Notes


Tree:  

Matches 201 to 250 of 4,851

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 #   Notes   Linked to 
201 Area D Tarbert, Nellie May (I64)
 
202 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I661)
 
203 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I3)
 
204 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I2865)
 
205 Berwick, Pierce, or MeHenry, North Dakota is the right county for his birth?

Joane (Becker) Waldo's Uncle on her mother's side of her family. 
Paulson, Melvin Peter (I2675)
 
206 Bill

INFORMATION: Charlotte Evans Atkinson, Nebr in 1978 
Evans, William (I424)
 
207 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I3479)
 
208 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I1286)
 
209 BIOGRAPHY:
1. Patriarchal Blessing dated 20 Nov 2011. William Cade Snegirev, b. 1 April 1998 at Longview, Cowlitz, Washington; parents Vasilisk Eftifeyevich Snegirev and Loretta Kaye Arndt.
"William Cade Snegirev, through the power of the Holy Melchizedek Priesthood which I hold and as an ordained Patriarch in The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints, I lay my hands upon your head to give unto you a Patriarchal Blessing; to assure you of the love of your Heavenly Father and of the purpose and meaning and power of your life.
As you begin this mortal ministry you have done well, you are doing so many things right. Your heart is a choice heart and your desire to do good is a choice desire. The Lord has been, is and will continue to watch over you. He is mindful of you. He knows you personally. He is your friend. He is your advocate with the Father and seeks to bless you and will bless you through all the days of your life.
You are a choice and chosen young man and have been placed here upon this earth with specific duties to perform, with a mission of great import. Your life is your mission. To live that life in tune with the Gospel of Jesus Christ and its principles is to be your desire and your goal.
The Lord will bless you to live a life of great meaning and to live a life of impact.
I bless you with wisdom. I bless you with compassion.
You have been blessed and I bless you with a gentle heart, with a kind and gentle spirit.
I bless you with the ability to counsel and direct.
I bless you with patience that you may feel compassion for those who do not have the Gospel of Jesus Christ in their lives.
I bless you with that strength of character that you will need to deal with those both and in and outside the church who have lost their way and that through your gentle loving spirit you will be able to reach out to them and pull them back and bind them to you as friends not just in this life but for all eternity that they will call your name blessed.
I bless you with insight into those who are hurting and those who are afraid and your sweet and gentle spirit will be as a refreshing breeze on a hot day, as a healing balm of Gilead binding up the wounds of those who have been hurt and tormented by the challenges of this world. You will be a friend to many. You will be a counselor to many. I bless you that you will counsel in wisdom that you will be able to feel the Spirit of the Lord in your life and that you will be directed by that Spirit.
I bless you that as you attend the temple; study your scriptures, have your personal prayers and do those things that you know to do; that as you fast and draw closer to your Heavenly Father that your testimony will grow to a certain knowledge of the truthfulness of the Gospel and I bless you that you will be able to bear testimony with power before your mission, on your mission and after your mission, throughout all your life that the Holy Ghost will be with you and will drive your words into the hearts and minds of those you teach. You will be a leader in your mission, make no mistake about that, you will set an example of integrity and faithfulness to others. Leadership is not about titles. Leadership is about how you live your life; the integrity, the honesty and the durability that you have.
I bless you with that durability that will allow you to be resilient to the afflictions of this world; that you will be able to overcome the adversary, that you will be able to put every challenge and temptation behind you and move forward in the Gospel to be the husband and the father and the grandfather, the man in Zion that the Lord intended for you to be.
I bless you that you will bring great honor to your parents because of the life that you will lead.
I bless you with the ability to reach out to family members and to bind those family members to you and to be a uniting force in your family both for those who are living; those who will be coming to this earth and those who are no longer here. That you will use the temples which shall be upon the earth to unite your family. You will be able to use kind and understanding words to overcome injury. I bless you that you will be the individual that family members turn to when they need help, particularly spiritual help and spiritual guidance that you will be respected that you will be honored and that your companionship will be sought after and treasured.
Thou art of a choice and chosen lineage. Thou art of Ephraim. You are here to help in the Gathering of Israel and you will be an effective emissary for the Lord for that purpose. The Lord will watch over you and He will bless you and He will help you and He will answer your prayers and as you turn to Him you will feel an easing of the pressures of the world.
As you choose your career understand this; that you have the ability and the intelligence and the capability to be successful in the career that you choose and you will feel the Lord blessing you in this, helping you to remember the things that you need to remember and helping you to forget those things that are of a hurtful nature. That you will be able to focus on the good in yourself in your heart and in your life and in the Gospel and in others. That you will be blessed to be a happy person and a person that is here upon this earth to lift others.
I bless you that as you seek an eternal companion to go to the temple with that you will be guided by your Heavenly Father and I bless you that in your marriage that there will be great love existing between you and your wife.
I bless you that you will thirst for greater knowledge from the scriptures. I bless you with a love of the scriptures; that you will draw closer to your Heavenly Father, that you will be someone that people can turn to for gospel answers and answers to their questions.
I bless you that as a father you will come to be beloved by your children and as a grandfather that you will know great joy and rejoicing through your influence on those whom you will come to love and whom you loved before the creation of this earth and claim them as your own throughout the eternities of time.
I bless you with faith I bless you with the gift of discernment that you will be readily able to distinguish between truth and error. I bless you that the Lord will ever watch over you and be with you seeking to bless your life in every way that you are willing to have it blessed.
I seal these blessing upon your head until that glorious day when you feel once again the arms of the Savior around you and hear those blessed words, "Well done my good and faithful friend and servant." I do this in the name of Jesus Christ. Amen."
Brian Dirk McNair, Stake Patriarch
Wasilla Alaska Stake"

2. A short biography of Cade's scouting experience as was used in his posthumous application for the BSA "Spirit of the Eagle" award submitted 29 Jun 2014:
"Cade joined the Cub Scouts on his eighth birthday. It was something he had looked forward to his whole young life. Cade loved the adventure and early on was a boy that his pack looked to for guidance. Cade earned his Arrow of Light and was proud to wear it when he crossed over into Boy Scouts.
Cade was a true adventurer. He absolutely loved anything and everything outdoors. If there was a bike ride, campout, or hike, Cade was the first to volunteer. Cade's excitement was contagious and he led the way in having a good time. Cade was a gatherer and always made room for "one more." Cade excelled at "high adventure" hikes. He completed "The Bomber" glacier trail and a 26-mile hike on two occasions. He completed the Crow Pass hike which was 24 miles one way. Cade loved the Alaskan Freezeree camps and was awarded the "best shelter" for his Wilderness Survival merit badge.
Cade had completed 17 merit badges: Space Exploration, Wilderness Survival, Cooking, Painting, Tracking, Pioneering, Finger Printing, Swimming, Carpentry, Life Saving, First Aid, Emergency Preparedness, Cycling, Communication, Environmental Science, Aviation, and Engineering.
Completed, but not signed off, Automotive, Bird Study, Animal Science, Mammal Studies, Home Repairs, Citizenship in the Community, Citizenship in the World, Fly Fishing, Camping, and Water Sports.
Cade was also very active in 4-H and was raising a reindeer at the time of his death. Cade worked at Pyrah's Farm and for Joe Lentz. Cade was a trumpet player for the Palmer High School Jazz Band.
Cade looked forward to his Eagle Project and had kicked around several ideas. He wanted something that would be of use to our community. He had decided that he wanted to create a bridge/water decking over the swamp area that lead to his favorite swimming hole at Matanuska Lake. Cade had received contact information from Dr. Hawkins, as to who to call for approval. He was excited about this and felt like it would make this area of the lake much safer and accessible for families.
Cade loved the scouting program. He was without a doubt a leader in our group. The boys and leaders alike loved him, looked to him, and now, miss him. Cade's loss has been heartbreaking. Cade was a handsome 6ft tall kid, but that was no match for the beauty on the inside. Cade loved. Cade served. Cade worked and played and represented everything that is good in the Boy Scouts of America! Thank you for your consideration in his behalf and in behalf of his family."

BIRTH:
1. Adopted through LDS Social Services through laws of the States of Alaska and Washington. Birth parents Thomas Paul Ercanbrack of Mapleton, Utah and Alene Speer, b. 22 Aug 1979 at Livermore, California (dau. of Allen Speer and Merlene Sorensen and wife of John "Tyler" Root, m. 14 May 2005 at Salt Lake City Temple). Half-siblings are Bailey Nava Root, b. 12 Aug 2008 at Murray, Utah, and Waylon Elijah Root, b. 10 Oct 2011 at West Jordan, UT. Tyler was previously married with a child named Caiden Isaac Root, b. 27 Oct 1999 at Salt Lake City. Tyler Root, b. 11 Apr 1977 in California.

OBITUARY:
1. The newspaper "Anchorage Daily News," Feb. 7, 2014, p. B-4:
"Our beloved son, brother, and beautiful boy, William Cade Snegirev, 15 passed away at Providence Hospital in Anchorage, AK on January 31st 2014. Cade was born April 18th, 1998 in Longview WA, and was raised in Palmer AK.
Cade accomplished so much in his short life. He was an avid reader and loved outdoor high adventure. He loved Palmer Alaska and was home on the "Butte". At 12 Cade hiked 23 miles through the Bomber Glacier Trail. He traveled through Europe and the Holy Land with his grandparents in 2011. In Israel he was able to gather olive leaves in the garden of Gethsemane, because of this experience he gained a testimony of the Savior and his Atoning sacrifice. Cade ran his first marathon in Anchorage last year, placing 3rd in his age division. He was a member of the Pioneer Peak 4-H Club and had raised many animals, including a grand champion reindeer. Cade was a sophomore at Palmer High School, where he played the trumpet in the Jazz band. He loved math, music and learning which lead to his love of architecture and engineering.
Cade had many good friends and was happiest when he was with his buddies. He was a gatherer, everyone felt they had something in common with Cade. He loved his family and his brother and sisters adored him. His kindness and gentle heart was unmatched.
Cade was an active member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. He took his priest hood responsibilities seriously and served with honor. He loved scouting and was working towards his Eagle.
Through our faith and sure knowledge of Christ's plan, we know that we will see our darling boy again.
Cade is survived by his parents, William and Lori Snegirev; brother, Heath; sisters, Cullen , Haylee, Avi and Ellery; birth mother, Alene Root; grandparents, Jane and Kerry Petersen; grandmother, Dorothy Arndt; great grandparents, Jack and Irene Petersen; numerous aunts, uncles, and cousins.
He was preceded in death by his grandfather, Gale William Arndt.
Funeral services will be held at the LDS Palmer Chapel on 02/08/2014, at 10 a.m."

BAPTISM:
ENDOWMENT:
SEALING TO PARENTS:
SEALING TO SPOUSE: 
Snegirev, William Cade (I1580)
 
210 BIOGRAPHY:
1. "Rebecca Canida Knowles Mangum, Third Wife of John Mangum." Rebecca Canida was born in England [I believe this is erroneous and Pennsylvania is more likely] on the 10th of October. There is some descrepency as to the year of her birth. One record indicated that the year was 1785, another 1787, and still another in 1790. The location of her birthplace is not known. She was the daughter of James Canida and Abigall (maiden name is unknown). Rebecca had one son from her first marriage, Jesse Knowles."

BIRTH:
1. Date and place appears to be total speculation by individuals submitting LDS temple work.

MARRIAGE:
1. James Knowles. Some Ordinance Index entries tentatively reference James Knowles abt 1806 of Boydton, Mecklenburg, VA. No documentation of first name or marriage is given. A better source is the temple work done for their son Jesse Knowles in 1877 by William Mangum, his step-brother which states Jesse was born 8 Feb 1805 in South Carolina. William in 1877 probably had a better information than we do presently. Abt .1804 in South Carolina appears to be a more educated guess for the marriage.
 
Knowles, James (I1437)
 
211 BIOGRAPHY:
1. "Rebecca Canida Knowles Mangum, Third Wife of John Mangum." Rebecca Canida was born in England [I believe this is erroneous and Pennsylvania is more likely] on the 10th of October. There is some descrepency as to the year of her birth. One record indicated that the year was 1785, another 1787, and still another in 1790. The location of her birthplace is not known. She was the daughter of James Canida and Abigall (maiden name is unknown). Rebecca had one son from her first marriage, Jesse Knowles."

BIRTH:
1. Given with baptism and endowment entry in Ordinance Index. Relative listed as William Mangum who would be his step-brother and since the work was in 1877, William was in a very good position to know. Entry notes birth as 8 Feb 1805 in South Carlina and death 1814 and that William was "brother." Endowment shows variant death date of 1815.

DEATH:
1. See birth notes above.
 
Knowles, Jesse (I584)
 
212 BIOGRAPHY:
1. "The Great Migration Begins: Immigrants to New England 1620-1633, Volumes I-III (Online database: NewEnglandAncestors.org, New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2002), by Robert Charles Anderson, 1995. Note that the entry was later edited and republished in 2014 by the same author; see "The Winthrop Fleet; Massachusetts Bay Company Immigrants to New England 1629-1630" (NEHGS; Boston, 2014). The version below is the most current version:
"EDMUND LOCKWOOD
ORIGIN: Probably Combs, Suffolk ["Connecticut Ancestry 47:120-23].
MIGRATION: 1630 (based on request for freemanship on 19 October 1630 and jury service on 9 November 1630 [MBCR 1:79, 81]). (Edmund Lockwood was "Lockwood" of John Winthrop's 1629 list [WP 2:276].)
FIRST RESIDENCE: Unknown (probably Watertown).
REMOVES: Cambridge by 1632. "Mr Edmond Lockwood" was the third in the list of eight "Newtone Inhabitant" which is found at the beginning of the Cambridge town records, and probably dates from 1632 [CaTR 2].
FREEMAN: Requested 19 October 1630 (as "Mr. Edmond Lockwood") and admitted 18 May 1631 (as "Mr. Edmond Lockewood") [MBCR 1:79, 366]. OFFICES: Deputy for Cambridge to Massachusetts Bay General Court (as Mr. Lockwood")., 9 May 1632 [MBCR 1:95].
Massachusetts Bay petit jury, 9 November 1630 (as "Mr. Edmond Lockwood"), [MBCR 1:81].
Cambridge constable (as "Mr. Edmond Lockwood"), 9 May 1632 [MBCR 1:81]. ESTATE: On 3 March 1634/5, "It is ordered, that Ruth [sic] Lockwood, widow, shall bring all the writings that her husband left in her hands to John Haynes, Esq., & Simon Bradstreete, on the third day of the next week, who shall detain the same in their hands till the next Court, when they shall be disposed of to those to whom they belong" [MBCR 1:134]. On 7 April 1635, "It is referred to the church of Waterton, with the consent of Rob[er]te Lockwood, executor of Edmond Lockwood, deceased, to dispose of the children & estate of the said Edmond Lockwood, given to them, to such persons as they think meet, which if they perform not within fourteen days, it shall be lawful for the Governor, John Hayne, Esq., & Simon Bradstreete, to dispose of the said children & estates as in their discretion, they shall think meet, as also to take an account of the said Rob[er]te Lockwood, & give him a full discharge" [MBCR 1:143-44]. On 2 June 1635, "In the cause of the children & widow of Edward Lockwood, (the elders & other of the church of Waterton being present,) and upon consideration of the order of Court in April last made in the case, which was found not to have been observed, because the estate was not computed & apportioned, it is now ordered, with consent of all parties, viz:, the church of Waterton, the widow of the said Edmond living, & the executor having consented to the former order, that the present Governor & the Secretary shall have power to call parties & witnesses for finding out the true estate, having consideration of the uncertainty of the will, & the debts, & other circumstances, to apportion the remainder of the estate to the wife & Children, according to their best discretion; & then the church of Waterton is to dispose of the elder children & their portions as shall be best for their Christian education & the preservation of their estate" [MBCR 1:151]. BIRTH: By about 1600 based on estimated date of marriage (but see COMMENTS below). [KP note: It appears the author did not update this statement in the revision since the COMMENTS do not address the birth at all; however, the his reference to "Connecticut Ancestry" does as 16 Jan 1598/1599 at Combs, Suffolk, England.] DEATH: Cambridge between 9 May 1632 [MBCR 1:95, 96] and 3 March 1634/5 [MBCR 1:134] (and probably closer to the earlier date, since Edmund Lockwood does not appear in any of the recorded Cambridge land grants beginning in August 1633). MARRIAGE: (1) By about 1625 ____ ____; she may have died in England before 1630.
(2) By 1632 Elizabeth Masters, daughter of JOHN MASTERS {1630, Watertown}. She married (2) CARY LATHAM {1639, Cambridge}. CHILDREN:
With first wife
i EDMUND LOCKWOOD, b. say 1625; m. Stamford 7 January [1655/6] Hannah Scott, daughter of TTHOMAS SCOTT {1634, Ipswich} [GM 2:6:209-13].
ii child LOCKWOOD, (one or more additional children by first wife implied by court order to the Watertown church "to dispose of the elder children" [MBCR 1:151]); no further record.
With second wife
iii JOHN LOCKWOOD, b. Cambridge [blank] November 1632 ("son of Edward Lockwood & Elisabeth his wife") [NEHGR 4:181]; d. at New London in 1683, unmarried [Lockwood Gen 10].
ASSOCIATIONS: In a discussion of financial transactions, John Winthrop wrote to his son John in Grot on 23 July 1630 saying "If money be brought to you or your Uncle Downinge for Goodman Lockwood, let Mr. Peirce be paid his bill of provisions for him, and bring the rest with you" [WP 2:306]. "Mr. Edmond Lockwood" was the third in the list of eight "Newtowne Inhabitants" which is found at the beginning of the Cambridge town records, and probably dates from 1632 [CaTR 2]. After NICHOLAS KNAPP was fined for quackery on 1 March 1630/1, "Mr. Will[ia]m Pelham and Mr. Edmond Lockewood hath promised to pay to the Court the sum of £5" [MBCR 1:83]. BIBLIOGRAPHICAL NOTE: The 1889 Lockwood genealogy (Frederic A. Holden and E. Dunbar Lockwood, "Descendants of Robert Lockwood, History of the Lockwood Family in America," [Philadelphia 1889]) was deservedly described by Jacobus as "a genealogical atrocity" [TAG 31:222]. By lumping all the descendants of the first Edmund under his brother Robert, the posterity of this family through eldest son Edmund was misplaced. Donald Lines Jacobus began to sort the family out properly in 1930, with further contributions made in 1955 [FOOF 1:380-81; TAG 31:222-24]. In 1978 Harriet Woodbury Hodge published detailed arguments for a rearrangement of the Lockwood families that would restore to Edmund Lockwood his children ["Some Descendants of Edmund Lockwood (1594-1635) of Cambridge, Massachusetts, and his son Edmund Lockwood (c. 1625-1693) of Stamford, Connecticut" (New York 1978), cited above as Lockwood Gen]."
In 2004 Robert Charles Anderson reviewed the evidence for the English ancestry of Edmund and Robert Lockwood ["Connecticut Ancestry" 47:119-30]."

2. "Connecticut Ancestry," periodical published by the Connecticut Ancestry Society, Inc., Dec. 2004, Vol. 47, No. 2, pp. 119-130: "Robert Lockwood of Watertown, Stamford and Fairfield: English Ancestry, New England Connections and Children's Marriages," by Robert Charles Anderson, FASG, (may be contacted at 2 Fenway, Deny, NH 03038, or at >). See notes of Robert Lockwood for full transcript of article from which this partial excerpt is taken:
"Introduction
In 1889 Frederic A. Holden and F. Dunbar Lockwood were the first to make public their researches on Robert1 and Edmund1 Lockwood when they compiled "Descendants of Robert Lockwood. Colonial and Revolutionary History of the Lockwood Family in America from AD. 1630," which was "Printed Privately by the Family" at Philadelphia.(1) As indicated by the title the bulk of this volume presents the descendants of Robert Lockwood, but a ten-page appendix presents information about Edmund Lockwood. This appendix also includes a brief treatment of John, son of Edmund, but completely loses Edmund, son of Edmund. In 1955 Jacobus characterized this book as "so poorly put together that twice in working on Lockwood lines for descendants the present writer has found their male lines of descent given erroneously. Many descendants of Edmund Lockwood are included among those of Robert."(2)
Donald Lines Jacobus directed his attention to the Lockwood family at least three times during his career. In 1928, as part of his work on the family of Thomas Miner, he prepared a brief treatment of the family of Edmund Lockwood. He noted that a number of descendants of Edmund had been erroneously placed as grandchildren of Robert Lockwood, and so included also a summary of that man's life and Children.(3) In 1930, when he published his three-volume study of the early families of Fairfield, Jacobus included in his first volume separate entries for Robert1 Lockwood, his five sons who married, three grandsons, and Edmund2 Lockwood (Edmund1).(40 Finally, in 1955, Jacobus published two articles on specific problems in the Lockwood family, "An Atrocious Lockwood Blunder" (which corrects the history of a fifth generation descendant of Robert) and "The Gershom Lockwoods of Greenwich, Conn."(5)
In 1978 Harriet Woodbury Hodge, building on the work of Jacobus and correcting Lockwood Family, published an account of the immigrant Edmund Lockwood and his son of the same name.(6)This volume has limited information on Robert Lockwood. In 1984 Hodge published an extended article setting forth the agnate descendants of Ephraim2 Lockwood (Robert1).(7) The Great Migration Study Project sketch of Edmund Lockwood relies heavily on the work of Jacobus and Hodge.(8)
Footnotes:
1. This volume will be cited in the course of this article as "Lockwood Family."
2. "The American Genealogist" 31(1955):222 (cited hereafter as TAG).
3. Lillian Lounsberry Miner Selleck (and Donald Lines Jacobus), "One Branch of the Miner Family ..." (New Haven, 1928), 121-24.
4. Donald Lines Jacobus, "History and Genealogy of the Families of Old Fairfield," 2 vols. in 3 (Fairfield, 1930-32), 1:380-387 (cited hereafter as Jacobus, "Old Fairfield").
5. TAG 31 (1955):222-28.
6. Harriet Woodbury Hodge, "Some Descendants of Edmund Lockwood (1594-1635) of Cambridge, Massachusetts, and His son Edmund Lockwood (c. 1625-1693) of Stamford, Connecticut" (New York, 1978) (cited hereafter as Hodge, "Edmund Lockwood").
7. "Connecticut Ancestry" 27 (1984):9-18, 64-70, 141-47.
8. Robert Charles Anderson, "The Great Migration Begins: Immigrants to New England, 1620-1633," 3 vols. (Boston, 1995), 2:1192-94 (cited hereafter as Anderson, "Great Migration Begins").
English Origin
In her 1978 treatment of Edmund Lockwood, Harriet Hodge included baptismal dates for Edmund and Robert, from the parish register of Combs, Suffolk.(9) Her source for this information is the work by Col. Charles E. Banks on the Winthrop Fleet of 1630.(10) Clarence Almon Torrey had commissioned Banks to do this research and, in a letter to Jacobus, Torrey included three baptisms from Combs, Suffolk, two for boys named Edmund and one for a Robert. Torrey concluded that the first of these two Edmunds died young, but Banks decided otherwise in his Winthrop Fleet book.(11)
The original parish register for Combs, Suffolk, has apparently not been microfilmed. What is now available at Salt Lake City is a nineteenth-century handwritten transcript, with the given names in the entries written as standard abbreviations.(12) The earliest register begins in 1569 and was searched for Lockwood baptisms from 1569 to 1650 and for burials from 1569 to 1693. Unless otherwise noted, all parish register entries are from this first Combs register. There are many Lockwood entries from the earliest years, with the surname in several instances given as Lockwood alias Baker or Baker alias Lockwood. We consider in this article only those entries immediately pertinent to the family of the probable parents of the immigrants Edmund and Robert. For the purposes of this article, we have taken at face value the readings for sons "Edm." and "Edw.," but if the transcriber has made any errors with these names, revisions would have to be made in our conclusions.
On 3 September 1592, "Edmund Lockwood & Ales Cowper" were married at Combs.(13) "Edm. Lockwood" was buried there on 23 November 1638 and "Lockwood, Alice, wid.," was buried there on 23 February 1638[/9]. Edmund Lockwood died intestate and on 30 November 1638 administration on his estate was granted to "Alicia eius relict" [Alice his widow].(14)
Four days after this grant of administration Alice prepared her own will, which is transcribed here in full:(15)
"In the name of God Amen I Alice Lockwood of Combes in the countie of Suff[olk] & diocese of Norwich widdowe being sick in bodie but of good understanding & memory praise be god doe ordeyne & make my last will and testament uppon the fourteenth daie of December in the yeare of o[u]r lord god 1638 in manner & forme followeing first I bequeath my soule into the hand of the almightie god my heavenly father stedefastlie beleevyng by his infinite mercie & the infinite merit of the blood of my blessed lord & saviour Jesus Christ to obteyne remission of my sines & an inheritance among them that are sanctified through faith in hym And I comytt my bodie to the earth from whence it was in confident expectation of a ioifull & happy resurection to etemall life and for my woridlie goods w[hi]ch it hath pleased god of his goodnes to bestowe uppon me I thus dispose of them First I give & bequeath to William Lockwood my sonne ten pounds Item I give Alice Hoddy my daughter twentie shillings. Item I give to Dorothy Manwood my daughter ten pounds. Item I give to Edward Lockwood my sonne five pounds upon condicon notwithstanding that he shall suffer my executor hereafter named to p[ro]ve & execute this my saide will w[i]thout any molestacon or disturbance from hym the said Edward or any other in his name or by his p[ro]curement And if my saide sonne Edwarde therby hymselfe or any other by his p[ro]curement shall attempt & goe about to hinder my saide executor p[ro]veing or executing of this my saide will upon any p[re]tence whatsoever then the former bequest of the legacie offive pounds to hym made shalbe utterlie voide. Item I give to W[illia]m Lockwood my sonne my greate brasse pott upon condicon that he shall teache Josephe Sowgate my grandchilde his mystery or trade of a carpenter at such tyrne as the saide Josephe shalbe ofa fitting age to learne the saide trade But if my saide sonne William shall dep[ar]te this life before the saide Joseph Sowgate shalbe fitt to learne the said trade or shall neglecte or refuse to teach hym when he is fitt to learne then I give the saide brasse pott to the saide Joseph Sowgate my grandchilde Lastly all the rest of my goods or debts unbequeathed I give to the foresaid William Lockwood my sonne whome I make & ordeyne sole exec[uto]r of this my last will and testament And in witness hereof have sett to my hand & scale the daie & yeare abovewritten.
"The marke of Alice Lockwood
"Read, signed, sealed & declared by Alice Lockwood as her last will & testam[en]t in the p[re]sence of us Thomas Sotheby Robert Wiles
"Probated at Bury St. Edmunds, 27 February 1638, by William Lockwood, son and executor
With this information in hand, we will summarize what we know of the family of Edmund and Alice (Cowper) Lockwood.
Edmund Lockwood was born perhaps about 1567 and married at Combs, Suffolk, on 3 September 1592 Alice Cowper. Edmund was buried at Combs on 23 November 1638 and Alice Lockwood, widow, was buried there on 23 February l638[/9].
Children (all baptized at Combs):
i. Joan Lockwood, bp. 4 June 1593; no further record, unless she is the daughter who married ___ Sowgate and had son Joseph Sowgate.
ii. Edmund Lockwood, bp. 9 February 1594[/5]; d. soon.
iii. Edward Lockwood, bp. 3 October 1596; living on 4 December 1638.
iv. Edmund Lockwood, bp. 16 January 1598[/9]; not mentioned in mother's will.
v. Robert Lockwood, bp. 18 January 1600[/1]; not mentioned in mother's will.
vi. Dorothy Lockwood, b. say 1603; m. ___ Manwood by 4 December 1638.
vii. Alice Lockwood, bp. 14 April 1605; m. ___ Hoddy by 4 December 1638.
viii. William Lockwood, b. say 1607; living on 27 February 1638[/9], executor of his mother's estate.
ix. Martha Lockwood, bp. 28 October 1610; bur. 31 January 1610[/1].
x. JohnLockwood, bp. 21 December 1611; no further record.
xi. Mary Lockwood, bp. Little Finborough, 1 August 1615 (daughter of "Edm. of Combs"); bur. Combs, 21 December 1632.
The eleven baptisms above are spread across twenty-two years, a reasonable span for one woman's childbearing range. In the 1620s we find a few more baptisms for children of an Edmund Lockwood. In Combs there is a Mary baptized on 5 October 1620 and a "Su:" (presumably Susan or Susannah) baptized on 10 December 1622 (with the annotation "bap. at Litt[le] Finbarrow"). In the register for Little Finborough is the baptism of an unnamed daughter of "Edm. of Combs" on 10 December 1622, who would be the "Su:" noted in Combs. (As noted above, there was also a Mary Lockwood baptized at Little Finborough on 1 August 1615 to "Edm. of Combs," whom we have placed in the main family above.) In the burials at Combs are recorded two children of "Edm. jun.," daughter "Su:" on 5 April 1624 and son Edmund on 20 December 1625.
We are strongly tempted to identify this grouping of records as belonging to the Edmund Lockwood, son of Edmund, baptized at Combs on 16 January 1598[/9]. He would have been about twenty-one years old at the baptism of Mary on 5 October 1620. The three records for a daughter Susan certainly all pertain to this man, as does the burial for son Edmund in 1625.
A problem arises in that the Edmund Lockwood who came to New England had a son Edmund supposed to have been born about 1625. There are, of course, many ways to alleviate this possible conflict. The son Edmund who came to New England could have been the next child born to this Edmund, say about 1626, and still be of the right age for the New England son.
There is no New England record that states explicitly that the New England settlers Edmund and Robert Lockwood were brothers, but that conclusion is reasonable. Most importantly, on 7 April 1635, "Rob[er]te Lockwood" was "executor of Edmond Lockwood, deceased," and his consent was sought for the disposition of Edmund's children.(16) As we will see below, Robert Lockwood apparently took into his household two children of Edmund Lockwood by his first marriage.
In summary, we feel that the probability is very high that Edmund and Robert Lockwood were brothers and that they were the two children baptized at Combs, Suffolk. With the exception of the baptismal and burial records in the 1620s for children of an Edmund Lockwood (which could well belong to the Edmund Lockwood of Cambridge), there are no additional items in the Combs parish register which can be assigned to Edmund or Robert, including no burial record for either, so they could well have moved away. They are not named in the will of the widow Alice (Cowper) Lockwood, a few years after Edmund and Robert had appeared in New England. This pattern is seen frequently in families of migrants to New England, and so their absence from their mother's will is no evidence against the identification.
Further research should be undertaken, however. The original of the parish register should be searched to ensure that the transcription consulted for this article is accurate. Other probate records for the Lockwoods of Suffolk should be examined.
Footnotes:
9. Hodge, "Edmund Lockwood," p.3, 9.
10. Charles Edward Banks, "The Winthrop Fleet of 1630" (Boston, 1630; rpt. Baltimore, 1972), pp. 79-80. (As we will see, Banks cited the baptism for an Edmund Lockwood who died as an infant.)
11. Letters from Clarence A. Torrey [CAT] to Donald Lines Jacobus [DLJ] dated 10 August and 24 August 1929, and letter from DLJ to CAT dated 15 August 1929, Folder #2, Correspondence of DLJ and CAT, Connecticut Historical Society. My thanks to Judith E. Johnson, Genealogist at CHS, for her assistance.
12. History Library microfilm #993,236.
13. W.P.W. Phillimore and Thos. M. Blagg, eds., "Suffolk Parish Registers. Marriages," Volume 1 (London, 1910), p. 123.
14. Archdeaconry of Sudbury, Administrations 1630-1652, p. 64.
15. Archdeaconry of Sudbury, Register of Wills, 1636-1638, Volume 53, folio 424.
16. Nathaniel B. Shurtleff, ed., "Records of the Governor and Company of the Massachusetts Bay in New England, 1628-1686," 5 volumes in 6 (Boston, 1853-1854), 1:143 (cited hereafter as Shurtleff, "Mass. Bay Records")..."

