Sarah Mary Chestnut

Female 1845 - 1886  (40 years)


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  • Name Sarah Mary Chestnut 
    Born 20 Sep 1845  , , Missouri, United States Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Female 
    Died 4 Jul 1886  Ogden, Weber, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Buried 5 Jul 1886  Ogden City Cemetery, Ogden, Weber, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID I1543  Petersen-de Lanskoy
    Last Modified 6 Sep 2015 

    Father William Albert Chestnut,   b. Abt 1812, of, , Missouri, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Sep 1852, Echo Canyon, Summit, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 40 years) 
    Mother Johanna or Nancy,   b. Abt 1816, of , , Illinois, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Sep 1852, Echo Canyon, Summit, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 36 years) 
    Married Abt 1843  of, , Missouri, United States Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Family ID F731  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 1 Jefferson Slade,   b. 25 Sep 1837, Opelousas, Saint Landry, Louisiana, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 28 Dec 1915, Eagar, Apache, Arizona, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 78 years) 
    Married 20 Nov 1860  New Harmony, Washington, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Divorced Yes, date unknown 
    Last Modified 22 Oct 2015 
    Family ID F875  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 2 John Moroni Foy,   b. 6 Nov 1835, Whitefield, Indiana, Pennsylvania, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 5 Nov 1900, Demersville (Kalispell), Flathead, Montana, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 64 years) 
    Married 13 Dec 1862  Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Divorced Yes, date unknown 
    Last Modified 22 Oct 2015 
    Family ID F876  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 3 Aquilla D. Trulock,   b. From 1822 to 1824, , ,Indiana, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 29 May 1869, Ogden, Weber, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 47 years) 
    Married Nov 1865  , , Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Last Modified 22 Oct 2015 
    Family ID F877  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 4 Jean Etienne or Stephen Malan,   b. 8 Jan 1835, Latour, Torino, Italy Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 15 Aug 1926, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 91 years) 
    Married 20 Dec 1869  Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Last Modified 22 Oct 2015 
    Family ID F878  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Notes 
    • RESEARCH_NOTES:
      1. Reviewed Rootsweb.com Worldconnect 10 Dec 2002.

      2. Censuses:
      1856 Utah Territorial Census was taken because Utah was trying to get statehood to avoid some of the problems that later came. As a result they wanted as many people as possible and frequently included names of everyone in a family without regard to whether or not they were living or dead. As a result, some of the people listed with the family may not actually have been in the household in 1856. Source for the following entry is FHL film # 505,913 (Index FHL book 979.2X22u); Ms d 2929 fd. 33, Weber Co., pg. 47:
      Erastus Bingham, m.
      Lucinda Bingham, f.
      Patience Bingham, f.
      Brigham H. Bingham, m.
      Sarah Chesnut, f.
      Sanford Bingham.
      Martha H. Bingham.
      Sanford Bingham Jr., m.
      John Bingham, m.
      Mary A. Bingham, f.
      Erastus Bingham, Jr., m.
      Sophia Bingham, f.
      Maria L. Bingham, f.

      1860 Census for Washington, Washington, Utah, page 150 indicates house #1291 and family #1114, July 27, 1860 (Samuel Adair, Thomas Adair, Wesley Adair, James Richey, Geo. W. Adair, James Mangum, John Mangum, Valentine Carson, John Price, William Mangum, Cyrus Mangum, Samuel N. Adair are all listed as neighbors):
      Geo. W. Adair, 23, farmer with value-real estate of $200, personal property $275, birthplace of Alabama.
      Ann, age 16, MO.
      Sarah Chesnut, age 14, MO.

      1870 US: Ogden, Weber, Utah, 145/145, 12 Jul 1870:
      Stephen Malin, 35, brickmaker, $200/400, Italy
      Sarah, 24, MO.
      Jefferson, 8, UT.
      Aquilla, 4, UT.
      Priscilla, 1, UT.

