; Adair, Thomas; Mangum, John; Mangum, William; Price, John; Rickey [Richey], James. Erected by the citizens of Washington City and the Washington City Historical Societ