3. FHL Book 929.273 L814a or FHL film 1321248, item 6, 'Some Descendants of Edmund Lockwood (1594-1635) of Cambridge, Massachusetts and his son Edmund Lockwood (c. 1625-1693) of Stamford Connecticut,' by Harriet Woodbury Hodge, C.G., 1978:
Foreword. Edmund Lockwood, The Forgotten Ancestor.
In 1630 two Lockwood brothers, 'Mr.' Edmund, aged 36 and Sergeant Robert, aged 36, came to New England with the Winthrop Fleet. Both men were sons of Edmund and Ales (Cowper) Lockwood of Combs, co. Suffolk, England. (See Phi more and Blagg, 'Suffolk County Registers, Marriages,' 1:123 and Banks, 'Winthrop Fleet of 1630,' pp. 79,80. Both brothers have many American descendants living today, those of Robert far more numerous than those of his brother, Edmund. Unfortunately, few of the Edmund Lockwood family acknowledge him as one of their forefathers, believing erroneously that they are descendants of Robert. The 'Edmund Lockwood Family Society' is today an exclusive group with a mere handful of members. How has this situation come about?
James Savage, who published his 'Genealogical Dictionary of the First Settlers of New England' in 1860-2, recognized that Edmund Lockwood had progeny into the third generation. But in 1889, two unbelievably inept compilers, Frederic A. Holden and E. Dunbar Lockwood, threw together a thick tome entitled 'Descendants of Robert Lockwood, History of the Lockwood Family in America.' This book, replete with multiple errors, assumes, as its title suggests, that all early American Lockwoods were descendants of Sgt. Robert Lockwood. His brother, Edmund Lockwood, is consigned to an appendix, which omits any mention of the records of Edmund's surviving son, Edmund Lockwood of Stamford, Connecticut.. Then, confronted with the six surviving children of Edmund Lockwood, the compilers divide them up and add them to the families of two sons of Robert Lockwood: Ephraim of Norwalk and Jonathan of Greenwich. The original errors are compounded in the Lockwood genealogy, tangling inextricably the lines of both Edmund and Robert Lockwood.
In 1930 Donald Lines Jacobus, who called the Holden and Lockwood compilation 'a genealogical atrocity' ('The American Genealogist,' 31:222 ff.), corrected the Connecticut Lockwood families through the first two generations in the 'History and Genealogy of the Families of Old Fairfield.' Unfortunately, this work has only recently become widely available through a reprinted edition, is as yet unknown to many Lockwood researchers and does not 'come down' far enough on Stamford, Norwalk and Greenwich lines to help identify later Lockwoods. Jacobus cautioned (TAG, 31:222), that no one should accept the 1889 Lockwood genealogy without extensive verification.
Jacobus, using carefully studied probate records, showed that no Connecticut Lockwood of suitable age could have been father of Abraham Lockwood (c1670-1747) of Rhode Island (Austin, Genealogical Dictionary of Rhode Island, p. 125) or of Richard Lockwood (1678-1757) of Delaware. The old Lockwood genealogy simply inserts Abraham and Richard into Connecticut families to which they clearly do not belong! The Delaware and Rhode Island L ockwoods are separate lines and must look elsewhere for their ancestry.
Additionally, two English Lockwood pedigrees are shown on preface pages xxiv and xxv of the Holden and Lockwood 1889 genealogy. Caveat! No connection to any American Lockwood has been proved or can be inferred.
The present compilation is limited in scope and does not attempt to correct more than a few of the errors in 'The Descendants of Robert Lockwood.' We have focused on retrieving the descendants of Edmund Lockwood, reworking the lineages. We have carried out all the male lines and a few females' families through five generations, insofar as they can be determined. Some have eluded us and we hope other researchers may provide us with the careers of more fifth generation descendants of Edmund Lockwood, from original material. We have included here a few sixth generation families, whose records have not been published heretofore. This book contains much new material, principally from original deeds.
Harriet W. Hodge, C. G.'
References:
Donald Lines Jacobus, 'History and Genealogy of the Families of Old Fairfield,' vol. 1, pp. 380-85, 715-16; vol. 2, p. 1075. (N.B. In this work, Fairfield, CT Lockwood families are carried on, but not those of Stamford, Norwalk and Greenwich.)
Donald Lines Jacobus, 'An Atrocious Lockwood Blunder,' 'The American Genealogist,' 31:222-28.
Charles Henry Pope, 'The Pioneers of Massachusetts,' pp. 289, 330.
Charles E. Banks, 'The Winthrop Fleet of 1630,' Boston, 1930, pp. 79, 80.
Robert Lockwood, son of Edmund and Ales (Cowper) Lockwood, bp. 18 Jan 1600 at Combs, co. Suffolk, England, d. 1658 at Fairfield, Connecticut, m. Susannah, prob. dau of Richard Norman of Salem, Mass. She 2/m. Jeffrey Ferris. Children:
1. Jonathan, b. 10 Sep 1634 Watertown, MA, d. 12 May 1688 Greenwich, CT, m. Mary Ferris who 2/m. 1696 Thomas Merritt. Ch:
a. Robert, d. 1732/3 m. Mary ___.
b. Jonathan, died without issue 1689.
c. Gershom, d. 1757 m. Hannah ____.
d. Joseph, - n.f.i.
e. Abigail m. Thomas? Baxter.
2. Deborah, b. 12 Oct 1636, Watertown, MA, 1/ m. William Ward 2/m. John Topping.
3. Joseph, b. 6 Aug 1638, Watertown, MA, d. 1717, Fairfield, CT, 1/m. ___ Beacham, 2/m. Mary (Coley)
(Simpson) Stream. Ch: (by 1/w.)
a. Robert, d. c1715, 1/m. ____, 2/m. Mary () Butler.
b. Susanna, 1/m. Nathaniel Burr, 2/m. Benjamin Rumsey.
c. John, d. 1736, m. Elizabeth Sarah, without issue
4. Daniel, b. 21 Mar 1640 Watertown, MA, d. 1691 Fairfield, CT, m. Abigail Sherwood. Ch:
a. Daniel, b. 1669 d. 1698, m. Abigail Burr who 2/m. Elnathan Hanford and 3/m. Nathaniel Sherman.
b. Abigail, b. c1674, m. Samuel Robinson.
c. Mary, b. c1681, m. Nathan Morehouse.
5. Ephraim, b. 1 Dec 1641 Watertown, MA d. 1685 Norwalk, CT, m. Mercy St. John. Ch:
a. John, b. 1665/6 died without issue1690/1.
b. Daniel, b. 1668 d. 1712, m. Sarah Benedict
c. Sarah, b. 1670, m. John Platt, Jr.
d. Ephraim, b. 1673, d.y.
e. Eliphalet, b. 1675/6, m. Mary Gold.
f. Joseph, b. 1680, d. 1760, 1/m. Mary Weed, 2/m. Hannah ___.
g. James, b. 1683, 1/m. Lydia Smith, 2/m. Mercy (Bushnell) (Bostwick) Gaylord.
6. Gershom, b. 6 Sep 1643 Watertown, MA, d.1718/9 Greenwich, CT, 1/m. ____ of Windsor, CT, 2/m. 1697 Elizabeth (/Townsend) Wright, 3/m. Elizabeth ___. Ch: (by 1/w.)
a. Gershom, d. by 1761, m. Ann Millington.
b. Hannah, 1/m. John Burwell, 2/m. Thomas Hanford.
c. Elizabeth, d. 1702, m. 1693/4 John Bates.
d. Joseph, d. 1748, m. ?Sarah Green.
e. Sarah, b. c1679, d. 1765, 1/m. 1699/1700 Nathaniel Selleck, 2/m. 1713/4 Benjamin Hickock, 3/m. 1755 Samuel Kellogg.
7. John, d. 1677, unmarried.
8. Abigail, m. before 1681 John Barlow.
9. Sarah, d. 1 Mar 1650/1 Connecticut.
10. Sarah, b. 27 Feb 1651/2 Connecticut, ? m. Abraham Adams.
11. Mary, 1/m. Jonathan Husted, 2/m. Joseph Knapp.
Edmund Lockwood, son of Edmund and Ales (Cowper) Lockwood, bp. 9 Feb 1594 at Combs, co. Suffolk, England, d. before 3 March 1634/5 at Cambridge, Massachusetts,
1/ m. ___. [Children]:
a. Edmund, b. c1625 England, d. 31 Jan 1692/3 Stamford, CT, m. 1655/6 Hannah Scott, b. c1636 d. 1706. Ch:
i. John, b. c1658-60 without issue 1689-92.
ii. Mary, b. c1664, m. 1693 Joseph Garnsey.
iii. Joseph, b. 1666 d. 1750, 1/m. 1698 Elizabeth Ayres, 2/m. 1716 Margery Webb, 3/m. by 1740 Susannah ___.
iv. Edmund b. c 1668, died without issue 1740, naming bros and sis in his will.
v. Daniel, b. c1670, d. 1744, m. 1702 Charity Clements.
vi. Abigail, b. c1674, m. aft. 1707 Joseph Clark.
vii. Sarah, b. c1679, m. 1707 Michael Lounsberry.
2/m. c1631 Elizabeth Masters, dau of John (She 2/m. Cary Latham). [Children]:
a. John, b. __ Nov 1632 Cambridge, MA died without issue 1683 New London, CT. His brother Edmund Lockwood of Stamford, CT was sole heir of his estate.
Some Descendants of Edmund Lockwood (1594-1635) And His Son Edmund Lockwood (c. 1625-1693):
Edmund Lockwood of Combs, county Suffolk, the English progenitor, married there 3 September 1592 ALES Cowper {Cooper}. Of their "Children, two sons came to Massachusetts in 1630 with the Winthrop Fleet:
1. Edmund Lockwood, baptized 9 February 1594 at Combs. (Charles E. Banks, 'The Winthrop Fleet of 1630,' Boston, 1930, pp. 79, 80.) He 1/m. before 1625 in England, ____, an unknown wife who perhaps d. shortly after her arrival in America. He 2/m before 1632 Elizabeth Masters, daughter of John Masters of Cambridge, Mass. (James Savage, 'Genealogical Dictionary of the First Settlers of New England, 1860-1862, reprint: Baltimore, 1965, 3:104-5, 170-71 & Charles H. Pope, 'Pioneers of Massachusetts,' 1900, reprint Baltimore, 1969, pp. 289 and 404).
2. Robert J. Lockwood, baptized 18 January 1600 at Combs (Charles E. Banks, 'The Winthrop Fleet of 1630,' Boston, 1930, pp. 79, 80.), d. 1658 at Fairfield, Connecticut. He m. Susannah, probably daughter of Richard Norman of Salem, Mass. (James Savage, 'Genealogical Dictionary of the First Settlers of New England, 1860-1862, reprint: Baltimore, 1965, 3:104-5, 170-71 & Charles H. Pope, 'Pioneers of Massachusetts,' 1900, reprint Baltimore, 1969, pp. 289 and 404). Robert Lockwood lived at Watertown, Mass. 1634-1646, then moved to Fairfield, Ct. After his death his widow m. Jeffrey Ferris and she d. at Greenwich 23 December 1660 (James Savage, 'Genealogical Dictionary of the First settlers of New England, 1860-1862, reprint: Baltimore, 1965, 3:104-5, 170-71 & Charles H. Pope, 'Pioneers of Massachusetts,' 1900, reprint Baltimore, 1969, pp. 289 and 404 & Donald Lines Jacobus, 'History and Genealogy of the Families of Old Fairfield,' New Haven, 1930, 1: 715, 381). Robert's progeny are far more numerous than those of his brother, Edmund, but this compilation makes no attempt to trace his descendants…
The American Family:
I. Edmund Lockwood, (Edmund of England), bp. 9 February 1594 at Combs, co. Suffolk, d. before 3 March 1634/5 at Cambridge, Mass. He came in 1630 with the fleet, which brought Governor John Winthrop to New England. Edmund first settled at Watertown and then at New Towne (Cambridge) where he was called "Mr.," a title of respect. His request to be made freeman of the colony on 19 October 1630, was granted 18 May 1631. He was juryman 9 November 1630: was appointed constable at Cambridge in May 1632 and the same year he was one of two persons appointed to confer with the court about raising a public stock. (James Savage, 'Genealogical Dictionary of the First Settlers of New England, 1860-1862, reprint: Baltimore, 1965, 3:104-5, 170-71 & Charles H. Pope, 'Pioneers of Massachusetts,' 1900, reprint Baltimore, 1969, pp. 289 and 404). In 1635 his brother Sergeant Robert Lockwood was appointed executor for Edmund's estate and Children. (James Savage, 'Genealogical Dictionary of the First settlers of New England, 1860-1862, reprint: Baltimore, 1965, 3:104-5, 170-71 & Charles H. Pope, 'Pioneers of Massachusetts,' 1900,, reprint Baltimore, 1969, pp. 289 and 404).
Edmund 1/m. before 1625 in England, ___, an unknown wife, who perhaps d..shortly after her arrival in America. On 3 March 1634/5 the court asked the widow "Ruth" to bring in writings left by her husband, Edmund Lockwood. (James Savage, 'Genealogical Dictionary of the First Settlers of New England, 1860-1862, reprint: Baltimore, 1965, 3:104-5, 170-71). Other records show clearly that Edmund's widow was Elizabeth (Masters), whom he had m. at least three years previously (James Savage, 'Genealogical Dictionary of the First settlers of New England, 1860-1862, reprint: Baltimore, 1965, 3:104-5, 170-71 & Charles H. Pope, 'Pioneers of Massachusetts,' 1900, reprint Baltimore, 1969, pp. 289 and 404). Was Ruth in error for the name of the first wife? There is no proof of this theory, although some have made the assumption.
Edmund 2/m. before 1632 Elizabeth Masters. She was d/o John Masters of Watertown and Cambridge, who d. 21 December 1639 and by his will two days before his death named with others, his grandchild. John Lockwood and his daughter Elizabeth, wife of Cary Latham. Edmund's widow m. Mr. Latham and in 1646 moved to Newv London, Connecticut, taking her son John Lockwood with them. (James Savage, 'Genealogical Dictionary of the First settlers of New England, 1860-1862, reprint: Baltimore, 1965, 3:104-5, 170-71 & Charles H. Pope, 'Pioneers of Massachusetts,' 1900, reprint Baltimore, 1969, pp. 289 and 404 & Genevieve Lockwood Davis, 'Israel Lockwood, Some Ancestry and Descendants,' MS at Newberry Library, Chicago - Ohio Historical Society Library, Columbus - New York Genealogical and Biographical Society Library and elsewhere - includes much unpublished material furnished by Donald L. Jacobus). See Appendix 1, p.71.
The only known child of Edmund Lockwood and his first wife was:
i. Edmund Lockwood, b. about 1625 in England, m. 7 January at Stamford, Ct. Hannah SCOTT. Lack of mention of Edmund Lockwood, Jr. in the wiII of John Masters would indicate that Edmund, Jr. was by an earlier wife, reinforced by a court order 2 June 1635, after the death of Edmund Lockwood, Sr. to place out "elder children" (James Savage, 'Genealogical Dictionary of the First settlers of New England, 1860-1862, reprint: Baltimore, 1965, 3:104-5, 170-71 & Genevieve Lockwood Davis, 'Israel Lockwood, Some Ancestry and Descendants,' MS at Newberry Library, Chicago - Ohio Historical Society Library, Columbus - New York Genealogical and Biographical Society Library and elsewhere - includes much unpublished material furnished by Donald L. Jacobus).
There were undoubtedly one or two other children of Edmundl Lockwood by first wife, but apparently none survived, for only Edmund, Jr. claimed the estate of his half -brother, John, in 1683.
The only known child of Edmund and Elizabeth (Masters) Lockwood was:
ii. JohnLockwood, b. November 1632 at Cambridge, Mass. (Vital Records, town or civil records. For Connecticut the source most often consulted has been the Barbour Index of vital records in the Connecticut State Library and widely available elsewhere on microfilm). He went to New London, Ct. with his mother and stepfather, Cary Latham. On 20 July 1658 Cary Latham conveyed to his son-in-law (i. e. step-son) John Lockwood (New London deeds 3:63) (Genevieve Lockwood Davis, 'Israel Lockwood, Some Ancestry and Descendants,' MS at Newberry Library, Chicago - Ohio Historical Society Library, Columbus - New York Genealogical and Biographical Society Library and elsewhere - includes much unpublished material furnished by Donald L. Jacobus). John lived at Foxen's Hill in New London and d. in 1683, unmarried (Francis M. Caulkins, 'History of New London,' 1895, pp. 89 and 312). New London deeds 5:18 contains a record that Edmund Lockwood of Stamford was declared heir of the estate of his brother, John Lockwood of New London by the County Court 3 June 1684. There are also deeds from Edmund Lockwood of Stamford, conveying lands inherited from his brother, John (New London deeds 5:76, 102 (Genevieve Lockwood Davis, 'Israel Lockwood, Some Ancestry and Descendants,, 'History of New London,' 1895, pp. 89 and 312). Edmund Lockwood was the sole heir."

4. FHL Book 929.273 L814a or FHL film 1321248, item 6, 'Some Descendants of Edmund Lockwood (1594-1635) of Cambridge, Massachusetts and his son Edmund Lockwood (c. 1625-1693) of Stamford Connecticut,' by Harriet Woodbury Hodge, C.G., 1978, Appendix 1, has the following quote to which the author attributes her source as follows: "All material on pages 71-73, except for this compiler's interpolations in brackets, is copied verbatim from the following source: Frederic A. Holden and E. Dunbar Lockwood, "Descendants of Robert Lockwood," Philadelphia, 1889. pp. 633-42. [This book contains many verbatim copies of previously unpublished and published Lockwood records. Unfortunately, these records were often ignored or misinterpreted by the compilers of the genealogy.]" The appendix:
"Copies of records pertaining to Edmund Lockwood [Jr., the Immigrant] from the appendix of the 'Lockwood Genealogy by Holden and Lockwood,' pp. 633-642. (It is difficult to understand how the compilers of that genealogy could have studiously copied these and similar records and have completely ignored them, depriving Edmund Lockwood of all his descendants while erroneously ascribing them to his brother, Robert Lockwood!) Rearranging for chronology, we read:
P.640: In the addenda of 'Savage's History of New England,' vol. ii. J he gives 'a catalogue of those who in February (1630) desired to come over,' which is taken from a manuscript volume of Governor Winthrop's, and 'of whom the greater part embarked and arrived." "It is probable the author designed by space between the columns to distinguish the passengers in the several ships, but I cannot detect his distribution perfectly.' Mr. Lockwood is the fifteenth name in the first column, which also contains the names of Governor John Winthrop and Sir Richard Saltonstall.
P. 638: "Not over three hundred persons were at the" New England plantation when Gov. Winthrop and the Massachusetts Company arrived at Salem June 22d, 1630.
The "Arbella" was named in compliment to Lady Arbella Johnson, and was formerly known as the "Eagle." Four vessels, viz. Arbella, Talbot, Ambrose and Jewell, set out at first, as the rest were not ready, and the "Arbella" was the admiral of the fleet. She was of 350 tons, 28 guns, and had 52 men.
"In this vessel were almost all the principal members of the company, with such of their families as accompanied them. The excellent Lady Arbella Johnson, daughter of tile Earl of Lincoln (now Duke of New Castle), was on board and her husband Isaac Johnson. There were also Sir Richard Saltonstall and three sons, Rev. George Phillips and wife, Wm. Coddington, afterwards Governor of Rhode Island, Thomas Dudley, Deputy Governor of Massachusetts Colony, one son and four daughters, Gov. Winthrop and two sons."
The "Arbella" sailed from Southampton on the 2d of March and Cowes on the 29th, 1629-30, and anchored off Yarmouth, and on April 8th the voyage was finally commenced. (Life and Letters of John Winthrop, by Robert C. Winthrop, 1630-1649, p. 25.)
On July 23d, 1630, a month after the "Arbella" arrived, Gov. Winthrop wrote to his son John as follows: "To my very loving son Mr. John Winthrop, at Groton, in Suffolk. "My good son: The blessing of God all sufficient be upon thee ever. Amen." After stating particulars of the voyage and the death of his son Henry, and giving various instructions, he alludes to Mr. Lockwood who was with him (probably Edmund). "If money be brought to you or your Uncle Downing for Goodman Lockwood, let Mr. Peirce be paid his bill of provisions for him and bring the rest with you."
P. 637: Dr. Bond's History of Watertown, Mass., vol. ii, p. 854, also pp. 1011, 1017, 1022, 1025, 1028, 1037, states "Edmund Lockwood applied to be admitted freeman October 1630, and was admitted May 18th 1631. He was foreman of a jury appointed by the court November 9th 1630, on a trial for murder.
He, 'Mr. Lockwood' was one of the two persons appointed by the court May 9th, 1632, for New Towne (Cambridge) to confer with the court about the raising of a publick stock. At the same time he was appointed constable of New Towne. He died previous to March 3d, 1634-5, when his widow Ruth (?Elizabeth) was ordered by the court to place all writings left by her husband in the hands of John Haynes, etc. [i.e., Simon Bradstreete]. It is very probable that he was one of those first planters of Watertown who went thither with Sir Richard Saltonstall; that upon the planting of New Towne [Cambridge] the next year, either he moved thither, or he had settled so far to the east as to be within the bounds assigned to New Towne, and that he was a brother of Robert Lockwood of Watertown, who was executor of his estate. This supposition is favored by the facts, 1st. That on the 31st March 1631 (before New Towne was planted), he was a surety for Nicholas Knapp of Watertown. 2dly. On the 7th of March, 1635, the general court referred to the church of Watertown, with the consent of Robert Lockwood, executor of Edmund Lockwood, deceased, to dispose of the elder children of said Edmund Lockwood and the estate given to them at their discretion. It is probable that he had two wives, the first of whom was the mother of "the elder children" assigned to the care of the Watertown church. His second wife was Elizabeth, daughter of John Masters, of Watertown, by whom he had a son John, born in New Towne, November, 1632. After his decease his widow Elizabeth married Cary Latham, of New Towne, who moved to New London, Connecticut, and by him she had several children (see Caulkins' Hist. of New London, pp. 87, 306 and 312; also [NEHG] Reg. 2:180; 4:62; also Hist. of Norwalk, Ct. by Edwill Hale, D. D., pp. 184, 203, 218, etc.) It is probable that all of the name of Lockwood in New England are descended from Robert and Edmund, and there is not much doubt but that there is a misnomer of the widow of Edmund in the Court Records of Massachusetts Bay as printed 1:134 and Index.
P. 635 - March 3rd, 1634/5. It is ordered that Ruth Lockwood, Widd, shall bring all the writeings that her husband lefte in her hands to John Haynes, Esqr., & Simon Bradstreete, on the third day of nexte weeke, whoe shall detaine the same in their hands till the nexte Court, when they shall be disposed of to those to whome they belonge. (Records of Mass., vol. 1, p. 134.)
P. 635 - April 7th, 1635. It is refered to the church of Waterton, with the consent of Robte Lockwood, executr of Edmund Lockwood disceased, to dispose of the children and estate of the said Edmond Lock wood, gyven to them, to such psons as they thinke meete, wch if they pforme not within foureteene dayes, it shall be lawfull for the Gounr, John Haynes, Esqr, and Simon Bradstreete, to dispose of the said children & estate as in their discrecon they shall thinke meete, as also to take an accompt of the said Robte Lockwood, and give him a full discharge. (Records of Mass., vol. 1, pp. 143, 144.)
P. 635-6 June 2, 1635. In the cause of the children and widdowe of Edward (sic) Lockwood, (the elders and other of the church of Waterton being prsent,) and vpon consideracon of the order of the Court in Aprill last made in the case, wch was found not to have bene observed, because the estate was not computed and apportioned, it is nowe ordered, with consent of all pities, vs.: the Church of Watertown, the wad of said Edmund livening, and the executor having consented to the former order, that the present Gounr and the Secretary shall have power to call pties and witnesses for finding out the true estate, and having consideracon of the uncertainty of the will, and the debts, and other circumstances, to apporcon the remainder of the estate to the wife and Children, according to their best discrecon; and then the Church of Waterton is to dispose of the elder children and their psons as shal be best for their Christian educacon and the preservacon of their estate. (Records of Mass. vol. i, p. 151.)
P. 640 JohnLockwood, SON of EDMUND: John Lockwood died in 1683. 'We suppose this person to have been the son of Elizabeth, wife of Cary Lathan, by a former husband, Edward (sic) Lockwood, and the same whose birth stands on record in Boston, ninth month, 1632. He dwelt on Foxen's Hill, at a place known as the Wheller homestead. In the settlement of the estate, no heir appears but Edmund Lockwood, of Stamford, who is called his brother.' Caulkins' History of New London, p. 306 and on p. 87 quotes, "John Lockwood as a new inhabitant in 1654."
Vol. 1:181. In early records of Boston and Cambridge, copied from the Antiquarian Journal, by Dr. Pulsifer, it reads thus: "John the sonne of Edward (sic) Lockwood and Elizabeth his wife was borne (9) 1632."
P. 641 [Abstract: The will of John Masters of Suffolk County, Mass. He d. 21 December 1639. Estate to my wife for her lifetime; afterward to daughters Sarah Dobyson and Lidya Tabor; to grandchild John Lockwood; to Nathaniel Masters and Abraham Masters; remainder to daughter Elizabeth Latham.] (N.E.H. andG. Register, vol. 2, p. 180.)"

5. Per "History and Genealogy of the Families of Old Fairfield," Donald Lines Jacobus, comp. and ed. pages 715: "...Robert was son of Edmond of Combs, County Suffolk, and bapt. 18 Jan. 1600; his brother Edmond was bapt. 9 Feb. 1594. They came in the Winthrop fleet, 1630. (Charles E. Banks: The Winthrop Fleet [1930], pp. 79, 80.)"

6. Per the book "The Story of the Early Settlers of Stamford, Connecticut, 1641 - 1700," by Jeanne Majdalany (including genealogies comp. with Edith M. Wicks), page 176/7: "Two Lockwood brothers from Combes, Suffolk, sons of Edward, came to America on the 'Arbella' in 1630. Edmund, thirty-six, came with his wife and child [Kerry's note: I cannot yet substantiate that there was his wife on the ship and I suspect this may be wrong.]; Robert was thirty. They settled first in Cambridge, MA and then to Watertown, MA where Edmund died 1634. Robert's family moved to Norwalk, CT sometime after 1645. There is some confusion over a possible sister Rose to the two brothers Edmund and Robert." Additional references: Harriet Woodbury Hodge, "Some Descendants of Edmond Lockwood of Cambridge, Mass."