      1880 US: Can't find her, her husband, nor any of the Malan children in Utah or nationally.

      BIOGRAPHY:
      1. Per "Pioneer Women of Faith and Fortitude; Volume III; International Society Daughters of Utah Pioneers; Copyright 1999; ISBN 0-9658406-1-1; pages 1862 - 1863; Heading "Sarah Mary Chestnut Slade Foy Trulock Malan" [Kerry's notes are in brackets; I see some errors such as marriage place with Stephen Malan is wrong]:
      "Name: Sarah Mary Chestnut
      Birthdate: about 1845
      Death: 24 Jul 1886
      Parents: William A. Chestnut, Joanna Chestnut
      Pioneer: Not given [this means the Co. they crossed the plains in]
      Spouse #1 Jefferson Slade
      Married 20 Nov 1860
      Death SP: 28 Dec 1915, Eagar, Apache Co. Az
      1 Child: Jefferson Chestnut, 11 Apr 1862
      Spouse #2 John Moroni Foy
      Married: 13 Dec 1862 Salt Lake Endowment House, Utah
      Death SP: 25 Dec 1900 [This may be incorrect and he may have died late 1862.]
      No children
      Spouse #3 Dr. Aquilla Trulock
      Married: Nov 1865
      Death SP: not given
      2 children: Acquilla Jr., 6 May 1866; Priscilla Chesnut, 13 Jan 1868
      Spouse #4 Stephen Malan
      Married 20 Dec 1869
      Logan, Cache Co. Utah [Error: should be Salt Lake City]
      Death SP: 15 Aug 1926
      6 children: Stillborn; Pauline Amaelia, 3 Aug 1872; Stephen Eugene, 26 Jun 1874, Wilford Augustus, 12 Jan 1877; Cora Maud (Hileman), 2 Mar 1880; Ada Lettitia, 10 Sep 1883."
      "Sarah Mary was born about 1845. When she was about five years old, traveling west with her parents and sister, Ann Catherine age eight, and brother, Alfred age two, their parents were murdered by two men that her father had hired as teamsters to take them west. The three children were spared but the cruel men tied them to a cow and sent it on its way. At this time they were outside Echo Canyon. The confused cow and the frightened children were left to wander until they were rescued by Samuel Jefferson Adair, widower of (sic) eight children, also on his way to Zion. Being shocked and amazed when he found them, he released them from the cow, took them in his arms and did his best to comfort the distraught Children. He brought them on to the Salt Lake Valley, arriving on September 21, 1848. When they arrived, the Chestnut children recognized that fine wagon that belonged to their parents. They started to shout, but were quickly silenced when two rough men told Samuel to shut them up or they would be shut up for good. The men were soon gone and the children remained with Samuel as he raised them as his own. They moved south to Payson and then on to Manti. Then Brigham Young sent Samuel to Washington County to grow cotton. They arrived on April 15, 1857, first settling at Adair Springs and then Pine Valley. Sarah Mary went to live with Bishop and Sister Bingham in Riverdale, Utah. She was living there, when at the age of fifteen, she married Jefferson Slade. By the time their first child was born the couple had been separated, possibly over polygamy. After some time passed, she reconciled with Jefferson, but he would have no part of it. She left without telling Jefferson that she was pregnant. She later married John Moroni Foy in the Salt Lake Endowment House on Dec. 13, 1862. Her son was eight months old at the time. The marriage lasted only two years and there were no children. On January 13, 1868, Sarah Mary married Dr. Aquilla Trulock. Shortly after the birth of their second child, Dr. Trulock passed away. On December 1869, in the Logan Temple, Sarah married Stephen Malan. They became the parents of six children. Three years after the birth of their last child, Sarah Mary passed away at the age forty one."