7. The book: "Genealogy of the Lockwood Family 1630-1888 - Descendants of Robert Lockwood, Colonial and Revolutionary History of the Lockwood Family in America from A.D. 1630," compiled by Frederic A. Holden and E. Dunbar Lockwood, printed privately by the family, 1889, Philadelphia [Caution! See notes in separate note above about the unreliability of this book):
"...freeman of the Colony of Massachusetts Bay in New Englandl, May 18th, 1631. (Records of Mass. vol.1, p.366. John Farmer, Gen'l Reg., p.181) Was of Cambridge in 1632. (John Farmer, ibid.) In Paige's History of Cambridge, Mass., 1632, p.32, the same 8 names are mentioned on p. 8, as being the first 8 inhabitants of New Town, and in both lists Mr. Edmund Lockwood's name appears third..." (Note: see hardfile for numerous court records in which Edmund is mentioned. Note especially his willingness to pay the five pound fine of Nicholas Knapp who may have been his brother-in-law.) "He died previous to 3 Mar 1634-5, when his widow Ruth [sic: s/b Elizabeth] was ordered by the court to place all writings left by her husband in the hands of John Haynes, etc...he was a brother of Robert Lockwood of Watertown, who was executor of his estate...to dispose of the elder children of said E.L. and the estate given to them at their discretion. It is probable that he had two wives, the first of whom was the mother of 'the elder children' assigned to the care of the Watertown church. His second wife was Elizabeth, dau. of John Masters, of Watertown, by whom he had a son John, born in New Towne, Nov. 1632. After his decease his widow married Cary Latham, of New Towne, who moved to New London, Conn., and by him she had several children. It is probable that all of the name of Lockwood in New England are descended from Robert and Edmund, and there is not much doubt but that there is a misnomer of the widow of Edmund in the Court Records of Massachusetts Bay."

8. The book: "A Genealogical Dictionary of the First Settlers of New England Showing Three Generations of Those Who Came Before 1692" by James Savage, published by Genealogical Publishing Co., 1981, Baltimore, vol.3, p.104: "Edmund, Cambridge, came, prob. in the fleet with Wintrop as he req. 19 Oct 1630, to be made free, when he bears the prefix of respect [Mr.],...'Elder Children' by order of Court 2 Jun 1635, to be disposed of, leaves no doubt of a former wife [and at least one sibling for Edmund]."

9. FHL book 929.273-K727kf: "Knapp's N' Kin, The Ancestral Lines of Frederick H Knapp and Others," compiled by: Frederick H Knapp, Rt. #2, Box 438C, AB Hwy, Richland, Missouri, 65556; 1987; Revised/Updated 1991, p. 83, has the following two quotes extracted from the 1 Mar 1630/1 Court Records of the Massachusetts Bay Colony:
A. This is probably the first medical malpractice suit on record in America: "Nich: Knopp is fyned v3/6 fro takeing upon him to cure the scurvey by a water of noe worth nor value, which hee solde att a very deare rate, to be impresoned till hee pay his ffine, or give securitye for it, or els to be whipped, & shalbe lyable to any mans accon of whome hee hath receaved mony for the sd. water."
B. "Mr. Willm Pelham & Mr. Edmond Lockewood hath pmised to pay to the Court the some of v3/6, for Nich: Knopp, before the last Court of May nexte."

10. Concerning Edmund's brother Robert from "The Great Migration," by Robert Charles Anderson:
"Robert Lockwood
Origin: Combs, Suffolk [Connecticut Ancestry 47:120-23].
Migration:1633.
First Residence: Watertown.
Removes: Stamford 1646, Fairfield 1650...
Associations: Brother of Edmund Lockwood {1630, Cambridge} [GMB 2:1192-94]. Two features of the landholding of Robert Lockwood illuminate further the life of Edmund Lockwood. First, prior to 1639, Robert Lockwood had sold to John Masters "five acres of marsh at the oyster bank near the river" [CaTR 53]. This was probably land originally in the possession of Edmund Lockwood who had resided in Cambridge before his death. Robert Lockwood was executor of the estate of Edmund Lockwood, whose widow had married John Masters [KP note: author in the notes of Edmund notes his second wife was Elizabeth Masters, dau. of John Masters]. Second, in the grants of land in the Beaverbrook Plowlands and the Remote Meadows, which were based on household size, Robert Lockwood received six acres. At the date of these grants, in late 1636 and early 1637, the immediate household of Robert Lockwood was four persons (himself, his wife, and his two eldest children). The most likely explanation for the additional two household members is that they were the orphaned children of Edmund Lockwood and his first wife. One of these children was the son Edmund. The identity of the second of these children is unknown, but this tells us that in 1637 there were only two surviving children by this first marriage..."

MARRIAGE:
1. Citation Information: "The Great Migration Begins: Immigrants to New England 1620-1633," Volumes I-III (Online database: NewEnglandAncestors.org, New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2002), partial excerpt from a biography about the father of Elizabeth Masters (see Elizabeth's notes for full transcript):
" ...Elizabeth, b. say 1612; m. (1) by November 1632 Edmund Lockwood (birth of first child [NEHGR 4:181]); m. (2) after 3 March 1634/5 (when she was called "Ruth Lockwood" [MBCR 1:134]) and by 1639 Cary Latham..."
 
Lockwood, Edmund (I977)
 
213 BIOGRAPHY:
1. "The Great Migration Begins: Immigrants to New England 1620-1633, Volumes I-III (Online database: NewEnglandAncestors.org, New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2002), by Robert Charles Anderson, 1995. Note that the entry was later edited and republished in 2014 by the same author; see "The Winthrop Fleet; Massachusetts Bay Company Immigrants to New England 1629-1630" (NEHGS; Boston, 2014). The version below is the most current version:
"NICHOLAS KNAPP
ORIGIN: Unknown
MIGRATION: 1630 (based on appearance at court on 1 March 1630/1 [MBCR 1:83])
FIRST RESIDENCE: Watertown.
REMOVES: Stamford 1646...
ESTATE: ...
In his will, dated 15 Apr 1670 and proved on an unknown date, "Nicholas Knap of Standford" bequeathed to "my son Moses Knap my house and land in Standford with all the meadows and upland belonging unto me," with same moveables; to "my son Timothy the monies remaining due to me upon the bill for the house of John Bats lives in"; to "my son Calep the loom and half the gears and the other half of the gears I give to my son Josuah"; to "my daughter Sarah Disbrowe the money due to me from her husband, about 37s. concerning the horse"; to "my daughter Hanna one mare"; to my daughter Lidea the mare that was Mr. Bishop's with the increase she hath"; to "my daughter Ruth twenty shillings"; to "my two daughters-in-law, viz: Sarah & Uneca Buxton all their mother's clothes as a free gift, except one hat and one new petticoat which my will is they have onward of their portions"; to "Uneca Buxton the new Bible as a free gift"; the portions due to my two daughters-in-law, viz: Sarah Buxton & Uneca Buxton out of the estate of their father Clement Buxton, I say that their part and portions be currently paid according to their proportion of that inventory"; "my son Josuah Knap [to be] sole executor" [Fairfield PR 2:55]...
BIRTH: By about 1606 (based on estimated date of marriage).
DEATH: Stamford between 15 April 1670 (date of will) and 27 April 1670 (date of inventory).
MARRIAGE: (1) By 1631 Elinor ____. She died at Stamford 16 August 1658 [Stamford TR 1:24].
(2) Stamford 9 March 1659 Unica (____) (Buxton) Brown [Stamford TR 1:77]. She was the widow of Clement Buxton and Peter Brown [Gillespie Anc 61-63], and had apparently died by 15 April 1670, as she is not mentioned in Nicholas Knapp's will.
CHILDREN:
With first wife
i. JONATHAN KNAPP, b. Watertown early November 1631 (calc.); bur. Watertown 27 December 1631 "aged 7 weeks" [WaVR 1:3; NEHGR 6:380].
ii. TIMOTHY KNAPP, b. Watertown 14 December 1632 [WaVR 1:3; NEHGR 6:380]; m. by about 1658 Bethia ___ (possibly Bethia Brundish [GM 2:1:447-48]).
iii. JOSHUA KNAPP, b. Watertown 5 January 1634[/5] [WaVR 1:3; NEHGR 6:380]; m. Stamford 9 June 1657 Hannah Close ("The American Genealogist" 10:45).
iv. CALEB KNAPP, b. Watertown 20 January 1636[/7] [WaVR 1:4; NEHGR 7:159]; m. by 1661 Hannah Smith (eldest child b. Stamford 24 November 1661 ["The American Genealogist" 10:174); in his will of 4 July 1687 Henry Smith of Stamford bequeathed to grandson John Knapp [FOOF 1:575]).
v. SARAH KNAPP, b. Watertown 5 January 1638[/9] [WaVR 1:5; NEHGR 7:160]; m. Stamford 6 April 1657 Peter Disborough ["The American Genealogist" 10:112].
vi. RUTH KNAPP, b. Watertown 6 January 1640[/1] [WaVR 1:8; NEHGR 7:162]; m. Stamford 20 November 1657 Joseph Ferris ["The American Genealogist" 10:112], son of JEFFREY FERRIS {1634, Watertown} [GM 2:2:517-21]
vii. HANNAH KNAPP, b. Watertown 6 March 1643[/4?] [WaVR 1:11; NEHGR 7:283]; named in father's will, 15 April 1670; no further record.
viii. MOSES KNAPP, b. say 1645; m. by 1669 Abigail Westcott (on 4 January 1669[/70], Moses Knapp receipted, in the right of his wife, for his share of the estate of Richard Westcott [FOOF1:660]).
ix. LYDIA KNAPP, b. say 1647; m. Fairfield 16 Jan 1666/7 Isaac Hall [FOOF 1:250]... COMMENTS: ... In the Beaverbrook Plowlands Nicholas Knapp received six acres, and in the Remote Meadows seven acres. Since these lands were granted in part on household size, this would suggest a birth in the interval between the two grants; the birth of Caleb fell exactly one month before the Beaverbrook Plowlands grant, and it may be that this was not taken into account for the Beaverbrook Plowlands grant, but was for the Remote Meadows grant. At the date of the Remote Meadows grant of seven acres, the Nicholas Knapp family was known to have five members: Nicholas, wife Elinor, and sons Timothy, Joshua and Caleb. This permits the possibility that there were one or two more persons in the household, not necessarily children; but the difference might also be explained if Nicholas had sufficient wealth in cattle, the other criterion for the size of these grants."

2. The book: "A Genealogical Dictionary of the First Settlers of New England Showing Three Generations of Those Who Came Before 1692" by James Savage, published by Genealogical Publishing Co., 1981, Baltimore, vol.3, p.34: "Moses, Greenwich 1670, [brother of Joshua] probably youngest, but perhaps was only a land holder, and never lived in Greenwich but at Stamford as early as 1667, and there his father gave him land by his will; married abt. 1669, Abigail, d. of Richard Wescoat. Whether he had children I am not advised but he was living certainly at Stamford up to 1701, perhaps later."

3. Per the book "The Story of the Early Settlers of Stamford, Connecticut, 1641 - 1700," by Jeanne Majdalany (including genealogies comp. with Edith M. Wicks), page 173-175: "Moses - b1646, d aft 1713, m1669 Abigail Westcott (bc 1642, d aft 1713, d/o Richard)."

4. Per the book "New England Families, Genealogical and Memorial," comp. William Richard Cutter, reprinted for Clearfield Co. by Genealogical Publishing Co., Baltimore, Maryland, 1994, p.1389: "Moses, son of Nicholas Knapp, was born in Stamford abt. 1645. He was of Stamford as early as 1667 and probably lived there all his life. His father left him land in his will. He married (1) in Stamford, 30 Oct 1668, Elizabeth Crissey. He married (2) Abigail, dau. of Richard Wescoat. Children: Elizabeth, b. 7 Sep 1690; Moses b. abt. 1700-10; prob. other children." [Note I believe order of marriage may be wrong; ordinance index reports a dozen times that marriage with Elizabeth is 30 Oct 1689 and also reports many children incl. Eliz. and Moses born thereafter to Moses and Elizabeth.]

5. "Nicholas Knapp Genealogy," compiled by Alfred Averill Knapp, M.D. "This Genealogy of the Descendants of Nicholas Knapp, first found mentioned at Watertown, Massachusetts in 1630, is the result of the work and research of many individuals. The four principal collectors of data were Charles Ruggles Knapp, Henry Eno Knapp, Ezra Fred Knapp and the author, Alfred Averill Knapp, but they were assisted through correspondence by a large number of individuals who furnished much valuable family and local information..." Second Generation:
"B-8. MOSES Knapp, son of A-1. Nicholas and Elinor ( ) Knapp.
B. 8-6-1645 or 46 or 56, perhaps at Stamford, Conn.
D. In Peekskill, N.Y., in 1756, "a very old man."
M. 1869 [Typo for 1669?], Abigail Westcoat or Westcott, dau. of Richard and Joanna Westcoat, of Stamford, Conn. Abigail was b. ca. 1647.
Probably these children belong to Moses and Abigail:
C-16. Lydia or Liddie, b. 1670. d. 2-9-1709/10. m. 5-2 or 22-1685, Thomas Pennoyer, of Stamford, Conn. He b. 3-9 or 29-1658. d. 11-27-1724, son of Robert Pennoyer and wife, widow Mary Scofield. Robert was son of William and Martha (Jocelyn) Pennoyer, of London. Thomas and Lydia had: -Abigail, b. 8-13-1686. -Mary, b. 11-22-1688. -Millicent, b. 4-13-1691. -Mercy, b. 9-28-1693. -Samuel, b. 4-3-1696. -John, b. 5-26-1698. -Lydia, b. 2-9-1709/10.
C-17. Abigail, b. ca. 1671/2. m. 12-1-1692, John Crissey (or Cressy) at Stamford. She d. 12-8-1706, having had 7 children. He m. 2nd Rebecca (Knawles) Morehouse. John Crissey was son of William Crissey.
C-18. Hannah. (Her record is identical with C-15. Hannah.) Probably there were two different Hannahs but with uncertain records. Probably this Hannah m. Nathaniel Cross.
C-19. Sarah, b. ca. 1674/6. m. Samuel Husted, son of Angell and Rebecca Husted. Probably there was a son Moses only a trace of whom has ever been found, and it is probable these other children belong to him. But there is much confusion about them. It is certain Abigail Westcoat could not have been mother of all of them. David E. Knapp has found a record that points to this MOSES. (See below for other options.)
C-20. Israel, b. ca. 1710/27. d. ca. 1785. m. Mary .
C-21. Moses, b. 10-4-1710 d. 5-7-1795. m. Elizabeth Ogden. [Author's later supplement includes note: "Elizabeth Ogden was dau. of John Ogden and grand-dau. of Richard Ogden."]
C-22. Jonah, b. ca. 1706.
C-23. Mary, b. Horseneck, Conn. m. 11-19-1754, Gorham Fairfield, at Norwalk, Conn.
There is unexplainable confusion over the above Children. Some think all belong to Moses and Abigail. Many think there is a lost family involved- another Moses, probably son of the first Moses. This is not yet proved but seems very probable. Henry Eno Knapp think Lydia. -Abigail. -Sarah and Hanna belong to this Moses. Chas. Ruggles Knapp and Henry B. Betts think that his children are Abigail. -Israel. -Jonah. -Mary and Moses. Henry B. Betts says all his children were born at Horseneck- none at Stamford. Also that he had five sons, one of whom settled in Shenandoah, Dutchess Co. N.Y. Charles Ruggles Knapp thought Abigail. -Israel. -Jonah. -Mary and Moses were children of Moses and Abigail. I think their probable dates of birth, especially that of Moses, b. 1710 were too late for this Moses and Abigail. S.P. Mead claims this Moses and Abigail had Lydia. -Abigail. -Sarah and Hannah. Dates and places of birth and death of a Moses, Jr. have not yet been found. The date of Mary's marriage is also disturbing.
B-8. Moses Knapp was a blacksmith. He lived at Stamford as late as 1701. He was a land owner both at Stamford and Greenwich, which land he received from his father by will. In 1670 he was only a land owner at Greenwich, but never lived there. He was admitted Freeman at Stamford in May, 1670. He was one of the 75 persons who drew land by lot in 1669. In Jan. 1701, a statement of the wealth of the town being made, he was credited with 45 pounds, 5 shillings. He probably moved to Peekskill, N.Y. soon after this where he lived to be a very old man. He d. at Peekskill, N.Y. in 1756, age 101 years. (See History of Westchester Co. N.Y. 1886 by Thomas J. Scharf.) He owned lots in Stamford, 12-26-1699. In 1690, Henry Kimball, a blacksmith, late of Boston binds himself to pay Moses Knapp, Jr. forty three pounds. Savage says he probably never lived in Greenwich but was only a land owner there, and lived in Stamford in 1776, where his father, Nicholas, gave him land by will. He was certainly living in Stamford as late as 1701, perhaps later. Moses was granted a parcel of meadow land at Cos Cob Neck, lying between Mr. Jones and Cellar Neck, 4-15-1699. Moses Knapp served under Capt. Mosely in June and July, 1675 at Mount Hope in King Philip's War and was credited two pounds. "King Philip's War" by Bodge, says: "Moses Knap, 3 pounds, 10 shillings, under Capt. Holbrooke 8-24-1676. Worke done ffor ye soulders by ye order of Capt. Poole and Commesary of Hattfield, 12-ye 10-1675 by Jacob Gardener." "Moses Knap, 1 Paire Shews, 8 shillings." In the land records of Stamford, Vol. B. p. 185, there is a deed from Moses Knapp, made 2-14-1712/3 to his three sons-in law, Thomas Pennoyer, Nathaniel Cross and Samuel Husted. And these three, on the same date, gave bond to maintain for their life their father-in-law and mother-in-law, Moses and Abigail Knapp. This would seem to prove the identity of these three children beyond a doubt."
[Author's later supplement includes note: "Richard Westcoat d. in 1651, Fairfield, Conn. His widow m. 2nd Nathaniel Baldwin and had Sarah, Deborah and Samuel. For a long time many Knapp dscendants have believed that there was a missing generation between B-8, Moses and Abigail (Westcoat) Knapp and C21, moses and Elizabeth (Ogden) Knapp, and that his name was Moses, also. (See Knapp Genealogy) Mrs. Alice B. Stewart, Denver, Colo., a descendant in this line, concludes from her studies and from Scharf's History of Westchester County, N.Y., that Moses Knapp, (#2), was a son of Moses Knapp and Abigail Westocat, was b. at Stamford or Greenwich, Conn., about 1655, d. about 1756. (Evidently an error in those dates.) He moved to Westchester Co. Was in White Plains, N.Y. in 1738 according to the Town Book, where he was one of its Patentees Mch. 13, 1721 and had a lot set off to him. Moved to Fredericktown, Dutchess Co., N.Y. (this town is no longer on the map.) This territory later became Putnam Co. He also lived in Yorktown, N.Y. He was the father of C-21. Moses Knapp who m. Elizabeth Ogden, who moved to White Plains and was there with his father in 1738. He later settled in Yorktown, N.Y. The children of Moses, (#2), ware unknown except for C-21 Moses, but are presumed to be some of those named in the Genealogy as belonging to B-8 Moses. Abigail could not possibly have been the mother of all these children if the dates are correct. The varying bondaries of the Counties in N.Y. and the disputes, lasting many years, over the boundaries between Conn. and N.Y., caused land and vital records to be recorded sometiems in Conn. and sometimes in N.Y., often depending upon the personal prejudices of the person who preferred to be a resident of his favorite state and recorded all his activities there. This has caused much confusion in later years. Also, Scharf's Hisotry contains many errors."]

6. "Abstracts of Stamford Probate records," compiled by Spencer P. Mead: "Knapp, Nicholas, late of Stamford, will dated Feb. 15, 1670, probated Oct. 31, 1670, mentioned his children Moses, Timothy, Caleb, Joshua, Sarah Disbrow, Hannah, Lidea, and Ruth; Sarah Buxton and Unice Buxton are called daughters-in-law, and are left property out of the effects of their father Clement Buxton. Executor son Joshua. Witnesses John Weed and Eleazer Slawson, page 56. Inventory taken Feb. 27, 1670, by John Holly and Clement Buxton, and filed Oct. 31, 1670, page 56. F1-19."

BIRTH:
1. Per Ancestral File and Knapp Family website.

2. Per book cited below: "b. say 1645".

MARRIAGE:
1. Per Ancestral File and per Knapp Family website.

2. Per book cited below: "m. by 1669 Abigail Westcott (on 4 Jan 1669(/70) Moses Knapp receipted, in the right of his wife, for his share of the estate of Richard Westcott ("History and Genealogy of the Families of Old Fairfield," Donald Lines Jacobus, comp. and ed. 1:660)".

3. See biography note #3 for additional comments.

DEATH:
1. Knapp Family website gives death as 1725 in Stamford. Alfred Knapp's book above gives: "He d. at Peekskill, N.Y. in 1756, age 101 years. (See History of Westchester Co. N.Y. 1886 by Thomas J. Scharf.) "

SOURCES_MISC:
1. See biography notes for father for quote from the book: "The Great Migration Begins, Immigrants to New England 1620-1633," 1995, Robert Charles Anderson, ISBN 0-88082-043-8, published by New England Historic Genealogical Society, 101 Newbury Street, Boston, Mass. 02116.2. From "The Knapp Family" at website: "http://members.tripod.com/~Silvie/Knapp.html"

2. FHL book 929.273-K727kf: "Knapp's N' Kin, The Ancestral Lines of Frederick H Knapp and Others," compiled by: Frederick H Knapp, Rt. #2, Box 438C, AB Hwy, Richland, Missouri, 65556; 1987; Revised/Updated 1991. The author has prepared a family group sheet on which he notes the following miscellaneous sources:
-NK Gen (1953).
-NK Gen Suppl (1956).
-Hist. of Watertown, Mass, by Bond.
-Hist. of Stamford, by Huntington.
-Hist. of Greenwich, by Mead.
-Fairfield Probate Rec., v. 1665-1675, p. 55.
-Amer. Anc., v. 8, p. 166.
-Ferris Gen.
-TAG 1:112.
-Boston Town Record.
-MCR, v. 1.
-Winthrop Fleet, by Banks.
-Fam. of Old Fairfield, by Jacobus.
-Hist of Chf. Fam. Bearing the Name fo Knapp, by O.G. Knapp (1939). 
Knapp, Moses (I182)
 
214 BIOGRAPHY:
1. "The Great Migration," by Robert Charles Anderson:
"Robert Lockwood...
Estate: ...On 1 December 1681, "Jonathan Hewsteed of Greenwich having marrying Mary Lockwood the daughter of Robert and Susanna Lockwood" acknowledged having received his wife's portion of her parents' estates from "Daniell Lockwood, Joseph Lockwood and Will[ia]m Ward administrators upon the estate of their father and mother" [Fairfield PR 3:314]. On 28 December 1681, "John Barlowe of Fairfeild," noting that "there was a portion due out of the estate of my father-in-law Robert Lockwood deceased and of the estate of my mother -in-law Susanna Ferris deceased unto she that is now my wife Abigal their daughter, and whereas that my brother-in-law Will[ia]m Ward in his lifetime and my brother-in-laws Joseph and Daniel Lockwood were appointed by the court to administer on the abovesaid estate," acknowledged having received his wife's portion [Fairfield PR 3:313]...
Children...
viii. Abigail Lockwood, b. say 1648; m. by about 1668 John Barlow (eldest known child b. about 1668), son of Thomas Barlow [Fairfield PR 3:313; FOOF 1:29]..."

2. Per the book "The Israel Barlow Story," p.30: "From a number of sources a tradition or rumor has circulated that James I [ancestor of Israel Barlow], who was mentioned in the land division at Suffield, Mass. (now Conn.) in the period 1670 to 1681, was a relative, perhaps a brother, of John Barlow who first settled in Redding, Fairfield, Conn... All information from every source that has ever come down has been checked by the genealogists in the family, as well as by official workers in the LDS Genealogical Library. Any of these researchers have yet to find what can be called any positive evidence of the existence of such supposed kinship, or any other close relationship, between John of 'Fairfield' and James of 'Suffield'." Accordingly, the Israel Barlow line claims a different ancestry.

3. "Connecticut Ancestry," periodical published by the Connecticut Ancestry Society, Inc., Dec. 2004, Vol. 47, No. 2, pp. 119-130: "Robert Lockwood of Watertown, Stamford and Fairfield: English Ancestry, New England Connections and Children's Marriages," by Robert Charles Anderson. Note that the following is a partial transcript of the full transcript in the notes of Robert Lockwood; the full article is well written by one of the very best modern genealogists and should be consulted in conjunction with the following notes:
"Abigail Lockwood, b. say 1648. She m. by about 1668 John Barlow, son of Thomas Barlow.(68)
Footnotes:
68. Fairfield Probate Records 3:313. The eldest child of John and Abigail (Lockwood) Barlow was born about 1668 (Jacobus, "Old Fairfield," 1:29."
 
Barlow, John (I3287)
 
215 BIOGRAPHY:
1. "The National Cyclopaedia of American Biography":
a. Entry for George Barber, pg. 169: "...a descendant of Thomas Barber who came from Bedfordshire, England, to Windsor, Conn., in 1635, and won local faame by his services in the Pequot war. From him and his wife Jane (or Joan), the line is through their son Thomas and wife Mary Phelps.
b. Entry for Charles Russel Barber, pg. 399: "...a descendant of Thomas Barber, who came from England in 1635, settling at Windsor, Conn. From Thomas and his wife Jane ___ the descent was through Thomas and Mary Phelps."

2. FHL book 929.273 B233bd, "The Connecticut Barbers, A Genealogy of the Descendants of Thomas Barber of Windsor, Connecticut," 2nd Ed., Donald S. Barber, pp. 5-6: "Lt. Thomas Barber, baptized Windsor, CT, 14 Jul 1644, d. Simsbury, CT, 10 May 1713, m. Windsor 17 Dec 1663 Mary Phelps, b. 2 Mar 1644/5, d. 13 Feb 1725/6, dau. of William Sr. and Mary (Dover) Phelps. After Thomas and Mary were married, they lived in a house built by Thomas in Windsor, on a lot he purchased in 1664. About 1670/1 he moved his family to Simsbury along with his brother Samuel and family. On March 3, 1676/7 during the so-called 'King Phillip's War,' Lt. Thomas Barber of the original military company of Simsbury was instrumental in saving the Simsbury residents, according to an old tradition. Some of Phillip's Wampanoag Indians threatened to attack the town. Thomas 'ascended the roof of his house, in the place called Hopmeadow, and beat an alarm on his drum. The wind being favorable, the alarm was heard in Windsor, some seven or eight miles off.' The Windsor militia, hearing the alarm, quickly assembled, rushed to Simsbury and were able to evacuate safely the people of Simsbury to safety in Windsor, where they stayed for several months. King Phillip burned and destroyed everything on March 26th, 1676. Eventually they returned to their community and began the task of rebuilding. Once the town was rebuilt life in Simsbury was due to change. Up to this point the grain grown by the farmners had to be hauled to the Warham Gristmill in Windsor. This was no easy task, due to weather conditions not always being favorable, the roads leaving much to be desired even for the oxen, and the lessening danger of attacks by Indians or wild animals. Thomas Barber had proven his leadership ability during the King PHillip's War, and now his skills, along with those of 3 other men, were contracted by the town for a more peaceful pursuit, that of building and running a sawmill and gristmill. The Simsbury gristmill built by these men in about 1680 was still in operation until the early 1950s, when the mill was operated as a Jute Yarn factory under the ownership of R.H. Ensign. After that the mill was idle for about 30 years. In 1985 major renovations took place. The Ensign-Bickford Company dismantled the entire building board by board and reassembled it. The present-day building is beautifully resotred, winning for the owners the Greater Hartford Architecture Conservancy Award. The Hop Brook Restaurant was recently located for a time in the present structure. This was an absolutely delightful place beside the brook, for lunch or dinner. Thomas Barber's carpentry skills, passed on from his father, were much in demand, and he later built the first church in Simsbury, in 1683. He was hired by the town in 1671 to build 'a meeting house for public worship,' but for 12 years there was a bitter argument over which side of the river it would be built on. Finally 2 slips of paper were placed in a hat, and one was drawn, in favor of the West side of the river. Once it was completed, the new building was used for 60 years. [Sources: 1909 Barber Gen; Lure of the Litchfield Hills; Barbour Index; Lyman Barber Gen; CT Hist Soc: LB Barbour Manuscripts.] children of Thomas and Mary:
a. John, b. Windsor, 1 Nov 1664, m. Mary Holcomb.
b. Mary, b. Windsor, 11 Jan 1666/7.
c. Sarah, b. Windsor, 2 Jul 1669, d. 31 Mar 1748, m. Simsbury 26 Nov 1701 Andrew Robe, b. 30 May 1662. Sarah had no children.
d. Joanna, b. 1670(?), m. (1) Simsbury 3 Jan 1710/1 Josiah Adkins, bapt. 16 Jan 1686/7, d. Hartford, CT, 25 Jun 1713, son of Thomas and Jane (Williams) Adkins. Joanna and Josiah had no children. Joanna m. (2) Benjamin Colt, born abt. Apr 1669, d. at Hartford May or June 1739, son of John and Hester (Edwards) Colt... Benjamin res. Windsor 1710, East Windsor in 1722, and later in Hartford. [One child noted of Joanna and Benjamin.]
e. Anne, b. Simsbury 1671, d. there 15 Nov 1722, m. Simsbury ('both of Simsbury') 4 Dec 1701 Jonathan Higley, b. Windsor 16 Feb 1675/6, d. May 1716, son of Captian John and Hannah (Drake) Higley. [Notes children born of this couple.]
f. Thomas, b. Simsbury 7 Oct 1671 (?confused with birthdate of Thomas, son of Samuel), m. Abigail Buel.
g. Samuel, b. Simsbury 17 May 1673, m. Sarah Holcomb.
h. Child, b. Simsbury 1677, d. young."

3. Mentioned in father's will per the book "The Phelps Family of America and their English Ancestors," comp. by Oliver Seymour Phelps of Portland, Oregon and Andrew T. Servin of Lenox, Massachusetts, 1899, pp. 72-85:
"The following is the last Will and Testament of Mr. William Phelps, or properly speaking, his Settlement Deed. From Windsor Records,
'These presents testify, that I, William Phelps, of Windsor, on Connecticut, in consideration of a marriage concluded between my son Timothy, on the one part, and Mary, the daughter of Edward Griswold, on the other; have given and granted, and by these presents do give and grant unto my son, that he, the said Timothy, shall jointly enjoin and possess, together with me, all my houseing, lands and accommodations, as also all my estate, both real and personal, both within door and without, with all the property emoluments, products, and income of the same, during my material life; And my said son is to inhabit and dwell in my house, with me and my wife, in joint way; and that it shall continue during my material life; and if my wife shall survive me, she have and enjoy in a joint way with my son the estate for her maintenance as before expressed. But if my wife chooses to settle in any place and to leave the house, then my son shall pay yearly to my wife, the sum of ten pounds during her material life, and in case I myself in my life time, or my wife after my decease, in her lifetime while she abides, to inhabit with my said son Timothy, she see cause or desire it, I do reserve power both for myself and for her, after my decease to dispose a barrel or two of cider and some apples yearly, without any harm to the premises, and likewise I do reserve like liberty for myself and my wife, to dispose of my wearing apparel, and whom we shall meet to enjoy them after our decease. Also I do give full power of bequeathing the great brass pan at her decease; and my son Timothy is to carry the improvements of the whole Estate, and to order and dispose of the stock, so far as the necessity of our subsistance shall require, and after my decease and the decease of my wife, my said son Timothy shall have and enjoy all my whole estate fore mentioned to him and his heirs forever, always provided that in case my said son Timothy shall die and leave no natural heirs begotten by him, that shall either not attain the age of twenty-one years or marry, then the one-half of my lands exempting the orchard and pasture down to the bridge, that goeth into the meadow; also the upper pasture by the house that shall belong to the house, shall return to 'william, the son of my son Samuel. Also my son Timothy is to pay out of the estate: Imprimis to discharge my daughter Mary, with that which is paid, the sum of 34 pounds, which is the full portion I allow her. To my son William twenty shillings, to Samuel ten pounds, to Nathaniel fifteen pounds, to Joseph five pounds - these legacies to my sons to be discharged within two years of my decease. In consideration of the premises we both have hereunto set our hands this 22nd day of April Anno Dom. 1660. Witness to the signatures: Daniel Clark, James Alford, William Phelps, Timothy Phelps. Entered o the Windsor, Conn., Register, July 26th, 1672'."

4. From the book "Great Migration Begins: Immigrants to New England, 1620-33":
"William Phelps:
Origin: Crewkerne, Somersetshire Migration: 1630 on Mary & John First Residence: Dorchester Removes: Windsor 1635... Birth: By about 1593 based on estimated date of marriage. Death: Windsor 14 July 1672 ("Old Mr. William Phelps died" [Births Marriages and Deaths Returned from Hartford, Windsor and Fairfield and Entered in the Early Land Records of the Colony of Connecticut..., Edwin Stanley Welles, ed. (Hartford 1898), hereinafter refered to as CTVR, 27]). Marriage: (1) By 1618 Mary ____, who was buried at Crewkerne 13 August 1626. (2) Crewkerne 14 November 1626 Anne Dover. "Mistress Phelps" was the first on the list of women members of the church at Dorchester who came with Mr. Warham to Windsor ["Matthew Grant Record, 1639-1681" in Some Early Records and Documents of and Relating to the Town of Windsor, Connecticut, 1639-1703 (Hartford 1930) hereinafter refered to as "Matthew Grant Record, 1639-1681" 9]. She died Windsor 30 August 1689 ("Mrs. An Phelps died" [CTVR 57]). Children:
With first wife
i William, bp. Crewkerne 9 September 1618; m. (1) Windsor 4 June 1645 Isabel Wilson ["Matthew Grant Record, 1639-1681" 55; The American Genealogist, Volume 9 to present (1932+) 52:78]; m. (2) Windsor 20 December 1676 Sarah Pinney ["Matthew Grant Record, 1639-1681" 72].
ii Samuel, bp. Crewkerne 5 August 1621; m. Windsor 10 November 1650 Sarah Griswold ["Matthew Grant Record, 1639-1681" 55].
iii Infant, bur. Crewkerne 8 January 1623[/4].
iv Nathaniel, bp. Crewkerne 6 March 1624[/5]; m. Windsor 17 September 1650 Elizabeth (____) Copley ["Matthew Grant Record, 1639-1681" 55].
With second wife
v Cornelius, bp. Crewkerne 13 October 1627; no further record.
vi Joseph (twin), bp. Crewkerne 13 November 1628; m. (1) Windsor 20 September 1660 Hannah Newton ["Matthew Grant Record, 1639-1681" in Some Early Records and Documents of and Relating to the Town of Windsor, Connecticut, 1639-1703 (Hartford 1930) 57; The American Genealogist, Volume 9 to present (1932+) 65:13-16]; m. (2) Northampton 19 December 1676 Mary (____) Salmon [Manuscript volume of vital records kept by John Pynchon, at Connecticut Valley Historical Museum 20].
vii Mary (twin), bp. Crewkerne 13 November 1628; d. soon.
viii Mary, bp. Crewkerne 6 December 1629; no further record.
ix Sarah, b. say 1632; m. Windsor 9 June 1658 William Wade [Loomis 1:63].
x Timothy, b. Windsor Aug. or 1 September 1639 ["Matthew Grant Record, 1639-1681" 55]; m. Windsor 19 March 1661[/2?] Mary Griswold ["Matthew Grant Record, 1639-1681" 56].
xi Mary, b. March 1644 ["Matthew Grant Record, 1639-1681" 55]; m. Windsor 17 December 1663 Thomas Barber ["Matthew Grant Record, 1639-1681" 25]. Comments: In 1919 Mary Lovering Holman prepared a brief account of the family of William Phelps [Mary Lovering Holman, The Scott Genealogy.... (Boston 1919), 252-53]. In 1990 Myrtle S. Hyde resolved the problem of the identity of the wives of William Phelps and was also able to find the baptisms of his children in England [The American Genealogist, Volume 9 to present (1932+) 65:161-66]. All the Crewkerne records cited above are taken from her article."

5. The book "The Phelps Family of America and their English Ancestors," comp. by Oliver Seymour Phelps of Portland, Oregon and Andrew T. Servin of Lenox, Massachusetts, 1899, p. 97:
"Mary Phelps, b. Windsor, Ct., 2 Mar 1644, bp. 19 Jul 1644, m. Lieut. Thomas Barber, 13 Dec 1660, the son of Thomas Barber, (who was the first of his name in New England, coming with Francis Stiles in 1635.)
Mr. Barber first settled in Windsor, where he built a house in 1671, soon removing to Simsbury, where he died 10 Mar 1701 (or 3), in his 55th year, leaving an estate of 488 poounds, 18 shillings and 3 pence.
Children [all with surname Barber]:
I. John, b. Windsor, Ct. 1 Nov 1662, m. Mary Holcomb.
II. Mary, b. Windsor, 11 May 1666.
III. Sarah, b. Windsor, 12 Jul 1669. m. 26 Nov 1701, Andrew Robe. No issue.
IV. Joanna, b. Windsor abt. 1670, m. Josiah Adkins, 3 Jan 1710-11. No issue.
V. Anna, b. Windsor abt 1670, m. Jonathan Higley.
VI Thomas, b. Simsbury, Ct., 7 Oct 1671, m. Abigail Buell.
VII. Samuel, b. Simsbury, 17 May 1673, m. Sarah Holcomb.
VIII. A child, b. Windsor in 1677, died young."

6. Henry R. Stiles, "The History and Genealogies of Ancient Windsor, Connecticut," 1892, v. 2, p. 50: "Barber, Thomas (son of Thomas), m. 13 Oct 166-, Mary (dau. Wm., Sen.) Phelps, 17 Dec 1663 (Col. Rec.); 1664 he bought at W. land 'whereon he builded'; the lot of Smauel Pond, except about 1-1/2 acres next to Silver street, on which P.'s house stood, and which doubtless faced the Hollow Fall road; rem. 1671 to Simsbury, where, 1682, he was a townsman; d. at S. 1701 (03?); estate £488, 18s, 3d. She b. W. 2 Mch, bp. 19 July 1644. Ch. b. at W. (O.C.R.):
A. John, b. 1 Nov 1662; m. Mary Holcomb.
B. Mary, b. 11 Jan 1666.
C. Sarah, b. 12 Jul 1669; m. And. Robe.
D. Joanna, b. abt. 1670; m. Josiah Adkins.
E. Anne, m. Jonathan Higley.
F. Thomas, b. 7 Oct 1671, m. Abigail Buel.
G. Samuel, b. 17 May 1673, m. Sarah Holcomb.
(Thos.B. Jr. is cr (O.C.R.) in 1677 with 4 ch b. in W.)

7. Henry R. Stiles, "The History and Genealogies of Ancient Windsor, Connecticut," 1892, v. 2, pp. 563-65, has the following information, but I omit the first part which states he was born in 1599 in Tewkesbury in County Gloucester and married Elizabeth since this is not regarded as being correct as explained in notes above: "William... came to Dorchester, Mass., with Rev. Mr. Warham, of whose church, formed in Plymouth, England, he was an original member. - Old Church Records. He was accompanied hither by his wife and five children... He was from the first a prominent and highly respected citizen at Dorchester, his name frequently occurring in the "Mass. Records." 19 Oct 1630, he applied to be made a freeman; 9 Nov 1630, he was one of the jury empaneled for the trial of Walter Palmer for the murder of Austin Brotchus - the first trial by jury in New England; 27 Sep 1631, he was appointed Constable of Dorchester; 4 Mar 1634, Ens. Gibbs and Wm. Felps were appointed by the Genreral Court to go with a committee of three to arrange the borders between Boston and Dorchester, and explain what each town wants; 5 May 1635, he was a member of the General Court of Massachusetts from Dorchester. In the spring of 1636 he removed with his children (his wife having died in Dorchester) to Windsor, whither his brother George is understood to have preceded him, in the first emigration of Mr. Warham's church in the fall of 1635.
In Windsor, as in Dorchester, he ranked as an honored and active citizen; was a member of the first court held in Connecticut, 1636; also in 1637, which declared war against the Pequots; was a magistrate from 1638 to the close of 1642; foreman of the first Grand Jury 1643; deputy to Gen. Ct. 1645, '46-'49, '51, '57; in 1658 was again made magistrate and held the office for 4 years after; is frequeintly named on the petit jury; in 1641 was appointed together with Mr. Welles of Hartford a committee on 'lying'. He was an excellent, pious, and upright man in his public and private life, and was truly 'a pillar in church and state.' His residence in Windsor was about three-quarters of a mile N.W. of Broad St on the road to Poquonock, on a place owned (1859) by Dea. Roger Phelps.
He m. (2) at Windsor, Mary Dover, b. in England, and who is said to have been a fellow passenger with him on the 'Mary and John.' She was a member of original church of Dorchester and Windsor. - O.C.R.
After a residence of 42 years in New England, ow which 36 where passed in Windsor, he died there 14 Jul 1672; his widow d. 27 Nov 1675. - O.C.R.
In the Old Church Records and other Windsor records, Mr. Phelps was distinguished from his son William as 'Ould Mr. Phelps.' children (by first marriage, born in England):
A. William, b. abt. 1620 (in a deposition taken at Hartford 29 May 1677, is mentioned as being about threescore years of age - i.e. b. 1617); removed from Dorchester with his father to Windsor where he was admitted to member of Windsor church 17 Nov 1639. - O.C.R. He m. (1) Isabel Wilson, 4 Jun 1645, 'now since 29 years and has had no child,' 15 Jul 1674 (O.C.R.); she admitted to Windsor 11 Mar 1654 (O.C.R.); d.s.p. He m. (2) Sarah (dau. Humphrey) Pinney, 20 Dec 167 (O.C.R.); she was b. 19 Nov, bp. 3 Dec 1648; he sett. one-third of his ppy. on her before marriage; no issue by her. He was made a freeman at Hartford 1669; d. 7 Feb 1681; contrib. 9 s. to Conn. Fund for Relief of Poor of other Cols., 1676. His noncupative will, dated 10 Feb 1681 gives all his land to his bro. Timothy. (He had land near his father, and his homestead on the N. side of the E. and W. road which ran from Josiah Ellsworth's {late Peter Brown's} house to the Rivulet. It was garrisoned in King Philip's War (1675/6) by details of Windsor men. William,. Jr. was a worthy man, tho' not a conspicuous figure as compared with his father. He had one of his wife's nephew's, Samuel Wilson, reside with him, and possibly (O.C.R.) adopted him. He gave him land on the opp. side of road form his own house. In making Sarah Pinney his second wife he executed a jointure before marriage, giving her much of his property, and a controversy arose, after the death of 'William the younger,' concerning this land, between her and the adopted son. William Phelps owned the W. part of the Ellison-Orton lot, 40 rods on highway, and bought of Sam. Pond 11 rods more, ext'g from his ho.-lot S. 51 rods of present ditch which drained the once swamp W. of old highway. - J.H.H.)
B. Sarah, b. abt. 1623; m. Windsor 9 Jun 1658 Wm. Wade of Middletown, Conn.; she d. 10 Jul 1659; s.p.
C. Samuel, b. abt. 1625.
D. Nathaniel, b. abt. 1627.
E. Joseph, b. abt. 1629.
By second marriage:
F. Timothy, 'was born here in Aug. 1639' - O.C.R.
G. Mary, 'was born here March 1644'; m. Thos. Barber; sett. at Simsbury and became the ancestors of the S. Barbers."

8. "The American Genealogist," 68(Jul 1990):161-166, "The English Origin of William1 Phelps of Dorchester, Mass., and Windsor, Conn., with Notes on His Marriages," by Myrtle Stevens Hyde:
"William1 Phelps of Dorchester, Mass., and Windsor, Conn....
Children (Phelps) of William, v-viii by his second wife Anne (Dover) (bp. Crewkerne), ix-xi either by Anne or by a third wife (see discussion above)...
xi. Mary (again) b. in March 1644, bp. 2 March (Windsor Early Recs. p. 55; Windsor VR), prob. d. Simsbury 13 Feb. 1725/6 as "Marey Barber ye Eldest" (Albert C. Bates, "Simsbury, Connecticut, Births, Marriages and Deaths..." [Hartford 1898] p. 158); m. Windsor 17 Dec. 1663 Thomas Barber (Welles p. 10, as "Marsey")."

MARRIAGE:
1. Note the discrepancy of marriage dates between the Barber and Phelps history books. Barber had 17 Dec 1663 with first son John b. 1 Nov 1664. Phelps has 13 Dec 1660 with John b. 1 Nov 1662. Phelps has a four year gap between the birth of John and his next sibling Mary on 11 May 1666. I have selected Barber's date for the time being subject to further research.

ACTION:
1. I originally had two undocumented additional wives for Thomas: Anne Chase, m. 27 Apr 1681, and Mary Dow, no marriage date. They don't seem correct in light of the quotation above. Check out "The Chase Family Story" compiled by Richard Chase Fassett & Rosalind Chase Bush, just in case. 
Phelps, Mary (I2050)
 
216 BIOGRAPHY:
1. 11 Apr 2001 website : "Original Proprietors of Hartford, CT., 1636. List of names of the Founders of Hartford, CT. from an obelisk in the Center Church Burial Ground, erected 1837"; includes the name of this individual.

2. From various Worldconnect databases as of 21 Sep 2007: "Its not yet known when Nathaniel emigrated to New England nor exactly where he came from. He first appears in Hartford, Connecticut not long after its founding. In 1634 the General Court of the Massachusetts Bay Colony gave permission for some of the colonists in Newtown (which became Cambridge) to "seeke out some convenient place" to establish a new settlement. The following October "about sixty men, women and little Children, went by land toward Connecticut with their cows, horses, and swine, and, after a tedious and difficult journey, arrived safe there" - see Winthrop''s journal. They were probably the first group of settlers in Hartford, nearly half of them recent arrivals from England. Their journey took about two weeks. In November, thirteen of the men returned to Newtown, staying in Hartford only long enough to claim house lots and help the new settlers get established. The following May the next group of settlers left Newtown under the leadership of Thomas Hooker. "They tramped across the wilderness between the Charles and the Connecticut rivers, driving their cattle before them and carrying their household goods in wagons and founded the towns of Hartford, Windsor, and Wethersfield." Nathaniel may have been with either group, or he may have come a bit later, but his name is inscribed on the east face of the Founders Monument of Hartford "in memory of the first settlers of Hartford." By 1640 he had been granted a home lot containing six acres on "the brow of the hill." His only daughter Sarah was married in Hartford on 11 Sep 1645. One week before his daughter's marriage, on 4 Sep 1645 the court awarded him five shillings and charges of court in an action he brought against Edwards in March. Twenty three years later on 7 May 1668 William Edwards "in behalf of his wife Agnis" sued Nathaniel "for illegal possession of land belonging to the said Edwards, lying on the east side of the Great River, for a surrender of the said land." Agnes Edwards' first husband was William Spencer, Sarah Bearding's brother-in-law. William Spencer had died in Hartford in 1640, so it seems this was a long standing dispute. On 6 Sep 1649, Nathaniel was fined ten shillings by the Particular Court "for sleeping in ye time of his watch." Nathaniel was chosen a townsmen in 1658 and in 1666 he was chosen a surveyor of the highways. On 18 August 1658 Nathaniel and George Graves along with several other men complained to the General Court against Mr. Webster, Captain Cullick, Mr. Goodwin, and Andrew Bacon "in ye name of the rest of ye withdrawers at Hartford." The "withdrawers" were men who left the First Church of Hartford over a dispute involving baptism. The Court deferred the complaint until October so that they could "procure what light and help they can in the case." Several years later Nathaniel married George's sister, Abigail Graves, the recent widow of William Andrews. On 3 October 1669 Nathaniel's name appears on a list of freemen in Hartford "on the north side of the river" - see J. Hammond Trumbull's "Records of the Colony of Connecticut" 1:130, 137, 193, 318 and 2:518. Five years later he made his will and died that fall: 'I Nathaniel Berding of Hartford upon the River of Connecticut, planter doe in this my last will and testament give unto Abigaill my wife the sum of twenty pounds to be paid her in such pay as may bee comfortable for her not in any horse flesh; I doe also give to Abigaill my wife three cows both which gifts for her to possess and fivety shillings in peas fivety shillings in Indian corne and fivety shillings in pork all at the countey price; my will is also that Abigaill my wife shall have the two ould lower romes and the celler and the leanto for her to dwell in or dispose of all these during the time of her life; I do also give to my son-in-law Thomas Spencer the elder the sum of fivetene pounds to bee paid to him within the space of twoe years after my disease; I doe also give to Samuel Andrews and Elizabeth his wife the sum of fourty pounds to be paid him after the decease of my wife his mother; my parcel of land at Potunck and my household stuff to be to his for partt of that legacy; I doe also give to Sarah Spencer and to Hannah Spencer and to Mary Spencer and to Martha Spencer the fouer daughters of Thomas Spencer the elder the sum of tenn pounds to be equally devided amongst them that is to eather of them fivety shillings to be paid to them after my wife's decease. I do also give to John Andrews twenty shillings; I doe also give to Thomas Andrews twentye shillings to be paid after the discease of my wife their mother; alsoe my will is that my debts and theise legacies may be paid out of my moveable estate that so much as may be of my houseing and other lands may be kept intire. I have desired Paul Peck senior and George Graves to see this my will to bee performed, and i do hereby give to the said Paul Peck and Georg Graves the sum of fourty shillings for each man my debts and these legasyes being paid and my desires in this my will being attended. I go hereby give the remaining part of my estate to Jarrrett Spencer my grandchild whoe is the son of Thomas Spencer the elder; I doe also hereby make the sayd Jarrett my execquitor of this my will. My will also is that Abigaill my wife should have the use of all my household stuff during hir life; my will also is that my execquitor shold kepe all my houseing and barne and fenceing belonging to house and land in repaire; my will is also that what corn or provisions shall be in hand at my discease shall be for Abigail my wife as part of the twenty pounds I have before given hir; my will also is that Abigail my wife shall chose out of my cowes which cowes she will have for the three cowes given hir. In Witness hereof I have hereunto sett my hand dated this 7th of January 1673/4. The inventory of Nathaniel's estate was taken 14 Sep 1674 by Paul Peck, George Grave and Caleb Stanly and was valued at 282.15.10. See Hartford Probate Packets, film #1020549.'"

3. The book "Families of Early Hartford, Connecticut," Lucius Barnes Barbour, 1982 ed.: "William Andrews died 1659. Early member 1st Church [of Hartford]. Name on Founders' Monument [in downtown Hartford]. Mar. 1st Mary Jan. 19, 1639/40 (Savage) at Cambridge. M/2 Abigail Mch 20, 1682/3 who m. Nathaniel Bearding. [Kerry's note: date of 2nd marriage is evidently wrong considering William died in 1659. Additionally, Nathaniel Bearding notes Abigail as being the mother of Samuel Andrews in his will which would make a marriage between William Andrews and Abigail more likely before 1645 unless Nathaniel was speaking of Abigail in a generic sense without specifying whether she was the natural mother or stepmother.] Children:
Samuel, b. Oct. 20, 1645 (HTR) m. Elizabeth Spencer.
Abigail, died May 1653 (HTR) in Fairfield.
Christian, m. John Birchard.
John, died June 6, 1690 m. Mary.
Elizabeth, m. Edward Grannis May 3, 1654 (HTR).
Thomas, b. May 4, 1638 (Conn Land Rec) m. Hannah Kirby dau of John.
Esther, b. Sept 1641 (Conn Land Rec) m. Thomas Spencer Jr. of Suffield.
William Andrews, freeman Mass. Mch 4, 1634-5; constable, Newtown Oct 1636; an original proprietor of Hartford; received 30 acres in the division of 1639-40; his home lot was south of the Little River on land now included in the West Park. He was the first schoolmaster, teaching from 1643 until 1656; town clerk 1651-8. Will dated April 1, inv. Aug 8, 1659 ₤211.14.11, mentions his second wife Abigail and also names 'bro George Grave'.
Samewell Andrewes sun of William Andrewes was borne Oct. 21, 1645."
[Kerry's note: we can assume that George Graves was the brother-in-law to William making Abigail's maiden name Graves.]

4. FHL book 929.273 Sp33 "The Spencers of the Great Migration," by Jack Taif Spencer and Edith Woolley Spencer (Gateway Press, Baltimore; 1997) vol. 1, pp. 172-177 has a transcript and analysis of the will dated 9 Sep 1686 of Thomas1 Spencer (see his notes for transcript). He mentions all nine of his children, but not his wife Sarah who preceded him in death. Some of his children are also mentioned in the wills of his first wife's brother Barnabas Derifall (who died 1680) and his second wife's father Nathaniel Bearding (who died 1674):
"The Interpretation of the Will of Thomas1 Spencer.
Jacobus reported that Sarah Bearding Spencer, wife of Thomas1 Spencer, as dying before 1674 since she was not named in her father's (Nathaniel Bearding) will which was proven in 1674 (year of father's death).
The inventory of of the Thomas1 estate set the total value at ₤139 19 00, but does not mention the value of his shop or tools or of the considerable amount of land which he had purchased during his lifetime. (A separate analysis is being made of the multiple transactions in Hartford and will be published in a different article).
Not mentioned in this Will was the fact that Thomas had received a grant of 60 acres in 1660 in recognition of his military and civic services to the colony and the city of Hartford. It is possible that his woodworking shop and tools were included in the value of "home lot and housing" which was set at 50 pounds.
It is interesting that a nephew, Samuel2 Spencer, the only son of his brother, William1 Spencer, was named as an overseer in the Will. Samuel2 Spencer spent his whole life at Hartford and fathered eight children by Sarah Meakins. Samuel's last Child, in fact, was born just a few months before the death of Thomas1 in 1687...
In an earlier chapter, the present authors gave a detailed account of the inter-connections of the four or five families in Hartford who were related by cross marriages. As a sequel to that story, we have constructed a chart to show the beneficiaries of the estates of four pioneers who willed property and money to their children (or nieces and nephews) and sometimes to grandchildren. The four pioneers in order of death were William1 Andrews (d. 1659), Nathaniel Bearding (d. 1674), Barnabas Derifall (Derifeild) (d. 1680) and Thomas1 Spencer (d. 1687). All were residents of Hartford except Barnabas Derifall who lived in Braintree (West Quincy), Massachusetts.
The children involved as legatees were the nine children of Thomas1 Spencer (Ann Derifall and Sarah Bearding)and the six children of William1 Andrews. The latter also had two wives, of whom only the second has been identified (Abigail Graves). Abigail in later years became the second wife of Nathaniel Bearing (no children).
In order to simplify the chart of beneficiaries, we have not included any of the surviving spouses.
Chart: The Distribution of Assests to children from the Estates of Four Pioneers in New England [KP Note: reformatted for my transcript:]
Various estates:
A. Barnabas Derifall (d. 1680) of Braintree, MA.
B. Thomas1 Derifall (d. 1687) of Hartford.
C. Nathaniel Bearding (d. 1674) of Hartford
D. William1 Andrews (d. 1659) of Hartford
Children of Thomas1 Spencer (1607-1687):
-Obadiah2 Spencer A, B
-Thomas2 Spencer A, B
-Samuel2 Spencer A, B, C
-Sarah2 Spencer Huxley B
-Elizabeth2 Spencer Andrews B
-Gerard2 Spencer B
-Hannah2 Spencer Sexton-Brainerd B, C
-Mary2 Spencer Root B, C
-Martha2 Spencer Benton B, C
Children of William1 Andrews (d. 1659)
-John2 Andrews C, D
-Abigail2 Andrews D
-Elizabeth2 Andrews Grannis D
-Thomas2 Andrews C, D
-Esther2 Andrews Spencer D
-Samuel2 Andrews C, D
The emerging pattern from the chart illustrates the dichotomy which characterized the bequests from Nathaniel Bearding - some assets to his grandchildren in the Thomas1 Spencer family, but excluding any children who had been born to the first wife of Thomas1, Ann Derifall - a not unlikely scenario for those who did not share his bloodlines.
Nathaniel Bearding's legatees among the Andrews children showed some separation, but of a considerably different character. Nathaniel had only two step grandchildren, Esther2 Andrews and Samuel2 Andrews. Samuel2 was a major beneficiary with 40 pounds, while Esther2 Andrews Spencer was not named in the will. On the other hand, Nathaniel Bearding made bequests to John2 Andrews and Thomas2 Andrews who were bore no blood relation to Nathaniel We believe the explanation of the latter two bequests was based on the fact that Abigail Graves Andrews-Bearding had raised the four children (stepchildren) from William Andrews first marriage to Mary Britton as well as her own two children by William1 Andrews.
In the case of the bequests by Thomas1 Spencer, there is an oddity in the fact that his son Samuel2 Spencer essentially was excluded from the will (except for clothing). We do not believe this is an indication of differential favoritism among the sons, but the fact that Samuel2 had been well provided for in the will of his grandfather, Barnabas Derifall of Braintree, Massachusetts.
Abigail2 Andrews was not named in her father's will because she had died (1653) some years before her father's death.
The only other aspect of the estates is the fact that females in general received only token recognition from the father or grandfather as the case might be. It was the sons and grandsons who always were the major legatees."

5. FHL book 929.273 Sp33 "The Spencers of the Great Migration," by Jack Taif Spencer and Edith Woolley Spencer (Gateway Press, Baltimore; 1997) vol. 1, partial excerpts from pp. 261-263 (see notes of Thomas2 Spencer for full transcript):
"The Families Immediately Related to Thomas1 and Thomas2 in Hartford.
Because a rather complex relationship existed among the immediate relatives of Thomas1 in Hartford, the present authors have prepared a separate article (1995) on the interrelationships of Thomas1 and Thomas2 to the Andrews, Graves, and Bearding families. A brief summary is presented in the following notes along with the accompanying chart.
Linkages Among The Andrews, Graves, Bearding and Spencer Families in Hartford [KP note: reformatted for my transcription]:
William1 Andrews (-1659)
m.(l) Mary Britton. Children by Wife#1:
-John2 (ca.1632-1690)
-Abigail2 (1634-1653)
-Elizabeth2 (1636-)
-Thomas2 (1638-)
m.(2) Abigail Graves (-1683). [Abigail marries Nathaniel1 Bearding as his second wife.] children by Wife #2:
-Esther2 (1641-1698) [Esther marries Thomas2 Spencer.]
-Samuel2 (1645-1712)
Thomas1 Spencer (1607-1689)
m.(1) Ann Derifall (1610-1645). Children by Wife #1:
-Obadiah 2 (c.1639-1712)
-Thomas 2 (1641-1689) [Thomas marries Esther2 Andrews.]
-Samuel 2 (1643-1727)
m. (2) Sarah Bearding (-1674). [Sarah is child from Nathaniel1 Bearding's first wife.] children by Wife #2:
-Sarah2 (ca1646-1712)
-Elizabeth2 (1648)
-Gerard2 (1651-1712)
-Hannah2 (1653-1713)
-Mary 2 (1655-1690)
-Martha2 (1658-1704)
Nathaniel1 Bearding (-1674)
m. (1) ___. Children by Wife #1:
-Sarah2 Bearding [Becomes 2nd wife of Thomas1 Spencer]
m. (2)Abigail (Graves) Andrews (-1683) [Abigail marries William1 Andrews as his second wife.]
The first list on the left shows the children descended from William1 Andrews, while the list on the right shows the one child (Sarah) of Nathaniel1 Bearding. Sandwiched between these two lists are the descendants of Thomas1 Spencer and his two wives, Ann Derifall and Sarah Bearding. Connecting lines indicate the intermarriages.
Abigail (Graves) Andrews (d. 1683) was the second wife of William1 Andrews of Hartford and the mother of Esther Andrews (1641-1698) who married Thomas2 Spencer (later of Suffield). Esther Andrews had a brother, Samuel Andrews (1645-1712), who married Elizabeth2 Spencer, a half sister to Thomas2 Spencer.
In later life, Abigail. (Graves) Andrews married Nathaniel Bearding as his second wife. Earlier, Nathaniel Bearding had a daughter Sarah who became the second wife of Sgt. Thomas1 Spencer.
All of the above is totally unintelligible unless the reader makes a careful study of the chart."