      2. Typescript received Dec. 23, 2001 from J. Malan Heslop, 80 Edgecombe Dr., Salt Lake City, UT, 84 103-2220 from the Malan Book of Remembrance by John Daniel Malan, Vol. 1 and Vol. 2, 1993 [with editorial comments added in brackets by Kerry Petersen, HCO4 Box 7403-D, Palmer, AK 99645 who is a an Adair and Chestnut family researcher]: "Stephen Malan [birth name was Jean Etienne Malan, b. 8 Jan 1835 at Latour, Torino, Italy and died 15 Aug 1926 either in Salt Lake City or Ogden]- His Life Entwined With Many. By J. Malan Heslop from material provided by Pauline Slade Voorhees and others. Life's loom weaves interesting patterns, its woof and warp of human threads cross paths, become entwined, cross again, and another pattern is formed. Consider Stephen Malan's life, a complex pattern of crossing threads. He married three times. Little is recorded about his first marriage to Mahala Billings, which lasted less than two years. Married 1863, divorced 1865. He took a second wife on November 28, 1869. She was Sarah Mary Chestnut Slade Foy Trulock, an attractive women [sic] whose history included three previous husbands and survival of a heinous crime. Her thread that stretched to entwine with Stephen Malan starts with the story of Samuel Jefferson Adair and his family. His roots were in Alabama [and South Carolina before Alabama where his father was a prosperous farmer. He married Jamima [Jemima] Catherine Mangum of Ohio in 1829 [3 Dec.]. They settled in Alabama, raised cotton, struggled on their farm and bore Children. William Jefferson, 27 August 1829 [1830]; John Milton, January 8, 1833; Rebecca Francis, July 6, 1835 [or July 8] and twins, George Washington and Pamela [or Permelia], June 27, 1837. When the twins were a year old the family moved to Mississippi and three more children were born: Samuel Newton, December 11, 1839; Joseph J. [Jasper], February [January 23], 1842, and Rufus Columbus Burleson, February 9, 1844. It was about this time that James Richie [Richey], a nephew of Samuel Adair came to bring the good news of Joseph Smith and the restored gospel. The Adair family members were converted and baptized. They rationalized that their life would be better if they went to Nauvoo to be with the Saints. It was not the case. Mob persecution made life miserable for the Mormons. The Adairs sought refuge in 1846, crossed the Mississippi River, and went on west and settled in Lexington, Iowa. Jemina [Jemima] was expecting their ninth child. A baby girl was born April 27 [6], 1846. They named her after her mother, Jemima Catherine. She lived nine days. [This is incorrect because Jemima died 15 Apr 1926 in Murray, Salt Lake, Utah and was married to Frederick Dickerson Rugg] This was the first child they had lost. It was hard. Before the pain of that death could soften, Joseph J., their seventh son died at age four September 6, 1846 [Sep. 8, 1846 at Mt. Pisgah, Union, Iowa]. Then, as though sorrow begot sorrow, their oldest son, William, became ill and died on October 31, 1846. He was buried in Mt. Pisgah. The pain was crushing. Many friends and relatives were dying. Samuel's mother, Rebecca Brown Adair, died on February 23, 1847. The family looked to the birth of another child to brighten their lives. A son, Ezra Taft B. Adair was born on April 25, 1848 at Mt. Pisgah. He died the next day. A day [actually 2 days] later Jemima, the mother, passed away. Discouraged, even ravished, Samuel hid his sorrow, packed up his belongings, and with his children and a young boy named David Sechrist, age eight, started for the Salt Lake Valley. Little Jemima was only two years old. [This is incorrect since they are in the 1850 Iowa census with Jemima at age 4 and they don't make the trip until 1852 when Jemima would be 6; after the death of Jemima, they move in fall of 1848 to Council Bluffs from Mt. Pisgah.] This trip, with eight [seven since Rebecca Francis had previously died] children to care for must have been difficult. He surely had all he could handle. Yet they made their way without apparent incident until they reached Echo Canyon. To Samuel's horror he came across three young children stumbling behind a wandering cow, to which they were tied with a rope. In their fear and shock, the oldest of the children, age eight, related bits and pieces of the terrifying experience. She sobbed out the story of their parents being killed, murdered by two men that her father had hired as teamsters to take them west. Their parents were William Albert and Johanna Chestnut. When the villains turned to kill the children, Ann Catherine pleaded for their lives with such emotion that they were spared. Instead the cruel men tied the girls to a cow and sent it on its way in the direction of a Mormon settlement, possibly Coalville. Then they ransacked the heavy wagon laden with the family valuables, took what they wanted, scattered the other goods, and with a further threat of death for the children if they ever told what had happened, the cowards drove the wagon away. The confused cow and the frightened children were left to wander. Imagine the plight of the children, Ann Catherine, 