SOURCES_MISC:
1. Per family group sheet archive record submitted by Jesse H. Barlow, Clearfield, Utah with heir listed of Israel Barlow Sr. references; "R8B1 Vol. 1 p. 114 Conn. H 4 P 13 Am. Pub H Vol. 13 p. 53 Barlow Rec. H1 Vol. 1 p. 230". 
Bearding, Nathaniel (I2190)
 
217 BIOGRAPHY:
1. 16 Sep 2007 http://www.hebronhistoricalsociety.org/history/vignettes.htm: "Hebron has an extremely rich history. In addition to some of the more well-known people and events in Hebron, there are also interesting tidbits that help weave a big-picture image of the community we all love and respect. Based on period newspaper articles, memories, public documents, and legends passed down from generation to generation, did you know…
The very first Hebron Town Clerk was Timothy Phelps? It was his wife, Martha Crow Phelps, who was the heroine behind the Prophet's Rock legend. She led a group of women who, searching for their husbands in 1704, yelled out from the rock, located off Burrows Hill Road. The echoes of their cries were heard by the men, resulting in a reunion of the families, and they decided that Hebron was a good place to settle. The Hebrew name "Hebron" has been translated as "city of refuge." The town was incorporated just four years later, in 1708."

2. From John Sibun's book "Our Town's Heritage 1708-1958 Hebron, Connecticut," published by Douglas Library, Hebron, CT, 1975: "The first white men to settle in town were Timothy Phelps and William Shipman, who arrived in Hebron from Windsor in June 1704. The area, then a wilderness, was used by the Indians as a hunting ground, and the few white men who knew of its existence passed through to other locations. The first two houses were located along Route 85 sourth of today's center. Approximately on what is now the Hilding driveway, Shipman built his homestead and Phelps constructed his home across the road on the land now owned by the Porter family. It is possible they worked on their property during the summer months only for the first two years, and returned to their families in Windsor when winter set in."
"Here in 1706, so legend has it, the wives of Shipman and Phelps came to find their husbands. One evening the two original settlers heard strange sounds echoing across the valley, and an investigation revealed their families standing on the rock [Prophet's Rock] calling for them. It is conjecture whether they really could be heard. Be that as it may, the men were overjoyed to be reunited with their families. Martha Crow Phelps thought her place was with her husband and on her own initiative had resolved the situation. Bringing with her the goods that would make life in a virgin area more bearable, she camped along the way as the trip apparently took a few days. It is said she did not herry, but negotiated the rough going stoically, clutching he Bible to herself as she lay down in the shelter of rocks and rested under fallen trees. Born in Windsor 36 years before, it could not have been an easy decision to make the journey, for Martha's mother had 'disappeared' many years before when she had set out on a like journey to seek her husband."

3. Mentioned in father's will and listing of father's children as follows per the book "The Phelps Family of America and their English Ancestors," comp. by Oliver Seymour Phelps of Portland, Oregon and Andrew T. Servin of Lenox, Massachusetts, 1899, pp. 93-97:
"Hartford Probate Records. Vol. 9, p.p. 338. Last will and testament of Mr. Timothy Phelps of Windsor, in the County of Hartford and Colony of Connecticut in New England.
'I, Timothy Phelps of Windsor, in the town, county and colony aforesaid in New England, being very aged, and yet through the mercy of God retaining a good measure of that understanding and memory that he had been pleased to bestow upon me, do make and ordain this to be my last will and testament: First, I commit my soul to God in Jesus Christ my saviour and my body to the earth, to be decently entered. As for my estate Real and personal, my just Debts and funeral expenses being deducted and paid by my Ex's, I will devise and bequeath as followeth.
Imprimis, I give, devise, and bequeath all my estate whatsoever, Both Real and personal, To my three sons William, Cornelius, and Samuell to have and to hold and Improve the same in trust for the use of my wife during her natural life and after her decease my will is and I hereby do give and devise all my houseing and Lands with the appurtenances, to my sons Timothy Phelps, William Phelps, Cornelius Phelps, Samuel Phelps, Natl. Phelps and the heirs of Joseph Phelps, in the Room of their father to be equally divided into Six Equal parts provided always; and it is my will that they pay and make up to their Sisters Sarah, Hannah, Ann and Martha, my daughters or to their heirs and to the heirs of my daughter Abigail deceased fourty eight pounds as money apiece and my will is that what they have already received as entered upon my book shall be reckoned as part of said sum and if my said sons and the heirs of my son Joseph shall pay their sisters and their heirs above mentioned in equal proportion except that the heirs of Joseph shall pay four pounds more then an equal proportion and my son Cornelius four pounds less then an equal proportion. And my will further is that my wife shall have the free disposal of all her wearing apparel at her decease and that my grandson Samuel Tiler shall have half of that bequeathed to the heirs of my Daughter Abigail if he liveth with me so long as I live or till he comes to the age of eighteen years and I do hereby nominate and appoint my living wife Mary to be my executrix and my three sons William, Cornelius and Sam'l to be my executors to this my last will and testament.
In witness whereof that his is my last will and Testament I ye sd. Timothy Phelps have hereto put my hand and seal this Second day of March Anno Domini 1716 or 1717. Timothy (his X mark and a seal] Phelps... [Witnesses: John Mansfield and Thomas Moore.]
And whereas I being aged and my wife so and not knowing how long it may please God to continue my life and not knowing what debts and charge may Arise before I leave this world my will is that my sons and my daughters & their heirs shall pay their equal parts and shares of my debts and charges after my decease and my daughters Sarah Hannah, Ann & Martha & and the heirs of Abigail shall have fourty six pounds apiece with what they have already have to be paid as money out of my estate after my decease by the charge as above mentioned I intend that if there be any extraordianry charge so that the improvement of my estate will not maintain me this addition of my will was made and published this 2nd day of March 1716 or 1717. Timothy [his X mark and a seal] Phelps. Witnessess: John Mansfield and Thomas Moore.'
[There is another statement added 28 Sep 1719 wherein the two witnesses came before Matthew Allyn, Asst., to declare that they saw Timothy Phelps sign the document with a sound mind and memory.]
Children [listed in the book] (all born Windsor, CT.) were:
I. Timothy, b. 1 Nov, bp. 8th 1663, m. Martha Crow.
II. Joseph, b. 27 Sep 1666, m. Sarah Hosford.
III. William, b. 4 Feb 1669, m. 1st Abigail Mudge, 2nd Ruth Barber.
IV. Cornelius, b. 26 Apr 1671, m. Sarah Mansfield.
V. Mary, b. 14 Aug 1673, d. 23 May 1690, aged 17 yrs.
VI. Samuel, b. 29 Jan 1675, m. Abigail Eno.
VII. Nathaniel, b. 7, bp. 13 Jan 1677, m. 1st Hannah Bissell, 2nd Abigail Pinney.
VIII. Sarah, b. 27 Dec 1679, m. David Marshall of Hebron, Ct.
IX. Abigail, b. 3 Jun 1682, m. Samuel Filer.
X. Hannah, b. 2, bp. 16 Aug 1684, m. Thomas Phelps.
XI. Anne, b. 2 Oct 1686, m. David Porter.
XII. Martha, b. 12 Nov 1688, m. Corporal Samuel Holcomb."

4. The book "The Phelps Family of America and their English Ancestors," comp. by Oliver Seymour Phelps of Portland, Oregon and Andrew T. Servin of Lenox, Massachusetts, 1899, pp. 107-108:
"Timothy Phelps, b. Windsor, CT., 1 Nov, bp. 8 Nov 1663, m. Martha Crow, 4 Nov 1686, dau. of Christopher and Mary Crow. She died in Hebron, CT. Mr. Phelps resided in Windsor, CT., up to 1690, when with his younger brother Nathaniel, then unmarried, he removed to Hebron, CT., though that town was not incorporated till 1708. He was one of the first selectmen on its organization. His brother Joseph removed there later. Mr. Phelps died in Hebron, CT. Children born in Hebron, CT:
I. Martha, b. 29 Oct 1690.
II. Timothy, b. 29 Jan 1692-3, m. Hannah Calkins.
III. Noah, b. 23 Jan 1694, m. Ann Dyer.
IV. Cornelius, b. 5 Mar 1698, m. Margaret Dewey.
V. Charles, b. 26 Jul 1702, m. Hepsibah Stiles.
VI. Ashbel, b. 1704, m. Ann Pinney.
VII. Hannah, b. 1705, m. Benjamin Smith, pub. 29 Jan 1725. He was born in Springfield. Res. Springfield."

5. Henry R. Stiles, "The History and Genealogies of Ancient Windsor, Connecticut," 1892, v. 2, pp. 565-6: "Timothy Phelps (Lt.) (son of William), m. 19 Mar (1661, Old Church Record) Mary (dau. of Edward) Griswold of Kenilworth, CT, b. at Windsor, 5, bp. 13 Oct 1644, and d. some years before her husband. He owned the Half-Way Covenant, Windsor Church, 8 Nov 1663 (O.C.R.); he was freeman at Windsor, 1664; rec'd his commission as Lieut. under Col. Wm. Whiting, with Capt. Matthew Allyn, in 1709 in Queen Anne's War; he d. 1719; the will of Capt. Tim. Phelps of Windsor, dated 2 Mar 1717, mentions all his twelve children (except Mary who died young) and 'grandson Samuel Filer'; he resided in Windsor on the original Phelps homestead. Children (born Windsor, first eight O.C.R.):
A. Timothy, b. 1 (bp. 8, O.C.R.), Nov 1663.
B. Joseph, b. 27 Sep 1666.
C. William, b. 4 Feb 1668(9).
D. Cornelius, b. 26 Apr 1671.
E. Mary, b. 14 Aug 1673; d. 23 May 1690.
F. Samuel, b. 29 Jan 1675.
G. Nathaniel (Capt.), b. 7 (bp.13, O.C.R.) Jan 1677.
H. Sarah, b. 27 Dec 1679; m. David Marshall.
I. Abigail, b. 5 Jun 1682; m. Samuel Filer; she d. 28 Jan 1709.
J. Hannah, b. 4 Aug 1684; m. as 2d wife Jas. Eno.
K. Ann, b. 2 Oct 1686; m. David Porter.
L. Martha, b. 12 Nov 1688; m. Corp. Samuel Holcomb."

6. Henry R. Stiles, "The History and Genealogies of Ancient Windsor, Connecticut," 1892, v. 2, p. 567: "Timothy Phelps (son of Lt. Timothy, g.son of William), resided a few years in Windsor; removed to Hebron abt. 1690 with his younger bro. Nath'l, then unmarried; was one of the first selectmen chosen at the org. of that town in 1708, and a prominent man in Hebron, where he died 28 Sep 1768 [Kerry's note: If this death date is correct, he would have been 105 years old, which seems unlikely]. He m. 4 Nov 1686, Martha Crow, who died at Hebron. Children (b. at Hebron):
A. Martha, b. 29 Oct 1690.
B. Timothy, b. 29 Jan 1692-3.
C. Noah, b. 23 Jan 1693/4, m. Ann Dyer.
D. Cornelius, b. 5 Mar 1698, m. Margaret Dewey, 18 Jan 1722.
E. Charles, b. 26 Jul 1702. - 'Hebron Town Rec.'
F. Ashbel, b. 1704, m. Anne Pinney, 9 Nov 1731.
G. Hannah, b. 1705, m. Benjamin Smith; sett. in Springfield."

7. From the book "Our Town's Heritage, 1708-1958, Hebron, Connecticut," by John Sibun, 1975, Connecticut State Historical Society:
"The first white men to settle in town were Timothy Phelps and William Shipman, who arrived in Hebron from Windsor in June 1704. The area, then a wilderness, was used by the Indians as a hunting ground, and the few white men who knew of its existence passed through to other locations. The first two houses were located along Route 85 south of today's center. Approximately on what is now the Hilding driveway, Shipman built his homestead and Phelps constructed his home across the road on the land now owned by the Porter family. It is possible they worked on their property during the summer months only for the first two years, and returned to their families in Windsor when winter set in.
The settlers had some prior knowledge of what to expect before they arrived, as the land had been scouted years before but never occupied. Like so much territory on which Connecticut towns were founded, Hebron's land was owned originally by the Indians. However, in the case of Hebron, it was obtained not by seizure or conquest, but legally, in the form of a legacy drawn up by Joshua, Sachem of the Western Nehantics…
…Hebron became an incorporated town in May 1708 with nine families living within its boundaries.
Up until then, Lebanon excepted, towns had been named for their English counterparts and Hebron was the second Biblical name used in Connecticut. No one is certain how or why the name of Hebron came to be used. It may have been named by a scholar of the Bible, for it was apt in that its Hebrew origin meant a settlement created by people coming from diverse directions. There are numerous Hebrons in the United States, and the one in Nova Scotia was founded by people from Hebron, Connecticut, who were Tory "refugees." The original Hebron in Palestine was old in Abraham's day and is believed to be one of the two oldest cities in the world.
The first settlers in Hebron included Shipmans, Roots, Sawyers, Posts, Tillotsons, Palmers, Curtis, and two families of Phelps. Filers, Jones, Youngs, and Trumbulls were also among the very earliest families.
Probably the first spot named in the area was Prophet's Rock in use even before the name of Hebron. Prophet's Rock, located on the Smith property on Burrows Hill Road, is really two pieces of granite which look as though one large mass had been cleaved down the middle. It stands on the brow of the highest point around with one stone slightly larger and higher than the other. Each part of the rock has an overhang where one can huddle snugly from the rain and wind, and a sheltered place where a fire can be lighted. It is easy to see why Indians probably used the rock for refuge and observation when on the trail. When man was not there, it became a natural lair for the hunted animal or one sheltering itself from the noonday sun.
Here in 1706, so legend has it, the wives of Shipman and Phelps came to find their husbands. One evening the two original settlers heard strange sounds echoing across the valley, and an investigation revealed their families standing on the rock calling for them. It is conjecture whether they really could be heard. Be that as it may, the men were overjoyed to be reunited with their families. Martha Crow Phelps thought her place was with her husband and on her own initiative had resolved the situation. Bringing with her the goods that would make life in a virgin area more bearable, she camped along the way as the trip apparently took a few days. It is said she did not hurry, but negotiated the rough going stoically, clutching her Bible to herself as she lay down in the shelter of rocks and rested under fallen trees. Born in Windsor 36 years before, it could not have been an easy decision to make the journey, for Martha's mother had "disappeared" many years before when she had set out on a like journey to seek her husband.
Hebron is the 41st oldest town in the state and its very early origin can be shown by the fact that the Mayflower had arrived at Plymouth a bare 80 years before the first white men came to the region. For many people this magic date, to all intents and purposes, marks the start of the country's history. During the 1600's Plantations were founded in areas such as Saybrook, Hartford, Windsor, and Wethersfield which were accessible by waterways. It was not until later that inland towns, such as Hebron, came into being.
The 17th century was a time when the Indians in Connecticut chose sides and either fought for, or against, the white man. The Pequot tribe, which alone outnumbered the Englishmen, was one of the biggest and fiercest bands which roamed the countryside and frequently plundered the tiny colonies. Eventually, with the aid of other tribes, notably the Mohegans of Saybrook who hunted up through Hebron, the white man gradually brought lasting peace to the Connecticut countryside.
Before 1704 there was nothing to distinguish Hebron from the rest of this part of New England. Deer and other wild game roamed across a brush wilderness, slept in the caves, and sunned themselves on the great slabs of rock which dotted the countryside. Hunting the game to provide food and clothing, Indians from the local tribes hurried along the trails that had been blazed up from the shore line. Hebron was laced with these paths. The town area, as we know it now, probably did not support a regular large community of Indians, but from time to time, may have had isolated small resident groups.
In addition to hunting, the Indians used the area for a little seasonal farming. Each spring, the tribes would send some of their members to take possession of large inland hillsides suitable for growing corn. To clear the land quickly, vegetation was burned to the ground. Other Indians arrived with seed corn and ground fish porgies for fertilizer, and after the planting was completed, returned to their shore line homes. At the end of the summer the Indians collected their harvest. Some of it was used on the spot for a big celebration feast complete with dances around a corn stalk fire. The festivities over, the Indians headed for the shore with a corn supply which they hoped would last them through the long winter months ahead. Indians still used Burnt Hill, situated next to the Hebron road of that name, for growing corn long after the first white men came, but gradually the settler edged the red man out of his use of this type of land.
Very little, if any, trouble occurred between the first local Hebron settlers and the Indians. But in the first few decades when there was general unrest in the state, some residents took to sleeping in a Block House which was situated near the site of the old Brick School and what is now the junction of Route 85 and the Old Colchester Road.
In 1705, the Connecticut General Assembly authorized John Pritchard and John Plumb to survey the five mile tract (what is now part of the eastern and southern sides of Lebanon), the boundaries to be marked on convenient rocks. These markers remain; the one in Goshen bears the legend LVMC (for Lebanon Five Mile Corner). Many years ago, Clarence Bissell led a small party to rediscover the Hebron "L Rock." They set off from what is now Archie Green's house and located a flat rock three quarters of a mile from the southwest corner of Amston Lake; the chiseled "L" was still legible.
The "town fathers" also established laws at this time with which to govern the community. The first complete record of Town Officers was made in December 1709 when a town clerk, constable, 3 townsmen, surveyor of highways, and a lister were elected. It was voted that a diamond would be the town brand for cattle, and a certain white oak centrally located, was designated as the town's notice board. Initially, town meetings were held in various private homes. At this time, the primary business at meetings was that of establishing a church.
An early town law stated that no timber, wood, hay, or stone could be transported out of town. This was to ensure that the community did not experience any shortages in its attempt to become self-sufficient. In 1710 the state was petitioned to allow the town the right to tax the land within its boundaries.
There are few details of the first town meeting which was held on September 20, 1708, at which Timothy Phelps was elected Town Clerk. Another Phelps, Nathaniel, was "elected" in 1712 to be the town's first innkeeper. It appears that enough visitors were passing through the village to warrant such action. His tavern was situated near the Colchester line…
…It is very hard to find a time in the town's history when a Jones was not in residence. The oldest family grave- stones go back to 1775, but Joneses were in town long before that time. Many of them were soldiers including Ezekiel Jones who had been a drummer boy in the Revolution. Several towns in the state have a Jones family, and it is safe to say probably in many cases their ancestors came from Hebron many years before. Not only is there a street called after the prolific Jones family in Hebron, but there is a cemetery on that street named for them. For many years, they gathered once a year to put the cemetery grounds in order and at the same time have a picnic where everyone was brought up to date on the news of all branches of the family.
One Hebron Jones, Joel, found that being a principal citizen of the village had its drawbacks. In the late 18th century, he spent some time imprisoned in Tolland jail after the town was unable to pay its county taxes. This was one way the law could be enforced to collect taxes, but para- doxically, a sure way that a person could gain the respect of his fellow citizens…"
[Included with this article is a line drawing depicting "Martha Crow Phelps seeks her husband, with her on the "Prophet's Rock." Also there is a photo of the rock. Also included is a copy of a township map drawn in 1744 by Isaac Pinney with the original in the Connecticut State Library Ecclesiastical Vol. VII. The map lists the following Phelps: Esq. Phelps, Capt. Phelps, N. Phelps, C. Phelps, Noah Phelps, S. Phelps, and Phelps. The Phelpses are generally clustered to the east of the township center and approximately a third of the way up from the bottom of the township. There is only one "Jones" listed and that is on the western edge approximately 2 miles up from the southern border. This was John Jones' residence at which time he would have been a teenager in the household. There is still a Jones Street and Pond at the old location of the Jones. There is also a Jones Cemetery. Also listed are three "Porters" just to the west of the Phelps.]

MARRIAGE:
1. From the book "New England Marriages Prior to 1700,' by Clarence Almon Torrey, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, copy in the Windsor, CT., Historical Society Library, p. 576:
"Phelps, Timothy and Martha Crow; 4 Nov 1686; Windsor, CT/Hebron, CT."

DEATH:
1. Website 4 Sep 2007 www.douglaslibrary.org/barbour. The Douglas Library in Hebron, Connecticut has "Town of Hebron Vital Records: Barbour Collection 1708-1854," p. 103, does not report a death for Timothy or Margaret Phelps. I find no substantiation of their deaths in Hebron even though they were prominent.

SOURCES_MISC:
1. Per family group sheet archive record submitted by Ilda L. Davis, 54 Genesee Ave., Elgin, Ill. References "Stiles Hist. of Ancient Windsor, The Mayflowere Planters at Plymouth 1620, Phelps family in America,#46 p 107. 
Phelps, Timothy (I1958)
 
218 BIOGRAPHY:
1. 1787 census for Jestrup in Sønderhå notes Peder Leegaard 50 farmer both in their first marriage, Else Jensdatter 46 his wife, Inger Pedersdatter 14 Child, Laurids Pedersen 10 Child, Frederica Pedersdatter 7 Child, Jens Pedersen 4 Child, Caroline Pedersdatter 2 child.

2. 1801 census for same place notes Peder Leegaard 66, in first marriage, parish bailiff and "gaardbeboer," Else Jensdatter 60 his wife, Laurs 22, Frederica Louise 21 unmarried, Caroline 15 unmarried.

3. A farm by name of Legaard exists northeast of Sønderhå which may be namesake from whence comes "Leegaard".

4. Occupation: farmer, parish bailiff.

5. At the christenings of all of his children, his name is noted as Leegaard.

CHRISTENING:
1. FHL film # 053193; Sønderhå Parish Record.

2. Per Joyce Cupit: "Sønderhå kirkebog 1736 fødte: 29 Feb havde Anders Larsen of Inger Salmansdatter? i Ledgaard? her i jestrup til daaben en søn kaldet Peder. Gudmoder: Else Poulsdatter, Lars Bagges?, Faddere: Jesper Larssen, Peder Madsen, Christen Nørgaard."

MARRIAGE:
1. FHL film # 053193; Sønderhå Parish Record, 1696 - 1787, book 1, p 140. Confirmed the record below. Note that both witnesses signed. Anders Leegaard may be the father of Peder since it was customary to generally have the fathers as witnesses. The relationship of Povel Jensen to Else Jensdatter is not given, but could possibly be a brother.

2. Per research of genealogist Bent Pilsgård of Viborg, Denmark; Viborg Regional Archives microfiche C114.1 page 140 Sønderhå parish records; Witnesses: Povel Jensen of Kiestrup and Anders Leegaard of Jestrup, they were engaged 31 Jul 1766. The couple is Peder Andersen Leegaard and Else Jensdatter Mørch, both of Jestrup.

DEATH:
1. FHL film # 053193; Sonderhaa Parish Record.

BURIAL:
1. FHL film # 053193; Sønderhå Parish Record.

2. Per Joyce Cupit: "Sønderhå kirkebog 1814: begravet Nov. 23 Gaardmand Peder Andersen Leegrd., 78 år."

SOURCES_MISC:
1. Family information from LDS Archive record. Record originally submitted by Mrs. Wanda Roos, R.D. 1 Box 651B, Sandy, Utah. James Christian Westergard shown as 2ggson. Indicates information is from church and census records for Sønderhå by Eva M. Gregersen.

2. Per gedcom dated 6 Jan 1999 of Wayne Westergard, 785 W 1300 South, Woods Cross, Utah 84087, phone 801-295-2906.

3. Film 8848: Census Paper: 2787, 1801; Copenhagen, Denmark.

4. May 21, 1999 correspondence of Jens Praestgaard at "jens-v-p@post5.tele.dk".

5. Joyce Cupit's website 25 May 2002. 
Andersen Leegård, Peder (I1608)
 
219 BIOGRAPHY:
1. 1801 Census for Boddum, Thisted shows 44 families with one being Christen Jensen, a farmer of 76 years of age, in his first marriage. His wife was Johanna Christensdatter, first marriage and age 72, and their children, Christen, not married and age 30, and Anne, not married and age 32. Cannot find birth of Christen in Bodum nor Ydby according to Bent Pilgård (28 May 1999).
 
Jensen Brandtoft, Christen (I446)
 
220 BIOGRAPHY:
1. 28 Jul 2007 Http://www.herzenberg.net/leo/htmlrh/Content.html copyrighted by Leo Herzenberg:
"An meinen Sohn (To my son) Leonhard Herzenberg von (from) Robert Herzenberg. Memoirs written during the 1940's." Translated during the 1990's by Leonardo (Leonhard) Herzenberg. The entire memoir is quite lengthy and included in its entirety in my notes with Joseph Herzenberg, the original known ancestor, in this database. The following is only the portion dealing with this part of the family:
"...JulIUS HERZENERG, the second son, studied at the Polytechnic in Riga and graduated as a chemical engineer shortly after Uncle Abraham's death. In the following summer he married the daughter of his cousin Louis, Mery Herzenberg from Riga. It was a love marriage. The wedding took place in Karlbad, on the Riga shore, where all Riga's and some of Mitau's families moved every summer, and most of them had established summer residences. That same night the house burned down, and only the naked lives were rescued.
The parents bought him a gas light mantle factory in Berlin.[47] There their daughter Hedwig was born. When I was in Berlin in the October 1902, she lay in the cradle. The mantle undertaking soon went bankrupt. Julius never again worked as a chemical engineer. He left Berlin and Germany for ever. For a time he was in Irkutsk (in Russia, near lake Baikal) with representation, then back to Russia. There a son, Alfred (Fredy) was born. I did not hear much from them for a long time, after the revolution they were able to return to Latvia. Fredy went to the United States to study. Hedy married the Latvian architect Sproghe. Julius Herzenberg died soon after in Riga. Fredy came to Schenectady as an engineer at General Electric, then, in 1936 as an exploration engineer for Shell Oil in Houston, Texas, where he still works today (1940). In 1937 he brought his brother in law over, in 1938 Hedwig and Mery also came to Houston. Hedwig has a son Erik. So, the great-grandchild of Uncle Abraham, [48] Eric Sproghe, is the first half Latvian in out family. Fredy Married in Houston, but I do not know his wife's name."

2. Ancestry.com's "New York Passenger Lists, 1820-1957"
A. Arriving on the ship "Champlain" 11 Jun 1937: Paul Sprohge, 35, md., male, architect, reads and writes, German language, nationality of Germany, German race, b. in Riga Latviea, immigration visa QIV:225 issued in Riga 24 May 1937, last permanent address was Berlin, Germany, friend's name: Alfred Herzenberg.
B. Arriving on the ship "Champlain" 10 Jun 1938 having sailed from Southhampton, England.
a. Hedwig Sprohge, 35, md., h.wife, reads and writes, speaks German/english, citizen of Germany, German Hebrew, b. Berlin, Germany, visa issued in Riga, last permanent address was in Riga, Latvia, sponsoring friend is Paul Sprohge.
b. Erik Sprohge, 6, speaks German, German Hebrew, b. Riga, Latvia, visa issued in Riga, last permanent address was in Riga, Latvia, sponsoring friend is Paul Sprohge.
c. Merija or Maria Hercenbergs or Herzenberg, 57, widow, no occupation, speaks french/german/english/russian, citizen of Latvia, Hebrew, b. Riga, Latvia, visa issued in Riga, last permanent address was in Riga, Latvia, sponsoring friend is Paul Sprohge.

3. Ancestry.com's "Texas Birth Index" shows Paul Christopher Sprohge, b. 31 Mar 1963 in Harris County, Texas to Erik Tom Sprohge and Helen Jean Khilling.

DEATH:
1. Social Security Death Index: Paul R. Sproghe, b. 27 Sep 1901, d. 20 May 1990, ssn 450-12-5591 iss. in Texas bef. 1951.

2. Ancestry.com's "Texas Death Index": Paul Sprohge, d. 20 May 1990 in Harris County, Texas. Phone directories show him in Houston and Bellaire, Texas, phone 713-665-5978.