8; Sarah Mary, 5 [7], Alfred, 2 [Abt. 5]. No wonder Samuel Adair was shocked and amazed when he found them. He released them from the cow, took them in his arms and did his best to comfort the distraught Children. His children no doubt nurtured the tragically orphaned Chestnut children and gave them comfort as they continued on the Salt Lake City. John Milton Adair, 15 [19] years old, his sister Rebecca, 13 [I believe Rebecca was long dead before this time] and the twins, George and Pamala [Pamela or Permelia], 11 [15], must have helped. When the party arrived in Salt Lake City, on September 21, 1848 [incorrect; should be in fall of 1852], the Chestnut children recognized the fine wagon that belonged to their parents. They started to shout, 'That's our wagon, That's are wagon', but were quickly silenced when two rough men told Samuel to shut them up or they'd be shut up for good. The men were soon gone. The children remained with Samuel. He raised them as his own. Most of his relatives and friends had gone south to Payson and Manti, so Samuel and 11 [10] children followed. Sometime that year, Rebecca, his 13 year old daughter died. [Incorrect, she died long before the plains crossing either in Alabama in 1837 or Iowa in 1848 depending on whose data one follows.] Farming was different than it has been in Alabama and Mississippi, but Brigham Young gave Samuel Adair a call to lead a company to Washington County to raise cotton. They arrived on April 15, 1857 and settled at what became known as Adair Springs. That was not successful. They moved to Pine Valley. In time, Samuel moved to Arizona. He married twice more [actually thrice; once in Iowa and twice in Utah] and died at age 83 on July 26 [6], 1889. John Milton Adair married Eliza Jane Richey and moved to Tonaquint, Utah, near Pine Valley. George Washington Adair, whose father had rescued the three Chestnut girls [two girls and one boy], and then raised them, married Ann Catherine Chestnut the oldest of the three. They continued to live [for awhile] in Washington County and had two children. [He later marries Emily Tyler and has 11 more Children.] William Alfred Chestnut, when matured, returned to the east to look for relatives. He did not return. Sarah Mary Chestnut married Jefferson Slade on November 20, 1860, she had just turned 15 years old on September 26. By the time her first child was born the couple separated possibly over polygamy. Following a quarrel, he told her to go back to her former home with Bishop and Sister Bingham in Riverdale, Utah. She did, and after some time passed, she tried to reconcile with Jefferson, but he would have no part of it, she was no longer his wife. Sarah left without telling Jefferson that she was pregnant with his child. He was not notified of the birth which occurred on April 11, 1862, some 16 months following their marriage. Sarah was living with the Bingham family. The boy was named Jefferson Chestnut Slade. He became a successful business man, owner of the Slade Transfer Company. Great-granddaughter, Pauline Slade Voorhees, wrote in 1990 that "Evidence shows that Jefferson was unaware of the birth of this child. I don't know how or when he learned about his son. My father James Jefferson Slade, son of Jefferson Chestnut Slade, said that when he did learn, his son was already a successful business man living in Ogden, and was in his forties. Jefferson Chestnut Slade threw a big party and invited everybody he know to come and meet his father, for he had carried the stigma of 'illegitimate' for all these years. He had been tormented and teased because he didn't have a father. Now he had a father. 'Now all of you know I am no bastard!' he exclaimed. He knew he had been conceived in the bonds of matrimony, and he wanted everyone to know. Upon looking at the two men, there was little doubt that they were father and son. Jefferson Chestnut Slade's life had not been easy, but he had always had a home and family. His mother, Sarah Chestnut Slade married John Moroni Foy in the Endowment House on December 13, 1862. Her son Jefferson, was about eight months old at the time. The marriage gave security. There were no children by this marriage which lasted only two years, and as with her first marriage, there is no record of a divorce. [Unverified but John may have died 25 Dec 1862.] Sarah Mary married a third time in November, 1865 to Dr. Aquila Trulock. A son, Aquila, Jr. was born May 6, 1966 [1866] and a daughter, Priscilla Chesnut Trulock, January 13, 1868. Shortly after Priscilla was born, Dr. Trulock passed away. Sarah was alone again with a new baby and two boys to raise. Sarah Chestnut Slade Foy Trulock married Stephen Malan on December 20, 1869 in the Logan Temple [There is no ordinance record for Logan but there is one for the Endowment House per FHL film 183396]. This marriage endured and six children were born. Three died as infants. Apparently Stephen and his stepson, Jefferson C. did not always get along well. Jefferson relates that he was made to eat out on the door-step like a little animal, and that he was illy treated. 'One day he picked up a loaf of bread from his mother's kitchen, bade her farewell. He left home to be on his own,' Pauline Slade Voorhees wrote. 'He went down on 25th Street in Ogden and obtained a job at the tender age of 11 years, cleaning spittoons, ashtrays, moping [mopping] floors, cleaning out-houses and other odd jobs. He related how on day two gun slingers with side arms, stood drinking in the bar-room. The younger challenged the older man as to who could draw the fastest. They went for their guns - shots rang out, and the young fellow lay dead on the floor. Seeing this, young Jefferson swore he would never in his life take a drink. He maintained that promise his entire life. He also detested cigars with a passion and was quick to take a cigar from a man's mouth and throw it in the gutter.' Jefferson Chestnut Slade married Sarah Barker on September 26, 1883. Her mother was Stephen Malan's sister, Mary Catherine Malan, who was married to James Barker. Sarah was two years older than Jefferson. Their first baby, Mary Pauline, was born May 3, 1884. Sarah's sister Elfrida, 16, helped nurse her back to health and care for the baby. When a second baby was expected, the couple moved into the 'Old Barker' home on 12th Street. A year and a week after Pauline was born, a son, James Jefferson Slade was born on May 9, 1885. The father, Jefferson Chestnut, was an ambitious man and took to work with a vigor. He is described as a, 'self-taught, good businessman, determined, forceful, dominating man, large in stature, barrel chested, approximately 250 pounds, about five feet-ten tall. His word was law. He carried a bullwhip in place of a gun.' On the other hand, Sarah Barker was entirely opposite in background. 'Sadie,' as she was called was artistic. She taught music and could sew. She was beautiful, had a taste for the beautiful, yet she was modest shrinking from praise. There were some who thought she had married beneath herself. The marriage seemed destined for trouble. After four years of marriage they were divorced on May 13, 1887. A month later Jefferson married a young Dutch girl, Marea Ter Bruggen, a convert to the Mormon Church. They set up housekeeping in Ogden and had a family of nine children. Alone, Sarah raised her children, living in the 'Old Barker' home at 468 12th Street. Her living came from her own resources, teaching, sewing fine clothing made from silk she reeled from silk worms that were grown locally, and she worked as a telephone operator for many years. The Slade business did well. Jefferson helped his first family. As a young man, James Jefferson worked at the transfer company cleaning stables and driving excursion wagons up Weber Canyon. The business, like the lives of the families was entwined. Pauline Slade Voorhees wrote: 'Grandpa Jefferson, Jim, Jeff. C, Ed. and Gus, a half brother, all helped in the moving business, Jim seemed to be the main one at first, along with Gus Malan (Stephen and Sarah Chestnut Malan's son). Soon Jeff, Jr. grew up, and Ed became of age. These sons and brothers were the backbone of the workers and builders of the business. Jeff Jr. always looked up to his older half-brother Jim and told of many trips up Ogden Canyon when Jim was driving the tour carriages and excursion wagons.' Sarah became ill with what was diagnosed as 'cancer of the breast and liver.' On her death bed, she called for Jefferson C. and declared her appreciation and love for him. She died June 2, 1904, at age 44. Jefferson C. purchased a family burial plot for her and the two children. She died, perhaps of a broken heart, not knowing the posterity she left. There are more threads tied to the Malan family. Parley Quince, son of Bartholomew and Louisa Hatch Malan married Anna Margaret Slade, the oldest daughter of Jefferson C. and Maria Ter Bruggen. They were married June 23, 1909. Two daughters were born before Anna died of pneumonia on December 1, 1916. Bernice was born May 11, 1911, and Donna on July 25, 1914. 'following the death of our mother,' Bernice recalls, 'We spent time on Sunday, between meetings, with Grandpa Slade and Baw, as Grandma Slade was called. They bought a Victrola, and we loved to sit by the stove, eat ice cream and listen to the music. We always knew we were loved.' Jefferson Chestnut Slade died Oct. 13, 1936, at age 74, and was buried in the Ogden [cemetery]. When Sarah Chestnut married Stephen Malan on December 20, 1869, she brought with her Jefferson Chestnut [Slade], age eight, Aquilla Trulock, four, and Priscilla Trulock, one year old. This was indicated by the 1870 census. Priscilla died, an infant, in 1870. Sarah bore five children with Stephen. Two of these died in infancy. [Other biographies of Pauline Amaelia Chestnut Malan b. 13 May 1872, d. 17 Aug 1873 and Stephen Eugene Malan b 26 Jun 1874, d. 9 Nov 1931 and several other descending Malan family members continue for several pages. For the narrative above, the biography contains photos of Stephen Malan, Jefferson Slade, Slade's Baggage and Transfer Company's storefront, Sarah Barker, Mary Pauline, James Jefferson Slade, and Anna Slade. A copy of a painting of Sarah Chestnut is reprinted.]