SOURCES_MISC:
1. Leonardo Herzenberg http://www.herzenberg.net/

2. Website of Peter Bruce Herzenberg of London, England (since relocated to South Africa). Website is no longer functioning as of 7 Aug 2007. Copies of much of his data from the website in my possession. 
Sprohge, Paul R. (I4163)
 
221 BIOGRAPHY:
1. 28 Jul 2007 Http://www.herzenberg.net/leo/htmlrh/Content.html copyrighted by Leo Herzenberg:
"An meinen Sohn (To my son) Leonhard Herzenberg von (from) Robert Herzenberg. Memoirs written during the 1940's." Translated during the 1990's by Leonardo (Leonhard) Herzenberg. The entire memoir is quite lengthy and included in its entirety in my notes with Joseph Herzenberg, the original known ancestor, in this database. The following is only the portion dealing with this part of the family:
"MY PARENTS
"FANNY GERSON, Leonhard Herzenberg, SARA HALPERT
...When my mother died I was one and a half years old; I have no memory of her. When I was a child one did not speak of her; when I was older and got a second mother it had been agreed that one especially did not speak of my mother. So I know almost nothing of my mother. According to stories and the few photos, she was of short stature, blond, and very beautiful [116]. She was also very clever [klug] and calm in her bearing. I have several letters of hers, that through some kind of shyness I have been unable to read, and a few handicrafts, among them my father's prayer shawl [tales] bag.
There was great sorrow in the family over the deaths of my mother and aunt Sophie. Aunt Fanny, who later married Nathan Lowenstein, came into the house to care for me and run my widowed father's household. She knew nothing of child rearing or housekeeping, she was herself only a big child. In contrast to that, she vas very pretty, and let the students of the upper grades in our neighborhood court her much and often. Apparently the situation was not good either for me or my father. So it was natural that he would have to marry again. My father went on most of our holiday trips to the relatives, of which I wrote already, [msp 117] to find himself a wife and me a mother. It did not seem to work, because it lasted very long. Perhaps the candidates shied away from taking such a wild spoiled brat as me under their care. Finally my father made a match outside the country. He went to Konigsberg in private [i.Pr.] (without taking me along), got engaged to Sara Halpert, the daughter of Hirsch Halpert, Rabbi [Gabbe] in the polish schul (Synagogue), and the wedding took place on my father's birthday in 1893. I was already almost eight when the new mother, whom I always called Mamachen, came into the house in Libau. The marriage was happy, though not smooth. The percentage of happy unions was not smaller, perhaps larger, among the arranged ones than among the accidental ones (so-called love matches). When I met her at the railway station, Mamachen was a very pretty [bildhubshe], gentle [sanfte] woman, somewhat buxom [vollschlank] wearing a camel colored plush jacket, into which I liked to cuddle. [118] She was usually serious, an outstanding housewife [hausfrau], and cooked and baked wonderfully; your mother is the only one I've met so far who can do it still better in every respect. Mamachen was no longer young, did not make herself younger, but would give her age as ten years younger.
Unfortunately neither she nor anyone else thought of it that smallpox immunization disappears at around age 30. She was vaccinated as a child, and in Germany smallpox was a rare, almost unknown, illness. But in Russia, and in God's little land of Kurland, it was all too common. Perhaps she got infected in an employment agency for servants, and became seriously ill with smallpox. She lay in the city [stadtlichen] hospital, and I would visit her with my father. She was in mortal danger for a long time; when she came out of it the once beautiful, smooth, white, face was a single red scar. [msp 119] She remained pockmarked the rest of her life. (In Russia pockmarked is called ..... (rjaboi); it is such a common sight that a special [urtumlich] word was coined [gepragt] for it. The bodily manifestation of her disease disturbed Mamachen's spirit for the rest of her life. [gab Mamachen ein knacks]. Papachen could surround her with the greatest love, concern, and attention, but she would convince herself that he did not love her, that he cared more for other women; I am sure she was mistaken, but she suffered in spite of it, and Papachen suffered along with her. But they lived quietly and withdrawn. In 1895 uncle Erich was born, at the end of 1896 uncle George. We three grew up, Erich and I left the parental home and moved away [fremde], George stayed home, he was Mamachen's darling. Mamachen fulfilled her step-motherly duty in an exemplary way; before going to Libau she had to swear to her father that she would not touch the orphan [waise], and she never did. [120] I never got a slap from her, though I must have driven her to desperation with my mischief, stubbornness, and back-talk. In later years we understood each other very well, and I would get her annoyed only in jest, for example when I would say I was going to marry a Christian she became speechless just as in my Childhood when I did not want to be subdued.
For a time she became very fat, she went to Marienbad several times, she visited me in Freiberg, in Kiel and in Hamburg. She complained [krankelte] about various things. In 1922 she was in Kissingen with Papachen. The diagnoses of the physicians did not sound good, and at the end of 1922 she suffered a stroke which robbed her of speech and movement. So she suffered until the 15 Kislev (November 1923). When she died I was in Hamburg, I went to Libau for the funeral, but arrived too late. Uncle Erich was not allowed to return to [121] Latvia at that time, so uncle George and I were there alone to console Papachen. During Mamachen's illness an electric heating pad set the covers on fire. Since she could not call or move, she would have been seriously burned had not cousin Fanny (now in Prescott, AZ) happened to come in the room and torn the burning cover away. During her illness a very strange thing became evident. Some time before she had set a room aside and locked it with keys from which she would not be separated. Then she declared that the business staff were dishonest, that when Papachen and George went to lunch she herself sat in the cashiers place. She used this daily period to cut off pieces of cloth and hoard them in her locked room. Papachen found this collected hoard when he acquired the key during Mamachen's illness. This hoarding did not make sense, because the cut pieces were not useful for either [122] a suit or a dress. Perhaps this all happened in a state of craziness that later culminated in the stroke. To accomplish it she won the complicity of one of the clerks, who took the opportunity to cut coupons of cloth for himself, but with more sense, with which he supplied his girlfriend's [geliebten] shop in New Libau, who ran an active [schwunghaften] business with the stolen goods.
...Soon after his second marriage Papachen with his brother Joseph founded the firm Gebruder Herzenberg. The shop was located in the Knopf building, on the corner of Korn and Julian streets. After a few years the whole [126] block of buildings up to the market burned down. The shop changed locations several times until the Knopf's rebuilding was complete. The shop again moved back to the old corner, and is still there. However, I don't know what it is called now, since the Bolsheviks who took back Latvia after France collapsed in June 1940 "nationalized" the business, that is took it over without compensation, and your uncle George, the owner, was set out on the street.
The business went well, but it was no true happiness. Papachen did not get along with uncle Joseph, and Mamachen even less so with aunt Frieda, uncle Joseph's wife. Both had equal rights, and when Papachen hired somebody, and uncle Joseph did not like them, the latter would fire them. But they both withstood it. Shortly before the world war uncle Joseph died, and Papachen became sole owner. Then the war came, almost all Jews in Libau left the city and moved to inner Russia, partly to save what one could take along, partly to flee to the capital invested in Russian [127] banks and enterprises, partly due to forced evacuation of Jews from the border areas. Uncle Leopold moved to Riga, but Papachen stayed; the Germans came, and were greeted as liberators from the Russian domination, since they came a day before the forced evacuation of the Jews, and instead of them the Russian administration fled to the north. The Germans soon showed themselves in all their ostentation. Life was difficult during the occupation time. Papachen remained a Russian patriot and invested his earnings in czarist rubles. When these then dropped down to nothing, he invested in Reichsmark, and so he also lost this portion.
...So, after Mamachen's death he lived in company with uncle George in the beautiful home [wohnung] at Gymnasiumstrasse-4. I was there in November 1918 when Germany surrendered in the first world war, in 1923, after Mamachen's death, in 1925 before emigrating to Bolivia [129], and last in 1930 during my European vacation. Papachen lived quietly and withdrawn; he was not a misanthrope, but was disinclined toward any turbulent gathering. He lived esteemed and loved by the congregation, the city, and with few friends from the old guard of his youth. He lived as he wanted and as he believed was right. Unfortunately he lacked Mamachen's nurture. He had already suffered from a kidney ailment earlier, which kept getting worse over the years. He rarely traveled to the German baths, about once every ten years. Shortly after my last visit in 1930 he became severely ill from kidney stones. Once in a while he had some relief, and then he worked resolutely in the business and the congregation. Finally the crisis came in July 1932. He was transferred to a clinic, but there was no help. He suffered with horrible pain, and succumbed to Uremia on the 12 Tamuz (15 July 1932). With him were uncles Erich and George. [130]...
...ERICH [284] In the summer of 1912 your uncle Erich graduated, and came to visit Hamburg as a reward. Erich was rather sickly as a child and was very spoiled, and that left a trace in his life. He is more egotistical than the rest of the family, has no sense of family, and when he can achieve a goal by a straight or crooked path he will always pick the crooked one for the sporting excitement. In business and dealing with people he is also hard, harder than we are in our way. Erich was born on 25 march 1895 in Libau, in the [Schwederskicschen Hause ?],at Seestrasse 32. He went to kindergarten, then at age 10 entered Commerce School [Kommerzschule]. Your uncle George and I attended the Libau Realschule. The Kommerzschulen were newly founded in Russia. They reported to the Finance ministry, rather than the mass education [volksaufklarung] ministry. [285] The uniform was just like that of the Realschule, but the trim was green rather than yellow, and on the cap and belt the staff of Mercury, color and symbol of the finance ministry. These schools were relatively good, and in many respects freer than the bureaucratically led schools of the education ministry. The program was similar to that of the Realschulen; no classical languages were taught, and they were the first schools in Russia to consciously reject French, and instead required English. As tribute to the Finance ministry subjects such as accounting, national economics, business geography, and so on were included.
The schools were well endowed and could attract the best teachers from other schools. This was the kind of school your uncle Erich attended and completed uneventfully in summer 1912. He intended to follow in my footsteps, and go the mining school at Freiberg. He was not especially talented, but outdid the brightest around him by extraordinary diligence, [286], stubborn endurance, and absolute conscienciousness. So Erich came to Hamburg. He had broken his bridges behind him. As a child he had successfully learned to play the cello, but wanted nothing to do with it. Before he left home he took apart his cello and hid the parts in various places in the house, hoping to be rid of it. Then he came to me and everything was supposed to change. I tried to talk him out of going to Freiberg. Only thanks to my love and aptitude for the odd subject of Mineralogy had I found shelter in science. Otherwise I have no idea what I would have done with my engineer diploma, so what did he want with Freiberg. Eventually I persuaded him to go into business [kaufmann verden]. The look of the royal merchants in Hamburg had really impressed him. I would have had no objection to Erich studying further if he had shown any special interest, or inclination, or aptitude, [287] but without any of those it would have been nonsense to become a mining engineer, with no rights in Russia, and no prospects in Germany.
So Erich began his business track. There was a chance of getting a job with M. M. Warburg, but the goods [waren] trade appealed to him more than the banking trade, so he started and apprenticeship with the firm of Schoenfeld and Wolfers on the Rodingsmarkt, with 100 mark the first training year, 200 the second, and 900 the third. The senior partner of the firm, Eduard Wolfers, was an old friend of my father and helped Erich however he could. The firm had a history of hiring apprentices, training them quickly, and giving them responsible work during their first year if they were suited for it - there was no way to get cheaper workers. The firm purchased silk fabrics from China and Japan, along with other textiles, and sold them all over Europe and Russia. Trained apprentices could be travelling buyers or sellers, the usual career path for a Hamburg merchant. Erich soon was reluctant to work, [msp 288] did not like either the work or Hamburg, claimed that the single swan on the Libau swan pond was more beautiful than the hundreds on the Alster. He got used to it soon, but apparently never forgave me for tearing him out of the academic career he had set his sights on. On his first visit to Sakom he was asked to play the cello. Sakom found him very suited for the instrument, and offered to get him instruction at no cost. Letters went to Libau, the cello pieces were searched for and sent to Hamburg, and instruction started.
We were both living in crowded quarters at the Ratzmann family, but it did not go well, since they had grown children in the house, and space was tight. So we persuaded Miss Charlotte Mess (msp 261) to give up the pension she was running in Kiel and to move to Hamburg. We rented an [msp 289] apartment at Grundalle 80, and move in with Miss Mess, where we settled ourselves comfortably and had it as good as at home, since Miss Mess mothered us. In the morning we left for work together, met around 5 after work to eat at Miss Mess, then Erich practiced cello for 3 hours that went by with all of us in the pension hearing and seeing it if he did not have a lesson. under the guidance of Sakom, in just two years Erich was the best cello dilettante in Hamburg, played in many concerts, and was a popular guest for house music; soon he had more invitations than I did. That is how the year 1913 went by.
In the meantime I experienced the death of a Freiberg fellow student, Hoffmeister. He had finished Freiberg in 1909 and had gone to the Belgian Congo with professor Stutzer ([Lagerstattender nicht erze]) on a geological research trip. While there he caught sleeping sickness and returned to Hamburg to the tropical disease institute to be cured [290]. The specific remedy Bayer-205 had not yet been discovered. Actually, the sleeping sickness patients in the tropic disease hospital at that time were really guinea pigs [versuchskaninchen] and after a longer or shorter period of illness they all succumbed. However, during the course of the disease, that sometimes lasted 2 years, there would be some months where the patient would feel almost totally healthy. During these periods Hoffmeister worked in the mineralogical institute and made a trip to Petersburg to visit his parents and siblings. During the remissions he lived at Miss Mess. He died in the tropic disease hospital. He was a very dear person, and we all mourned him greatly.
Hamburg did not have a university; the lower house [burger-schaft] did not approve one, and in the meantime the upper house [senat] built a similar institution that called itself "General Lecture and Colonial Institute" from which Hamburg University sprang forth. [291] Thus there were no fixed admission requirements. Anyone who wanted to study or work there was admitted, so the audience was very colorful. Aside from Hoffmeister several younger and older Folkschool teachers, and some middle school women teachers [mittelschullehrerinnen], a daughter of Eduard Woehrmann, an old South Africa settler-fighter, Melchior, who told many stories of the Herero battles, who we nick-named "Piek van der Westerhus" after the main character of his poetically tinged reports. Also there was a Bremen merchant Otto Labahn, who would later play a large role in my life, but for the time being diligently pursued determinative mineralogy and owned a tantalum mine in English South Africa, and students spending their vacations in the institute being tutored.
So we came into 1914, splashing around in world history without anticipating anything awful. [ 292] In the summer of 1914 your uncle Erich and I went to Kiel to enjoy the colorful festival of "Kiel week." We left Hamburg on the early morning of Sunday, 28 June, and returned in the evening. One could bustle about the Kiel firth all day, and get ones fill of sailing activity. The entire German fleet was assembled in Kiel, and many foreign yachts were participating in races. There also was a whole row of English warships, whose dark gray paint contrasted uncomfortably with the light fog gray of the German ships. We rode on Firth steamers around the whole firth, in the wonderful sunny weather, and there is hardly a more lively sight than hundreds of ships decorated in full flag regalia. As we rode around we noticed movement in the flags. All warships lowered their stern flags to half mast. Then a flag with horizontal red and white stripes was raised on their fore masts. [293] Erich and I, coming from Libau, were familiar with sailing flags, even though we had not seen this flag in our home port. It was the Austrian flag, and what could its combination with mourning mean? It could only be the death of Kaiser Franz Joseph. He was already old, and had gone through a lot; may he rest in peace.
The pleasant mood in Kiel collapsed. All festivities were called off, the foreign ships did not need to weigh anchor, and cast off from their buoys and slipped through the Kaiser Wilhelm canal, and Erich and I returned to Hamburg. We came to the rail station, and in spite of our 3rd class tickets, the conductor put us in 1st class compartments of an extra train; we had no idea why. We arrived in Hamburg at night, and there were extra telegrams that Franz Ferdinand, the crown prince of Austria-Hungary [294] and his wife had been victims of a plot [attentat]. Now we were greatly saddened that the old Kaiser Franz still had to experience this tragedy. Some people spoke of danger of war, but these voices quieted soon. It was such a nice summer, and what did the average person of the time (or of today) know of what played out behind the wings of world politics. Since then my interest in, and reading about, world politics has increased so that there rarely is an event that I am not prepared for.
So, it was July 1914, I had received the equipment with which I wanted to uncover nature's ways of making diamonds. Professor Gurich was on a research trip in South Africa; I received a request to go to southern Norway, [ 295] and examine some feldspar veins around Stavanger for a Mr. Spandow, who made canned sardines, and wanted to export the minerals for porcelain glazing. I left Hamburg for Stavanger on 11 July, and spent two weeks in Flekkfjord, Egersund and Hittero collecting two crates of feldspar chunks. When I went back along the Danish coast we met the "Hohenzollern" with part of the German war fleet. The Kaiser was bound for the north land on his annual trip. The weather was so beautiful, and in us, the unsuspecting human Children, there was no trace of a thought that we were living in the last days of a world epoch, that everything, everything, would change. The ancient empires would be shattered; tradition, well being, security, life itself, would become shaky concepts and that the whole earth would for decades be plunged into blood and tears.
Your uncle Erich yelled "war, war," but for me it did not look good. Austria had [296] given Serbia an ultimatum, Germany sided with Austria; Russia, France and England took the Serbian side, and the first world war began. Uncle Erich and I were cut off from home. We were Russians, therefore enemy aliens. Our home town. Libau was attacked by German warships on the first day. But our sympathies were totally on the German side. As a foreigner I enjoyed more rights in Germany than as a Russian at home. In czarist Russia I could never have the position that I occupied in Hamburg in spite of being a foreigner...
...MY BROTHERS ERICH and George DURING and AFTER WW I
At the outbreak of the war your uncle Erich was with me in Hamburg. He continued learning at the firm of Schonfeld and Wolfers on the Rodingsmarkt. I enlisted in the army and went to war, Erich also wanted to enlist in the Navy, but I managed to dissuade him from it. He actually was photographed in the uniform of our unit, including spiked helmet and rifle, but that was just a spoof. At first he stayed in Hamburg, then went home to Libau, where he did not over-work and led a good life. When Germany surrendered Erich befriended the Baltikumern, German partisans who, under the pretext of freeing Latvia from the Bolsheviks, wanted to created their own state along with the Baltik barons. [msp 345] The adventurer Bermondt, called Duke Avalon-Bermondt, a Czarist Russian general, led the partisans against the Bolsheviks, and Erich joined this army as a commissary official. All white troops hoped to easily defeat the reds. Army suppliers got great profits, but the dream came apart. The Bolsheviks were driven out of Latvia, but then the Latvians drove out the Balticum partisans, and your uncle Erich was happy to again get out of the witches cauldron.
He came to me in Hamburg, where he worked for a scrap metal firm for a while. Then he went to Berlin, into the firm "Holuri," founded by my old friend Jona Lurie and the brothers Hoff. They dealt in tea and Baltic linen yarn. After a few years Jonny Lurie drove Erich out of the firm in a disagreeable way. Then with the help of Hoffs, he opened his own yarn factory in Berlin, Nowawes, but remained [msp 346] a representative of the brothers Hoff and processed their yarns. Erich swore by Germany, had connections to military circles since he supplied yarn for tent manufacture. On 15 October 1936 the factory burned down. It was rebuilt and put back in operation on 15 December 1936; on 30 June 1938 the Nazis took the factory from him. He lived in Riga, married in December 1939, and in the spring of 1941 had gotten a visa to the USA, where he had been transferring money. But since he could not break off from the Hoffs in time he never got out. Since June 1941 I have heard nothing from him or his young, pretty wife Abigail, born Abkin. Maybe he got stuck in Latvia by the German advance. God only knows what became of all of them..."
...In the summer of 1922 father and mother came to Kissingen, where I and Erich visited them. That was the last time I saw mother. The doctors gave worrisome diagnoses. At the end of 1922 she had a stroke which crippled her and took her speech, and in 1923 she was freed by death. During this time, when she was cared for by our cousin Fanny, who now lives in Prescott, AZ, she was almost burned alive. Mother lay in bed with an electric heating pad, which apparently burned out and set the blankets on fire. Mother could neither scream or move in the bed; fortunately the nurse [schwester] noticed the smoke in time and was able to save her...
...Mother died in November 1923 (on the 15th of Kislev). When I got the telegram I wanted to got to Libau immediately, and could have gotten there in time for the funeral, but I lost so much time that I did not arrive till the evening after the burial. I got the passport relatively easily, but that was not enough. I had to have a visa from the polish consul because I would travel through the Polish corridor, a Lithuanian one to pass through Lithuania, and then I needed a Latvian one. Each consulate was in a different part of town, and the gentlemen were all so arrogant that one had to wait and beg to get the visa, and the fees for permission to spend a few hours over the holy Lithuanian or other foreign soil were sky-high. Your uncle Erich was not allowed into Latvia at that time, since he was still on their blacklist which included those involved with Bermondt-Analow. I spent the whole mourning period in Libau. [msp 361] However I was not ritually tied to the mourning, was not allowed to say Kadish, and could leave the house at any time, that is I did not have to sit Schiva. The household continued operating the way mother had led it, Anna carded it on. Then it was back to Hamburg. I did not have much work, but enough to live on. I had already long ago started to take foreign currency for instruction or professional reports. At the start of 1924, when the deflation started to be fully effective all my income stopped. From March 1924 on I had no students, no more reports, no longer earned a penny. My only activity was that in the lodge; I read a lot at home. What I needed to live on father sent me, since there was enough for that. I sold the greater part of my equipment, the better large microscope, the complete blowpipe apparatus, and much else. You can imagine, dear Nardi, that I felt plenty bad. I saw no way out. In spite of [msp 362] being lodge president, and having many good connections, it was not possible for me to get the most minor position. I lived and waited, as long as father could afford it he would never have left me in need. Uncle Erich, who was doing well in Berlin at the time, failed me in every respect [versagte in jeder beziehung]. Uncle George was in the business with father and did not have much to say, he was mostly concerned about himself. He was a great fan of water sport, one day it was a new Yacht, another a motorboat. Water sports were popular with Jewish youth in Latvia. They were united in the KYK (Kurland-ischer Yacht Klub), jokingly called the Kurlandischer Juden Klub by the German and Latvian clubs. But the KYK paid them back by winning most of the regattas...

BIRTH:
1. Leo has conflicting birth dates. On his family pedigree he notes:
Erich, b. 25 Mar 1885 with mother as Fanny Gerson.
George, b. 19 Nov 1887 with mother as Fanny Gerson.
His father's memoirs have these two boys born to the second wife, Sara Halpert, in 1895 and late 1896 respectively. The memoirs speak of Robert as the stepchild to Sara, but not Erich and George.
I use the latter.

SOURCES_MISC:
1. Leonardo Herzenberg http://www.herzenberg.net/

2. Website of Peter Bruce Herzenberg of London, England (since relocated to South Africa). Website is no longer functioning as of 7 Aug 2007. Copies of much of his data from the website in my possession. 
Herzenberg, Erich (I4139)
 
222 BIOGRAPHY:
1. 28 Jul 2007 Http://www.herzenberg.net/leo/htmlrh/Content.html copyrighted by Leo Herzenberg:
"An meinen Sohn (To my son) Leonhard Herzenberg von (from) Robert Herzenberg. Memoirs written during the 1940's." Translated during the 1990's by Leonardo (Leonhard) Herzenberg. The entire memoir is quite lengthy and included in its entirety in my notes with Joseph Herzenberg, the original known ancestor, in this database. The following is only the portion dealing with this part of the family:
"The Generation of My Parents
[78] My grandparents Naftali and Nese had four sons and six daughters: Leonhard, Joseph, Ignatz, Leopold, Sarah, Ernestine, Sophie, Fanny, Dora, and Lina.
All four brothers lived in Libau...
The youngest, uncle Leopold, married in Minsk, while I was a student in Riga. Aunt Betty was less beautiful than able, German was difficult for her until the last. Uncle Leopold worked for the iron firm Samuel Michelson except for a short time when he was independent. He was always extremely able and diligent, he built up some wealth, had a nice house in the Thomasstrasse, with wonderful fruit and flower gardens. They had two children, Mascha and Kolja, the latter named after grandfather Naphtali (Nikolaus). Only the first letter is the same, but I doubt that the name Naphtali can still be used in western Europe, since it sounds just like the [81] naphthalene of moth-balls. Uncle Leopold and aunt Betty are still (April 1941) living in Libau, as well as Kolja, who works in the firm with his father. I don't know what became of Mascha. She was a pretty, clever, typically eastern Jewish girl; she married an eastern Jewish engineer-chemist Feodor Leszinsky whom she learned to know and love during her student time in Paris and Brussels. They had a daughter Claude. So Mascha ended up with the name of the polish princess Maria Lezinska, wife of King Ludwig the XV of France. Every time that they passed through the polish corridor on trips to Libau and showed the passport to the Polish officers, the latter were quite confused, since one could never know - who knows everything so well - that the thing went back 200 years. Leszinskys lived in Paris where old jewelry was melted and pure gold, silver,and platinum [msp 82] for jewelers were produced. I met him in 1930, at uncle Leopold and aunt Betty's silver wedding anniversary, when I was on vacation if Libau. He offered me a position which I did not accept. The things apparently went very wrong there, but I could not find out what was the matter. It seems that Leszinsky went out of the country, and Mascha with the child were to follow. I have heard nothing from them since. Aunt Betty and the other relatives in Libau sealed their lips air-tight, so I do not know how and when Mascha was surprised by the second world war.
{Note added 21 June 42: Mascha went to Paris from Libau via Stockholm and London in August 39, and after a week to the United States, where her husband, Fedja had gone earlier. She wrote me in March 1942, they were then living in new York, he is employed by Philip Brothers. They changed the name, and are now called Leston. Uncle Leopold and aunt Betty were in the Libau ghetto, and no trace of Kolja, who had married a Lett}."

2. Per Leo Herzenberg, they had a son named Claude.

3. Website of Peter Bruce Herzenberg of London, England (since relocated to South Africa). Website is no longer functioning as of 7 Aug 2007. Copies of much of his data from the website in my possession. He indicates references by codes, which pertain to the original source and file held in his database, which I have not seen. I have no key to the sources except HL is Leonardo Herzenberg, HG is Gail Herzenberg, PC is probably Piltene Cemetery records, LA is probably Latvian Archives, FA is probably Aleksandrs Feigmanis (Latvian researcher hired by Harold Hodes), and YL is Len Yodaiken (Israeli researcher hired by Harold Hodes); however, he lists the main researchers and their contributions in a lengthy report which I include in full in the notes of the earliest Herzenberg of this database. In regards to this individual:
HL 083 shows Feja (Feodor) Leszinski (Lezinska) changed to Leston, last of New York, md. to Mascha Herzenberg, one son named Claude.

4. Len Yodaiken notes name as Theodor Leszinsky in his "The Herzenbergs of Piltene and Liepeja Latvia," 1 Jan 2000, copy in my possession - KP.

SOURCES_MISC:
1. Leonardo Herzenberg http://www.herzenberg.net/ 
Leszinsky or Leston, Feodor (I4110)
 
223 BIOGRAPHY:
1. 28 Jul 2007 Http://www.herzenberg.net/leo/htmlrh/Content.html copyrighted by Leo Herzenberg:
"An meinen Sohn (To my son) Leonhard Herzenberg von (from) Robert Herzenberg. Memoirs written during the 1940's." Translated during the 1990's by Leonardo (Leonhard) Herzenberg. The entire memoir is quite lengthy and included in its entirety in my notes with Joseph Herzenberg, the original known ancestor, in this database. The following is only the portion dealing with this part of the family:
"Great Uncles on Mother's Side...
Great Uncle Jacob I saw a few times in Goldingen. He had several sons, of whom I knew only the youngest - Robert. He was a pharmacist, but we lost touch still before the first world war. He also had 11 daughters, known as the "elves" (eleven and elf are the same word in German). From the time I was with him in Goldingen I only remember the dinner table with the many, many girls; oddly enough they all became dentists. One of them married a dentist Friedman from Tashkent, the son of a [?] [Kantonisten] (Dubnow, Weltgeshichte odes Judishen Volks IX, p 191 ff.) I never heard anything more from the others."

SOURCES_MISC:
1. Leonardo Herzenberg http://www.herzenberg.net/ 
Herzenberg, Robert (I4105)
 
224 BIOGRAPHY:
1. 28 Jul 2007 Http://www.herzenberg.net/leo/htmlrh/Content.html copyrighted by Leo Herzenberg:
"An meinen Sohn (To my son) Leonhard Herzenberg von (from) Robert Herzenberg. Memoirs written during the 1940's." Translated during the 1990's by Leonardo (Leonhard) Herzenberg. The entire memoir is quite lengthy and included in its entirety in my notes with Joseph Herzenberg, the original known ancestor, in this database. The following is only the portion dealing with this part of the family:
"SOPHIE Herzenberg was very beautiful and cultured. She played the piano very well, and painted, but only by copying; she also accomplished spottily in burn painting . She married her cousin David Herzenberg in Mitau. It was a very unharmonious marriage, even though there were three children, Robert, Genja, and Flora. [55]
David had very little understanding for Sophie, who was a very modern woman. They lived in Mitau in the nice old paternal house. David led the firm of his late father. When Uncle Abraham died and the firm Abraham Herzenberg was moved to Riga, Sophie and the children moved there also. David usually came to visit in Riga on Sundays - it did not come to a divorce, but in practice they lived separated. David worked and earned in Mitau, and Sophie lived and dissipated [lebte und verlebte] in Riga, always surrounded by a swarm of admirers. I don't know exactly when David died, Robert had finally become a businessman and lived and married in Reval, and lastly lived in Stockholm. Sophie and the girls led a wandering life, alternately in Riga and Germany. Always from the earnings of the business in Mitau and from the sale of the house. Finally they settled down in Riga, where Genja and Flora [56] had married a few years earlier."