      3. She was raised by Erastus Bingham and Lucinda Gates as a foster child. She returned to them between marriages. Erastus lists her as one of his biological children in his journal.

      BIRTH:
      1. Tombstone gives a birth date of 20 Sep 1845.

      2. Birth calculates to Sep 1845 per obituary age of 40 years and 10 months.

      3. Note cemetery record cited below as well as the 1870 census give birthplace as Missouri.

      DEATH:
      1. Per burial records, tombstone, and obituary.

      BURIAL:
      1. Per obituary.

      2. Ogden City Cemetery online: Sarah C. Malan, b. Missouri, father is William Chestnut, d. 4 Jul 1886 in Ogden, Utah. Bur. E-2-43-2E.

      3. Family Search's "Billion Graves Index": Sarah Chestnut Malan, b. 20 sSep 1845, d. 4 Jul 1886, Ogden City Cemetery.

      4. Www.findagrave.com 60835104 accessed 4 Mar 2013: "Sarah Chestnut, wife of Stephen Malan, Sept. 20, 1845 - July 4, 1886."

      OBITUARY:
      1. "Malan - On Sunday, July 4, 1886, at 10:30 a.m., of paralysis of the heart, Sarah Malan, wife of Stephen Malan, aged 40 years and 10 months. Funeral took place yesterday at 10 o'clock at the Third Ward meeting." Ogden Daily Herald, Tues., 6 Jul 1886.

      SOURCES_MISC:
      1. Paul Price at http://www.softcom.net/users/paulandsteph/tjadair/descendants.html