2. Website of Peter Bruce Herzenberg of London, England (since relocated to South Africa). Website is no longer functioning as of 7 Aug 2007. Copies of much of his data from the website in my possession. He indicates references by codes, which pertain to the original source and file held in his database, which I have not seen. I have no key to the sources except HL is Leonardo Herzenberg, HG is Gail Herzenberg, PC is probably Piltene Cemetery records, LA is probably Latvian Archives, FA is probably Aleksandrs Feigmanis (Latvian researcher hired by Harold Hodes), and YL is Len Yodaiken (Israeli researcher hired by Harold Hodes); however, he lists the main researchers and their contributions in a lengthy report which I include in full in the notes of the earliest Herzenberg of this database. In regards to this individual:
YL160 notes Genja b. 1896 in Mitau, d. in Riga, md. to Leo Wolooshinski.
HL060 notes Genja.

3. Received 30 Apr 2009 a copy of the following from Irene Gottleib Slatter entitled "Archival Reference about Brenson Family. It was prepared for Nina Kossman Dec 2006 and is report no. 3-K-7622; 7794N by Latvijas Valsts Vestures Arhivs (Latvian National Archives), Slokas iela 16, Riga, LV-1007. The following is only a partial transcript concerning this individual; please see the notes of Isidor Brenson within this database to see full and complete transcript including sources and documentation:
"...David, son of Robert Herzenberg, born on July 17 of 1864 in Mitau, 2nd guild merchant, since 1915 - 1st guild merchant, the Hereditary Honourable Citizen. His wife Sophia, daughter of Abram Herzenberg was born on August 20 (Gregorian calendar) of 1869 in Mitau. According to the birth records Klara Herzenberg was born on August 8 (Julian calendar) of 1869 in Mitau, her father was Abram Herzenberg and mother Teresa, daughter of Joseph, nee Herzenberg. We suppose that Sophia and Klara might be one and the same person. The marriage of David and Sophia was registered on January 7 of 1890 in Mitau. They had children:
- son Robert, born on December 13 of 1892 in Mitau.
- daughter Jenny (Eugenia), born on October 18 of 1896 in Mitau.
- daughter Flora, born on February 8 of 1898 in Mitau.
Since 1935 a widow Sophia and her daughters Eugenia and Flora lived in Riga at Lacplesa Street 9, apt. 11. In 1939 Robert Herzenberg, a correspondent by profession, his wife Beila and son David-Harry were registered as living in Riga at Lacplesa Street 9, apt. 11. They left for Sweden in August - September of 1939. Eugenia married to Lev Wolozhinski, born on January 15 of 1891 in Riga. Sophia, Eugenia, Lev were struck off the house register of Lacplesa Street 9 in July 19-21 of 1941 (during Nazi occupation), obviously they were sent to ghetto. Lev Wolozhinsky was killed in July of 1941. Flora married to Nechemy/Nikolay Friedlender, born on December 21 of 1880 in Mitau. They lived at Elizabetes Street 27, apt. 2 and were struck off the house register on August 14 of 1941 a moved to Maskavas Street 171, apt. 4. According to the records of the Soviet Extraordinary State Commission for 1945, Nechemy and Flora were killed in 1941."

MARRIAGE:
1. From Xavier Volozinskis [mailto:xsav@laposte.net] 20 Oct 2008. Xavier is a descendant (grandson?) of Leo and lives in France. He does not have much information and had written me asking if I knew who Leo's parents may be, which I did not. He notes: "Probably my greatfather could be married (as a 2nd wedding) to Eugenie, I am not sure." Email update as of 5 Jun 2013: [x.volozinskis@laposte.net].

DEATH:
1. Http://www4.yadvashem.org Holocaust database: Eugenie Woloshinsky nee Herzenberg was born 1896 in Mitau, Latvia to David and Sophie. She was married to Leo. Prior to WWII he lived in Riga, Latvia. Eugenie perished in the Shoah. She was a secretary. This information is based on a Page of Testimony submitted 20 Oct 1888 by her nephew Harry Herzenberg of 20 Alladinsvagen, 16138 Bromma, Sweden.

2. Email from: "Nina Kossman" Aug 16, 2007 and Aug 19, 2007. She has memoirs written by Isidor Brenson in German. Currently it is being translated into Latvian by Riga's Museum of the History of Medicine. It is also being translated into English for Nina:
Yes, I know of that family [David and Sophie Herzenberg]. In fact, I had stones installed in the Rumbuli forest in memory of Sophie Herzenberg and her two daughters, Yevgenia and Flora, as well as in memory of the daughters' husbands. In the latest installment (part 3) of the translation of my g.gfather's memoir there is a mention of a historical "Herzenberg" house (Herzenbergsche Haus) in Jelgava and, a few pages later, of his meeting, in the summer of 1872, a thirteen year girl, Clara Herzenberg (his future wife), in the home of her parents where he accepted a position as a tutor. But so far there isn't much detail about the Herzenbergs; only that years before 1872, as a seven and eight year old boy, he had played with Clara's little sisters, Rosa and Fanny, until his visits to the house were discontinued due to their illness (and subsequent death). There is a paragraph that describes the historical meaning of the Herzenberg House, yet it doesn't seem that the events that took place there in 1726 have anything to do with the Herzenbergs per se.
Later email: "Here's the translation of the passage from my g.g.father's memoir which mentions the "Herzenberg House":
"Among the oldest buildings of the city which have historical importance is the Herzenberg House (Herzenbergsche Haus) on the corner of Catholic St. and Big St. This house is a historical landmark building because it was there that in 1726 Moritz Saksonski was hiding from the Poles. He was freed by the life guards of the duchess Anna Ioanovna. Moritz Saksonsky was invited to the palace, but due to his thoughtlessness, he lost the good will of his benefactors and had to flee, disguised as a coachman, from his last place of refuge on the Usmas island, which, by that time, was surrounded by the Russians." I couldn't find anything on Google about Moritz Saksonsky. Usmas is a camping site in present-day Latvia. I'll keep you posted if I find anything else that gives clues to the past of the Herzenbergs."

3. There is a website dedicated to the infamous events of Rumbula Forest near Riga. Some comments from the website http://www.rumbula.org/remembering_rumbula.shtml: Rumbula (Rumbuli in German) Forest, near Riga, Latvia, became the mass murder site and grave of 27,800 Jews from the Riga Ghetto on November 30 and December 8, 1941 (10th and 18th of Kislev on the Jewish calendar). Only 3 people who arrived at the Rumbula killing site escaped death. Family members of some who perished survived the war, and a number of them live today in Latvia, the U.S., Europe and Israel. This site is an introduction to the mass murders at Rumbula Forest for educational and research purposes. It is maintained on a non-commercial basis. The acts that took place in Rumbula Forest in late 1941 are documented here through historical accounts and personal memoirs. Also included are accounts of modern-day anti-semitic activity in Latvia and of the dedication of the Rumbula Forest Memorial in 2002.

4. The following accounts are copied from JewishGen.Inc and report the holocaust actions of Libau which affected many Herzenbergs. It was also typical of many of the nearby areas as well:
A. Translation of an Excerpt Relating to Libau, From the Book Published by Mr. Mendel Bobee in Yiddish
"With the outbreak of hostilities in the East, Libau was bombarded on 22.6.41 [June 22, 1941]. A very small portion of the local population could flee the next day because the trains were overloaded with the children and families of the officers and civil servants serving in Libau.
Before the war the Russians organised "Workers Guards" in which many Jews participated. These Guards were the first to see action. The first attack on the town was repulsed, but in this first action the number of casualties was very high and, as it happened, most of the casualties were Jewish boys.
The Germans occupied Libau on 29.6.41 [June 29, 1941]. The radio stations of Koenigsberg, Danzig, and Memel broadcast in Latvian highly inflammatory tirades against the Jews. With the entry of the German Army in Libau the Nazis distributed a pamphlet in Latvian to revenge the acts of "the bloodthirsty Jews who have expelled the good sons of the Latvian People to the USSR" The Latvian military and police forces under the command of the Latvian Generals Dankers and Bengersky joined the German forces and gladly participated in their infamous propaganda.
Orders were published to hand over all valuables, radios and other means of communications. The meagre food portions were cut and the infamous "Aizsargi," in their alleged searches for weapons, invaded Jewish homes and robbed, beat up and killed. With the conquest of Libau by the Germans the Jewish population counted 9,000 souls and immediately the systematic extermination started. The first victims were 33 Jewish workers who reported to work the next morning after the occupation. They were killed the same day in the "Rainis Park" in Neu-Libau.
Another order was published saying that all Jewish males between the ages of 16-65 had to come every morning to the "Hauptwachplatz" from where they were dispatched to different stations of work, accompanied by beatings and curses. No one was sure he would return home at night, as indeed many did not. The Jews were commanded to dismantle with their own hands the Great Synagogue - "The Chor-Schul" - and to destroy the Sifrei Tora. After the destruction of the building the Latvian Press claimed that the cellars of the Synagogue contained hidden weapons and Latvian property.
In these first weeks around 2000 Jews were killed and on the 24th [of] July, 3000 more men were assembled on the "Hauptwachplatz" and after their papers and valuables were taken from them, they were transported to a small fishing port near the Lighthouse at the entrance of the Port. They were all killed then and there. The Jewish population of the smaller surrounding towns like Grobin, Hasenpot, etc. were all killed in their different small towns, and only a few were deported to Libau. The murderers took special satisfaction when they killed on Yom Kippur Day 50 old men and women. After complaints from Latvians living near the Lighthouse about the noise, the executions there were stopped.
Soon another order was published saying that Jews were not to leave their homes on the 15th and 16th [of] December. They were then told by Latvians to dress warmly as they were about to be sent to work in distant places. The truth was they did not go far, only 7 kilometres, to Shkeden, and there on the beach another 3000 Jews were massacred. It was later reported that some of the killers could not bear any more the sight of these bestialities and literally went crazy. The German Commissar named Laze heard about these massacres and asked Berlin either to stop these or change the means of exterminations. He argued that the killings were disrupting his plans for the work the Jews were carrying out for the German Army. The laconic reply he received from Berlin was "economic considerations are not to be taken into account in solving that problem."
Another 375 Jews were killed on 12.2.42 [February 12, 1942] and by the end of June 1942 the Ghetto of Libau was founded. On the 1st of July the Ghetto was entirely cut off from the remaining population, and in the Ghetto, 816 people including 175 males were settled. Eleven houses were prepared for the inmates, and the preparation of the buildings, etc. was made by Jews especially selected for their good physical condition. In spite of overcrowding in the Ghetto houses, the inmates led an orderly life which was mostly due to the devotion of Mr. Israelit, a senior Jewish functionary in the town, who was assisted by Mr. Kagansky, the lawyer. Life as such in the Ghetto, with a small synagogue, a library and a small ambulatory clinic was not too difficult. The German Commander named Kretscher was rather an exception between the thousands of German officers, and treated the Jews relatively humanely. The Ghetto existed 18 months and was dismantled on the 18th of October 1943, when all were packed into railway cattle cars and transported to the "Kaiserwald" Camp near Riga. Of those who were sent there, 360 people were sent to the Auschwitz Crematorium. From the "Kaiserwald" Camp many were also sent to the "Riga-Reichsbahn," "A.E.G." and other camps in and around Riga. With the Russians approaching Riga, most of the Libauers were evacuated to Germany through Danzig and Stutthof, and were dispersed between the camps in Germany itself.
When Libau was liberated, 40 living Jews were found out of the 9000 who had lived there until 1941."

B. Libau Revisited, by Raya Westermann-Mazin
"My first visit to Libau was in 1945, less than 2 months after the end of the war. At that time it was a closed city and the special laissez- passer had been difficult to obtain. I found eleven Jews in town, who had survived by miracles. After having dug up all the details available about the destruction of my family and friends, I listened for long hours to their stories, to the whole chronicle of the past 4 years, enveloped and absorbed in a nightmare in a nightmare for which there were hardly any adequate words in any human language. When I left I was sure that this was for good.
In 1961 I came with my family from Odessa to Riga for a summer vacation. It was good to meet old friends, to enjoy the cool Baltic summer, to bathe in the sea and to linger in the white sand of the Riga Bay under the high fir trees. What suddenly made me lose my piece of mind was the last news about Libau: the city had been declared open by the Soviet authorities, with no need for a laissez-passer any more. Even Shkeden, the place in the "Kriegshafen" where the "Aktionen" had taken place, was open territory now; the centres of gravity of the naval port had evidently been moved elsewhere. Human bones had been found in the area of 8 kilometres where the shooting had taken place. The mass graves had been so close to the beach that the sea, penetrating the shallow sands, had washed them up to the surface. The authorities had permitted the Jewish community to take the bones to the cemetery and to bury them. There had been a memorial service, a gravestone had been put up.
The plane which took me to Libau in 45 minutes hardly deserved the proud definition of an aircraft. It was a primitive little thing, not soundproofed, which held 15-20 passengers who sat lulled and dulled by the deafening noise of the engine. It had been raining and the plane was bumping up and down from one cloud to the other. Only at noon when we landed the sun broke through.
Libau had changed. Sixteen years ago the whole centre and the adjoining streets had been a vast heap of ruins with mutilated skeletons of houses sticking out here and there, the grass sprouting out of the dust which had cemented the stones in the four years of the war. I had felt shaken then but I had not felt stranger. It still had seemed a part of myself - this beautiful, small Baltic town. That it looked victimised, violated and ruined was an integral part of the tragedy which had happened to it and to me.
This time, venturing out into the city of my hotel at the Rosenplatz, I felt like a tourist in a strange town. The roses on the square, all shades from white to pink to purple, looked as lush and well groomed on their long stems as before, but now there were some renovated buildings and Russian-style cafeterias around the square. New modern houses were making up a new Weidenstrasse and part of the Kornstrasse which had been destroyed, but these were completely new streets, awakening no memories whatsoever. The names of the streets had been changed, the signs were in Latvian and Russian. There were many uniforms, mostly naval.
"You go straight down the Ulichstrasse till the entrance to the "Fisherhafen," I had been advised by old Libau friends. The street had not changed. Although it looked much smaller and narrower than in my memories, the wide branches of the old lime and acorn trees still cast the same deep shadow over the sidewalk, with the breeze rustling lightly in their ample foliage. The entrance to the "Fisherhafen" was changed: some new stone houses had been put up. The plaque I had come to see was on one of the walls. There was an inscription in Latvian and in Russian: "To the victims of Fascism" killed during the German occupation. One cannot put flowers on a wall, so I put mine down on the ground - to my father and to all the others.
It was already rather late in the afternoon but there might still have been time to drive down to the cemetery. Only...I didn't feel like it. Nobody I had come to visit here had been quietly put to rest in that peaceful place. Then, all of a sudden, I knew where I really wanted to go.
To admit the truth, I have no recollections whatsoever of the 8 or 10 kilometres' drive from Libau to Shkeden on that summer day of 1961. Never during all the coming years would even a single memory surface or a single vision arise of the surrounding landscape. The taxi might have been speeding through a vacuum as far as I was concerned. The last thing which stuck in my memory was hiring it at the stop near the Central Market Place where I had bought a huge bunch of red roses. The driver was a Russian and I had felt relieved that he was not a Latvian. "This is a long drive," he said giving me a strange side-glance as I slipped into the seat beside him. But he didn't ask any questions and we drove in silence.
It was a sunny day but I didn't feel it. In my mind I was in snow and cold and winter, back to all I had been told of this last journey - the death march of the Jews of Libau. This way they had gone in buses in December 1941, and in sledges and carts or more primitive vehicles in February 1942. As many times before I tried to imagine what my mother must have thought and felt, or my aunts, or my friends or other people I had known. I don't think I even came close to it, but there was no getting away from it, neither from the stories I had heard, nor from the photographs I had seen in Libau in 1945, fresh from the lab, pictures of people on the snow, stripped naked, in the background the Latvian "aizsargi" with their rifles, the earflaps of their caps down, and the collars of their uniforms up against the biting cold...
The driver had stopped the car. "Well...?" he said turning to me, "That's as far as we can go." "Leave your taximeter on," I replied getting out of the car.
The vast terrain was unbelievably quiet. One could hear the humming of the insects flitting by in the sun, or a sudden shriek of a seagull from the nearby sea. There was only a very light breeze, the blue surface was scarcely rippled by tiny waves, only far away there were a few white crests. A couple of old wooden watchtowers showed that this had been maritime border region some time ago. The dunes were very low and when I turned away inland from the sea they stopped altogether. The ground was sand everywhere, only a few clusters of sharp grey-greenish sea grass were growing here and there.
I saw the obelisk from afar. It was a simple unspectacular four-edged cone of white limestone. When I came up to it, I read the stereotyped inscription in Russian and Latvian dedicated to the "Victims of Fascism" during the war. This time there was a number of the people killed. I don't remember it exactly but it was unbelievably high. There had never been so many Jews in the whole Baltic states. I had, however, heard that Eichmann's twisted bookkeeping had brought the Hungarian Jews to die on this sandy beach, and probably there had also been others. The word "Jew" was mentioned nowhere on any inscription. By now, however, I was used to this sort of Soviet post-mortem discrimination.
As I had done the day before, I here, too, put down my roses and resumed my wandering. There were many empty cartridge cases of different calibre's on the ground. I bent down to look at them but I did not pick them up. Then I found the bone. It was an ulna, one of the two bones connecting the wrist with the elbow. It looked very dry and frail, it was small, that of a child probably not older than ten or twelve years. I don't know why I saw a little girl before me, it could as well have been a little boy. I took it back to the obelisk and started to dig a hole in the ground having no other instruments than my bare ten fingers. As I could not find a stone on the sandy ground I put some roses on the tiny grave and rose to my feet.
It was a long walk back to the car. If the town had looked much smaller in comparison to what I had remembered, this sandy plain felt vast and endless and larger than life.
A few hours later I was on my way back. Strapped to my seat in the same little bee of a plane I looked down at the city vanishing quickly beneath the wings. There was no regret or nostalgia that this was, I knew, the last time I would be seeing it.

C. Witness for the Prosecution, by Arnold Engel
"I waited a long time for this day. I thought the day would never come. The room in the new hotel - Intercontinental in Hanover - was spacious, warm and well lit. I got up early on this Friday, April 3rd, 1970, shaved and gave a look at my watch.
It was 7:30 in the morning. One more hour. One more hour and I will face him. Will I recognise him? Will I be able to look into his eyes? I opened the curtain and looked outside. The new, modern television tower looked yellowish, as the sun was rising, and the light snow from the night before was starting to melt.
I had a cup of coffee and hailed a taxi-cab: "Zum Landesgericht bitte."
It was a ten minute ride. A police car rushed by blowing its horn, which sounded exactly as the Gestapo horns: pipi-pipi-pipi-pipi, the same sound of the police van which picked up Anna Frank and millions of others.
The guard on duty at the court house directed me to the court room. It was early. I and "his" attorney were first. The court session was called for 8:30. Two minutes before, they started to come. One by one, in groups of three or four.
Then I saw him. I recognised him at once. How could I have ever thought that I would not remember him? Aged, but still tall, slim, blondish and his trade-mark: cool, murderish, motionless eyes.
The court clerk called to order. The judges entered. The jury looked bored. The defenders looked somewhat nervous, the defendant tried to remember if he ever saw me. He whispered something to his lawyer. Everything became quiet in the court room No. 127.
Who is this man? It was said that he was once so powerful, that he helped to wipe out a whole town, he killed Children, shot hundreds of old people, young people, men, women, Jews and others all in one day, and managed to wash his bloody hands, have a few drinks and spend that evening joking or dancing, playing games or reading a newspaper - as if nothing had happened that day.
After stating my name, address and birthday I was asked by one of the judges:
"Mr. Engel, do you recognise any of these gentlemen?"
"I do, sir."
"Please point out, whom do you recognise?"
"Him, Erich Handke."
"Please tell us what do you know about Erich Handke?"
For twenty-nine years I had dreamed about having the opportunity to testify against this brutal man - Handke. I knew that he was alive somewhere in Germany. One week after Hitler attacked the USSR, the Wehrmacht entered our small town of Libau on the Baltic Sea. Close to 9,000 Jews lived in Libau before the war - out of a population of 56,000.
Libau had a rich Jewish community with two noted synagogues, a Jewish trade school, a Yeshiva, a Jewish private school, high school and a Jewish sports stadium, a yacht club and all the usual organisations, including the known sport club "Maccabi"." There were very few real rich Jews, but also very few were poor. Always a shipping and trading city plus its location at the white sandy Baltic seacoast, the city did its share of progress in tourism, in export and in import.
Soon after the Wehrmacht, the Gestapo arrived, under leadership of SS-Obersturmfuehrer Dr. Fritz Dietrich, SD-leader Wolfgang Kigler, and Erich Handke who seemed to be in charge of everything, but mainly to solve the Jewish question.
The first mass destruction of the Libau Jews took place on the hot summer day of July 27, 1941. The Jews were ordered to appear on the Hauptwachplatz. Known as ever law-abiding, the Jews obeyed the orders. At the square they had to stay at attention. Many were beaten up and had to undergo terrible treatment by the SS-men.
Erich Handke was on the warpath. Kicking, shouting and slapping, he ordered hundreds of Jews to be thrown on ready brought trucks. As the number of Jews present diminished, he noticed a tall handsome, grey- haired gentleman, who was none other than Dr. Schwab, a well known local physician. Handke killed him in a brutal manner; this murder was witnessed by the hundreds of Jews who were still standing at attention on the square, where I used to come as a child and watch the fire engines being cleaned. During that day, on a hot July, over three thousand Jews were executed near the lighthouse in the vicinity of the sandy beach, where people used to bathe.
Handke did not stop here. He was everywhere. Almost daily he would appear somewhere. Wait for them with their yellow rag, marked Jews marching from work, tired from their slave labour, hungry from not eating - and with a "blitz" he would start to attack.
It would take up this and many more journals to describe all the "heroic deeds" of this bloodthirsty murderer. When a day passed by and he did not destroy a human life, he would order one of his Jewish slaves to find some pigeons and bring them to him in a hurry. Once they brought him the pigeons, he would take them, one by one and squeeze their heads off, by placing the birds between the door of his office and pulling the door shut.
By 1942, one year later, there were only 800 Jews alive. A Ghetto was created and the 800 moved into it on the 1st of July, 1942. The Libau Ghetto was liquidated on the 6th of October, Yom Kippur day, and the inmates were sent to the Kaiserwald near Riga concentration camp, and when the number dwindled to less than 500 they were sent to the Stutthof death camp near Danzig.
Today, there are less than 80 Jews who survived the war, the camps and Handke. Many do not have the strength to testify against the Scharfuehrer (Staff Sergeant) Erich Handke, born 10 November, 1914 (SS #371241) in Lisa, Germany; many do not recall the exact dates, locations or even if Dr. Schwab was attacked at the Firemen's Square or in the women's jail (where the Jews were once more screened before being sent to their death). The German court at Hanover tried their best to have Erich Handke with his eight other cohorts convicted, they have travelled to the USA and Israel, and were permitted to interview survivors now residing in the USSr.
But, because of the time elapsed, the reasons I gave before, Erich Handke may be walking the streets a free man at Tailfingen. I do not regret that I went to Hanover, that I once more faced this mass-murderer Handke. I am glad, that I was able to be a witness for the prosecution."

SOURCES_MISC:
1. Leonardo Herzenberg http://www.herzenberg.net/ 
Herzenberg, Eugenie or Genja or Jenny (I4080)
 
225 BIOGRAPHY:
1. 28 Jul 2007 Http://www.herzenberg.net/leo/htmlrh/Content.html copyrighted by Leo Herzenberg:
"An meinen Sohn (To my son) Leonhard Herzenberg von (from) Robert Herzenberg. Memoirs written during the 1940's." Translated during the 1990's by Leonardo (Leonhard) Herzenberg. The entire memoir is quite lengthy and included in its entirety in my notes with Joseph Herzenberg, the original known ancestor, in this database. The following is only the portion dealing with this part of the family:
"...Of the sisters of my grandmother on my mothers side I have already mentioned aunt Therese, the "Grand-duchess of Kurland," (42-43). Great aunt Fanny I believe to have still seen in Pilten, and great-aunt Ralchen alias Roche I saw often when I was a student in Riga in the years 1903-1905.
She was married to Moses Herzberg, and their children were Rosa, Bernhard, Leonhard, Edward, and Bertha. Bernhard lived in Warsaw, and occasionally came to Libau in my parents home. Edward was a judge in Siberia, he had let himself be baptized. The other children I did not know, Rosa the baroness I met in Riga when I visited aunt Rahlchen, I had been very curious about her. Whether the Baron [67] also ever visited the mother in law, I do not know. Rosa must have been a very pretty, intelligent girl and went to school in Goldingen, which the young Baron Lowenstern also attended. The two fell in love, and the love held against the strongest counter-currents from the families. They married. They were spurned by both families and lived miserably on a small property in Lithuania. Then the older brothers of Baron Lowenstern died one after another; he acquired primogeniture and became owner of the princely castle Kokenhusen on the Danube, where in 1917 the Germans crossed the Danube to capture Riga. Baroness Rosa lived for many years on the heights of earthly fortune. She was accepted by the nobility, had four children, and none of them ever thought of possible change. Then came the world war, followed by the liberation [68] and autonomy of the Baltic states. The Latvians and Estonians expelled the barons and took over their property and estates without compensation. Baroness Rosa, with the children, went to Germany, where the children found miserable positions; the father had meanwhile died. I have not heard from then since then, and do not know how much they suffered from the Arian laws.
Aunt Ralchen had a tragic end. She was a shrivelled little woman with tear moistened eyes. She lived in Riga in an elegant part of town in a modest apartment. She lived from support form her children, and was very fearful and locked up everything. By this she made an impression of wealth on the servants, and one night there was a break-in. [69] When the burglars entered the bedroom she woke up and died immediately of a heart attack caused by fright."

SOURCES_MISC:
1. Leonardo Herzenberg http://www.herzenberg.net/ 
Herzberg or Herzman, Moshe or Moses (I3985)
 
226 BIOGRAPHY:
1. 28 Jul 2007 Http://www.herzenberg.net/leo/htmlrh/Content.html copyrighted by Leo Herzenberg:
"An meinen Sohn (To my son) Leonhard Herzenberg von (from) Robert Herzenberg. Memoirs written during the 1940's." Translated during the 1990's by Leonardo (Leonhard) Herzenberg. The entire memoir is quite lengthy and included in its entirety in my notes with Joseph Herzenberg, the original known ancestor, in this database. The following is only the portion dealing with this part of the family:
"Great Uncles on Mother's Side...
Great Uncle Jacob I saw a few times in Goldingen. He had several sons, of whom I knew only the youngest - Robert. He was a pharmacist, but we lost touch still before the first world war. He also had 11 daughters, known as the "elves" (eleven and elf are the same word in German). From the time I was with him in Goldingen I only remember the dinner table with the many, many girls; oddly enough they all became dentists. One of them married a dentist Friedman from Tashkent, the son of a [?] [Kantonisten] (Dubnow, Weltgeshichte odes Judishen Volks IX, p 191 ff.) I never heard anything more from the others."

BIRTH:
1. No actual date known. Just a sequential estimate based on a child every two years.

SOURCES_MISC:
1. Leonardo Herzenberg http://www.herzenberg.net/ 
Herzenberg (I3247)
 
227 BIOGRAPHY:
1. 28 Jul 2007 Http://www.herzenberg.net/leo/htmlrh/Content.html copyrighted by Leo Herzenberg:
"An meinen Sohn (To my son) Leonhard Herzenberg von (from) Robert Herzenberg. Memoirs written during the 1940's." Translated during the 1990's by Leonardo (Leonhard) Herzenberg. The entire memoir is quite lengthy and included in its entirety in my notes with Joseph Herzenberg, the original known ancestor, in this database. The following is only the portion dealing with this part of the family:
"Great Uncles on Mother's Side...
Great Uncle Jacob I saw a few times in Goldingen. He had several sons, of whom I knew only the youngest - Robert. He was a pharmacist, but we lost touch still before the first world war. He also had 11 daughters, known as the "elves" (eleven and elf are the same word in German). From the time I was with him in Goldingen I only remember the dinner table with the many, many girls; oddly enough they all became dentists. One of them married a dentist Friedman from Tashkent, the son of a [?] [Kantonisten] (Dubnow, Weltgeshichte odes Judishen Volks IX, p 191 ff.) I never heard anything more from the others."

BIRTH:
1. No actual date known. Just a sequential estimate based on a child every two years.

SOURCES_MISC:
1. Leonardo Herzenberg http://www.herzenberg.net/ 
Herzenberg (I3245)
 
228 BIOGRAPHY:
1. 28 Jul 2007 Http://www.herzenberg.net/leo/htmlrh/Content.html copyrighted by Leo Herzenberg:
"An meinen Sohn (To my son) Leonhard Herzenberg von (from) Robert Herzenberg. Memoirs written during the 1940's." Translated during the 1990's by Leonardo (Leonhard) Herzenberg. The entire memoir is quite lengthy and included in its entirety in my notes with Joseph Herzenberg, the original known ancestor, in this database. The following is only the portion dealing with this part of the family:
"Great Uncles on Mother's Side...
Great Uncle Jacob I saw a few times in Goldingen. He had several sons, of whom I knew only the youngest - Robert. He was a pharmacist, but we lost touch still before the first world war. He also had 11 daughters, known as the "elves" (eleven and elf are the same word in German). From the time I was with him in Goldingen I only remember the dinner table with the many, many girls; oddly enough they all became dentists. One of them married a dentist Friedman from Tashkent, the son of a [?] [Kantonisten] (Dubnow, Weltgeshichte odes Judishen Volks IX, p 191 ff.) I never heard anything more from the others."

BIRTH:
1. No actual date known. Just a sequential estimate based on a child every two years.

SOURCES_MISC:
1. Leonardo Herzenberg http://www.herzenberg.net/ 
Herzenberg (I3244)
 
229 BIOGRAPHY:
1. 28 Jul 2007 Http://www.herzenberg.net/leo/htmlrh/Content.html copyrighted by Leo Herzenberg:
"An meinen Sohn (To my son) Leonhard Herzenberg von (from) Robert Herzenberg. Memoirs written during the 1940's." Translated during the 1990's by Leonardo (Leonhard) Herzenberg. The entire memoir is quite lengthy and included in its entirety in my notes with Joseph Herzenberg, the original known ancestor, in this database. The following is only the portion dealing with this part of the family:
"Great Uncles on Mother's Side...
Great Uncle Jacob I saw a few times in Goldingen. He had several sons, of whom I knew only the youngest - Robert. He was a pharmacist, but we lost touch still before the first world war. He also had 11 daughters, known as the "elves" (eleven and elf are the same word in German). From the time I was with him in Goldingen I only remember the dinner table with the many, many girls; oddly enough they all became dentists. One of them married a dentist Friedman from Tashkent, the son of a [?] [Kantonisten] (Dubnow, Weltgeshichte odes Judishen Volks IX, p 191 ff.) I never heard anything more from the others."

BIRTH:
1. No actual date known. Just a sequential estimate based on a child every two years.

SOURCES_MISC:
1. Leonardo Herzenberg http://www.herzenberg.net/ 
Herzenberg (I3243)
 
230 BIOGRAPHY:
1. 28 Jul 2007 Http://www.herzenberg.net/leo/htmlrh/Content.html copyrighted by Leo Herzenberg:
"An meinen Sohn (To my son) Leonhard Herzenberg von (from) Robert Herzenberg. Memoirs written during the 1940's." Translated during the 1990's by Leonardo (Leonhard) Herzenberg. The entire memoir is quite lengthy and included in its entirety in my notes with Joseph Herzenberg, the original known ancestor, in this database. The following is only the portion dealing with this part of the family:
"Great Uncles on Mother's Side...
Great Uncle Jacob I saw a few times in Goldingen. He had several sons, of whom I knew only the youngest - Robert. He was a pharmacist, but we lost touch still before the first world war. He also had 11 daughters, known as the "elves" (eleven and elf are the same word in German). From the time I was with him in Goldingen I only remember the dinner table with the many, many girls; oddly enough they all became dentists. One of them married a dentist Friedman from Tashkent, the son of a [?] [Kantonisten] (Dubnow, Weltgeshichte odes Judishen Volks IX, p 191 ff.) I never heard anything more from the others."

BIRTH:
1. No actual date known. Just a sequential estimate based on a child every two years.

SOURCES_MISC:
1. Leonardo Herzenberg http://www.herzenberg.net/ 
Herzenberg (I3242)
 
231 BIOGRAPHY:
1. 28 Jul 2007 Http://www.herzenberg.net/leo/htmlrh/Content.html copyrighted by Leo Herzenberg:
"An meinen Sohn (To my son) Leonhard Herzenberg von (from) Robert Herzenberg. Memoirs written during the 1940's." Translated during the 1990's by Leonardo (Leonhard) Herzenberg. The entire memoir is quite lengthy and included in its entirety in my notes with Joseph Herzenberg, the original known ancestor, in this database. The following is only the portion dealing with this part of the family:
"Great Uncles on Mother's Side...
Great Uncle Jacob I saw a few times in Goldingen. He had several sons, of whom I knew only the youngest - Robert. He was a pharmacist, but we lost touch still before the first world war. He also had 11 daughters, known as the "elves" (eleven and elf are the same word in German). From the time I was with him in Goldingen I only remember the dinner table with the many, many girls; oddly enough they all became dentists. One of them married a dentist Friedman from Tashkent, the son of a [?] [Kantonisten] (Dubnow, Weltgeshichte odes Judishen Volks IX, p 191 ff.) I never heard anything more from the others."

BIRTH:
1. No actual date known. Just a sequential estimate based on a child every two years.

SOURCES_MISC:
1. Leonardo Herzenberg http://www.herzenberg.net/ 
Herzenberg (I3241)
 
232 BIOGRAPHY:
1. 28 Jul 2007 Http://www.herzenberg.net/leo/htmlrh/Content.html copyrighted by Leo Herzenberg:
"An meinen Sohn (To my son) Leonhard Herzenberg von (from) Robert Herzenberg. Memoirs written during the 1940's." Translated during the 1990's by Leonardo (Leonhard) Herzenberg. The entire memoir is quite lengthy and included in its entirety in my notes with Joseph Herzenberg, the original known ancestor, in this database. The following is only the portion dealing with this part of the family:
"Great Uncles on Mother's Side...
Great Uncle Jacob I saw a few times in Goldingen. He had several sons, of whom I knew only the youngest - Robert. He was a pharmacist, but we lost touch still before the first world war. He also had 11 daughters, known as the "elves" (eleven and elf are the same word in German). From the time I was with him in Goldingen I only remember the dinner table with the many, many girls; oddly enough they all became dentists. One of them married a dentist Friedman from Tashkent, the son of a [?] [Kantonisten] (Dubnow, Weltgeshichte odes Judishen Volks IX, p 191 ff.) I never heard anything more from the others."

BIRTH:
1. No actual date known. Just a sequential estimate based on a child every two years.

SOURCES_MISC:
1. Leonardo Herzenberg http://www.herzenberg.net/ 
Herzenberg (I3240)
 
233 BIOGRAPHY:
1. 28 Jul 2007 Http://www.herzenberg.net/leo/htmlrh/Content.html copyrighted by Leo Herzenberg:
"An meinen Sohn (To my son) Leonhard Herzenberg von (from) Robert Herzenberg. Memoirs written during the 1940's." Translated during the 1990's by Leonardo (Leonhard) Herzenberg. The entire memoir is quite lengthy and included in its entirety in my notes with Joseph Herzenberg, the original known ancestor, in this database. The following is only the portion dealing with this part of the family:
"Great Uncles on Mother's Side...
Great Uncle Jacob I saw a few times in Goldingen. He had several sons, of whom I knew only the youngest - Robert. He was a pharmacist, but we lost touch still before the first world war. He also had 11 daughters, known as the "elves" (eleven and elf are the same word in German). From the time I was with him in Goldingen I only remember the dinner table with the many, many girls; oddly enough they all became dentists. One of them married a dentist Friedman from Tashkent, the son of a [?] [Kantonisten] (Dubnow, Weltgeshichte odes Judishen Volks IX, p 191 ff.) I never heard anything more from the others."

BIRTH:
1. No actual date known. Just a sequential estimate based on a child every two years.

SOURCES_MISC:
1. Leonardo Herzenberg http://www.herzenberg.net/ 
Herzenberg (I2136)
 
234 BIOGRAPHY:
1. 28 Jul 2007 Http://www.herzenberg.net/leo/htmlrh/Content.html copyrighted by Leo Herzenberg:
"An meinen Sohn (To my son) Leonhard Herzenberg von (from) Robert Herzenberg. Memoirs written during the 1940's." Translated during the 1990's by Leonardo (Leonhard) Herzenberg. The entire memoir is quite lengthy and included in its entirety in my notes with Joseph Herzenberg, the original known ancestor, in this database. The following is only the portion dealing with this part of the family:
"Great Uncles on Mother's Side...
Great Uncle Jacob I saw a few times in Goldingen. He had several sons, of whom I knew only the youngest - Robert. He was a pharmacist, but we lost touch still before the first world war. He also had 11 daughters, known as the "elves" (eleven and elf are the same word in German). From the time I was with him in Goldingen I only remember the dinner table with the many, many girls; oddly enough they all became dentists. One of them married a dentist Friedman from Tashkent, the son of a [?] [Kantonisten] (Dubnow, Weltgeshichte odes Judishen Volks IX, p 191 ff.) I never heard anything more from the others."

BIRTH:
1. No actual date known. Just a sequential estimate based on a child every two years.

SOURCES_MISC:
1. Leonardo Herzenberg http://www.herzenberg.net/ 
Herzenberg (I937)
 
235 BIOGRAPHY:
1. 6. Partial excerpt from the biographical sketch of Thomas Barber included in the book "Great Migration," which is a highly dependable modern research publication (see Thomas' notes for full transcript):
"...Josiah, b. Windsor 15 February 1653/4 [CTVR 40]; m. (1) Windsor 22 November 1677 Abigail Loomis [Grant 74; CTVR 14]; m. (2) by 12 March 1701/2 Sarah (___) Drake, widow of Enoch Drake [Manwaring 1:551]..."

2. FHL book 929.273 B233bd, "The Connecticut Barbers, A Genealogy of the Descendants of Thomas Barber of Windsor, Connecticut," 2nd Ed., Donald S. Barber, p. 8-9: "Lt. Josiah Barber, bapt. Windsor, CT, 15 Feb 1653/4, d. there 14 Dec 1729,m (1) there 22 Nov 1677 Abigail Loomis, b. Windsor, 27 Mar 1659, d. there 19 Feb 1700/1701, dau. of Nathaniel and Elizabeth (Moore) Loomis. Josiah m. (2) Windsor ('both of Windsor') 5 Nov 1701, Sarah (Porter) Drake, b. 5 Sep 1655, d. Windsor, 13 Dec 1730, dau. of John and Mary (Stanley) Porter, and widow of Enoch Drake. After his parents' death, Josiah at age 9 was placed (4 Feb 1662/3) in the home of Dea. John Moore until age 21. After their marriage Josiah and Abigail lived in the south part of Windsor, near the Connecticut River, in the section of Windsor which is now called Wilson. Josiah was a wheelwright. He was captain of a military company and did some 'Indian fighting.' In his will when the inventory was taken in 1729 Josiah left an estate of 817 pounds. (Sources: 1909 Barber Gen; Barbour Index; CT Hist Soc: LB Barbour Manuscript; Stiles: Windsor; Jerijah Barber Manuscript; Lure of the Litchfield Hills.) children of Josiah and Abigail born at Windsor:
a. Abigail, b. 12 Mar 1678/9, m. Windsor 4 Dec 1701 Cornelius Brown, b. at Windsor 30 Jul 1672, d. there 26 Jan 1747/8, son of Peter and Mary (Gillett) Brown. Josiah's first cousin Samuel Barber married Hepzibah Brown, Cornelius' sister. [9 children detailed for this couple.]
b. Elizabeth, d. 2 Apr 1717, m. Windsor 20 Apr 1704 Enoch Drake, b. 5 May 1683, d. Bloomfield, CT, 17 Nov 1776, son of Enoch and Sarah (Porter) Drake, res. Wintonbury (now Bloomfield). [Other wives of Enoch Drake and 6 children of Elizabeth and Enoch detailed in book.]
c. Josiah, b. 1685, d. Dec 1729.
d. Rebecca, b. 11 Apr 1687, d. 22 May 1768, m. Windsor 23 Jan 1706/7, Nathaniel Drake, b. 1685, son of Enoch and Sarah (Porter) Drake,res. Windsor. Rebecca's sister Elizabeth, above, married Nathaniel's brother Enoch. [4 children detailed for this couple.]
e. Nathaniel, b. 6 Apr 1691, m. Mary Filley.
f. Jonathan, b. 4 Jun 1694, m. Rachel Gaylord.
g. Aaron, b. 20 Jul 1697, m. Mary Douglas."

3. FHL book 929.273 B233w, "Descendants of Thomas Barber of Windsor, Connecticut, 1614-1909," John Barber White, pp. 30-32: "Josiah Barber, b. Feb 15, 1653; m. 1st, Nov. 22, 1677, Abigail Loomis, who was b. in Windsor, Mch. 27, ___; bp. Apr. 1, 1659. She d. Feb. 19, 1700-1, and he m. 2nd, Nov. 5, 1701, Sarah, widow of Enoch Drake, and dau. of John and Mary (Stanley) Porter, who was b. Sept. 5, 1655, and d. Dec. 13, 1730. According to some authorities he d. Dec. 14 or 24, 1733, but according to the Hartford Probate Records final settlement of his estate was made Aug. 3, 1731. Children all by first wife Abigail Loomis:
a. Abigail, b. 12 Mar 1678; m. Dea. Cornelius Brown.
b. Josiah, b. 1685; possibly d. in 1729; not mentioned in his father's will, hence must have d. first.
c. Rebecca, b. 11 Apr 1687 or 1690; m. Nathaniel Drake.
d. Nathaniel, b. 6 Apr 1691; m. Mary Filley.
e. Jonathan, b. 4 Jun 1694; m. Rachel Gaylord.
f. Aaron, b. 20 Jul 1697; m. Mary Douglas.
Abigail Loomis, mother of the above family, was a sister of Mary Loomis, who m. Joseph Barber. [Will of 'Lt. Josiah Barbour, wheelwright' of Windsor follows with mention of his wife Sarah, eldest son Nathaniel, son Jonathan, son Aaron, and daughters: Abigail Brown and Rebecca Drake, grandchildren Elizabeth Drake and Hannah Drake. Will dated 1 Apr 1726, inv. 7 Jan 1729-30 by Jacob Drake, Job Loomis and Timothy Loomis. Final settlement 3 Aug 1731.]"

4. Henry R. Stiles, "The History and Genealogies of Ancient Windsor, Connecticut," 1892, v. 2, p. 621: "John Porter (son of John), m. Mary (dau. Thomas) Stanley of Hartford, who d. 13 Sep 1688; he d. 2 Aug 1688; she was admitted to Windsor Church fellowship, 3 May 1663, and had 6 children (marked with * below) bp. on 10th of same month. - Old Church Records. he contrib. 10s. to Conn. relief Fund for the Poor of the other Colonies, 1676 (O.C.R.); he owned the Half-Way Cov't 7 Feb 1670. - O.C.R. Children (baptized by Mr Chauncey - O.C.R.):
A. John, * b. 3 Jun 1651.
B. Mary, * b. 17 Jul 1653; m. according to O.C.R.
C. Sarah, * b. 5 Sep 1655; m. (1) Enoch Drake, 11 Nov 1690; (2) Josiah Barber, 12 Mar 1702.
D. James, *, b. 22 Dec 1657.
E. Nathaniel, * b. 20 Apr 1660, m. Deborah Bush.
F. Hannah, b. 1 Jan 1662; m. Thos. Loomis, 17 Dec 1682, d. 12 Aug 1739.
G. Samuel, b. 5, bp. 12 Mar 1664; d. 16 Nov 1694.
H. Rebecca, b. 8, bp. 10 Mar 1666; m. Timothy Loomis, 20 Mar 1689/90.
I. Hester, b. 8, bp. 9 May 1669.
J. Ruth, b. 7, bp. 10 Aug 1671; m. Nath'l Loomis, 28 Nov 1689.
K. Hezekiah, b. 9 Nov 1673.
I. Joseph, b. 7 Feb 1675; 'bp. 13th day."

5. Henry R. Stiles, "The History and Genealogies of Ancient Windsor, Connecticut," 1892, v. 2, p. 179: Enoch Drake's sister Ruth Drake married Samuel Barber of my database.
"John Drake (son of John), m. Hannah (dau. Dea. John) Moore, 30 Nov 1648; a first settler at Simsbury, but res. Windsor until 1659, perhaps longer. Inscription on his gravestone at Sims., as copied by Miss R.T. Sperry, gives 7 Jul 1688, as date of his death, age 39; but 'Sims. Town Rec.' (Vol. I, 80) give invent. of est. of John D. of S., 'dec'd July ye 9, 1689, taken Aug 1689...': also mentions wid. Mary and Children: Mary, age 15 y., Hannah, age 11 y., John, age 1... His wife d. 16 Feb 1686; she was admitted to Windsor Church 2 Apr 1655 (O.C.R.). Children (born and baptized Old Church Records):
A. John, b. 14 Sep 1649; bpt. 15 Apr 1655, m. Mary (dau. Robert and Mary Rockwell Watson of E.W.), b. 11 Jan 1651; rem. to Sims.; he d. 8 Feb 1724/5 (Sims. Rec.)...
B. Job b. 15 Jun 1651, bp. 15 Apr 1655.
C. Hannah, b. 8 Aug 1653, bp. 10 Apr 1655, m. John Higley, located N.W. from Tariffville, now called Higleytown.
D. Enoch, b. 8, bp. 10 Dec 1655.
E. Ruth, b. 1, bp. 6 Dec 1657 (Col. Rec.); m. Samuel Barber; res. Windsor; rem. to Simsbury.
F. Simon, b. 28, bp. 30 Oct 1659.
G. Lydia, b. 26 Jan, bp. 2 Feb 1661; m. Joseph Loomis; she d. May 1702.
H. Mary, b. 29 Jan, bp. 3 Feb 1666; m. Thomas Marshall.
I. Elizabeth, b. 22, bp. 24 Jul 1664; d. 20 Feb 1697.
J. Mindwell, b. 10 Nov 1671.
K. Joseph (Capt.), b. 26, bp. 28 Jun 1674."

6. Henry R. Stiles, "The History and Genealogies of Ancient Windsor, Connecticut," 1892, v. 2, p. 179: Enoch Drake, m. Sarah (dau. John) Porter (O.C.R.) 11 Nov 1680, 'both 25 years old, - Sarah 5 of last June, Enoch the 8th of next month,' (O.C.R.) After his death (21 Aug 1698) she m. (2) Josiah Barber, who, 12 Mar 1701/2 moved for a distribution of Drake's estate. Children:
A. Sarah, b. Tues. 31 May 1680. - O.C.R.
B. Enoch, b. 5 May 1683.
C. Nathaniel (Prob. Rec.), b. 1685.
D. Samuel, b. 27 Jul 1688; d. young.
E. Hannah, b. 6 Oct 1695; prob. m. Remembrance Shelding of Hartford, 19 Feb 1718."
 
Porter, Sarah (I2207)
 
236 BIOGRAPHY:
1. According to Archive Record family group sheet for father as submitted by Mrs. Wanda Roos, last name also known as Smed (blacksmith).

2. 1801 Ydby census: Eiler Pedersen, man 25 married first time, farmer; Cathrine Michelsdatter, wife 27 married first time; Michel son 1; Peder Eilersen, the father of the man 59; Anne Jensdatter, the mother of the man 54.

CHRISTENING:
1. FHL film # 053030; Ydby Parish Record, 1669 - 1914, p. 188.

2. Viborg, Denmark Regional Archives; Ydby parish records; microfiche C123.A plate 4 page ?; sponsors: Lars ?, Morten Jacobsen, Peder Ejlersen, ? Jensdatter, Ellen Marie Ejlarsdatter.

SOURCES_MISC:
1. Per gedcom dated 6 Jan 1999 of Wayne Westergard, 785 W 1300 South, Woods Cross, Utah 84087, phone 801-295-2906. 
Michelsdatter, Helvig Cathrine (I1647)
 
237 BIOGRAPHY:
1. According to Archive Record family group sheet for father as submitted by Mrs. Wanda Roos, last name also known as Smed (blacksmith).

2. Known as a "poor body".

CHRISTENING:
1. FHL film # 053245; Heltborg Parish Record, 1771-1814, book 7.

2. Viborg, Denmark Regional Archives; Heltborg Parish Records; Microfiche C118. 10 plate 3 page 60; sponsors are the wife of Christen Christensen Maren Therkildsdatter of Mardahl of Kjestrup carried the Child, Niels Hoy Niels Sorensen, the wife of Ole Hansen, Christen Iversen, and the daughter of Peder Back Kirsten Pedersdatter all of Kjaestrup. Christened at home 25 Jun and later in the church on 12 Aug 1810.

SOURCES_MISC: 1. Per gedcom dated 6 Jan 1999 of Wayne Westergard, 785 W 1300 South, Woods Cross, Utah 84087, phone 801-295-2906. 
Jensen, Laust (I1626)
 
238 BIOGRAPHY:
1. According to Archive Record family group sheet for father as submitted by Mrs. Wanda Roos, last name also known as Smed (blacksmith).

2. Shows her residing in Grurup in 1801 when she was sponsor of niece Margrethe Jensdatter in Hurup.

CHRISTENING:
1. FHL film # 053030; Ydby Parish Record, 1669 - 1914, p. 185. Name appears as Appelone Michelsdatter with father named as Michel Smed.

2. Viborg, Denmark Regional Archives; Ydby parish records; microfiche C123.A plate 4 page ?; sponsors: Boy Pedersen, Jens Andersen, Povel Christensen, the wife of the miller, ? Jensdatter.

CONFLICTS:
1. Alt. birthdate of 8 Dec 1771 given Ancestral File.

SOURCES_MISC:
1. Per gedcom dated 6 Jan 1999 of Wayne Westergard, 785 W 1300 South, Woods Cross, Utah 84087, phone 801-295-2906.

2. Per Family group sheet prepared by Wanda Roos per research of Ydby parish records and censuses by Eva M. Gregersen. 
Michelsdatter, Appelone (I1661)
 
239 BIOGRAPHY:
1. According to Archive Record family group sheet for father as submitted by Mrs. Wanda Roos, last name also known as Smed (blacksmith).

CHRISTENING:
1. FHL film # 053030; Ydby Parish Record, 1669 - 1914, p. 193.

2. Viborg, Denmark Regional Archives; Ydby parish records; microfiche C123.A2 plate 4 page ?; sponsors: Lars Skadkiaer, Madz Christensen, Niels Olufsen, Karen Jacobsdatter, Mette Jensdatter.

CONFLICTS:
1. Ancestral File shows alternate date of bap: 8 Nov 1954 and alt. birth date of 23 Aug 1778.

SOURCES_MISC:
1. Per gedcom dated 6 Jan 1999 of Wayne Westergard, 785 W 1300 South, Woods Cross, Utah 84087, phone 801-295-2906. 
Michelsen, Jacob (I1674)
 
240 BIOGRAPHY:
1. According to Archive Record family group sheet for father as submitted by Mrs. Wanda Roos, last name also known as Smed (blacksmith).

CHRISTENING:
1. FHL film # 053030; Ydby Parish Record, 1669 - 1914, p. 197.

2. Viborg, Denmark Regional Archives; Ydby parish records; microfiche C123.A2 plate 4 page ?; sponsors: Lars Fladkiaer, Peder Moller, Niels ?gaard, the wife of the parish clerk, Else Jensdatter.

MARRIAGE:
1. Per written family history of Niels Soendergaard of Bryggerivej 6, 7760 Hurup, Denmark.

DEATH:
1. Per written family history of Niels Soendergaard of Bryggerivej 6, 7760 Hurup, Denmark. Mr. Sœndergård is quite elderly (as of 1999). Related to us through Michel Jacobsen, but his downline continues through Michel's son Anders. Full history in file. History given to Kerry Petersen while visiting Hurup public library.

SOURCES_MISC:
1. Per gedcom dated 6 Jan 1999 of Wayne Westergard, 785 W 1300 South, Woods Cross, Utah 84087, phone 801-295-2906. 
Michelsen, Anders (I945)
 
241 BIOGRAPHY:
1. According to Archive Record family group sheet for father as submitted by Mrs. Wanda Roos, last name also known as Smed (blacksmith).

CHRISTENING:
1. FHL film # 053030; Ydby Parish Record, 1669 - 1914, p. 201.

2. Viborg, Denmark Regional Archives; Ydby parish records; microfiche C123.A2 plate 4 page ?; sponsors: Lars Fladkiaer, Peder Moller, Boy Pedersen, Anna Boysdatter, the wife of Christen Andersen of Ydby.

CONFLICTS:
1. Alternate temple work dates shown in Ancestral File: Bap: 8 Nov 1954; End: 18 Jan 1955.

SOURCES_MISC:
1. Per gedcom dated 6 Jan 1999 of Wayne Westergard, 785 W 1300 South, Woods Cross, Utah 84087, phone 801-295-2906. 
Michelsen, Johannes (I1653)
 
242 BIOGRAPHY:
1. According to Archive Record family group sheet for father as submitted by Mrs. Wanda Roos, last name also known as Smed (blacksmith).

CHRISTENING:
1. FHL film # 053030; Ydby Parish Record, 1733-1809, book 2, p.149. Gives the name of Jens, son of Jacob Smed of Ydby. Mother's name not mentioned. No birth given.
 
Jacobsen, Jens (I1669)
 
243 BIOGRAPHY:
1. According to Archive Record family group sheet for father as submitted by Mrs. Wanda Roos, last name also known as Smed (blacksmith).

CHRISTENING:
1. FHL film # 053030; Ydby Parish Record, 1733-1809, book 2, p.153. Gives the name of Dorthe, child of Jacob Smed of Ydby. Mother's name not mentioned. No birth given.
 
Jacobsdatter, Dorthe (I1664)
 
244 BIOGRAPHY:
1. According to Archive Record family group sheet for father as submitted by Mrs. Wanda Roos, last name also known as Smed (blacksmith).

CHRISTENING:
1. FHL film # 053030; Ydby Parish Record, 1733-1809, book 2, p.155. Gives the name of Johannes, child of Jacob Smed of Ydby. Mother's name not mentioned. No birth given.
 
Jacobsen, Johannes (I1662)
 
245 BIOGRAPHY:
1. According to Archive Record family group sheet for father as submitted by Mrs. Wanda Roos, last name also known as Smed (blacksmith).

CHRISTENING:
1. FHL film # 053071; Hurup Parish Record, 1784 - 1868 2. Viborg, Denmark Regional Archives; Hurup Parish Records; Microfiche C122.1, plate 1, page 13b. Sponsors: Anne Kirstine of Brandtoft carried her; Jens Biisgaard and his wife Maren Nielsdatter; Peder Dalgaard, Jens Brandtoft.

SOURCES_MISC:
1. Per gedcom dated 6 Jan 1999 of Wayne Westergard, 785 W 1300 South, Woods Cross, Utah 84087, phone 801-295-2906. 
Jensdatter, Anne (I2672)
 
246 BIOGRAPHY:
1. According to Archive Record family group sheet for father as submitted by Mrs. Wanda Roos, last name also known as Smed (blacksmith).

CHRISTENING:
1. FHL film # 053071; Hurup Parish Record, 1784 - 1868.

2. Viborg, Denmark Regional Archives; Hurup Parish Records; Microfiche C122.1 plate 1 page 22; Family living in Brandtoft, sponsors are Apellone Michelsdatter of Grurup carried the Child, Jens Veigaard, Anders Dalgaard, Jacob Michelsen, Ane Marie (no surname).

SOURCES_MISC:
1. Per gedcom dated 6 Jan 1999 of Wayne Westergard, 785 W 1300 South, Woods Cross, Utah 84087 (801) 295-2906. 
Jensdatter, Margrethe (I1678)
 
247 BIOGRAPHY:
1. According to Archive Record family group sheet for father as submitted by Mrs. Wanda Roos, last name also known as Smed (blacksmith). All three of the daughter's last names in the parish records at time of birth were Jensen.

CHRISTENING:
1. FHL film # 053071; Hurup Parish Record, 1784 - 1868

2. Viborg, Denmark Regional Archives; Hurup Parish Records; Microfiche C122.1, plate 1, page 18. Sponsors: Anne Kirstine Brandtoft carried him; Christensen of Refstoft; Povel Brandtoft; Thomas Guldsmed (Goldsmith); Anne Michelsdatter; Bodil Simonsdatter.

SOURCES_MISC:
1. Per gedcom dated 6 Jan 1999 of Wayne Westergard, 785 W 1300 South, Woods Cross, Utah 84087, phone 801-295-2906.

2. Per Family group sheet prepared by Wanda Roos per research of Heltborg parish records and censuses by Eva M. Gregersen. 
Jensen, Jens (I450)
 
248 BIOGRAPHY:
1. According to his mother's estate probate of 13 feb 1795, he was 29 years old and at that time living by his brother in Uglef, Ydby parish. No other children found in Hurup parish; may have moved from parish before having other children.

2. The church book for Hurup parish from 1733 to 1784 is missing.

MARRIAGE:
1. Viborg, Denmark Regional Archives; Hurup Parish Records; Microfiche C123A.2, plate 2, page 127; witnesses: ? Boyesen and Christen Jensen Brandtoft, Boddum parish.
 
Jensen Brandtoft, Jens (I1294)
 
249 BIOGRAPHY:
1. According to Poul R. Pedersen at Vester Roijkaer, Martin may have stayed single.

BIRTH:
1. Parish records for Vestervig, 1870-1884; Hurup, Denmark public library.
 
Pedersen, Martin (I2902)
 
250 BIOGRAPHY:
1. Address as of 4/9/90: Route de la Gorra, St. Martin de Peille, France 06440; ph. #93411945.

BURIAL:
1. Burial crypt in Monaco city cemetery viewed 15 May 2010:
-Anne Landau, nee a Moscou 1877. Decedee a Monaco 1962.
-Vladimir Landau, St. Petersbourg 29-3-1902, Hanovre 24-9-1971, Champion de Tennis de Monaco.
-Alice Landau – Nikitina, Petrograd 21-2-1900, Monaco 8-6-1978, Danseuse Etoile des Ballets Russes de Diaghilev.
-Patrick Landau, 5-9-1945, 3-10-2007, Champion de Tennis de Monaco.

 
Landau, Patrick Serge (I3456)
 

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